CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 549

_id acadia18_404
id acadia18_404
authors Clifford, Brandon; McGee, Wes
year 2018
title Cyclopean Cannibalism. A method for recycling rubble
source ACADIA // 2018: Recalibration. On imprecisionand infidelity. [Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-17729-7] Mexico City, Mexico 18-20 October, 2018, pp. 404-413
summary Each year, the United States discards 375 million tons of concrete construction debris to landfills (U.S. EPA 2016), but this is a new paradigm. Past civilizations cannibalized their constructions to produce new architectures (Hopkins 2005). This paper interrogates one cannibalistic methodology from the past known as cyclopean masonry in order to translate this valuable method into a contemporary digital procedure. The work contextualizes the techniques of this method and situates them into procedural recipes which can be applied in contemporary construction. A full-scale prototype is produced utilizing the described method; demolition debris is gathered, scanned, and processed through an algorithmic workflow. Each rubble unit is then minimally carved by a robotic arm and set to compose a new architecture from discarded rubble debris. The prototype merges ancient construction thinking with digital design and fabrication methodologies. It poses material cannibalism as a means of combating excessive construction waste generation.
keywords full paper, cyclopean, algorithmic, robotic fabrication, stone, shape grammars, computation
series ACADIA
type paper
email bcliffor@mit.edu
last changed 2019/01/07 11:22

_id 6547
id 6547
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 19:09

_id bc88
id bc88
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:46

_id sigradi2005_416
id sigradi2005_416
authors Combes, Leonardo
year 2005
title The acts of showing and demonstrating and their connections with visual and quantitative facts in architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 416-420
summary This paper attempts to clarify the limits between the act of conceiving architecture and the act of designing architecture. The main argument turns around the idea that the output of conception is just a definition used uncompromisingly as evidence, whereas the design tasks are directed to demonstrate the possibilities the defined ideas have to be actualized. Graphic expression is the vehicle used by conception to present ideas synthetically. On the other hand, design tasks are sustained by analytical and quantitative evaluations that validate the conceived proposal. Thus the final presentation of an architectural project is a mixture of written expressions (calculations, texts, figures) and graphic expressions. This paper has no intention of demonstrate but to show one of the possible approaches concerning the relations between conception, design and their respective means of expression. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 2005_607
id 2005_607
authors Coppola, C., Calabrese, A., Iazzetta, A., Mele, F. and Talamo, O.
year 2005
title The Transformation’s Control and Development
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 607-614
summary The study of DNA of artifact and the development leading to its use in the field of industrial production of a single piece is now a common feature in the syllabus of the degree in Industrial Design at Faculty of Architecture “Luigi Vanvitelli” of SUN. The Generative Design Laboratory is where this process is carried out and includes the PROGEOR project for Generative Jewels Design. The experience acquired in the Generative Design Laboratory has developed along the lines of THE SINGLE PIECE, a product which combines the uniqueness of a handcrafted artefact with mass production methods. The development of project control technologies and also production technologies enables real-life experimentation of these hypotheses to be conducted.
keywords Generative Model Design, Ontology, Agents
series eCAADe
email carlo.coppola@unina2.it
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_535
id sigradi2005_535
authors Costa, Lucia Maria S.A .; Yuri Queiroz Abreu Torres, Erivelton Muniz da Silva, Leonardo Ventapane, Ana Lucia Cordeiro Luz
year 2005
title Carioca urban waters: digital representations
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 535-539
summary The main objective of this paper is to discuss the value of digital graphic representation as a tool to display research findings in Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. This is discussed through the presentation of a web site named Águas Urbanas Cariocas. The paper, after briefly presenting the research context, explains the process of the making of the site, highlighting its main aspects. It concludes arguing the value of graphic representation as one of the ways of interacting different knowledges. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email lcosta@acd.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2005_599
id 2005_599
authors Couceiro, Mauro
year 2005
title Architecture and Biological Analogies
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 599-606
summary The study described in this paper evolves within the larger context of a research aimed at inquiring into analogies between architecture and nature, and more specifically between architecture and biology. Biology is a recursive source of architectural inspiration due to the tight relationship between form and function, the natural balance of forces and the corresponding geometric solutions found in living beings. Roughly, one can classify historical analogies between architecture and biology into two main categories. The first tries to mimic biological forms and the second biological processes. The specific goal of the described study is to find how new technologies can redefine and support the process of constructing such analogies. It uses as a case study a tower project designed by the architect Manuel Gausa (ACTAR, Barcelona) called Tornado Tower because of its complex shape inspired in the frozen form of a tornado. Due to the geometric irregularities of the tower, Gausa’s team had difficulties in designing it, especially because solving the structural problems required constant redrawing. This paper describes the first part of the study which primary goal was to conceive a parametric program that encoded the overall shape of the Tornado Tower. The idea was to use the program to simplify the drawing process. This required a mathematical study of spirals and helices which are at the conceptual basis of the external structure and shape of the tower. However, the program encodes not only the shape of Gausa’s tower, but also the shapes of other buildings with conceptual similarities. Such class of shapes is very recurrent in nature with different scales and with different utilities. Therefore, one can argue that the program makes a mathematical connection between a given natural class of shapes and architecture. The second part of the study will be devoted to extending the program with a genetic algorithm with the goal of guiding the generation of solutions taking into account their structural fitness. This way, the analogy with genetic procedures will be emphasized by the study of the evolution of forms and its limits of feasibility. In summary, the bionic shape analogy is made by the generation of mimetic natural forms and a genetic process analogy starts with the parametric treatment of shape based on code manipulations. At the end the program will establish an analogy between architecture and biology both terms of form and process.
keywords Genetics; Evolutionary Systems; Parametric Design
series eCAADe
email mauro@bluebottle.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_037
id 2005_037
authors Côté, Pierre, Léglise, Michel and Estévez, Daniel
year 2005
title Virtual Architecture as Representation for Creative Design Process - Through a Collaborative eDesign Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 37-45
summary Using Virtual Architecture (VA) as a general scheme for representations to sustain the reflection activities involved in the design process can help students to initiate creative design ideas. Because of its implicit abstract nature, VA can be used, to represent original ideas or processes, or well-known architectural theories to articulate design ideas. Furthermore, VA as a mean of expression, turn out to be a source of inspiration for students who perceive it as medium with very few limits with which to develop, explore and express their design intuitions. A recent collaborative edesign studio experience is reported to illustrate the benefit observed. Using three examples out of ten student projects, we show how designs and design process have been characterized by those virtual representations. In fall semester 2004, the edesign studio took place between the Schools of Architecture of Toulouse and Université Laval in Québec. VA was both an academic and a studio topic at Laval while the other school students had a traditional design task to tackle, namely the rehabilitation of Chapou University Residences for students in Toulouse. Students from both schools composed each edesign team. In addition, three common architectural themes were web-documented and introduced to both classes: room, as defined by Louis Kahn: “a space which knows what it wants to be is a room”; color, as an architectural medium in dialectic with structure; and body-space relationships, as articulated by Gilles Deleuze and its projection to cyberspace. From the edesign studio results, we are arguing that virtual architecture should be looked at not only as new domain to be investigated by architects and taught in academic studios but also as a new medium of design to develop and explore design intuitions through virtual representations.
keywords Virtual Architecture; Virtual Representations; Medium; eDesign; Design by Collaboration
series eCAADe
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ijac20053403
id ijac20053403
authors Datta, Sambit; Beynon, David
year 2005
title A Computational Approach to the Reconstruction of Surface Geometry from Early Temple Superstructures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 4, 471-486
summary Recovering the control or implicit geometry underlying temple architecture requires bringing together fragments of evidence from field measurements, relating these to mathematical and geometric descriptions in canonical texts and proposing "best-fit" constructive models. While scholars in the field have traditionally used manual methods, the innovative application of niche computational techniques can help extend the study of artefact geometry. This paper demonstrates the application of a hybrid computational approach to the problem of recovering the surface geometry of early temple superstructures. The approach combines field measurements of temples, close-range architectural photogrammetry, rule-based generation and parametric modelling. The computing of surface geometry comprises a rule-based global model governing the overall form of the superstructure, several local models for individual motifs using photogrammetry and an intermediate geometry model that combines the two. To explain the technique and the different models, the paper examines an illustrative example of surface geometry reconstruction based on studies undertaken on a tenth century stone superstructure from western India. The example demonstrates that a combination of computational methods yields sophisticated models of the constructive geometry underlying temple form and that these digital artefacts can form the basis for in depth comparative analysis of temples, arising out of similar techniques, spread over geography, culture and time.
series journal
email sambit.datta@deakin.edu.au
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00002
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia05_058
id acadia05_058
authors Daveiga, José and Ferreira, Paulo
year 2005
title Smart and Nano Materials in Architecture
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 58-67
summary We describe and analyze the fields of Smart and Nano Materials and their potential impact on architectural design and building fabrication. Distinguishing Smart and Nano materials, Smart Materials perform both sensing and actuating operations, whereas many Nano materials are capable of self-assembly. In general, Smart and Nano materials can perform like living systems, simulating human skin, the body’s muscles, a leaf’s chlorophyll and self-regeneration. Recognizing that the traditional partition between Materials Science and Architecture is obsolete, our intent is to show how these two fields are intrinsically connected, while growing evermore symbiotic as we progress into the futureKeeping the designer in mind, our paper begins with the question: “What Nano and Smart materials can be used in future architectural designs?” Outlining what such materials might mean for architectural fabrication and design, we claim that Smart and Nano Materials can imitate living organisms. Effective implementation of these materials will therefore allow designed spaces to operate as active organs within a larger dynamic organism, synthesizing both expressive intent and pragmatic considerations. This paper is a collaboration between an architect and a materials scientist on the future of materials and their influence in architecture. By giving examples of work already underway we intend to illustrate and suggest directions ranging from the functional to the expressive, from tectonics to morphology. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of future research between our two areas of knowledge.
series ACADIA
email jfernand@ucla.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ecaaderis2018_103
id ecaaderis2018_103
authors Davidová, Marie and Prokop, Šimon
year 2018
title TreeHugger - The Eco-Systemic Prototypical Urban Intervention
source Odysseas Kontovourkis (ed.), Sustainable Computational Workflows [6th eCAADe Regional International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 9789491207143], Department of Architecture, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, 24-25 May 2018, pp. 75-84
keywords The paper discusses co-design, development, production, application of TreeHugger (see Figure 1). The co-design among community and trans-disciplinary participants with different expertise required scope of media mix, switching between analogue, digital and back again. This involves different degrees of physical and digital 'GIGA-Mapping' (Sevaldson, 2011, 2015), 'Grasshopper3d' (Davidson, 2017) scripting and mix of digital and analogue fabrication to address the real life world. The critical participation of this 'Time-Based Design' (Sevaldson, 2004, 2005) process is the interaction of the prototype with eco-systemic agency of the adjacent environment - the eco-systemic performance. The TreeHugger is a responsive solid wood insect hotel, generating habitats and edible landscaping (Creasy, 2004) on bio-tope in city centre of Prague. To extend the impact, the code was uploaded for communities to download, local-specifically edit and apply worldwide. Thus, the fusion of discussed processes is multi-scaled and multi-layered, utilised in emerging design field: Systemic Approach to Architectural Performance.
series eCAADe
email marie.davidova@gmail.com
last changed 2018/05/29 12:33

_id ijac20053305
id ijac20053305
authors de Almeida, Clarissa Ribeiro Pereira; Pratschke, Anja; La Rocca, Renata
year 2005
title In-between and Through:Architecture and Complexity
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 3, 335-354
summary This paper draws on current research on complexity and design process in architecture and offers a proposal for how architects might bring complex thought to bear on the understanding of design process as a complex system, to understand architecture as a way of organizing events, and of organizing interaction. Our intention is to explore the hypothesis that the basic characteristics of complex systems – emergence, nonlinearity, self-organization, hologramaticity, and so forth – can function as effective tools for conceptualization that can usefully extend the understanding of the way architects think and act throughout the design process. To illustrate the discussions, we show how architects might bring complex thought inside a transdisciplinary design process by using models such as software engineering diagrams, and three-dimensional modeling network environments such as media to integrate, connect and 'trans–act'.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/expand?pub=infobike://mscp/ijac/2005/00000003/00000003/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2012_405
id sigradi2012_405
authors de Oliveira Junior, Jair Antonio
year 2012
title Biomimética e processo da Fabricação Digital: aplicações na produção da Arquitetura [Biomimetics and Digital Fabrication process: applications in the production of Architecture]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 352-355
summary Seeking to investigate, in a preliminary way, the possibilities of applied research in architectural language through parametric software and rapid prototyping. However, the search for logic and analog references to the creative process of architectural projects to emerge from such research solutions adopted by nature. A class of protozoa called radiolarian, class “Radiolaria (HAECKEL, 2005), presents radial skeletons that form hexagonal patterns, enabling large-scale conceptual application. Objective is to connect different systems, such that in the inter-relationship of specific propositions, resulting in a mediation between these systems, they are: the Biomimicry, Digital Manufacturing, Architecture.
keywords Biomimicry, radiolarians, Digital Fabrication, Grasshopper, Architecture
series SIGRADI
email jairoliveira.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id caadria2006_545
id caadria2006_545
authors DIETRICH ELGER, ANDREAS DIECKMANN, PETER RUSSELL, THOMAS STACHELHAUS
year 2006
title THE INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO: A VIEW BEHIND THE SCENES:Liquid Campus 3
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 545-548
summary Over 10 months ending in July 2005, architecture students from Aachen, Karlsruhe and Weimar took part in a design studio that differed significantly from other studios in that the result of the studio was a 1:1 realisation of the design. This is part of an evolution of the virtual faculty of architecture “Liquid Campus”, founded in 2001, which has seen the complexity of the projects steadily rise and this continued in the Project “Ein Fest: Ein Dach”. The integrated studio is arranged to encourage an active, economic and transparent learning process, which encompasses design, communication and cooperation issues. The stated goal at the beginning of the two-semester process is to build and although only a few of the ideas are realised, all participants are involved in the realisation. In this case, the project was to create “roofs” for an open-air concert for 200,000 people in Karlsruhe, Germany. The planning was carried out using the Netzentwurf platform, with which the authors have several years experience.
series CAADRIA
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2005_421
id sigradi2005_421
authors Diogo Righetto, Adriana Volpon
year 2005
title The drawing of architecture and its drawing in time
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 421-426
summary The project of architecture involves several phases, to knowledge: outline, ante-project, executive project and project of presentation. And, this last, the presentation of the project of architecture is the objective of this I study; therefore he represents the expression of the idea in its totality. Also, healthy in these drawings that are implicit the paradigms inherent to its output. Therefore, the methodology consisted of raise facts in several springs for that could be drawn a profile of the evolution of the Presentation of the Project of Architecture to the long one of all the history of the humanity what implicit study the variables: event, author, kind of representation, technical, local, year, period, context and contribution. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email adrid@mpc.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id sigradi2005_270
id sigradi2005_270
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang; Michael W. Knight
year 2005
title Sketch as sketch can or model as model can?
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 270-274
summary This paper reports about an ongoing experience for the use of computers in the early design stages. It tries to evaluate how recent software developments in the field of CAAD will influence the way architects design and how we teach them architectural design. There is now doubt to us that the ongoing change in the technology will influence the way we work in future when we do architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching and curricula. We use an ongoing educational project to try to find some answers to these questions.
series SIGRADI
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 2005_383
id 2005_383
authors Ebert, Oliver, Schoenemann, Patrick and Lenhart, Michael
year 2005
title Cityscape Computing System
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 383-389
summary The central feature of the project is the development of a computer and its interfaces to simulate urban space and, in the context of an intermedia city tour, to allow citizens to creatively influence their urban space by manipulating media structures at chosen points throughout the city. A master plan is set up to re-cultivate public spaces and points of architectural focus. The city reacts interactively to the commands. A dialog is created between user and public space. The tour route is an open structure which can be expanded at any time. Via interfaces the user activates a reaction in the real city by making changes to the virtual model. This results in a dynamic space, a communication based on the results of this transformation. The user interface allows an information transfer between real people and virtual space. Virtual reality then reacts to the input by transferring that information back to reality. The direct influence on the architecture is effected by a media-transformer. It projects an additional perception level on to reality while monitoring the data via various analysis interfaces.
keywords Interactive Urbanism; Media Installation; Human-Computer-Interaction
series eCAADe
email lenhart@architektur.uni-siegen.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_547
id 2005_547
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2005
title Crisis? What Crisis?
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 547-556
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with structural (civil) engineers. This is not surprising in consideration of the fact, that the architectural education industry produces far too many new architects for the economy to absorb. In Germany, the number is almost three times too many. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past twenty years so that the skills that architects want to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have idly watched their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields like civil and structural engineering The reasons for this crisis are manifold. In the schools of architecture, the discussions often deal with form or formal arguments, which, in fact, have little or no relevance to the building industry. This position was tenable so long as the clients were willing to accept formal arguments in order to receive buildings of high quality or current social relevance (i.e. current architectural fashion). With the dual aspects of globalisation and a shift to maintaining building stocks rather than producing new buildings, the tolerance for “architectural” discussions has been reduced even further. Indeed, the monetary pressures overwhelm almost all other aspects, including so-called green issues. What is more, most of the monetary issues are time based. Time represents, perhaps, the largest pressure in any current planning project. The clients expect expedient, accurate and inexpensive solutions. If architects are not able to produce these, the clients will (and do) go elsewhere. The authors argue that there remain serious problems to be solved for architects and the metier in general. Ever cheaper, ever faster and ever encompassing information technologies offer the architectural community a chance to turn recent trends on their head. By using information technologies to their full potential, architects can reassert themselves as the coordinators of building information and processes. Simply put, this means less photorealistic rendering and more databases, which may be unappealing for those architects who have positioned themselves as “designers” and are able to talk long on form, but short on cost or logistics. Nonetheless, the situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. It is not a question of one or the other. Architects must be able to offer innovative design solutions that not only address the fiscal, legal and programmatic constraints, but also push the boundaries at to the position of architecture in the community at large. For educators, it must be made clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building process including their expertise concerning questions of architectural form, function, history and art. Precisely while they are generalists are architects invaluable in a sea of specialists. The biggest hurdle to asserting this in the past has been the control of the vast amounts of information. This is no longer a problem and also no longer an excuse. In the education of architects, it must be made clear that their role dictates sovereignty over architectural information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which including Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Mangement, Computer Supported Design Studios, CSCW
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ecaadesigradi2019_027
id ecaadesigradi2019_027
authors Erzetic, Catherine, Dobbs, Tiara, Fabbri, Alessandra, Gardner, Nicole, Haeusler, M. Hank and Zavoleas, Yannis
year 2019
title Enhancing User-Engagement in the Design Process through Augmented Reality Applications
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 2, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 423-432
summary Augmented Reality (AR) technologies are often perceived as the most impactful method to enhance the communication between the designer and the client during the iterative design process. However, the significance of designing the User Interface (UI) and the User Experience (UX) are often underestimated. To intercede, this research aims to employ new and existing techniques to develop UI's, and comparatively assess "the accuracy and completeness with which specified users can achieve specified goals in particular environments" (Stone, 2005) - a notion this research delineates as 'effectiveness'. Prompted by the work of key scholars, the developed UI's were assessed through the lens of existing UI evaluation techniques, including: Usability Heuristics (Nielsen, 1994) and Visual and Cognitive Heuristics (Zuk and Carpendale, 2006). In partnership with PTW Architects, characteristics such as the rapidity and complexity of interactions, in conjunction with the interface's simplicity and intuitiveness, were extracted from 15 trials underwent by architectural practitioners. The outcomes of this research highlights strategies for the effective development of user interface design for mobile augmented reality applications.
keywords User Interface; Human Centered Design; User Experience; Heuristics; Usability Inspection Method
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email m.haeusler@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2019/08/26 20:26

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