CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 335

_id sigradi2006_c169c
id sigradi2006_c169c
authors Culagovski Rubio, Rodrigo and Guevara S., Sebastián
year 2006
title Arquitectura, Datos y Forma: Una primera aproximacion instrumental. [Architecture, data and form: A first instrumental approach]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 268-272
summary The production of forms via iterative computational processes allows designers to operate on datasets that would be to large to be managed via traditional analog methods. This fact opens the door to new aesthetic and formal experimentation as well as attempts to reference or influence large scale phenomena such as geographical or network based sitatuations. This document presents the results of a series of investigations into the creation of algorithmic and parametric methods or instruments that could inform architectural practice. The work was done by the authors within the Masters of Architecture Program of the Catholic University of Chile.
series SIGRADI
email rodrigo.cr@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id ascaad2006_paper12
id ascaad2006_paper12
authors Katodrytis, George
year 2006
title The Autopoiesis and Mimesis of Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The use of digital technology in architecture has proven to be more assertive than originally thought: it has reconditioned the nature of the design process, and established new practices and techniques of fabrication. The 21st century began with the technology of art. There is a new responsiveness to the reading and understanding of digital space, which is characterized by complexity and the uncanny. Recent applications in digital technology show inquisitiveness in the contentious subject Genetic Algorithms. This new architectural process is characterized by two main shifts: from poiesis (or poetry) to autopoiesis, and from authenticity to mimesis. Since evolutionary simulations give rise to new forms rather than design them, architects should now be artists and operators of both Inventive and Systematic design. Inventive design: The digital media should bring about poiesis (poetry). Digital spaces reveal and visualize the unconscious desires of urban spaces and bring forth new dreamscapes, mysterious and surreal. This implies a Freudian spatial unconscious, which can be subjected to analysis and interpretation. “Space may be the projection or the extension of the physical apparatus”, Freud noted1. Space is never universal, but subjective. A space would be a result of introjection or projection – which is to say, a product of the thinking and sensing subject as opposed to the universal and stable entity envisaged since the Enlighten. There is a spatial unconscious, susceptible to analysis and interpretation. Systematic Design: Digital media should bring about an autopoiesis. This approach calls into question traditional methods of architectural design – which replace the hierarchical processes of production known as “cause and effect” - and proposes a design process where the architect becomes a constructor of formal systems. Will the evolutionary simulation replace design? Is metric space dead? Is it replaced by the new definition of space, that of topology? The new algorithmic evolutionary conditions give architecture an autopoiesis, similar to biological dynamics. The use of algorithms in design and fabrication has shifted the role of the architect from design to programming. Parametric design has introduced another dimension: that of variation and topological evolution, breaking the authentic into the reused. Architecture now is about topology than typology, variation than authenticity, it is mimetic than original, uncanny and subconscious than merely generic. In a parallel universe, which is both algorithmic and metaphysical, the modeling machine creates a new abstraction, the morphogenesis of the “new hybrid condition”. The emphasis of the exploration is on morphological complexity. Architecture may become – paradoxically - rigorous yet more uncanny and introverted.
series ASCAAD
email gkatodrytis@aus.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2009_1020
id sigradi2009_1020
authors Natividade, Veronica Gomes; Alessandro Ventura
year 2009
title Arquitetura Algorítmica. Uma abordagem conceitual [Algorithmic Architecture: A conceptual approach]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary The current paper aims to a conceptual approach to the widespread algorithmic architectures defined for Terzidis Kostas (2006) through the philosophy of complex sciences theorized by Edgar Morin (1998). It intends to discuss two approaches outwardly contradictory emerged from the theme: on one hand, the conception of contemporary architecture is beyond generation of complex shapes into computer software, on the other hand the overvaluation of logics can lead architects to incur in the same mistake of simplification performed by the modernists.
keywords new paradigms; algorithimic architecture; complexity; design process
series SIGRADI
email veronica.natividade@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id 032e
id 032e
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel; Bowller, Nicole
year 2007
title Disparallel Spaces
source Exhibition Catalogue, Tin Sheds Gallery at The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, NSW, Australia, ISBN: 978-0-9581221-1-5
summary DISPARALLEL SPACES is an architectural design exhibition showcasing creative digital design techniques at the Tin Sheds Gallery, Sydney, 24 May to 16 June 2007. It explores how the coupling of architectural design with digital modelling and fabrication methods allows for a deeper comprehension and experience of space and form. It confronts problems in architectural design from a diversity of multi-faceted and eccentric approaches, setting the trend for novel viewpoints of innovation and spatial design. It offers a unique opportunity to experience the digitalized future in the field of architecture. Work by Bachelor of Architecture students, curated by Damien Butler, Belinda Cowen, Patrick Keane, Zayad Motlib and Dr Marc Aurel Schnabel.
keywords parametric design, scripting, algorithmic design, exhibition
series book
type normal paper
email marcaurel@usyd.edu.au
more http://disparallelspaces.tk/
last changed 2007/12/17 04:33

_id ecaade2011_015
id ecaade2011_015
authors van der Zee, Aant; de Vries, Bauke
year 2011
title Out of the box design: Pedagogical approach on generative design teaching
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.709-715
summary A traditional design studio is organized round tutors who give the students an assignment, more precisely a design problem which the students have to solve in 12 weeks. Since 2006 we run at our University a design studio which is focused on a new way of thinking in and about architecture. In many aspects the organization differs greatly from the more traditional organized design studios. In the first part of the paper we will discuss the pedagogical organization of ‘our’ studio and how this new way of generative design is used in architectural training. In the second part we will show and discuss some students work, one project will be discussed in more detail. Finally, we will summarize our experience with this design studio and provide some guidelines for successful implementing Generative Design in architectural design teaching.
wos WOS:000335665500082
keywords Generative design; algorithmic design; teaching
series eCAADe
email a.vd.zee@tue.nl
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ijac201715302
id ijac201715302
authors Borges de Vasconselo, Tássias and David Sperling
year 2017
title From representational to parametric and algorithmic interactions: A panorama of Digital Architectural Design teaching in Latin America
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 15 - no. 3, 215-229
summary This study focuses on the context of graphic representation technologies and digital design on Architectural teaching in Latin America. From categories proposed by Oxman and Kotnik and through a mapping study framed by a systematic review in CumInCAD database, it is presented a panorama of the state-of-art of the digital design on Architectural teaching in the region, between 2006 and 2015. The results suggest a context of coexistence of representational interaction and parametric interaction, as well as a transition from one to another and the emergence of the first experiments in algorithmic interaction. As this mapping shows an ongoing movement toward Digital Architectural Design in Latin America in the last decade, and points out its dynamics in space in time, it could contribute to strengthen a crowdthinking network on this issue in the region and with other continents.
keywords Computer-aided architectural design, Digital Architectural Design teaching, interaction with digital media, levels of design computability, Latin America, mapping study
series journal
email tassiav.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2019/08/07 12:03

_id 2006_290
id 2006_290
authors Cenani, Sehnaz and Gulen Cagdas
year 2006
title Shape Grammar of Geometric Islamic Ornaments
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 290-297
summary Shape grammars are the algorithmic systems used to analyze existing designs or create new ones. In spite of using text or symbols to express abstract representations, shape grammars aid to create novel designs through computational effort with shapes and rules. Many probabilities of rule selections and applications of these rules may generate emergent design solutions or create new design objectives. This paper aims to present the characteristics, shape grammar rules and historical background of geometrical ornaments in Islamic culture and to point out the possibilities of mathematics of symmetry. The knowledge presented in this paper can be used to generate new depictions and to gain new application areas like typography, wallpaper, landscape, façade design, tiling, jewelry, and textile designs. Even, these types of shape grammar studies can be used to open a novel approach as in Jean Nouvel’s “Arab World Institute” in Paris. The role of shape grammar analysis of geometrical Islamic ornaments explained in this paper is to increase the efficiency of architectural design education by facilitating the formal understanding of historical patterns. Novel use of shape grammars in education can enrich the designer’s ability to generate original designs. In this paper variants of Islamic ornaments are created with a CAAD program. A selected geometrical bezeme (ornament) from Islamic ornamental design is generated by encoding with a computer programming language. According to the generated bezeme, interaction scenario is as follows: Computer has the main control over grammar application. Only, some of the rules can be selected by the user. Varieties of this ornament are generated randomly through their line weight, line colors, filling types and filling colors. The shape grammar rules outlined in this paper are simple, but the resulting figures can be very inspiring. Furthermore, the endless potential for future design innovations is unlimited.
keywords Computer-generated geometrical design; shape grammar rules; geometrical Islamic ornaments; Islamic patterns
series eCAADe
email sehnazcenani@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e090b
id sigradi2006_e090b
authors Hanna, Sean and Turner, Alasdair
year 2006
title Teaching parametric design in code and construction
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 158-161
summary Automated manufacturing processes with the ability to translate digital models into physical form promise both an increase in the complexity of what can be built, and through rapid prototyping, a possibility to experiment easily with tangible examples of the evolving design. The increasing literacy of designers in computer languages, on the other hand, offers a new range of techniques through which the models themselves might be generated. This paper reviews the results of an integrated parametric modelling and digital manufacturing workshop combining participants with a background in computer programming with those with a background in fabrication. Its aim was both to encourage collaboration in a domain that overlaps both backgrounds, as well as to explore the ways in which the two working methods naturally extend the boundaries of traditional parametric design. The types of projects chosen by the students, the working methods adopted and progress made will be discussed in light of future educational possibilities, and of the future direction of parametric tools themselves. Where standard CAD constructs isolated geometric primitives, parametric models allow the user to set up a hierarchy of relationships, deferring such details as specific dimension and sometimes quantity to a later point. Usually these are captured by a geometric schema. Many such relationships in real design however, can not be defined in terms of geometry alone. Logical operations, environmental effects such as lighting and air flow, the behaviour of people and the dynamic behaviour of materials are all essential design parameters that require other methods of definition, including the algorithm. It has been our position that the skills of the programmer are necessary in the future of design. Bentley’s Generative Components software was used as the primary vehicle for the workshop design projects. Built within the familiar Microstation framework, it enables the construction of a parametric model at a range of different interfaces, from purely graphic through to entirely code based, thus allowing the manipulation of such non-geometric, algorithmic relationships as described above. Two-dimensional laser cutting was the primary fabrication method, allowing for rapid manufacturing, and in some cases iterative physical testing. The two technologies have led in the workshop to working methods that extend the geometric schema: the first, by forcing an explicit understanding of design as procedural, and the second by encouraging physical experimentation and optimisation. The resulting projects have tended to focus on responsiveness to conditions either coded or incorporated into experimental loop. Examples will be discussed. While programming languages and geometry are universal in intent, their constraints on the design process were still notable. The default data structures of computer languages (in particular the rectangular array) replace one schema limitation with another. The indexing of data in this way is conceptually hard-wired into much of our thinking both in CAD and in code. Thankfully this can be overcome with a bit of programming, but the number of projects which have required this suggests that more intuitive, or spatial methods of data access might be developed in the future.
keywords generative design; parametric model; teaching
series SIGRADI
email s.hanna@cs.ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2014_047
id sigradi2014_047
authors Igansi Nunes, João Fernando
year 2014
title PréCRIAR - ProGRAMAR : Por Uma Estética Da Interface Computational
source SiGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 429-432
summary Definitions of Computational Aesthetics from the metric measurement of algorithmic mathematical language will be treated here under the concepts of: Aesthetic Measures by Birkhoff (1928); Information-, Generativ-, Abstract- and Experimental-Aesthetic by Bense (1965); Aesthetic of algorithmic by Stiny and Gips (1978); Endo-Aesthetic by Claudia Giannetti (2005); and, Maximizing Transfer of Struture and Maximizing Recoverability of the Generative Operations by Leyton (2006). The methodological approach to issues of practice and theory used is the main concepts of the relationship between author / reader on the perspective of Arts and Design with Computational Science.
keywords Interface; Computational; Aesthetic
series SIGRADI
email fernandoigansi@mac.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cf2009_poster_25
id cf2009_poster_25
authors Nembrini, Julien; Guillaume Labelle, Nathaniel Zuelzke, Mark Meagher and Jeffrey Huang
year 2009
title Source Studio: Teaching Programming For Architectural Design
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009 CD-Rom
summary The architectural studio framework presented here is based on the use of programming as central form generation reflexive medium (Schon, 1983). Its aim is to teach architectural design while introducing a different approach toward computer tools by enabling students to fully explore variations in their designs through the use of coding for form definition. It proposes the students to reflect on their design process through its confrontation to algorithmic formalization (Mitchell 1990). This results in exercising the synthetic re-thinking of their initial sketch intents to comply with the difficult task of fitting the language syntax. With the proliferation and constant replacement of computer tools among the architectural practice, a shift appears in the attitude towards introducing students to different tools: studio teaching is branded by specific software platforms advocated by the teaching team. A lack of generalized view, independent of commercial CAD software, is problematic for the definition of new teaching tools suited for this constantly evolving situation (Terzidis, 2006).
keywords Programming, studio teaching, scripting, parametric design
series CAAD Futures
type poster
last changed 2009/07/08 20:12

_id ddss2006-hb-467
id DDSS2006-HB-467
authors A. Fatah gen. Schieck, A. Penn, V. Kostakos, E. O'Neill, T. Kindberg, D. Stanton Fraser, and T. Jones
year 2006
title Design Tools for Pervasive Computing in Urban Environments
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 467-486
summary In this paper we report on ongoing research in which the implications of urban scale pervasive computing (always and everywhere present) are investigated for urban life and urban design in the heritage environment of the city of Bath. We explore a theoretical framework for understanding and designing pervasive systems as an integral part of the urban landscape. We develop a framework based on Hillier's Space Syntax theories and Kostakos' PSP framework which encompasses the analysis of space and spatial patterns, alongside the consideration of personal, social and public interaction spaces to capture the complex relationship between pervasive systems, urban space in general and the impact of the deployment of pervasive systems on people's relationships to heritage and to each other. We describe these methodological issues in detail before giving examples from early studies of the types of result we are beginning to find.
keywords Urban space, Pervasive systems, Urban computing, Space Syntax, Interaction space
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ascaad2006_paper21
id ascaad2006_paper21
authors Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2006
title The Relations Between Design Idea Emergence and Design Solution Direction: digital media use in mass exploration of architectural design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The unfolding of research is that design is a creative activity of problem-solving, directed to achieve what architecture should provide man with. The first part of the research investigates Design-Idea Exploration in the initial phases of design process, in terms of exploring the links between Design-Idea Emergence and Design-Solution Direction. The second part of the research presents a use of digital media in Design-Idea Exploration of three dimensional shapes throughout the initial phases of design process. The research has concluded the links between Design Ideas Emergence and Design Solution Directions, and presented the features of the program, which distinguish it from other standard modeling software.
series ASCAAD
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_032
id 2006_032
authors Al-Attili, Aghlab and Leonidas Koutsoumpos
year 2006
title Ethics of Virtuality… Virtuality of Ethics
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 32-39
summary This paper addresses issues pertaining to architecture, virtuality and ethics by establishing an interactive, non-linear virtual environment as a tool for investigation into the virtuality of ethics and ethics of virtuality, in the context of architecture. Starting from the assertion that ‘Virtual Environment (VE) is a metaphor of Real Environment (RE)’, we test the proposition that suggests ‘Ethics of RE can be tested and simulated in VE’. Challenging the notion that sees people reacting to VE in the same way as they interact with their surroundings in RE, we propose that since ethics are engulfing architecture they are also present and simulated in VE. Virtual architecture has elements of ethics that we refer to as ‘Ethics of Virtuality’. In this context, VE ethics seem to lose the ubiquity that is present in RE. In order to examine this hypothesis, we created a VE that corresponds to the RE of the PhD students’ offices, within the Department of Architecture, School of Arts, Culture, and Environment in the University of Edinburgh. The real life users of these offices were subjected to this VE. A qualitative method of research followed to probe their experience, focusing on issues related to ethics. Subjects were asked to give a personal accounts of their experience which gave us an insight into how they think. The compiled list of results and their evaluation showed startling possibilities, further establishing VE as an arena for investigating issues pertaining to both architecture and ethics.
keywords Virtual Environments; Ethics; Place; Representation; Trust
series eCAADe
email Al-Attili@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper23
id ascaad2006_paper23
authors Ali, Rasha
year 2006
title Islamic Architecture and Digital Databases
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Epigraphy in Islamic architecture represented an indispensable element in its conceptual design and structure. Our research investigates this unique role, which epigraphy played in Islamic architecture as a tool singularizing this architecture and the sensuality it inspires inside a building while bestowing on it its particular identity. This how SADEPIG came to being: it is a virtual database regrouping all the information about the monumental epigraphy which date from the Sa‘dian period in Morocco (1527- 1660). The digital corpus of monumental Sa‘dian inscriptions provides also buildings plans, virtual tour within the monument, construction details, information about the identity of patron and builders.
series ASCAAD
email ruchii@aucegypt.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddss2006-pb-101
id DDSS2006-PB-101
authors Aloys W.J. Borgers, I.M.E. Smeets, A.D.A.M. Kemperman, and H.J.P. Timmermans
year 2006
title Simulation of Micro Pedestrian Behaviour in Shopping Streets
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 101-116
summary Over the years, scholars have developed various models of pedestrian movement. These models can be used to assess the effects of detailed design decisions or to predict pedestrian behaviour under conditions of crowding. To date, not much attention has been paid to pedestrians' shopping behaviour at the micro level. Therefore, the main purpose of this project is to test a model that aims at simulating micro pedestrian behaviour in shopping streets, including entering shops. The model assumes a detailed network of links to represent the structure of street segments and entrances to the shops. The basic principle underlying the model is that a pedestrian moves from one link in the network to another, adjacent link. In fact, a pedestrian enters a segment at one side, heading for the other side of the segment. However, a pedestrian might enter the segment by leaving a shop as well. Then, the pedestrian might be heading for either side of the segment. While transferring from the current link to the next link, the pedestrian will be attracted by the shops along both sides of the street. The study area is Antwerp's main shopping street. During a one-week workshop in July 2004, students observed pedestrian movement in this shopping street. An inventory of some physical characteristics of the shopping street was made and pedestrians were tracked through two separate segments of the shopping street. In total, 334 pedestrians were tracked. A conventional multinomial logit model is used to simulate pedestrians' micro behaviour. The process of consecutively selecting links continues until the pedestrian has reached one of the terminal links or a shop. The model performs very well. Simulated routes were used to assess the validity of the model. Observed and simulated link loading correspond fairly well, however, the model seems to slightly mispredict the attraction of a number of shops.
keywords Micro pedestrian behaviour, Shopping street, Simulation
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id acadia06_455
id acadia06_455
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces interactive surface configurations
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 455-460
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture.The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes: the Individuated, the Traditional, the Conflicted, and the Assured (York and John 1992). For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual. However, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure.” The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how each configuration may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
series ACADIA
email Ambachb@aol.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2006_paper13
id ascaad2006_paper13
authors Ambrose, Michael A.
year 2006
title Plan is Dead: to BIM or not to BIM, that is the question
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Drawing, modeling and the explicit abstraction embedded in the traditions and conventions of visual communication through composition and representation are fundamental to the how, why and what of architectural design. BIM presents simulation as an antiabstract means of visual communication that seeks to displace the discreet representation of plan, section and elevation with the intelligent object model. If plan is dead, the implication is that the value of abstraction is dead or dying as well. How can architectural education prepare students for digital practice with such an assault on the underlying role of abstract representation of formal and spatial constructs that constitute architecture? This paper explores a possible path for engaging digital media in education that explores the gap between design theory and digital practice. The investigation centers on ways of exploring architecture by developing teaching methods that reprioritize ways of seeing, thinking and making spatial design. Digital architectural education has great opportunity and risk in how it comes to terms with reconceptualizing design education as the profession struggles to redefine the media and methods of architectural deliverables in the age of BIM.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

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