CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 546

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ascaad2014_023
id ascaad2014_023
authors Al-Maiyah, Sura and Hisham Elkadi
year 2014
title Assessing the Use of Advanced Daylight Simulation Modelling Tools in Enhancing the Student Learning Experience
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 303-313
summary In architecture schools, where the ‘studio culture’ lies at the heart of students’ learning, taught courses, particularly technology ones, are often seen as secondary or supplementary units. Successful delivery of such courses, where students can act effectively, be motivated and engaged, is a rather demanding task requiring careful planning and the use of various teaching styles. A recent challenge that faces architecture education today, and subsequently influences the way technology courses are being designed, is the growing trend in practice towards environmentally responsive design and the need for graduates with new skills in sustainable construction and urban ecology (HEFCE’s consultation document, 2005). This article presents the role of innovative simulation modelling tools in the enhancement of the student learning experience and professional development. Reference is made to a teaching practice that has recently been applied at Portsmouth School of Architecture in the United Kingdom and piloted at Deakin University in Australia. The work focuses on the structure and delivery of one of the two main technology units in the second year architecture programme that underwent two main phases of revision during the academic years 2009/10 and 2010/11. The article examines the inclusion of advanced daylight simulation modelling tools in the unit programme, and measures the effectiveness of enhancing its delivery as a key component of the curriculum on the student learning experience. A main objective of the work was to explain whether or not the introduction of a simulation modelling component, and the later improvement of its integration with the course programme and assessment, has contributed to a better learning experience and level of engagement. Student feedback and the grade distribution pattern over the last three academic years were collected and analyzed. The analysis of student feedback on the revised modelling component showed a positive influence on the learning experience and level of satisfaction and engagement. An improvement in student performance was also recorded over the last two academic years and following the implementation of new assessment design.
series ASCAAD
email sura.almaiyah@port.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id ijac20053202
id ijac20053202
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2005
title Integrating Digital and Building Technologies: Towards a New Architectural Composite
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 181-190
summary This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of the materials and fabrication techniques for a fundamentally new class of architectural composite. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_131
id 2005_131
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2005
title Digital Tools for Design Learning
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 131-138
summary There is growing consensus among architectural critics and educators that there exists an increasing divide between the worlds of architectural education and practice. New social and cultural norms, new materials, and current global concerns, like sustainability, have largely influenced the need for an improved balance/integration between design theory and practice. This places schools of architecture around the world under pressure to provide their graduates with the requisite skills that support responsible design characterized by good design thinking strategies. The Caribbean School of Architecture, in addition to being affected by this predicament, has other pressures on its educational offerings. The region’s lack of resources and particular social issues mandates that graduates of the school adopt a responsible attitude towards design in the region. A positive attitude to such issues as sustainability, energy conservation and community will only come about through an effective transmission of particular architectural knowledge that is relevant to the region. The challenge (globally and in the Caribbean), therefore, is the provision of an innovative and effective way of supporting the student master dialogue in studio, facilitating the transfer of “practical, appropriate knowledge” needed by students to create safe, purposeful and responsible architecture. This paper exists within the research paradigm of providing digital teaching tools to beginning students of architecture. This digital research paradigm seeks to move digital technology (the computer) beyond functioning as an instrumental tool (in visualization, representation and fabrication) to becoming a “Socratic machine” that provides an appropriate environment for design learning. Research funds have been allocated to the author to research and develop the information component of the tool with special reference to the Caribbean. The paper will report on the results of prior investigations, describe the reaction and appreciation of the students and conclude with lessons learnt for the further development of the teaching tool.
keywords Design Education, Digital Design, Teaching Tools
series eCAADe
email rbailey@utech.edu.jm
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_763
id 2005_763
authors Beilharz, Kirsty
year 2005
title Architecture as the Computer Interface: 4D Gestural Interaction with Socio-Spatial Sonification
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 763-770
summary Architecture today extends far beyond designing building shells and material, peripheral boundaries. Arguably, it has always been, and shifts increasingly in contemporary environments towards, designing space and interaction with space. Hence, the role of the designer includes integration of computing in architecture through ambient display and non-tactile interaction. This paper explores a framework in which the architecture is the computer interface to information sonification. (Sonification is automatically generated representation of information using sound). The examples in this paper are Emergent Energies, demonstrating a socio-spatially responsive generative design in a sensate environment enabled by pressure mats; Sensor-Cow using wireless gesture controllers to sonify motion; and Sonic Kung Fu which is an interactive sound sculpture facilitated by video colour-tracking. The method in this paper connects current information sonification methodologies with gesture controller capabilities to complete a cycle in which gestural, non-tactile control permutes and interacts with automatically-generated information sonification. Gestural pervasive computing negotiates space and computer interaction without conventional interfaces (keyboard/mouse) thus freeing the user to monitor or display information with full mobility, without fixed or expensive devices. Integral computing, a blurring of human-machine boundaries and embedding communication infrastructure, ambient display and interaction in the fabric of architecture are the objectives of this re-thinking.
keywords Interactive Sonification, Gesture Controllers, Responsive Spaces, SpatialSound
series eCAADe
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_665
id 2005_665
authors Brito, Tiago, Fonseca, Manuel J. and Jorge, Joaquim A.
year 2005
title DecoSketch – Towards Calligraphic Approaches to Interior Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 665-670
summary Computer-Aided Design tools have long played an important role in architecture design. However, we need to go beyond direct manipulation to devise new tools that will expedite the interior design and decoration. Indeed, conventional CAD systems, while providing ever increasing functionality, do not provide equal support to the drafting and drawing tasks. This makes even the simplest drawings a complicated endeavor. Draftspeople struggle with different concepts that those learnt from their earlier days in school and have to think long and hard to translate familiar sequences of operations to commands which require navigating a dense jungle of menus. The term calligraphic interfaces was coined by us to designate a large family of applications organized around the drawing paradigm, using a digital stylus and a tablet-and-screen combination as seen most recently in Tablet PCs®. Using these, users can enter drawings in a natural manner, largely evocative of drafting techniques that were perfected for pencil-and-paper media. This paper presents a simple calligraphic interface to explore interior design literally from the ground up. The Decosketch application is a modeling and visualization tool structured around 2 _D architectural plants. Its purpose is to help architects or customers easily creating and navigating through house designs starting from the floorplan and moving to their three-dimensional representation. Moreover, both 2D and 3D representations can be independently edited, providing a natural interface that tries to adhere to well-known representations and idioms used by architects when drafting using pencil and paper.
series eCAADe
email jorgej@acm.org
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2005_000
id 2005_000
authors Duarte, José Pinto, Ducla-Soares, Gonçalo and Sampaio, A. Zita (Eds.)
year 2005
title Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms
source 23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-3-2], Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, 880 p.
summary As the field of computer-aided design evolved over the last thirty years or so, it has witnessed five changes of emphasis in research direction. In the first stage, the use of computers in architecture focused on the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD), that is, systems that simulated the use of drafting tools, and research was mainly concerned with the satisfaction of designers' ergonomic needs. In the second stage, there were efforts to use computer tools in non-graphical aspects of designing, such as the use of Data Base Management Systems (DBMS) in the quantity survey of buildings. The concern was to satisfy the cognitive needs of designers by focusing on the way information and knowledge were perceived, acquired, stored, and processed. In the third stage, the focus shifted to the development of realistic models of buildings to permit the assessment of design proposals. In the fourth stage, the focus was on studies concerned with the encoding of architectural knowledge into design tools (KBMS), and the discussion was whether to go towards design automation or design supporting tools. In the fifth stage, with the advent of the Internet and the development of communication tools, research became focused on the collaborative and social aspects of design activity. In recent years, research also became concerned with the exploration of the physical implications of digital media in the production of artefacts. Today, there is a vast range of research interests and approaches, but the quest for new, unifying paradigms continues.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_114
id acadia05_114
authors Due Schmidt, Anne Marie
year 2005
title Navigating towards digital tectonic tools
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 114-127
summary The computer holds a great potential to break down the barriers between architecture and the technical aspects relating to architecture, thus supporting innovative architecture with an inner correspondence between form and technique. While the differing values in architecture and technique can seem like opposites, the term tectonics deals with creating a meaningful relationship between the two. The aim of this paper is to investigate what a digital tectonic tool could be and what relationship with technology it should represent. An understanding of this relationship can help us not only to understand the conflicts in architecture and the building industry but also bring us further into a discussion of how architecture can use digital tools. The investigation is carried out firstly by approaching the subject theoretically through the term tectonics and by setting up a model of the values a tectonic tool should encompass. Secondly the ability and validity of the model are shown by applying it to a case study of Jørn Utzon’s work on Minor Hall in Sydney Opera House - for the sake of exemplification the technical field focused on in this paper is room acoustics. Thirdly the relationship between the model of tectonics and the case will be compared and lastly a discussion about the characteristics of a tectonic tool and its implications on digital tectonic tools will be carried out.
series ACADIA
email amds@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2005_b_6a_a
id caadria2005_b_6a_a
authors José R. Kós, Tereza C. Malveira Araujo, José S. Cabral Filho, Eduardo Mascarenhas Santos, Marcelo Tramontano
year 2005
title Low-tech remote collaborative design studios
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 415-425
summary This paper aims to analyze Virtual Design Studios in big countries such as India, China and Brazil with great disparities between the schools of architecture and cultural diversity within their territories. Two VDS experiences with Brazilian institutions based the paper’s arguments. Limitation of equipment, bandwidth or available tools should not impede the organization of collaborative experiences. Instead, they should ground the strategies for the implementation of those experiences. Several free tools that are available on the Internet and which the students were used to, where chosen for the communication between the participants. Limited resources were not an obstacle to gain what we have considered the most important benefit of our experience: the exchange between students and faculty towards the recognition of the other participants’ different cultures, traditions and knowledge, allowing a better understanding of their own context.
series CAADRIA
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id ijac20053205
id ijac20053205
authors Kacher, Sabrina; Halin, Gilles; Bignon, Jean-Claude; Humbert, Pascal
year 2005
title A method for Constructing a Reference Image Database to Assist with Design Process. Application to the Wooden Architecture Domain
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 227-244
summary Designing architectural projects requires the introduction of references, because design is an activity oriented towards a result which does not yet exist. If we summarise the current categories used in Artificial Intelligence to characterise the different forms of reasoning, we are able to consider that design is more the concern of the induction or the abduction mechanism than the deduction mechanism. Moreover, the main characteristic of the designer's activity is to work towards non-routine situations with the use of many references. In this paper we will present method principles to construct a reference image database. These references will enable the designer to further in solving the design problem. To illustrate these reference usage, we choose photographic images belonging to the wooden construction domain We also present at the end of the paper an experiment which aims to evaluate the real help that this reference image database can bring to designers during their creation task.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2005_640
id sigradi2005_640
authors Kensek, Karen M.
year 2005
title Digital Reconstructions: Confidence and AmbiguitY
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 640-644
summary Digital representations have progressed tremendously from the earliest wireframe images to realistic ray-traced renderings that are often indistinguishable from real-life. Yet, in many cases, in the fooling of the eyes, one should not also fool the brain. Especially in the reconstruction of the past, it may be useful for the visualization to also contain information about the certainty of the result. Methods exist to show what data was missing and is now restored and the confidence level of the reconstruction. This in-progress summary paper will discuss the overall usefulness of many of these techniques and list methods from architecture, archaeology, and other fields towards providing information beyond the visualization.
series SIGRADI
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2005_139
id sigradi2005_139
authors Orciuoli, Affonso
year 2005
title Towards a non-standard architecture: design and manufacture as it relates to information systems
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 139-143
summary The development of computer programs has brought about a new trend for architects and designers. Topology, splines, nurbs and the use of sophisticated computer programs, which were formerly possible only to be executed on powerful computers, have triggered an interest in architects. Ten years ago, computers started to replace traditional drawing tools. Nowadays it is possible to develop the whole architectural process in three dimensions (project and manufacturing), reaching certain proposals that otherwise would be impossible or very tedious and time-consuming to carry out. Information technology proposes a new architectonic language, already experimented in a virtual way, but one that can be made real by means of the computer numeric control. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email affonso@cir.uic.es
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id sigradi2005_473
id sigradi2005_473
authors Oxman, Rivka E.; Ruth Rotenstreich
year 2005
title Digital architecture – Towards a new Discourse
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 473-477
summary Discourse in digital architecture has begun to occupy new design concepts related to digital design. Design concepts are now becoming integrated into the general architectural discourse. This research investigated this process, the emergence, migration, and crystallization of a new conceptual content under the influence of digital design. In order to demonstrate this shift, significant projects were selected to represent features of the expression that reflects the changes and evolution of conceptual content that underlie digital design. This analysis was accomplished employing the ICF analytical framework. Our findings demonstrate the change in the conceptual structure in digital architecture. Certain expressions that are related to digital technology have moved up from a low level descriptive level to a significant conceptual role in formulating current ideational content. The methodology findings and the contribution to the definition of the conceptual content of contemporary discourse in digital architecture are described and presented in this paper.
series SIGRADI
email rivkao@tx.technion.ac.il
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id cf2005_1_66_173
id cf2005_1_66_173
authors RICHENS Paul and NITSCHE Michael
year 2005
title Mindstage: Towards a Functional Virtual Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 331-340
summary Mindstage is a multi-user real-time 3D environment in which is embedded a lecture on film design by Christopher Hobbs. The spatial design follows the structure of the lecture, and is richly illustrated with stills and film clips. The environment, implemented in Virtools, proved to be a visually intriguing combination of architectural, filmic and virtual space, though it was found that co-presence induced some problems with the concept of time.
keywords virtual learning environment, knowledge spatialisation, film design
series CAAD Futures
email pnr12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id acadia07_130
id acadia07_130
authors Satpathy, Lalatendu; Mathew, Anijo Punnen
year 2007
title Smart Housing for the Elderly: Understanding Perceptions and Biases of Rural America
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 130-137
summary It is commonly acknowledged that ‘smart’ environments, interactive architecture and ‘smart’ homes will define the next cutting edge in architectural research. Most critics agree that one of the first problems that ‘smart’ homes will help to address is that of spiraling costs of healthcare and aging-in-place. This may be true for urban settings where there is the financial feasibility for such technologies but what about rural America? It has been conclusively proven that rural America suffers from a lack of healthcare (delivery and access). Prior research (Mathew 2005) has also established that a rural home is different from an urban home. Will technologies designed for the urban home work in a rural setting? And do rural people carry the same attitudes and biases towards technology? This paper continues our research in the design of ‘smart’ rural environments. It summarizes findings from focus group studies conducted in rural communities that help us to understand attitudes of people towards ‘smart’ technology. We will use these findings to examine the feasibility of ubiquitous computing and ‘smart’ spaces in rural areas. In conclusion, we will present guidelines to help designers in the creation of technology to augment healthy aging in rural home settings.
series ACADIA
email lsatpathy@cmu.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id 5b89
id 5b89
authors Sevaldson, Birger
year 2005
title Developing Digital Design Techniques Investigations on Creative Design Computing
source Oslo School of Architecture and Design, PHD-Thesis
summary 1.1. The themes in this theses 16 1.1.1. Mind the mind gap 16 1.1.2. Prologue: The World Center for Human Concerns 17 1.1.3. Creative computer use 26 1.1.4. Design strategies and techniques 31 1.2. Overview 33 1.2.1. Main issues 34 1.2.2. The material 36 1.2.3. The framework of this thesis 37 2. CURRENT STATE AND BACKGROUND 39 2.1. New tools, old thoughts. 39 2.1.1. A misuse strategy 44 2.1.2. Emergence in design 47 2.1.3. Programming and design 50 2.1.4. Artificial intelligence 53 2.1.5. Human intelligence and artificial representations 53 2.2. Electronic dreams 54 2.2.1. The dream of intuitive software 55 2.2.2. The dream of the designing machine 60 2.2.3. The dream of self-emerging architecture; genetic algorithms in design 61 2.2.4. A cultural lag 62 2.3. Ideas and ideology 64 2.3.1. A personal perspective on the theories of the 1990s 65 2.3.2. "The suffering of diagrams" 68 2.3.3. Architectural theory and design methodology 69 2.4. Ideas on creativity 72 2.4.1. What is creativity? 73 2.4.2. Creativity, a cultural phenomenon. 75 2.4.3. Creativity in the information age 79 2.4.4. Creativity-enhancing techniques 81 2.4.5. Crucial fiicro-cultures 82 2.4.6. A proposal for a practitioner approach to creativity 83 2.5. Summary and conclusion of part 2 84 3. NEW DESIGN TECHNIQUES 86 3.1. Introduction 86 3.2. New technology - new strategy 87 3.3. Thinking through design practice: the inspirational playful design approach 88 3.4. A Corner stone: emergence 89 3.4.1. The source material 94 3.5. Recoding, translation and interpretation 95 A case: Tidsrom 97 3.6. Reconfiguring schemata 109 3.7. Rules and games 113 3.8. Virtuality and virtual models 118 3.8.1. What is "The Virtual"? 118 3.8.2. Virtual reality 119 Investigating "the virtual" 120 3.8.3. Analysing the virtual 126 3.9. Visual thinking (diagrams and visual thinking) 130 3.9.1. Visual Thinking and Abstraction. 130 3.9.2. A heuristic process 132 3.9.3. Visual thinking, skills and tacit knowledge 132 3.9.4. Media for visual thinking 133 3.10. Diagrammatic thinking 138 3.10.1. Descriptive diagrams 142 3.10.2. Generative diagrams 144 3.10.3. Versioning 149 3.10.4. Finding 153 3.10.5. Translation and interpretation 158 3.10.6. From generative diagram to program 168 3.10.7. Dynamic generative diagrams 171 3.11. The question of selection 175 3.12. Summary and conclusion of part 3 178 4. WAYS OF WORKING: FROM DESIGN PRACTICE TOWARDS THEORY AND DIGITAL DESIGN METHODS 179 4.1. Introduction 179 4.1.1. Practice-based research 180 4.1.2. Visual material is central. 180 4.1.3. Two investigation paths 180 4.1.4. Achievements 180 4.2. Methods 181 4.2.1. Explorative and generative research 182 4.2.2. A first-person approach 183 4.2.3. Analysis 184 4.2.4. The Material 185 4.3. Systematising creative computer use. Ways of working; techniques in creative computer use. 186 4.3.1. Categorization 186 4.3.2. Mapping the field of design computing. 187 4.3.3. Generic techniques 190 4.3.4. Specific techniques 192 4.3.5. Table of techniques 193 4.3.6. Examples of techniques 200 4.3.7. Traces of technology. 213 4.4. The further use of the generated material 219 4.4.1. Realisation strategies 221 4.4.2. Templates and scaffolds 223 4.5. Summary of Part 4 240 PART 5. WAYS OF THINKING: INTENTIONS IN CREATIVE COMPUTER USE. 241 5.1. Intentions 241 5.1.1. Categorising intentions 242 5.2. Intention themes 243 5.2.1. Cases and samples from Group one: Formal, phenomenal, spatial and geometrical themes 244 5.2.2. Intentions of response to the complexity of urban systems 297 5.3. The Hybrid Process 317 5.3.1. Hybridization strategies 319 5.3.2. The hybrid process and its elements. 328 6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 344 6.1. Principles, concepts and methods for creative design computing 344 6.2. A new type of creativity? 348 6.3. A practice as the field for an investigation 349 6.4. Suggestions for further studies 349
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
last changed 2007/04/08 14:11

_id sigradi2005_235
id sigradi2005_235
authors Soza Ruiz, Pedro; Leonardo Céspedes Mandujano
year 2005
title Towards a self-made digital platform
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 235-239
summary In the superior education, the repercussions of the new technologies, has becoming a irreversible process, who engages all the aspects of it. E-learning, Chat, Forums, Blogs, etc, are concepts handled by all the students and academic community of our universities, this discussion and it matters has even becoming a national debate. In this paper we will talk about the decisions for adopt and develop an e-learning platform more conveniently to the necessity of the students and the academic purposes of the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism of the University of Chile. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email psoza@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

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