CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 19 of 19

_id cf2011_p018
id cf2011_p018
authors Sokmenoglu, Ahu; Cagdas Gulen, Sariyildiz Sevil
year 2011
title A Multi-dimensional Exploration of Urban Attributes by Data Mining
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 333-350.
summary The paper which is proposed here will introduce an ongoing research project aiming to research data mining as a methodology of knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis. To address the increasing multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires a multidisciplinary approach to urban analysis. This research is an attempt to establish a link between knowledge discovery methodologies and automated urban feature analysis. Therefore, in the scope of this research we apply data mining methodologies for urban analysis. Data mining is defined as to extract important patterns and trends from raw data (Witten and Frank, 2005). When applied to discover relationships between urban attributes, data mining can constitute a methodology for the analysis of multi-dimensional relational complexity of urban environments (Gil, Montenegro, Beirao and Duarte, 2009) The theoretical motivation of the research is derived by the lack of explanatory urban knowledge which is an issue since 1970’s in the area of urban research. This situation is mostly associated with deductive methods of analysis. The analysis of urban system from the perspective of few interrelated factors, without considering the multi-dimensionality of the system in a deductive fashion was not been explanatory enough. (Jacobs, 1961, Lefebvre, 1970 Harvey, 1973) To address the multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires the consideration of diverse spatial, social, economic, cultural, morphological, environmental, political etc. features of urban entities. The main claim is that, in urban analysis, there is a need to advance from traditional one dimensional (Marshall, 2004) description and classification of urban forms (e.g. Land-use maps, Density maps) to the consideration of the simultaneous multi-dimensionality of urban systems. For this purpose, this research proposes a methodology consisting of the application of data mining as a knowledge discovery method into a GIS based conceptual urban database built out of official real data of Beyoglu. Generally, the proposed methodology is a framework for representing and analyzing urban entities represented as objects with properties (attributes). It concerns the formulation of an urban entity’s database based on both available and non-available (constructed from available data) data, and then data mining of spatial and non-spatial attributes of the urban entities. Location or position is the primary reference basis for the data that is describing urban entities. Urban entities are; building floors, buildings, building blocks, streets, geographically defined districts and neighborhoods etc. Urban attributes are district properties of locations (such as land-use, land value, slope, view and so forth) that change from one location to another. Every basic urban entity is unique in terms of its attributes. All the available qualitative and quantitative attributes that is relavant (in the mind of the analyst) and appropriate for encoding, can be coded inside the computer representation of the basic urban entity. Our methodology is applied by using the real and official, the most complex, complete and up-to-dataset of Beyoglu (a historical neighborhood of Istanbul) that is provided by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB). Basically, in our research, data mining in the context of urban data is introduced as a computer based, data-driven, context-specific approach for supporting analysis of urban systems without relying on any existing theories. Data mining in the context of urban data; • Can help in the design process by providing site-specific insight through deeper understanding of urban data. • Can produce results that can assist architects and urban planners at design, policy and strategy levels. • Can constitute a robust scientific base for rule definition in urban simulation applications such as urban growth prediction systems, land-use simulation models etc. In the paper, firstly we will present the framework of our research with an emphasis on its theoretical background. Afterwards we will introduce our methodology in detail and finally we will present some of important results of data mining analysis processed in Rapid Miner open-source software. Specifically, our research define a general framework for knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis and enable the usage of GIS and data mining as complementary applications in urban feature analysis. Acknowledgments I would like to thank to Nuffic, the Netherlands Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education, for funding of this research. I would like to thank Ceyhun Burak Akgul for his support in Data Mining and to H. Serdar Kaya for his support in GIS.
keywords urban feature analysis, data mining, urban database, urban complexity, GIS
series CAAD Futures
email ahusokmenoglu@yahoo.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2005_755
id sigradi2005_755
authors Mántaras, Guillermo J.
year 2005
title Virtual unreality
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 755-759
summary What will be waiting for the man of a virtual, parallel world, conceived by another man? Inasmuch as a virtual atmosphere does not possess weather, there is no day or nights, simply there is no sky, and if there is neither sky nor ground it does not have an above or below and of course there is no gravity. In such case why would we need walls and windows? Would we need streets to circulate? Why would we walk or fly? Today, digital media bring the necessary tools to shape, to represent and to live impossible experiences within a world where all imaginable phenomena is possible. Our experience aims to explore an approach of the student towards the new processes of design in order to contrive new spaces, taking care of not falling in an exclusively aesthetic objective but reflecting on the characteristics and qualities that a virtual space and its matter must have. In order to be able to conceive them we must use and teach digital media stimulating the students to harness its “non-reality”. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email gcarbo@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id caadria2005_b_3c_e
id caadria2005_b_3c_e
authors Yasushi Onohara, Tatsuya Kishimoto
year 2005
title VR System by the Combination of HMD and Gyro Sensor for Streetscape Evaluation
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 123-128
summary In this paper, Virtual Reality System for Streetscape and Street space evaluation using the Virtual Reality system are concerned. Light and small VR system using the combination of HMD and 3 axes gyro sensor, which provides view stereoscopic environments and enable us to view all direction of streetscape, is presented. Next, the adaptability of this system for the streetscape and space evaluation is confirmed through two experiments. The sense of Height, Volume, Amenity, Depth, and Activeness of different stand points and those by different streets which have different width are investigated and several features of sense of Street space are clarified by the VR system.
series CAADRIA
email sweetsoul_-o@wine.ocn.ne.jp, kishimoto@sd.keio.ac.jp
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id cf2005_1_69_73
id cf2005_1_69_73
authors BEILHARZ Kirsty
year 2005
title Responsive Sensate Environments: Past and Future Directions
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 361-370
summary This paper looks at ways in which recent developments in sensing technologies and gestural control of data in 3D space provide opportunities to interact with information. Social and spatial data, the utilisation of space, flows of people and dense abstract data lend themselves to visual and auditory representation to enhance our understanding of socio-spatial patterns. Mapping information to visualisation and sonification leads to gestural interaction with information representation, dissolving the visibility and tangibility of traditional computational interfaces and hardware. The purpose of this integration of new technologies is to blur boundaries between computational and spatial interaction and to transform building spaces into responsive, intelligent interfaces for display and information access.
keywords responsive environments, sensate space, sonification, visualisation, gestural controllers
series CAAD Futures
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 6547
id 6547
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 19:09

_id bc88
id bc88
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:46

_id sigradi2012_405
id sigradi2012_405
authors de Oliveira Junior, Jair Antonio
year 2012
title Biomimética e processo da Fabricação Digital: aplicações na produção da Arquitetura [Biomimetics and Digital Fabrication process: applications in the production of Architecture]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 352-355
summary Seeking to investigate, in a preliminary way, the possibilities of applied research in architectural language through parametric software and rapid prototyping. However, the search for logic and analog references to the creative process of architectural projects to emerge from such research solutions adopted by nature. A class of protozoa called radiolarian, class “Radiolaria (HAECKEL, 2005), presents radial skeletons that form hexagonal patterns, enabling large-scale conceptual application. Objective is to connect different systems, such that in the inter-relationship of specific propositions, resulting in a mediation between these systems, they are: the Biomimicry, Digital Manufacturing, Architecture.
keywords Biomimicry, radiolarians, Digital Fabrication, Grasshopper, Architecture
series SIGRADI
email jairoliveira.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id sigradi2005_155
id sigradi2005_155
authors Economou, Athanassios; Michael Herndon
year 2005
title Linespace: An automated generation of the 19 spaces with 1 axis of growth
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 155-160
summary The structures of 3-dimensional spaces with one axis of growth are discussed in detail. The mathematical structure of all 19 possible patterns is briefly discussed and a computational framework to generate these spaces is presented in the end.
series SIGRADI
email thanos.economou@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id sigradi2005_586
id sigradi2005_586
authors Fialho Silva, Carolina
year 2005
title Salvador from the digital networks perspective
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 586-590
summary This paper is part of a research study on the spatial distribution of Information and Communication Technologies in the city of Salvador. The purpose is to analyze the new tendencies in the configuration of the urban space. It intends to present the issue from a broader viewpoint and specifically analyze two Internet connection services offered in various public areas: Infocentros installed by Programa de Inclusão Digital do Estado da Bahia; and hotspot Internet connection services offered by private corporations. It is verified that the localization of such services reinforces the patterns of current spatial dispersion or concentration in the city. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email carolinafialho@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 2d39
id 2d39
authors Heylighen A, Heylighen F, Bollen J, Casaer M
year 2005
title A DISTRIBUTED MODEL FOR TACIT DESIGN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE
source SID 2005, Proceedings of the 4th Social Intelligence Design Workshop, Stanford University, March 2005 (CD Rom)
summary The distributed cognition approach, and by extension the domain of social intelligence design, attempts to integrate three until recently separate realms: mind, society, and matter. The field offers a heterogeneous collection of ideas, observations, and case studies, yet lacks a coherent theoretical framework for building models of concrete systems and processes. Despite the intrinsic complexity of integrating individual, social and technologically-supported intelligence, the paper proposes a relatively simple ‘connectionist’ framework for conceptualizing a distributed cognitive system. This framework represents shared information sources (documents) as nodes connected by links of variable strength, which increases interactively with the number of co-occurrences of documents in the patterns of their usage. This connectionist learning procedure captures and uses the implicit knowledge of its community of users to help them find relevant information, thus supporting an unconscious form of exchange. The principles are illustrated by an envisaged application to a concrete problem domain: the dynamic sharing of design knowledge among a multitude of architects through a database of associatively connected building projects.
keywords connectionism, distributed cognition, tacit knowledge, architectural design
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:24

_id caadria2005_a_1b_c
id caadria2005_a_1b_c
authors Ju-Hung Lan, Mao-Lin Chiu
year 2005
title Information Mining to Enhance Shared Understanding in Collaborative Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 83-93
summary This research focuses on how to enhance shared understanding in collaborative design from information point of view. The data mining techniques are applied to discover the design semantic patterns with information classification and association capabilities. A system prototype with an information visualization tool is developed to demonstrate the capability of enhancing shared understanding in collaborative design.
series CAADRIA
email jhlan@cc.kyit.edu.tw, mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2005_1_92_179
id cf2005_1_92_179
authors LAEPPLE Eberhard, CLAYTON Mark and JOHNSON Robert
year 2005
title Case Studies of Web-Based Collaborative Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 455-464
summary Data collected from real-world projects using Web-based communications and project management systems provide quantitative evidence for characterizing the design process. Tens of thousands of records have been analyzed from six cases. The cases are all high-end office and retail building projects, with about 50 members of the design team. The data supports the distinction of multiple stages in the design process as the patterns of usage of the software changes through time. Coordination activities are more frequent in early stages, while collaboration activities are more common in late stages. In planning and design stages, use of the software is focused upon accessing static information, while in construction documentation a relatively greater number of activities include generate and process operations.
keywords collaboration, communications, design management, design process, software
series CAAD Futures
email eberhard@tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id cf2005_2_54_229
id cf2005_2_54_229
authors LEE Yungil, CHOI Jinwon and LERTLAKKHANAKUL Jumphon
year 2005
title Developing a User Location Prediction Model for Ubiquitous Computing
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 215-224
summary Our prediction model is based on the development of “Semantic Location Model.” It embodies geometrical and topological information which can increase the efficiency in prediction and make it easy to manipulate the prediction model. Data mining is being implemented to extract the inhabitant's location patterns generated day by day. As a result, the self-learning system will be able to semantically predict the inhabitant's location in advance. This context-aware system brings about the key component of the ubiquitous computing environment. First, we explain the semantic location model and data mining methods. Then the location prediction model for the ubiquitous computing system is described in details. Finally, the prototype system is introduced to demonstrate and evaluate our prediction model.
keywords prediction, data mining, semantic location model, ubiquitous computing
series CAAD Futures
email whaooer@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id cf2005_2_36_65
id cf2005_2_36_65
authors LIAO Kai and HAN Chia Y.
year 2005
title Collective Pavilions: A Generative Architectural Modelling for Traditional Chinese Pagoda
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 129-138
summary This paper investigates generative architectural modelling for traditional Chinese architecture and aims to explore and extend the potential of adaptive computing for architectural design methods. The design manners analysis of traditional pagodas architectures is made in a holistic view and under historical perspective. We propose a descriptive model and generative system for the design of traditional Chinese pagodas, by which each pagoda is defined as a collection of style-matched and form-coordinated pavilions and described by both topological graphs and variant geometrical units. Our approach models both of the building geometry and space organization/spatial patterns of pagodas separately. The generative mechanism consists of a framework of grammar-based design and parametric, recursive shape computation. Accordingly, the generative algorithm is also made of two levels, the topology of spatial patterns and the shape geometrical parameters that characterize pavilion variations. The algorithm for computing the former is based on GP (Genetic Programming) and the latter GA (Genetic Algorithms). To explore the collective behaviour of a group of pavilions, multi-agent modelling approach is incorporated in composition patterns search. A prototype system, 'glPagoda', using the OpenGL graphics library for rendering and visualization, has been developed and implemented on PC windows platform.
keywords pagoda, grammar-based design, multi-agent modelling, generative design system
series CAAD Futures
email liao_kai@yahoo.com, liaok@email.uc.edu
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id acadia05_212
id acadia05_212
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2005
title Modern Translations, Contemporary Methods: DL-1_Resonance House®
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 212-225
summary As the first design-build-fabricate-assemble experiment at our school, the intent of the studio was to design a framework from which to examine a “lived space” through digital-to-digital processes. Moving from digital models and physical stereo lithographic models to hand-fabrication and digital assembly allowed the students to move from creation to completion. As part of our holistic design process, the studio fabricated almost all components for the project. These elements include the wood flooring, the copper and wood skins, the building’s structural panels, and the two-story light vortex. This single-family, in-fill house is located within an historic downtown neighborhood and is subject to historic district zoning regulations, design guidelines, and Board of Architecture Review approvals. The project is analogous to design challenges presenting themselves in historic districts throughout the United States including the Savannah, Georgia site for the 2005 ACADIA Conference. The scale of the project relates well to the horizontal nature of this context and after a formal, televised review process with the local Board of Architecture Review, the project represents a dynamic, yet sympathetic architectural dialogue with the surrounding buildings. The project develops simultaneously from the exterior and interior resulting in two courtyards that mediate the urban “front door” and the private “terrace.” The students designed these areas through a series of two-dimensional axonometric drawings, three-dimensional physical and digital models, and four-dimensional time-based animations. The building massing separates into two core elements: gabled copper volume and wood screen volume. These elements maintain their conceptual purity by using the same types of modulations on their skins. The copper form with its deep-cut reveals and proportionally placed light scoring patterns reflects the horizontal datum lines of the floor, sill, threshold, and ceiling. In contrast, the wood volume reflects these same lines as applied “shadow screens” which create depths that seamlessly tie together the side, rear, and front facades.The hinge point of the house is the light vortex. Designed in Rhino, translated in Catia, fabricated out of aluminum, and clad in stainless steel, this two-story sculptural element will literally wrap light around its surfaces. Like a sunflower, the light vortex, with its angel hair stainless steel finish, responds to the incremental differentiation of light throughout the day. Photosensitive floor-mounted lights designed to augment the volume of natural light will provide a continuous light rendition on the sculpture. The project, scheduled for completion at the end of the 2005 summer session, is at the time of this submission about 60% complete.
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id sigradi2005_459
id sigradi2005_459
authors Monrás Charles, María José; Sebastián Graf Seballos
year 2005
title Architecture now! = contemporary imagination + new information technologies
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 459-462
summary The development of the architectural project is conditioned and determined by the design process, in which the operative modalities have big influence. That is why we can dare say, that the use of digital media and new information technologies in the architectural design process open the way to a “new architecture”, an architecture that represents the Contemporary Imagination. A change has taken place in the traditional patterns of Architecture, from the way of thinking and conceiving a project to its representation and later materialization. This “Contemporary Architecture”, founded in the circumstances of contemporary society, is represented by three main architectural consequences: 1. The expansion of the Spatial Imagination; 2. The break regarding a lineal or hierarchical design process; 3. The introduction of different disciplines to the design process, relating the design immediately with its realization. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

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