CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 116

_id acadia06_278
id acadia06_278
authors Mathew, Anijo
year 2006
title Aesthetic Interaction A Model for Re-thinking the Design of Place
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 278-291
summary We live in a landscape of digital information and communication. Digital technology finds pervasive application in many aspects of modern habitable spaces— environmental control systems, internet based systems for information exchange, cellular systems for instant communication, and the list goes on. In fact, recent Intel studies show that every day we encounter at least 150 different computing devices in our living environments. As computing initiatives evolve intelligent devices that work in the background of our day to day living, several questions arise about how we interact with these devices. The design of “smart” places will eventually involve the seamless integration of both the physical and virtual. Such interventions will lead to a transformation in the way we design. Architects will increasingly find themselves using the computer in design as opposed to design. Over the last few years our lab has been working on several projects, from the level of a room to the level of urban design, that use embedded interactivity and computing as part of the design. This paper describes three such projects, completed at different times, which deal with different problems and the overall impact of computing on the way the designs were developed. The description and evaluation of these projects will be used to develop a theory for the use of pragmatist aesthetics for “information interchange” within architectural design. In short, the paper will explore the evolution of Computer “Aided” Design from a model for designing architecture to a model for designing computing within architecture through aesthetic interaction.
series ACADIA
email amathew@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2006_paper11
id ascaad2006_paper11
authors Stanton, Michael
year 2006
title Redemptive Technologies II: the sequel (A Decade Later)
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Nearly ten years ago I published an article in the Dutch journal ARCHIS called "Redemptive Technologies." It derived from comments I made during a conference held in New Orleans in 1994. At that point the machine aesthetic associated with the "new technologies" generated by the computer had not established a precise formal vocabulary but were generating great excitement among the architectural avant-garde. It addressed the limits of the imagery and data produced by this machine and the simple but very political problem of cost and obsolescence. Now the millennium is well past and the somewhat apostolic fervor that accompanied the interaction of a very expensive consumer device with architecture has cooled. Discussion has generally moved from the titillating possibilities opened up by the device, many of which have so far not come to pass, to the sorts of hard and software available. An architectural language closely associated with the imagistic potential of new programs, biomorphism, has now come and gone on the runways of architectural taste. And yet, in recent articles rejecting the direct political effect of architectural work, the potential of new programs and virtual environments are proposed as alternative directions that our perpetually troubled profession may pursue. This paper will assess the last decade regarding the critical climate that surrounds cyber/technology. In the economic context of architectural education in which computers are still a central issue, the political issues that evolve will form a backdrop to any discussion. Furthermore, the problem of the "new" language of biomorphism will be reiterated as an architectural grammar with a 100-year history - from Catalan Modernismo and Art Nouveau, through Hermann Finsterlin and Eric Mendelsohn's projects of the 1920s, to Giovanni Michelucci and Italian work of the post-war, to Frederick Kiesler's Endless House of the late '50s, continuing through moments of Deconstructivism and Architectural Association salients, etc. These forms continue to be semantically simplistic and hard to make. Really the difference is the neo-avant-garde imagery and rhetoric involved in their continuing resurrection. Computer images, but also the ubiquitous machine itself, are omnipresent and often their value is assumed without question or proposed as a remedy for issues they cannot possibly address. This paper will underline the problem of the computer, of screens and the insistent imagistic formulas encourage by their use, and the ennui that is beginning to pervade the discipline after initial uncritical enthusiasm for this very powerful and expensive medium. But it will also propose other very valuable directions, those relating to reassessing the processes rather than the images that architecture engages, that this now aging "new" technology can much more resolutely and successfully address.
series ASCAAD
email ms22@aub.edu.lb
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2016_013
id ascaad2016_013
authors Belkis Öksüz, Elif
year 2016
title Parametricism for Urban Aesthetics - A flawless order behind chaos or an over-design of complexity
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 105-112
summary Over the last decade, paradigm shifts in the philosophy of space-time relations, the change from space-time to spatio-temporality, caused significant changes in the design field, and introduced new variations and discourses for parametric approaches in architecture. Among all the discourses, parametricism is likely the most spectacular one. The founder of parametricism, Patrik Schumacher (2009) describes it as “a new style,” which has “the superior capacity to articulate programmatic complexity;” and “aesthetically, it is the elegance of ordered complexity in the sense of seamless fluidity.” In its theoretical background, Schumacher (2011) affiliates this style with the philosophy of autopoiesis, the philosophy that stands between making and becoming. Additionally, parametricism concerns not only the physical geometry in making of form; but also discusses the relational and causal aspects in becoming of form. In other words, it brings the aesthetic qualities in making through the topological intelligence behind becoming. Regarding that, parametricism seems an effective way of managing /creating complex topologies in form-related issues. However, when it comes to practice, there are some challenging points of parametricism in large-scale design studies. Thus, this work underlines that the dominance of elegance for urban planning has the potential of limiting the flexible and dynamic topology of the urban context, and objectifying the whole complex urban form as an over-designed product. For an aesthetic inquiry into urban parametricism, this paper highlights the challenging issues behind the aesthetic premises of parametricism at the urban design scale. For that, Kartal Master Plan Design Proposal by Zaha Hadid Architects (2006) will be discussed as an exemplary work.
series ASCAAD
email elifb8807@gmail.com
last changed 2017/05/25 11:31

_id acadia06_440
id acadia06_440
authors Bell, Brad
year 2006
title The Aggregate of Continuum
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 440-454
summary The Traversable Matrix (Fig. 1.) illustrates the iterative fragments that comprise the continuum of exploration for a digital aesthetic and digital tectonic. These non-hierarchical fragments operate as footholds across a larger tessellated landscape of current digital design explorations. In seeking an organizational strategy, we attempt to move laterally across a variety of examples, texts, and illustrations. Each short excerpt is a partial architecture illustrating deeper issues in the current discussion of digital fabrication. Though counter to conventional academic inquiry, the associative approach can help frame the matrix; the synthetic landscape traversed becomes less linear, less framed but no less interconnected and cohesive. The patterning of complex geometries, the production of ornament, the leveraging of digital fabrication against standard forms of material and construction practices, and the acute emphasis on surface all serve as the aggregate to a broader spectrum of architectural thinking and architectural making.Introduction: The Traversable Matrix
series ACADIA
email bbell@uta.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_656
id 2006_656
authors Breen, Jack and Martijn Stellingwerff
year 2006
title De-coding the Vernacular - Dynamic Representation Approaches to Case-based Compositional Study
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 656-663
summary Representational approaches have always played an important role in the design-driven development of built environments, the analytical study of architectural compositions and their effects. With the introduction – and successive steady development – of computer-based platforms of visualization, the professional and intellectual palette of designers, as well as researchers, have expanded considerably. Nonetheless, in recent years the opportunities for systematic scrutiny and understanding of the expressive qualities of design proposals and artefacts have all too frequently been overshadowed by high-flying conceptual developments and seductive representation modes. It is time that the objective description and unravelling of architectural compositions – so to speak the discipline of Ekphrasis in design practice, education and research – is once again given more prominence in architectural discourse and debate. The central idea behind this contribution is that, by linking instruments of design with the methods of formal composition and decomposition, renewed opportunities for representation-driven study in a scholarly context, focusing upon elusive compositional attributes and their workings, may be given a new impulse. The project that is presented here concerns a case-based explorative study into the domains of aesthetic convention and invention, making use of a variety of virtual and physical representation techniques. These include digital as well as tangible modelling and sketching approaches (separately and in combination), in conjunction with computer-based image manipulation techniques, making use of systematic data identification and denotation. The opportunities, merits and shortcomings of the computer-based and physical visualization approaches, which were applied and tested, are discussed on the basis of results and findings from the ongoing AA Variations project.
keywords Design representation; Computer-based sketching; Virtual and physical modelling; Compositional variation; Contemporary aesthetics
series eCAADe
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_c169c
id sigradi2006_c169c
authors Culagovski Rubio, Rodrigo and Guevara S., Sebastián
year 2006
title Arquitectura, Datos y Forma: Una primera aproximacion instrumental. [Architecture, data and form: A first instrumental approach]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 268-272
summary The production of forms via iterative computational processes allows designers to operate on datasets that would be to large to be managed via traditional analog methods. This fact opens the door to new aesthetic and formal experimentation as well as attempts to reference or influence large scale phenomena such as geographical or network based sitatuations. This document presents the results of a series of investigations into the creation of algorithmic and parametric methods or instruments that could inform architectural practice. The work was done by the authors within the Masters of Architecture Program of the Catholic University of Chile.
series SIGRADI
email rodrigo.cr@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id sigradi2006_e145a
id sigradi2006_e145a
authors Heiss, Leah
year 2006
title Empathy over distance: Wearables as tools for augmenting Remote Emotional Connection
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 66-69
summary Mainstream communication modes emphasise network speed, connection access, resolution, portability, and aesthetic design as primary to the success of their products. Within this vision a three by four centimetre screen and high resolution display are deemed adequate to emulate the intensities and complexities of face-to-face connection with loved ones. They allow us to ‘be there with you’ from wherever we might be. Yet interpersonal communication is a massively complex phenomenon. It involves a plethora of micro-activities which occur at a physical, physiological, and psychological level allowing us to recognise at a cellular scale intention, motive and emotional authenticity. Our conscious and non-conscious involvement in spatially collocated communication is substantial due to these myriad channels of real-time bi-directional information transfer. While contemporary communications technologies have the capacity to mediate our relationships, they fall short of encouraging the richness of spatially co-present interaction. The research discussed in this paper investigates the potential expansion of remote connection when electronically enhanced apparel is incorporated into the communications mix. Rather than pursuing the manifold functionalities of traditional communications media the garments discussed focus solely on the goal of enhancing empathy between physically distant individuals. This paper reports on the development and testing of a range of garments that conduct presence information between remotely located people. The garments sense, process, transmit and receive the heartbeat wavelength (ECG). They are enabled with ECG sensors, signal processing equipment, small vibration motors, and radio transceivers which allow users to ‘feel’ the heartbeat of a remote friend/lover/relative as vibration through their garment. The prototypes aim to enrich the remote communications experience through reintroducing an embodied, tactile dimension that is present in face-to-face communication. A range of user testing trials will be discussed which have been undertaken to assess the impact of the garments at a conscious and a non-conscious level. Conscious experiences were gauged through qualitative testing, by way of interviews and unsolicited written reactions, which have provided a range of engaging emotional responses. Non-conscious physiological reactions were assessed by recording ECG throughout user-testing periods. This data has been processed using HRV (heart rate variability) analysis software, running on MatLab. Preliminary results suggest that users have strong conscious and non-conscious reactions to the experience of wearing the prototype garments. The paper will describe the data processing techniques and findings of the user testing trials. The development of biosignal sensing garments has raised a range of issues including: innovative potentials for embedded peripheral awareness media; the expansion of the classical body to incorporate remotely sensed information; the issue of data semantics and the development of intensely personal non-verbal languages; and the issue of corporeal privacy when one’s biological information is exposed for potential download. They also bring into question how our bodily experiences might change when we incorporate remote sensory systems.
keywords Enabled apparel; emotional tools; biosignals
series SIGRADI
email leah.heiss@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2014_047
id sigradi2014_047
authors Igansi Nunes, Joăo Fernando
year 2014
title PréCRIAR - ProGRAMAR : Por Uma Estética Da Interface Computational
source SiGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 429-432
summary Definitions of Computational Aesthetics from the metric measurement of algorithmic mathematical language will be treated here under the concepts of: Aesthetic Measures by Birkhoff (1928); Information-, Generativ-, Abstract- and Experimental-Aesthetic by Bense (1965); Aesthetic of algorithmic by Stiny and Gips (1978); Endo-Aesthetic by Claudia Giannetti (2005); and, Maximizing Transfer of Struture and Maximizing Recoverability of the Generative Operations by Leyton (2006). The methodological approach to issues of practice and theory used is the main concepts of the relationship between author / reader on the perspective of Arts and Design with Computational Science.
keywords Interface; Computational; Aesthetic
series SIGRADI
email fernandoigansi@mac.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 2006_046
id 2006_046
authors Karoussos, Katerina
year 2006
title Imagineering-A phenomenology of image, as an aesthetic mechanism of experimental media landscapes
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 46-48
summary Living in the world of sprawl, the way we define ourselves and our space, as we are moving continuously, is constituted of hybrid conditions. Sprawl expands itself through universal ready – made images that create homogeneous media landscapes. The proxy of our image fixed us in a region where we can not have the right to celebrate our own landscape views.
keywords Imagineering; sprawl; dislocation; mobility; diaspora
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email martket@hol.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_217
id caadria2006_217
authors KILIAN, AXEL
year 2006
title DESIGN EXPLORATION WITH CIRCULAR DEPENDENCIES: A chair design experiment
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 217-226
summary The paper demonstrates the need for advanced models of representation for circular dependency networks common in design problems that deal with multiple constraints. Constraints in a design problem are generally perceived as limitations to design exploration. The careful construction of constraint relationships can help to turn constraints into design drivers for the problem instead. Closely related to the notion that new goals may emerge from creating designs is the idea that one goal of planning may be the design activity itself (Simon 1981). The interplay of many constraints can lead to circular dependencies that make design exploration a challenge as any change causes ripples throughout the entire design construct. D’Arcy Thompson (1942) describes form as a diagram of forces. The construction of design representations that reflect such dependency networks pose a challenge and are far from exact matches of the task environment (Simon 1981). The paper proceeds in mapping these abstract observations of the circular dependencies in the design process to a chair experiment from design to fabrication giving detailed descriptions of the interdependencies of material, fabrication and aesthetic constraints. The experiment shows how those constraints were instrumental in achieving the aesthetics of the full scale prototype.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email akilian@alum.mit.edu
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ŚµśÖ = good and Ś¨śÄśŃśâ = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner ‚Äě potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique ‚Äútouch‚Äů for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2014_092
id ecaade2014_092
authors Sherif Abdelmohsen
year 2014
title A BIM-based Framework for Assessing Architectural Competition Entries
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 473-483
summary Architectural competitions have been traditionally used to select best design practices. The basis of assessment for competitions has typically involved non-technical concepts of quality, subjective and emotional appreciations of experiences, and inseparable accord of formal, functional, aesthetic and contextual values (Rönn, 2011), rather than clear-cut objective and precisely measured values as in the engineering domain (Nashed, 2005; Nelson, 2006). Criteria for judgment usually focus on design parti and clarity of concept, novelty of architectural approach, context compliance, spatial organization, functional adaptability, economical solutions, and design flexibility. The assessment process, although presumably comprehensive and involving multiple evaluation techniques and resources, may still overlook important technical issues that may be fundamentally significant to the exclusion or approval of a given entry. This paper introduces a framework for assessing architectural competition entries aided by concepts of building information modeling (BIM).
wos WOS:000361385100050
keywords Building information modeling; architectural competitions; design evaluation; best practices; rule checking
series eCAADe
email sherif.morad@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id 4362
id 4362
authors Talbott K
year 2006
title Hand-Machine Conflict and the Ethics of Digital Fabrication
source Cheng R and Tripeny PJ (eds) Getting Real: Design Ethos Now, Proceedings of the 94th Annual Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Salt Lake City, 2006, 207-214
summary The introduction of machines into human affairs produces tension between competing needs. We need to engage the world directly with the hand, and we need to augment the hand with mechanical power. What is the right balance between human autonomy and mechanical influence – between direct and indirect control? With the rise of the computer age, we seem to resolve the matter in favor of machines, encouraging their unrestrained expansion. However, a Resistance Movement persists. It resurfaces with each wave of technological invention, rekindling the tension. This can be seen in the current debate over the appropriate use of digital fabrication technology. Some architects believe it yields unprecedented creative freedom by overcoming the restrictions of mass production. Others believe it alienates us from a vital source of inspiration by deemphasizing direct contact with material. This paper examines the hand-machine conflict in its current form, and argues that its polarized categories cloud our thinking with false moral alternatives such as: embrace technology and foster a new aesthetic age, or resist it and protect mankind from further alienation. Instead, we should seek a third alternative that frees us from this either-or thinking. One established way of doing this in architectural design is to use traditional media and computer media in oscillation. The paper critically evaluates this approach and presents a design studio experiment that moves beyond oscillation, seeking a higher degree of hand-machine unity.
keywords digital fabrication, 3D printing, design, hybrid media
series other
type normal paper
email ktalbott@uwm.edu
last changed 2006/08/13 04:25

_id caadria2006_007
id caadria2006_007
authors TOYO ITO
year 2006
title CHANGE THE GEOMETRY TO CHANGE THE ARCHITECTURE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 7-18
summary Over these last hundred years since the beginning of the twentieth century, the world's population has increased from 1.6 billion to 6 billion. At the same time, people have concentrated in urban areas in ever greater numbers. As a result, society has suddenly been obliged to construct quantities of buildings rapidly and economically. In responding to this challenge, the demand has been for architecture independent of any special regional or environmental character, simple homogeneous spaces that could be factory-produced. Modernist architecture gave theoretical bases to societal demands as well as a normalized aesthetic mean. Under the ideological banner of Mies van der Rohe's dictum "Less is more," the Modernists drew up beautiful continuous spaces on a uniform grid. While Le Corbusier's assertion that "The house is a machine for living in" found concrete expression in an idealized architecture of pure geometric forms--circles, cubes, cylinders.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ddss2006-hb-467
id DDSS2006-HB-467
authors A. Fatah gen. Schieck, A. Penn, V. Kostakos, E. O'Neill, T. Kindberg, D. Stanton Fraser, and T. Jones
year 2006
title Design Tools for Pervasive Computing in Urban Environments
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 467-486
summary In this paper we report on ongoing research in which the implications of urban scale pervasive computing (always and everywhere present) are investigated for urban life and urban design in the heritage environment of the city of Bath. We explore a theoretical framework for understanding and designing pervasive systems as an integral part of the urban landscape. We develop a framework based on Hillier's Space Syntax theories and Kostakos' PSP framework which encompasses the analysis of space and spatial patterns, alongside the consideration of personal, social and public interaction spaces to capture the complex relationship between pervasive systems, urban space in general and the impact of the deployment of pervasive systems on people's relationships to heritage and to each other. We describe these methodological issues in detail before giving examples from early studies of the types of result we are beginning to find.
keywords Urban space, Pervasive systems, Urban computing, Space Syntax, Interaction space
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ascaad2006_paper21
id ascaad2006_paper21
authors Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2006
title The Relations Between Design Idea Emergence and Design Solution Direction: digital media use in mass exploration of architectural design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The unfolding of research is that design is a creative activity of problem-solving, directed to achieve what architecture should provide man with. The first part of the research investigates Design-Idea Exploration in the initial phases of design process, in terms of exploring the links between Design-Idea Emergence and Design-Solution Direction. The second part of the research presents a use of digital media in Design-Idea Exploration of three dimensional shapes throughout the initial phases of design process. The research has concluded the links between Design Ideas Emergence and Design Solution Directions, and presented the features of the program, which distinguish it from other standard modeling software.
series ASCAAD
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper23
id ascaad2006_paper23
authors Ali, Rasha
year 2006
title Islamic Architecture and Digital Databases
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Epigraphy in Islamic architecture represented an indispensable element in its conceptual design and structure. Our research investigates this unique role, which epigraphy played in Islamic architecture as a tool singularizing this architecture and the sensuality it inspires inside a building while bestowing on it its particular identity. This how SADEPIG came to being: it is a virtual database regrouping all the information about the monumental epigraphy which date from the Sa‘dian period in Morocco (1527- 1660). The digital corpus of monumental Sa‘dian inscriptions provides also buildings plans, virtual tour within the monument, construction details, information about the identity of patron and builders.
series ASCAAD
email ruchii@aucegypt.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

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