CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 549

_id caadria2005_b_4b_c
id caadria2005_b_4b_c
authors Tomohiro Fukuda, Atsuko Kaga, Ryuichiro Nagahama, Nobuyuki Shibano, Tsuyoshi Sasada, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2005
title The World’s Largest VR-Dome for Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 203-213
summary This paper reports on the development of a new VR (Virtual Reality) system with the world’s largest hemispherical screen, which can display high immersive, life-size scale, stereoscopic images. A cluster of PCs is used in master-slave architecture, with 18 slave PCs for rendering left eye and right eye images, and the master for synchronizing the images for stereo view. Contents can be shared with a VR system operating on a notebook with a new VR system developed as part of the same VR toolkit. We apply the system to a real, collaborative architectural design project.
series CAADRIA
email fukuda@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_269
id 2005_269
authors Caldas, Luisa and Duarte, José
year 2005
title Fabricating Ceramic Covers
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 269-276
summary This paper describes a studio experiment developed with the aim of exploring the design and fabrication of innovative roof systems based on ceramic tiles using digital technologies. History is rich in examples of the use of ceramic roof tiles since the ancient world. Today’s systems derive from such ancient systems and fall into several basic categories depending on the form of the tiles and how they interlock. These systems present acceptable functional performances due to centuries of refinement, but as they have suffered little formal evolution in recent centuries, to respond to modern needs they require complex layering and assemblies. Recent technological evolution has emphasized the optimization of the tile production process in terms of time saving and cost reduction, and the improvement of product quality in terms of material homogeneity and durability. Little attention has been paid to the tile form and the roof system as a whole, including the assembly process. As a result, despite the variety and performance of existing designs, they are often perceived as outdated by architects who refuse to use them following a stylistic trend in architectural design towards primary forms and flat roofs. The challenge of the experiment was to take advantage of digital design and fabrication technology to conceive systems with improved performance and contemporary designs. The hope was that this could lead architects to consider integrating roof tiles systems in their architectural proposals. Results yielded five different roof systems. These systems are innovative from a formal viewpoint both at the tile and roof level. In addition, they are easy to assemble and possess better thermal and water-proofing performance. Digital technologies were determinant to enable students to design the complex shape of the tiles, to manipulate them into assemblies, and to assess the shape of the roofs, as well as their thermal and structural performance in some cases.
keywords Design Education; Rapid Prototyping; Collaboration; Ceramics; Innovation; Tiles
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2005_b_4b_d
id caadria2005_b_4b_d
authors Martin Tamke
year 2005
title Baking Light: Global Illumination in VR Environments as architectural design tool
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 214-228
summary As proven in the past, immersive Virtual Environments can be helpful in the process of architectural design (Achten et al. 1999). But still years later, these systems are not common in the architectural design process, neither in architectural education nor in professional work. The reasons might be the high price of e.g. CAVEs, the lack of intuitive navigation and design tools in those environments, the absence of useful and easy to handle design workflows, and the quality constraints of real-time display of 3D models. A great potential for VR in the architectural workflow is the review of design decisions: Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today's off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge from looking at still renderings. In collaboration with the Institute of Computer Graphics at our university we have established a series of regular design reviews in their immersive virtual environment. This paper describes the workflow that has emerged from this collaboration, the tools that were developed and used, and our practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary.
series CAADRIA
email m.tamke@tu-bs.de
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2005_1_84_44
id cf2005_1_84_44
authors ROSENMAN M.A., SMITH G., DING L., MARCHANT D. and MAHER M.L.
year 2005
title Multidisciplinary Design in Virtual Worlds
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 433-442
summary Large design projects, such as those in the AEC domain, involve collaboration among a number of design disciplines, often in separate locations. With the increase in CAD usage in design offices, there has been an increase in the interest in collaboration using the electronic medium, both synchronously and asynchronously. The use of a single shared database representing a single model of a building has been widely put forward but this paper argues that this does not take into account the different representations required by each discipline. This paper puts forward an environment which provides real-time multi-user collaboration in a 3D virtual world for designers in different locations. Agent technology is used to manage the different views, creation and modifications of objects in the 3D virtual world and the necessary relationships with the database(s) belonging to each discipline.
keywords collaboration, multiviews, virtual worlds, agents
series CAAD Futures
email mike@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id acadia05_254
id acadia05_254
authors Sheil, Bob and Leung, Chris
year 2005
title ‘Kielder Probes’ – bespoke tools for an indeterminate design process
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 254-259
summary Sixteen (makers) are a group of practicing architects, academics, designers and makers who assemble when key questions surrounding design, fabrication, use and adaptability in architecture emerge. Initially, the group was formed out of a motivation to engage as designers with the physical and tactile aspects of production without a dependency upon drawing. Now, in the post digital age, the age of digital fabrication, boundaries between drawing and making, between the designer and the maker, have dissolved. Consequently sixteen*(makers) work is now engaged with questions of knowledge transfer, expertise, and innovation where modes of investigation are equally embedded within in the analogue and the digital world. This article relates to our latest ongoing work which is due for completion in 2005/06. The work has been developed as a specific response to the award of an architectural residency by the Art and Architecture Partnership at Kielder Park, Northumbria, England. From the outset, it has not been a requirement of the residency that an outcome is identified early on. In fact, as I write, the outcome remains open. Presented with an extraordinary site and coinciding with a time of rapid change the work has begun by exploring a design process that is adaptable, indeterminate, and informed by site conditions. In October 2003, sixteen*(makers) were awarded an architecture residency by The Art and Architecture Programme at Kielder (AAPK) of Northumbria, UK. This organization is well known for commissioning works such as the ‘Belvedere’ by Softroom and the ‘Skyspace’ by James Turrell. Coordinated by Peter Sharp, AAPK consists of a number of large public bodies, including The Forestry Commission, Northumbrian Water and Tyndale District Council. Together they manage a land area of 62,000 ha’s centred on the UK’s largest reservoir and surrounded on all sides by one of Europe’s largest managed forests.
series ACADIA
email r.sheil@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ecaade2017_184
id ecaade2017_184
authors Almeida, Daniel and Sousa, José Pedro
year 2017
title Tradition and Innovation in Digital Architecture - Reviewing the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 267-276
summary Please write your aToday, in a moment when digital technologies are taking command of many architectural design and construction processes, it is important to examine the place and role of traditional ones. Designed by Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura in collaboration with Cecil Balmond, the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005 reflects the potential of combining those two different approaches in the production of innovative buildings. For inquiring this argument, this paper investigates the development of this project from its conception to construction with a double goal: to uncover the relationship between analogical and digital processes, and to understand the architects' role in a geographically distributed workflow, which involved the use of computational design and robotic fabrication technologies. To support this examination, the authors designed and fabricated a 1:3 scale prototype of part of the Pavilion, which also served to check and reflect on the technological evolution since then, which is setting different conditions for design development and collaboration.bstract here by clicking this paragraph.
keywords Serpentine Gallery Pavilion; Computational Design; Digital Fabrication; Wooden Construction; Architectural Representation;
series eCAADe
email jsousa@arq.up.pt
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id 2005_131
id 2005_131
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2005
title Digital Tools for Design Learning
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 131-138
summary There is growing consensus among architectural critics and educators that there exists an increasing divide between the worlds of architectural education and practice. New social and cultural norms, new materials, and current global concerns, like sustainability, have largely influenced the need for an improved balance/integration between design theory and practice. This places schools of architecture around the world under pressure to provide their graduates with the requisite skills that support responsible design characterized by good design thinking strategies. The Caribbean School of Architecture, in addition to being affected by this predicament, has other pressures on its educational offerings. The region’s lack of resources and particular social issues mandates that graduates of the school adopt a responsible attitude towards design in the region. A positive attitude to such issues as sustainability, energy conservation and community will only come about through an effective transmission of particular architectural knowledge that is relevant to the region. The challenge (globally and in the Caribbean), therefore, is the provision of an innovative and effective way of supporting the student master dialogue in studio, facilitating the transfer of “practical, appropriate knowledge” needed by students to create safe, purposeful and responsible architecture. This paper exists within the research paradigm of providing digital teaching tools to beginning students of architecture. This digital research paradigm seeks to move digital technology (the computer) beyond functioning as an instrumental tool (in visualization, representation and fabrication) to becoming a “Socratic machine” that provides an appropriate environment for design learning. Research funds have been allocated to the author to research and develop the information component of the tool with special reference to the Caribbean. The paper will report on the results of prior investigations, describe the reaction and appreciation of the students and conclude with lessons learnt for the further development of the teaching tool.
keywords Design Education, Digital Design, Teaching Tools
series eCAADe
email rbailey@utech.edu.jm
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_058
id acadia05_058
authors Daveiga, José and Ferreira, Paulo
year 2005
title Smart and Nano Materials in Architecture
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 58-67
summary We describe and analyze the fields of Smart and Nano Materials and their potential impact on architectural design and building fabrication. Distinguishing Smart and Nano materials, Smart Materials perform both sensing and actuating operations, whereas many Nano materials are capable of self-assembly. In general, Smart and Nano materials can perform like living systems, simulating human skin, the body’s muscles, a leaf’s chlorophyll and self-regeneration. Recognizing that the traditional partition between Materials Science and Architecture is obsolete, our intent is to show how these two fields are intrinsically connected, while growing evermore symbiotic as we progress into the futureKeeping the designer in mind, our paper begins with the question: “What Nano and Smart materials can be used in future architectural designs?” Outlining what such materials might mean for architectural fabrication and design, we claim that Smart and Nano Materials can imitate living organisms. Effective implementation of these materials will therefore allow designed spaces to operate as active organs within a larger dynamic organism, synthesizing both expressive intent and pragmatic considerations. This paper is a collaboration between an architect and a materials scientist on the future of materials and their influence in architecture. By giving examples of work already underway we intend to illustrate and suggest directions ranging from the functional to the expressive, from tectonics to morphology. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of future research between our two areas of knowledge.
series ACADIA
email jfernand@ucla.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id caadria2005_a_2c_b
id caadria2005_a_2c_b
authors Geeta Arjun
year 2005
title An Agent Facilitated Design Conversation System for Aiding Creative Thinking in Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 216-221
summary This paper presents an on-going research aimed at designer support in the conceptual stages of architectural design. It is argued that collaboration plays an important role at every stage of the design process. Extending Schön's seminal theory of 'design as a conversation', the support of the conceptual architectural design process is proposed as a dialogue between the designer and the computational agents wherein the agents adopt the role of design team members. The dialogue is theoretically aimed at triggering the experiential memory of the designer and associating significant experiences from different domains of the design problem to stimulate creative thinking. The paper presents an outline of the proposed model for a design-conversation system implementing computational agents in a blackboard architecture environment.
series CAADRIA
email geeta1arjun@yahoo.com
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2005_1_52_176
id cf2005_1_52_176
authors GU Ning and MAHER Mary Lou
year 2005
title Dynamic Designs of 3D Virtual Worlds Using Generative Design Agents
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 239-248
summary 3D virtual worlds are networked environments designed using the metaphor of architecture. Recent developments in 3D virtual worlds focus on interactivity, flexibility and adaptability. Rather than creating virtual environments in which the objects have intelligent behaviours, our research takes a different approach to develop an agent model that is associated with an individual person in the 3D virtual world as a personal design agent. This paper presents a Generative Design Agent (GDA), a kind of rational agent capable of representing a person in a virtual world and designing, implementing and demolishing 3D virtual places based on the occupants' current needs in the virtual world. The core of a GDA's design component is a generative design grammar that is able to capture a style of 3D virtual worlds. 3D virtual worlds designed using the GDA model is another kind of architecture for the "moment".
keywords virtual environments, generative design, interactive design, shape grammars
series CAAD Futures
email ning@design-ning.net
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id caadria2005_b_4a_c
id caadria2005_b_4a_c
authors Halil I. Erhan, Ulrich Flemming
year 2005
title User-System Interaction Design for Requirements Modeling
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 160-170
summary RaBBiT (Requirements Building for Building Types) provides computational support for architectural programming or requirements modeling in building design. A highly interactive graphical user interface (GUI) allows users to adapt RaBBiT to various programming styles and terminologies. Since users are not expected to have any prior computer programming experience, the design of RaBBiT’s GUI posed particular challenges, which we attempted to meet through a direct-manipulation interface based on the model-world metaphor.
series CAADRIA
email hierhan@uaeu.ac.ae, ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_b_3c_f
id caadria2005_b_3c_f
authors Kai-Ming Yang
year 2005
title A bodily user interface for VR-CAVE
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 129-135
summary The main purpose of this research is to explore how body movement can increase user’s sense of presence in the virtual reality cave (VR-CAVE). Traditionally, in architectural applications, there is no interaction between users and VR-CAVE. Visual perception is the major way of presentation. The users feel certain level of sense of presence. Therefore, in order to increase user’s sense of presence, we designed a bodily user interface as our controller which utilized user’s body movement to interact with VR. The contribution is that not only a user can easily or effortlessly control and navigate VR space but also VR navigation will directly link to the experience of walking in a physical space, which provides strong sense of presence to user.
series CAADRIA
email zyca@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2005_1_92_179
id cf2005_1_92_179
authors LAEPPLE Eberhard, CLAYTON Mark and JOHNSON Robert
year 2005
title Case Studies of Web-Based Collaborative Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 455-464
summary Data collected from real-world projects using Web-based communications and project management systems provide quantitative evidence for characterizing the design process. Tens of thousands of records have been analyzed from six cases. The cases are all high-end office and retail building projects, with about 50 members of the design team. The data supports the distinction of multiple stages in the design process as the patterns of usage of the software changes through time. Coordination activities are more frequent in early stages, while collaboration activities are more common in late stages. In planning and design stages, use of the software is focused upon accessing static information, while in construction documentation a relatively greater number of activities include generate and process operations.
keywords collaboration, communications, design management, design process, software
series CAAD Futures
email eberhard@tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id caadria2006_443
id caadria2006_443
authors M.W. KNIGHT, A.G.P. BROWN, J.S. SMITH
year 2006
title DIGITAL TERRAIN MESHES FROM GPS IN URBAN AREAS: A Practical Aid to City Modelling
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 443-451
summary The work presented here brings together two core interests that have been developed by the first two authors over recent years. The first is the development of city models for use in a range of applications where different data sets and different levels of detail may be appropriate. The second is the development of low cost systems that can deliver useful tools to help address Computer Aided Architectural Design problems. In addition the involvement of a colleague in Electrical Engineering and Electronics reflects a long standing belief in the benefits of cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary work between architecture and parallel research fields. The product of the collaboration is a system that can aid in the production of terrain models that, in our case, are particularly important as the base for a city model (Brown et.al, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email mknight@liv.ac.uk, andygpb@liv.ac.uk, J.S.Smith@@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2005_055
id 2005_055
authors Moloney, Jules
year 2005
title Game Engines and Virtual Design Studios
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 55-62
summary A discussion of the outcomes from the use of a game engine based collaborative virtual environment for virtual design studios. By way of introduction the use of a game engine is positioned between the high end visualization capabilities of immersive VR, and the high dimensional accuracy of 3D CAD. Software development, which address problems related to content creation and communication lag, are reported. This is supplemented with a more general discussion of the motivations for design collaboration between architectural schools. We confer with other researchers that lack of engagement is more related to pedagogy, then as a result of technical issues. In conclusion we discuss the potential of game play to enhance virtual design studios in terms of engagement and deliberation
keywords Collaborative Virtual Environments, Game Engines, Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_723
id 2005_723
authors Norman, Richard
year 2005
title Digital Color as a Paradigm for 3D Modeling
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 723-728
summary Johannes Itten wrote in the 1920’s that seven distinct possibilities exist for the contrast of color: “Each (is) unique in character and artistic value, in visual, expressive and symbolic effect...together these constitute the fundamental resource of color design” Itten (1973). In either the digital world or in the world of painting, there has never been a more profound statement about color arrangement. Of Itten’s seven contrasts, the contrast of hue, value, and saturation, taken together have become a standard description of digital color today. As most projects reach the final stage of presentation, color selection becomes a possible paradigm for their development. It is customary to leave the selection of color to the end of a project — if time permits, then the colors are changed to make the project “appear better”, otherwise the selection of color is put in a pile of “good intentions” — overlooked. Proposed here is an alternative, a method of selecting color “up front”. Student projects are used to illustrate just how a building, or even a group of buildings may be better illustrated if one bases a presentation on a successful and understood work of art. The use of a painting as a source of color is proposed as a specific way of working. Most libraries contain an abundance of examples. The web, too, has many paintings; painters generally have more experience at putting colors together than architects and usually do not mind if their color ideas are borrowed, Done right, the result can be a happy merger of idea, emotion, and color, providing another paradigm for studying digital modeling.
keywords Color ; Painting ; Itten ; Design
series eCAADe
email normafs@auburn.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2006_168
id 2006_168
authors Papalexopoulos, Dimitris
year 2006
title Digital Territories and the Design Construction Continuum
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 168-174
summary The purpose of the paper is to bring together the two newly elaborated concepts of Digital Territories (DT) and Design Construction Continuum (DCC) in order to approach the design of evolving – intelligent environments.Digital Territories is a concept elaborated 2005 by a Core Expert Group, conceived as an ephemeral Ambient Intelligence (AmI) space. DTs formed through the interconnection of physical objects embedding digital technologies, postulate the integration of the physical and the digital world, searching for operative definitions of new evolving in time functionalities. In DT’s, bridges between the physical and the digital are discrete elements disposing of certain autonomy in their conception and internal structure. Bridges have to be designed and located. The DCC proposes to relate design, fabrication and construction through information networks (it is in fact a DT). Through the DCC approach, design information is becoming construction information and industrial fabrication information. The DCC has to integrate interaction design and respond to questions posed by DTs design. DTs are integrated to DCC by constituting an intermediate level between building programming and design. Intelligent Building Components, that is AmI components operating as bridges between the physical and the digital in Digital Territories formations, cooperating to develop swarm intelligence applications to architectural space, are elements managed by the DCC. DT’s are about spaces communicating and the DCC is about communicating (design) space.
keywords Digital Territories; Design Construction Continuum; Interaction Design; Evolving Environments; Intelligent Environments; Location Diagrams; Building Programming
series eCAADe
email dplxs@otenet.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2005_067
id 2005_067
authors Pellitteri, Giuseppe, Colajanni Benedetto and Concialdi, Salvatore
year 2005
title Distance Collaboration. A Comparative Analysis of Tools and Procedures
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 67-73
summary Besides design theory and practice, curricula of architectural students should include some experiences referring to professional situations. Among these experiences, Collaborative Design is nowadays somewhat frequent. It is normally practised by large professional studios, using expansive software which is beyond what they can afford on average. Much academic research on the topic has also been carried out often resulting in the proposition of new and too complex description models of the building object. We think that students should instead get acquainted with such a design process: an experience has been planned and carried out in our Department for the purpose of practising the possible paradigm in a more ordinary context. Its purpose was threefold. First, making the students grasp the method’s potentialities and learn the right approach. Second, testing the practical suitability of the most widely used software. Third, comparing their relative efficiency. The software we used was: Architectural Desktop, AutoCad Revit, ArchiCad for Teamwork. We focused special attention on how representing and managing restraints, since they are the main source of conflicts. This was the hardest topic to manage. The results were partly positive inasmuch as the experience showed that it could be possible to adopt the Collaborative Design paradigm which is also used in the AEC field. The drawbacks emerged from the analysis of non-dedicated software are: a relative slow process for the lack of certain specific tools; a subsequent necessity of integrating them with different communication software; the difficulty of managing hard and soft restraints. However, in the final analysis, the experience can be considered as positive.
keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural teaching
series eCAADe
email pellitt@www.unipa.it
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_2_21_64
id cf2005_2_21_64
authors ROMÃO Luís
year 2005
title SGtools: A Computer Tool for Exploring Designs with Set Grammars
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 53-62
summary A set grammar interpreter is presented in this paper. It differs from previous interpreters in many ways: it accepts any shapes for edition, the user rather than symbols, manipulates shapes, and rules can be stored and retrieved. This tool is intended as a conceptual design tool and not as a tool for full design development. The tool has been developed in the AutoLisp language as a plug-in to AutoCAD, thereby taking advantage of the existent means of visualizations.
keywords shape grammars, human-computer interaction, collaboration
series CAAD Futures
email lromao@mit.edu
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

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