CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 617

_id acadia06_542
id acadia06_542
authors Faulders, Thom
year 2006
title Airspace Tokyo
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 542-543
summary Airspace Tokyo is designed to establish a screened buffer zone - a thin, super-compact artificial “yard” that protects the building’s occupants from the pressing context of the dense urban environment outside. The new white, minimalist four-story building, designed by a Tokyo architect, is a stacked four unit multi-family dwelling with a garage and two large professional photography studios for lease on its ground floor. Located in the Ota-ku area of the city, the site was previously occupied by the owner with a sprawling residence that was wrapped by a layer of dense vegetation, and was unique in a city where open space is rare amidst the high demand for built space. Since the entire site is to now be razed to accommodate construction for the new and much larger development, the design intention for the screen is to invent an architectural system that performs with similar attributes to the demolished green strip and creates an atmospheric zone of protection. In effect, the demolished two meters of setback width of open ground space is now to be reduced into a new zone with a width of only 20 cm.
series ACADIA
email thom@beigedesign.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id cf2011_p163
id cf2011_p163
authors Park, Hyoung-June
year 2011
title Mass-Customization in the Design of 4,000 Bus Stops
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 265-278.
summary In Hawaii, ‚"TheBus‚" has been a main transportation system since 1971. Considering the high cost of living in Hawaii and the absence of a rail system, the use of ‚"TheBus‚" has been an instrumental vein of the city life in Honolulu with rhythmical pauses at about 4,000 bus stops in Honolulu. However, existing undifferentiated bus stops are developed from a cost effective mass production system so that they have been problematic for satisfying specific needs from various site conditions. In this research, an integrated computational method of mass-customization for designing 4,000 bus stops is introduced. According to various site conditions, the design of each bus stop is customized. Unlike the mass‚Äêproduced bus stops commonly seen in cities today, the proposed computational method in this paper produces bus stop design outcomes that fit into the physical characteristics of the location in which they are installed. Mass-customization allows for the creation and production of unique or similar buildings and building components, differentiated through digitally‚Äêcontrolled variation (Kolarevic, 2003). The employment of a computational mass‚Äêcustomization in architectural design extends the boundary of design solutions to the satisfaction of multi-objective requirements and unlimited freedom to search alternative solutions (Duarte, 2001; Caldas, 2006). The computational method developed in this paper consists of 1) definition of a prototype, 2) parametric variation, 3) manual deformation, and 4) simulation based deformation. The definition of a prototype is the development of a basic design to be transformed for satisfying various conditions given from a site. In this paper, the bus stop prototype is developed from the analysis of more than 300 bus stops and the categorization of the existing bus stops according to their physical conditions, contextual conditions, climatic conditions, and existing amenities. Based upon the outcome of the analysis, the design variables of a bus stop prototype are defined. Those design variables then guide the basic physical parameters for changing the physical configuration of the prototype according to a given site. From this, many possible design outcomes are generated as instances for further developments. The process of manual deformation is where the designer employs its intuition to develop the selected parametric variation. The designer is compelled to think about the possible implication derived from formal variation. This optional process allows every design decision to have a creative solution from an individual designer with an incidental quality in aesthetics, but substantiated functional quality. Finally the deformation of the selection is guided and controlled by the influence of sun direction/ exposure to the selection. The simulation based deformation starts with the movement of the sun as the trigger for generating the variations of the bus stop prototype. The implementation of the computational method was made within the combination of MEL (Maya Enbedded Language), autodesk MAYA and Ecotect environment.
keywords mass-customization, parametric variation, simulation based deformation
series CAAD Futures
email hjpark@hawaii.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2006_paper23
id ascaad2006_paper23
authors Ali, Rasha
year 2006
title Islamic Architecture and Digital Databases
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Epigraphy in Islamic architecture represented an indispensable element in its conceptual design and structure. Our research investigates this unique role, which epigraphy played in Islamic architecture as a tool singularizing this architecture and the sensuality it inspires inside a building while bestowing on it its particular identity. This how SADEPIG came to being: it is a virtual database regrouping all the information about the monumental epigraphy which date from the Sa‘dian period in Morocco (1527- 1660). The digital corpus of monumental Sa‘dian inscriptions provides also buildings plans, virtual tour within the monument, construction details, information about the identity of patron and builders.
series ASCAAD
email ruchii@aucegypt.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_232
id acadia06_232
authors Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak
year 2006
title Bidirectional Interoperability Between CAD and Energy Performance Simulation Through Virtual Model System Framework
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 232-250
summary The paper describes a novel approach involving interoperability, data modeling technology, and application of the building information model (BIM) focused on sustainable architecture. They share relationships and multiple experiences that have existed for years but have never have been proven. This interoperability of building performance simulation maps building information and parametric models with energy simulation models, establishing a seamless link between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and energy performance simulation software. During the last four decades, building designers have utilized information and communication technologies to create environmental representations to communicate spatial concepts or designs and to enhance spaces. Most architectural firms still rely on hand labor, drafted drawings, construction documents, specifications, schedules and work plans in traditional means. 3D modeling has been used primarily as a rendering tool, not as the actual representation of the project.With this innovative digitally exchange technology, architects and building designers can visually analyze dynamic building energy performance in response to changes of climate and building parameters. This software interoperability provides full data exchange bidirectional capabilities, which significantly reduces time and effort in energy simulation and data regeneration. Data mapping and exchange are key requirements for building more powerful energy simulations. An effective data model is the bidirectional nucleus of a well-designed relational database, critical in making good choices in selecting design parameters and in gaining and expanding a comprehensive understanding of existing data flows throughout the simulation process, making data systems for simulation more powerful, which has never been done before. Despite the variety of energy simulation applications in the lifecycle of building design and construction projects, there is a need for a system of data integration to allow seamless sharing and bidirectional reuse of data.
series ACADIA
email pongsak_archenergy@sbcglobal.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ddss2006-pb-51
id DDSS2006-PB-51
authors Dino Borri, Giovanni Circella, Michele Ottomanelli, and Domenico Sassanelli
year 2006
title Optimization of Choice Modelling in Complex Urban Contexts - Applications in planning for sustainable development
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 51-66
summary This paper focuses on the capabilities of choice models in assisting planners in the development of transport policies and interventions for strategic transport planning for urban systems. Models are looked at as part of a decision support system for the development of transport measures for sustainable mobility. The use of participation is looked at as a tool for the understanding of the real needs in terms of mobility in the complex contemporary society and for the construction of the future transport scenarios and transport alternatives.
keywords Choice modelling, Behavioural models, Uncertainty, Sustainable development
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id sigradi2006_e171c
id sigradi2006_e171c
authors González Böhme, Luis Felipe and Vargas Cárdenas, Bernardo
year 2006
title Foundations for a Constraint-Based Floor Plan Layout Support in Participatory Planning of Low-Income Housing
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 283-287
summary We introduce the foundations of a novel approach that deals with constraint-based design methods to supporting participatory planning processes of low-income dwellings. We examine the space allocation problem inside the architectural domain on the basis of graph theory and combinatorics, providing a concise mathematical background for an implementation strategy called FLS (Floor plan Layout Support), which is analyzed here for the first time regarding this particular context of application. The philosophy underlying a design method that is mainly driven by the formulation of distinct constraints suggests to avoid the traditional procedure of first to create a yet not necessarily valid instance of the eventual design solution by directly choosing specific parameter values of its shape, and later on to evaluate its validity by confronting the designed model to a set of applicable constraints. Instead, constraint-based design poses a search procedure that operates in a space of planning-relevant constraint sets. The FLS methodology integrates some few principles of constraint-based automated reasoning with high user interactivity, into a design environment where as much dwellers as planners can collaboratively work in solving spatial organization problems of housing projects. The FLS model of application makes use of a combination of dweller-specified constraints, planning and zoning regulations, and a small library of modular space units. Constraint-based design ! methods are particularly capable of supplying efficient support for the collaborative involvement of dwellers into the architectural programming process of her/his own home. Mainly, because dwellers themselves tend to describe their space need and design intentions as a set of constraints on room quantity, space utilization, circulation system, allocation of available furniture, available budget, construction time, and so forth. The goal is to achieve an integrated tool for finding and modelling topologically valid solutions for floor plan layout alternatives, by combining user-driven interactive procedures with automatic search and generative processes. Thus, several design alternatives can be explored in less time and with less effort than using mainstream procedures of architectural practice. A FLS implementation will constitute one system module of a larger integrated system model called Esther. A FLS tool shall interact with other functional modules, like e.g. the BDS (Building Bulk Design Support), which also uses constraint-based design methods. A preliminary procedural model for the FLS was tested on Chile’s official social housing standards (Chilean Building Code – OGUC. Art. 6.4.1) which are very similar to most Latin American housing programs currently in operation.
keywords constraint-based design; floor plan layout; participatory planning; low-income housing; design theory; design proces
series SIGRADI
email bernardo.vargas@bauing.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id caadria2006_593
id caadria2006_593
authors GUI-HYUN LEE, EUN-JOO SIN, SO-YOUNG KIM, SUNG–HO WOO, SOON-BUM LIM
year 2006
title REPRESENTATION TECHNIQUE FOR STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF 3D CONSTRUCTION MODEL
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 593-595
summary With the recent developments in computer technology studies on how to digitally restore traditional buildings to their original state are being pursued. It is highly important that the public can be educated by digitally restoring these buildings online and/or offline. However, it is necessary to develop several techniques to understand a structural order and construction process in traditional buildings. We propose new techniques that we can better understand them and fit them into society in the education and the publicity.
series CAADRIA
email ghlee@sookmyung.ac.kr, kiki75@sookmyung.ac.kr, sykim712@sookmyung.ac.kr, shwoo@sookmyung.ac.kr, sblim@sookmyung.ac.kr
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id c7e6
id c7e6
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2006
title Digital Tools for Sustainable Revitalization of Buildings - Finding new Utilizations through Destructive and Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source Proceedings of the International Conference on Urban, Architectural and Technical Aspects of the Renewal of the Countryside IV., Bratislava, May 2006
summary In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote the poem “The Raven”, an act full of poetry, love, passion, mourning, melancholia and death. In his essay “The Theory of Composition” which was published in 1846 Poe proved that the poem is based on an accurate mathematical description. Not only in literature are structures present that are based on mathematics. In the work of famous musicians, artists or architects like Bach, Escher or Palladio it is evident that the beauty and clarity of their work as well as its traceability has often been reached through the use of intrinsic mathematic coherences. If suchlike structures could be described within architecture, their mathematical abstraction could supplement “The Theory of Composition” of a building. This research focuses on an approach to describe layout principles of existing buildings in the form of mathematical rules. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e. a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a design problem, two exemplary methods will be described to apply new utilizations to existing buildings through the use of these rules.
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 12:06

_id 73ae
id 73ae
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2006
title Revitalization of Existing Buildings through Sustainable Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source GBEN 2006, Global Built Environment Network: Towards an Integrated Approach for Sustainability, P. 181-189
summary The revitalisation of existing buildings is getting more and more important. We are facing a situation where in many cases there is no need to design new buildings because an increasing number of existing buildings is not used anymore. The most ecological procedure to revitalise these buildings would be through a continuous usage and by making few or no alterations to the stock. Thus, the modus operandi could be named a “non-destructive” approach. From the architects’ point of view, non-destructive redesign of existing buildings is time-consuming and complex. The methodology we developed to aid architects in solving such tasks is based on exchanging or swapping utilisation of specific rooms to converge in a design solution. With the aid of mathematical rules, which will be executed by the use of a computer, solutions to floor space relocation problems will be generated. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e., a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve such problems.
keywords Revitalisation, Optimisation, Floor Space Relocation, Constraint Programming
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 11:57

_id acadia06_064
id acadia06_064
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2006
title Synthetic Making
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 64-67
summary Various approaches of virtual and physical modeling have led to a synthetic form of making that is plastic and scalable in nature. This shift from traditional forms of representing and generating architecture now offers a better possibility of full-scale construction and fabrication processes and links transparently to industry. Architects are beginning to dynamically inform the visioning processes of assemblies and design through a range of precise subassemblies. Further to this end, the synthetic techniques and materials are opening up avenues for designers to investigate a range of fibers and fabrics that radically transform light and color renditions, and texture. Investigations in the realm of traditional materials such as stone, wood, and concrete continue to evolve, as do their associated methods of making. As a result of synthetic technologies, architects today have the possibility to work along side industry engineers and professionals to design castings, moldings, patterns, and tools that challenge not only the architectural work of art, but industrial and product design as well. This cultural shift from physical space to virtual space back to physical space and the combination of hand-, digital-, and robotic-making offers a unique juxtaposition of the built artifact to its manufacturing that challenges both spatial conventions and also the levels of precision and tolerance by which buildings are assembled. Traditional forms of documentation for example result typically in discrepancies between the drawn and the actualized which are now challenged by the level of precision and tolerance at the virtual level. It is within this context that leading-edge architects and designers operate today. Yet, how the profession and the academy respond to these opportunities remains an open line of inquiry and addressing these concerns opens up the rich potential enabled through synthetic making.
series ACADIA
email gregory.luhan@uky.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_261
id acadia06_261
authors Lömker, Thorsten M.
year 2006
title Revitalization of Existing Buildings through Sustainable Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 261-268
summary The revitalization of existing buildings is gaining importance. We are facing a development where, in many cases, there is no need to design new buildings because an increasing number of existing buildings are not used anymore. The most ecological procedure to revitalize these buildings would be through a continued usage and by making few or no alterations to the stock. Thus, the modus operandi could be called a “non-destructive” approach.From the architect’s point of view, non-destructive redesign of existing buildings is time-consuming and complex. The methodology we developed to aid architects in solving such tasks is based on exchanging or swapping utilization of specific rooms in order to reach a design solution. With the aid of mathematical rules, which will be executed by the use of a computer, solutions to floor space relocation problems will be generated. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e., a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve such problems.The design of the model developed is related to problems in logistics (e.g., the loading in trans-shipment centers). The model does not alter geometric proportions or locations of rooms, but solely changes their occupancy such that a new usage could be applied to the building. From our point of view, non-destructive models can play an important role in floor space relocation processes. Our examinations demonstrate that new patterns of utilization could be found through the use of this model.
series ACADIA
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2007/11/27 07:22

_id ddss2006-pb-253
id DDSS2006-PB-253
authors R. Di Giulio, M. Coccagna, and G. Tonelli
year 2006
title IT Tools for the Valorisation of the Building Heritage - Analysis and reuse of rural buildings to improve cultural-tourism activities
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 253-268
summary According to the valorisation of sustainable policies, many European countries developed common or individual strategies to preserve and exploit their environmental and building heritage. Through the VILLAS transnational project it has been possible to create a set of specific tools, focused on different user types and needs that are easy to be combined and applied to assess and valorise private and public building heritage.
keywords Design support tools, Geographical information systems (GIS), Multi-criteria & decision mapping, Networks for decision-making
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id caadria2006_495
id caadria2006_495
authors R. SATO, W. YEO, A. KAGA, M. OYAMA
year 2006
title NEW METHODS FOR URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE USING THE VR TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 495-501
summary Urban plan and architecture require the use of VR systems. We adapted the buildings into a VR system, and then performed a virtual realization in the world’s largest dome at Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Walking or flying through life-size space was enabled. We viewed the planned future scenes that featured real size, space composition, and a simulated environment. The construction, the materials and colors of the building were examined. In addition, VR system on PC was applied to city planning and architectural design and a number of novel functions were added to the VR system by plug-in, which assisted and facilitated the design process. The stereoscopic thinking mode in 3-D space can inspire and comprehend more directly the ideas of design, and confirm the intended effects. We accordingly carried out a further study on users operating the VR system to investigate their responses of “like” or “dislike” towards the real time adjustments of design effect at identical viewpoints. Fractals analysis was conducted to demonstrate physically the influence of real time 3-dimentional design and presentation on the psychological trends of subjective judgment. Our findings pave the way for future research on monitoring psychological impacts on observers of VR system during design process.
series CAADRIA
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id 2006_268
id 2006_268
authors Rajala, Marko and Hannu Penttilä
year 2006
title Testing 3D Building Modelling Framework In Building Renovation
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 268-275
summary The paper describes a process where digital measuring survey data is transferred into 3D building model to be used as a foundation for renovation design. The process and method is tested in a case study of an office building of 8 floors. Measuring survey data is more often documented to 2D plan drawings, whereas 3D-modelling was more preferable in the case project. The final aim of the case project is to further test building product model or building information model (BIM) based design methods in building renovation. Product modelling is one emerging framework to manage building related information in contemporary design & construction. Model based methods are more commonly used in new buildings, whereas renovation is usually done with more traditional techniques. Case project results underline the importance of measuring and modelling definition phase. Measuring and documenting objectives for 3D-model based design work are different than for traditional design work. Measuring survey has to be done under the coordination of the designer participants. Selecting and informing the proper and capable surveying partners is also important.
keywords 3D modelling; product modelling; building information modelling BIM; renovation; measuring surveys
series eCAADe
email marko.rajala@hut.fi
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ijac20064407
id ijac20064407
authors Sass, Lawrence; Botha, Marcel
year 2006
title The Instant House:A Model of Design Production with Digital Fabrication
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 109-123
summary Through a novel design production system, we have developed the ability to produce highly customized wood framed buildings for rural communities in need of designed environments. A definitive need exists for a system that rapidly deploys small buildings such as schools, small hospitals and houses while tailored for a specific design within a community. This paper describes the relationship of digital fabrication to materials and rules for design and fabrication. By example, this paper presents a process of construction of a small house on-site from an initial computer model in sequential stages. Our case study in this paper will express possibilities with digital fabrication for building with designed variation.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00008
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id bsct_tsiopoulou
id bsct_tsiopoulou
authors Tsiopoulou, Chamaidi
year 2006
title Calibrated Sky Luminance Maps for Daylight Simulation
source Vienna University of Technology; Building Science & Technology
summary Building design and control applications can benefit from daylight simulation. Sky models help to model the sky conditions and predict the availability of daylight in indoor environments. Sky luminance is changing according to the weather, the season of the year and the time of the day, therefore it is difficult to create an accurate sky model. The simplified models that are currently used for computational simulation do not take into account these constant changes. It is important to test if there is the possibility of creating a sky model that approaches the characteristics of real sky and provides the architects with more precise daylight predictions. As past research has demonstrated, relatively low-cost sky luminance mapping via digital imaging can provide an alternative to highly sophisticated sky scanners and support the provision of information on sky luminance distribution patterns on a more pervasive basis. The aim of this research is first to explore the potential of deriving sky luminance distribution maps based on digital imaging and then to test their efficiency for the prediction of indoor daylight. A comparison is made between the predictions based on existing sky models (CIE Standard Skies and Perez All-weather sky) and the camera-based sky model. Thus, the effects of the selection of the sky model on indoor daylighting prediction are explored. A set of measurements were performed at the roof of the TU Vienna in order to obtain the necessary data. The horizontal illuminance levels due to 12 sky sectors were measured with the help of a sky monitoring device. A scale (1:5) model of an architectural space was used to measure the indoor illuminance values with the help of three sensors. At the same time, images of the sky were obtained with the help of a digital camera with a fish-eye converter. Luminance values were derived from the images and four calibration methods were used to generate accurate sky luminance distribution maps. These variously calibrated luminance values were then compared with the corresponding photometric measurements. Finally, the application of a digitally derived sky model based on the best calibration method was compared with the other two sky models toward the prediction of indoor illuminance levels using the case of the scale model. The results demonstrated that the camera-based sky model was more reliable than the other two sky models. It was concluded that digital imaging combined with parallel photometric calibration can provide a valuable means for a real-time generation of sky luminance maps. Detailed sky luminance models can be generated and their application can increase the predictive accuracy of the computational daylight prediction tools. Moreover, the reliability of daylight simulation can be increased toward supporting the design process and the operation of daylighting systems in buildings.
keywords Daylight simulation; sky luminance mapping; digital imaging; sky models.
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email buildingscience@tuwien.ac.at
more http://cec.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/07/02 20:33

_id d715
id d715
authors Verdy Kwee, Antony Radford, Dean Bruton
year 2006
title Educative Visuals – Digital Delivery of Architectural Information for (potential) Heritage Buildings
source Eurographics Symposium Proceedings
summary The paper proposes models that address current issues and considerations at several key levels relating to treatment of architectural information, its presentation and delivery methods specific to architecture education requirements. It investigates fundamental digital communication strategies for the understanding of architec-tural work of heritage or potential heritage values, highlighting how digital simulations in particular could complement other media such as texts, drawings and photographs to facilitate an understanding of design. It proposes dynamic visual layering system of information and information types relating to site, construction, mate-rials, textures, design philosophy, etc, while also taking into account feedback from the intended audience.

The architectural work featured as an example is of high potential heritage value - an area of special interest in the context of a country with a relatively short architectural history as Australia. The information depicted in the model has a role to supplement a site visit or to communicate independently to the much larger audience who are unable to visit the site.

Although the paper does not insist on definite or final prescriptive techniques for the delivery of architectural information of heritage or potential heritage values, it suggests a possibility of standardisation in this area with features and considerations that need to be firstly addressed.

keywords heritage, representation, architectural information, visualisation, education
series other
type normal paper
email verdy.kwee@adelaide.edu.au
more http://www.eg.org/EG/DL/WS/VG01/info.html
last changed 2006/12/08 06:00

_id ddss2006-pb-153
id DDSS2006-PB-153
authors Linda Ma, Theo Arentze, Aloys Borgers, and Harry Timmermans
year 2006
title A Multi-Agent Model for Generating Local Land-Use Plans in the Context of an Urban Planning Support System
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 153-168
summary In a multi-player urban planning process, the outcome of any individual decision of the actors is uncertain until a state where the plan is satisfactory for all. To support the plan generation phase, this paper develops a generic multi-agent system, in which agents represent particular land-uses. In the system, agents higher in the hierarchy have priority over agents lower in the hierarchy to claim units of land. This one-direction claim process may result in a plan that is not optimal for every agent. The system, therefore, allows agents to revise their plans in an iterative procedure. A case study illustrates centralized, semi-centralized and decentralized solutions for a plan area based on the outcomes of different strategies used by facility agents (retail, green, schools) and a housing agent. The results show that the proposed system is able to generate rational and realistic plan alternatives for new residential areas.
keywords Multi-agent system, Planning support system, Plan alternative, Land use planning
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ascaad2006_paper3
id ascaad2006_paper3
authors Luesche, Andreas and Salim Elwazani
year 2006
title Adapting Digital Technologies to Architectural Education Need
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Adapting digital technologies to architecture school settings is a topic of universal interest. Properly construed, adapting digital technologies to architectural education emanates from philosophical underpinnings. For architectural programs, the scientific-artistic attribute notion can be a powerful reference for mapping program mission, goals, and curriculum. A program plan developed with scientific-artistic attributes of performance in mind can tap on the use of digital media from the perspective that the media has scientific-artistic characteristics itself. Implementation of digital technologies adaptation can be challenged, among other things, by scarcity in resources. This paper focuses on the role of digital equipment resources in adaptation. A case in point is the use of digital technologies at the Architecture and Environmental Design Studies (Arch/EDS) Program of Bowling Green State University. The study considered the utilization by the third and fourth year design studio students of the digital resources at the Center for Applied Technology, a College based, but University wide serving unit. The objective of the study was to build up a theoretical understanding of the adaptation problem and come up with strategy guidelines for adapting digital media resources to architectural education. A survey of students and interviews with the Center’s personnel were methods used to collect data. The study has placed the adaptation problem in a philosophical context, turned out a set of theoretical generalizations about digital utilization, and suggested strategy adaptive guidelines. Beyond facilitating adaptation specific to the Arch/EDS Program, the results of the study are bound to affect digital adaptation in a general sense.
series ASCAAD
email selwaza@bgnet.bgsu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddss2006-hb-341
id DDSS2006-HB-341
authors Usama El Fiky and Mark Cox
year 2006
title Culturally Accepted Green Architecture Toolbox - Pre-design helping tool and rating system for new built environment in Egypt
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 341-356
summary This paper describes and analyses the process of developing computer software to incorporate both green architecture design strategies and their cultural indicators in one easy tool to help a designer to match his / her design with green architectural principles in the pre-design stage. The three resources of architectural identity in Egyptian, current and past green building practices with the up to date foreign knowledge of green architecture were combined in one toolbox with their building cultural indicators in Egypt. Using the toolbox in primary design stage helps the designer by providing more information about each green design strategy, how to use it effectively. Finally, the toolbox provides indicators about how much the whole project will be accepted in Egyptian society and to what extend it applies green architectural principles. For verification reason, the toolbox was tested with two groups of students in Egypt and The Netherlands as well as professional architects from both countries.
keywords Software program, Building culture, Green architecture
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

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