CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 612

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper11
id ascaad2006_paper11
authors Stanton, Michael
year 2006
title Redemptive Technologies II: the sequel (A Decade Later)
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Nearly ten years ago I published an article in the Dutch journal ARCHIS called "Redemptive Technologies." It derived from comments I made during a conference held in New Orleans in 1994. At that point the machine aesthetic associated with the "new technologies" generated by the computer had not established a precise formal vocabulary but were generating great excitement among the architectural avant-garde. It addressed the limits of the imagery and data produced by this machine and the simple but very political problem of cost and obsolescence. Now the millennium is well past and the somewhat apostolic fervor that accompanied the interaction of a very expensive consumer device with architecture has cooled. Discussion has generally moved from the titillating possibilities opened up by the device, many of which have so far not come to pass, to the sorts of hard and software available. An architectural language closely associated with the imagistic potential of new programs, biomorphism, has now come and gone on the runways of architectural taste. And yet, in recent articles rejecting the direct political effect of architectural work, the potential of new programs and virtual environments are proposed as alternative directions that our perpetually troubled profession may pursue. This paper will assess the last decade regarding the critical climate that surrounds cyber/technology. In the economic context of architectural education in which computers are still a central issue, the political issues that evolve will form a backdrop to any discussion. Furthermore, the problem of the "new" language of biomorphism will be reiterated as an architectural grammar with a 100-year history - from Catalan Modernismo and Art Nouveau, through Hermann Finsterlin and Eric Mendelsohn's projects of the 1920s, to Giovanni Michelucci and Italian work of the post-war, to Frederick Kiesler's Endless House of the late '50s, continuing through moments of Deconstructivism and Architectural Association salients, etc. These forms continue to be semantically simplistic and hard to make. Really the difference is the neo-avant-garde imagery and rhetoric involved in their continuing resurrection. Computer images, but also the ubiquitous machine itself, are omnipresent and often their value is assumed without question or proposed as a remedy for issues they cannot possibly address. This paper will underline the problem of the computer, of screens and the insistent imagistic formulas encourage by their use, and the ennui that is beginning to pervade the discipline after initial uncritical enthusiasm for this very powerful and expensive medium. But it will also propose other very valuable directions, those relating to reassessing the processes rather than the images that architecture engages, that this now aging "new" technology can much more resolutely and successfully address.
series ASCAAD
email ms22@aub.edu.lb
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper13
id ascaad2006_paper13
authors Ambrose, Michael A.
year 2006
title Plan is Dead: to BIM or not to BIM, that is the question
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Drawing, modeling and the explicit abstraction embedded in the traditions and conventions of visual communication through composition and representation are fundamental to the how, why and what of architectural design. BIM presents simulation as an antiabstract means of visual communication that seeks to displace the discreet representation of plan, section and elevation with the intelligent object model. If plan is dead, the implication is that the value of abstraction is dead or dying as well. How can architectural education prepare students for digital practice with such an assault on the underlying role of abstract representation of formal and spatial constructs that constitute architecture? This paper explores a possible path for engaging digital media in education that explores the gap between design theory and digital practice. The investigation centers on ways of exploring architecture by developing teaching methods that reprioritize ways of seeing, thinking and making spatial design. Digital architectural education has great opportunity and risk in how it comes to terms with reconceptualizing design education as the profession struggles to redefine the media and methods of architectural deliverables in the age of BIM.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper10
id ascaad2006_paper10
authors Babsail, Mohammad and Andy Dong
year 2006
title Sensor-based Aware Environment
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper provides an overview of the requirements for a computational model of a Sensor-Based Aware Environment (SBAE) that integrates sensor technologies with the Building Information Modelling (BIM) in order to sense ambient and physical aspects of the built environment. Wireless sensors sense ambient data of a built environment, process, and communicate these data through an ad-hoc wireless network. The BIM, on the other hand, is based on International Foundation Classes (IFCs) and contains data about the physical infrastructure (i.e. Walls, Windows, doors) and abstract entities (i.e. Spaces, Relationships) and relationships between those entities. Therefore, the proposed computational model could sense real time data that are related to the as-built information model allowing for holistic building state information.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_440
id acadia06_440
authors Bell, Brad
year 2006
title The Aggregate of Continuum
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 440-454
summary The Traversable Matrix (Fig. 1.) illustrates the iterative fragments that comprise the continuum of exploration for a digital aesthetic and digital tectonic. These non-hierarchical fragments operate as footholds across a larger tessellated landscape of current digital design explorations. In seeking an organizational strategy, we attempt to move laterally across a variety of examples, texts, and illustrations. Each short excerpt is a partial architecture illustrating deeper issues in the current discussion of digital fabrication. Though counter to conventional academic inquiry, the associative approach can help frame the matrix; the synthetic landscape traversed becomes less linear, less framed but no less interconnected and cohesive. The patterning of complex geometries, the production of ornament, the leveraging of digital fabrication against standard forms of material and construction practices, and the acute emphasis on surface all serve as the aggregate to a broader spectrum of architectural thinking and architectural making.Introduction: The Traversable Matrix
series ACADIA
email bbell@uta.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2006_paper29
id ascaad2006_paper29
authors Bennadji, A. and A. Bellakha
year 2006
title Evaluation of a Higher Education Self-learning Interface
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper is a follow-up to a previous paper published in ASCAAD 2004 (A. Bennadji et al 2005). The latter reported on CASD (Computer Aided Sustainable Design) a self-learning educational interface which assists the various building’s actors in their design with a particular attention to the aspect of energy saving. This paper focuses on the importance of software evaluation and how the testing is done to achieve a better human-machine interaction. The paper will go through the summative evaluation of CASD, presents the output of this evaluation and addresses the challenge facing software developers: how to make an interface accessible to all users and specifically students in higher education.
series ASCAAD
email a.bennadji@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_148
id acadia06_148
authors Cabrinha, Mark
year 2006
title Synthetic Pedagogy
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 148-149
summary As tools, techniques, and technologies expand design practice, there is likewise an innovation in design teaching shifting technology from a means of production and representation to a means of discovery and development. This has implications on studio culture and design pedagogy. Expanding the skills based notion of digital design from know-how, or know-how-to-do, toward know-for, or knowledge-for-action, forms a synthetic relationship between the skills necessary for action and the developing motivations of a young designer. This shifts digital design pedagogy to a medium of active inquiry through play and precision. As digital tools and infrastructure are now ubiquitous in most schools, including the increasing digital material exchange enabled through laser cutters, CNC routers, and rapid prototyping, this topic node presents research papers that engage technology not simply as tools to be taught, but as cognitive technologies which motivate and structure a design students knowledge, both tacit and explicit, in developing a digital and material, ecological and social synthetic environment. Digital fabrication, the Building Information Model, and parametric modeling have currency in architectural education today yet, beyond the instrumentality of teaching the tool, seldom is it questioned what the deeper motivations these technologies suggest. Each of these tools in their own way form a synthesis between representational artifacts and the technological impact on process weaving a wider web of materials, collaboration among peers and consultants, and engagement of the environment that the products of design are situated in.If it is true that this synthetic environment enabled by tools, techniques, and technologies moves from a representational model to a process model of design, the engagement of these tools in the design process is of critical importance in design education. What is the relationship between representation, simulation, and physical material in a digitally mediated design education? At the core of synthetic pedagogies is an underlying principle to form relationships of teaching architecture through digital tools, rather than simply teaching the tools themselves. What principles are taught through teaching with these tools, and furthermore, what new principles might these tools develop?
series ACADIA
email cabrim@rpi.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2006_paper20
id ascaad2006_paper20
authors Chougui, Ali
year 2006
title The Digital Design Process: reflections on architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary These instructions are intended to guide contributors to the Second Architecture is presently engaged in an impatient search for solutions to critical questions about the nature and the identity of the discipline, and digital technology is a key agent for prevailing innovations in architectural design. The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, Architect’s ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Another source that provides information about dealing with complexity is architectural theory. As Rowe (1987) states, architectural theory constitutes “a corpus of principles that are agreed upon and therefore worthy of emulation”. Architectural theory often is a mixed reflection on the nature of architectural design, design processes, made in descriptive and prescriptive terms (see Kruft 1985). Complexity is obviously not a new issue in architectural theory. Since it is an inherent characteristic of design problems, it has been dealt with in many different ways throughout history. Contemporary architects incorporate the computer in their design process. They produce architecture that is generated by the use of particle systems, simulation software, animation software, but also the more standard modelling tools. The architects reflect on the impact of the computer in their theories, and display changes in style by using information modelling techniques that have become versatile enough to encompass the complexity of information in the architectural design process. In this way, architectural style and theory can provide directions to further develop CAD. Most notable is the acceptance of complexity as a given fact, not as a phenomenon to oppose in systems of organization, but as a structuring principle to begin with. No matter what information modelling paradigm is used, complex and huge amounts of information need to be processed by designers. A key aspect in the combination of CAD, complexity, and architectural design is the role of the design representation. The way the design is presented and perceived during the design process is instrumental to understanding the design task. More architects are trying to reformulate this working of the representation. The intention of this paper is to present and discuss the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and to reflect in particular on the role of digital design representations in this discussion. We also try to investigate how complexity can be dealt with, by looking at architects, in particular their styles and theories. The way architects use digital media and graphic representations can be informative how units of information can be formed and used in the design process. A case study is a concrete architect’s design processes such as Peter Eisenman Rem Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke gehry, who embrace complexity and make it a focus point in their design, Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, by using computer as an indispensable instrument in their approaches.
series ASCAAD
email ali_chougui@yahoo.fr
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_304
id acadia06_304
authors Dorta, T., Perez, E.
year 2006
title Immersive Drafted Virtual Reality a new approach for ideation within virtual reality
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 304-316
summary There is a void between design and computer in ideation. Traditional tools like sketching are more appropriate for conceptual design since they can sustain abstraction, ambiguity, and inaccuracy—essentials at the beginning of the design process. Actual graphical user interface approaches, as well as hardware devices, constrain creative thinking. Computer representations and virtual reality are now used for presentation and validation rather than for design. Most virtual reality tools are seen as passive rather than active instruments in this process of ideation. Moreover, virtual reality techniques come from other disciplines and are applied to design without considering the design process itself and the skills designers already possess.This paper proposes and evaluates a new approach for the conceptual design of spaces within virtual reality. Starting from the non-immersive technique we developed before, where the user was able to be inside a 3D modeled space through real sketches, this technique goes one step further, allowing the designer to sketch the space from the inside all in real-time. Using an interactive pen display for sketching and an immersive projective spherical display, designers and colleagues are able to propose and make design decisions from inside the project. The capabilities of the computer to display the virtual environment are, therefore, mixed with the designer’s skills in sketching and understanding the space.
series ACADIA
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_426
id acadia06_426
authors Garber, R., Robertson, N.
year 2006
title The Pleated Cape: From the Mass-Standardization of Levittown to Mass Customization Today
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 426-439
summary In the 1950’s, the Levitts put mass-production and the reverse assembly line into use in the building of thousands of single-family houses. However, the lack of variation that made their construction process so successful ultimately produced a mundane suburban landscape of sameness. While there were many attempts to differentiate these Levitt Cape Cods, none matched the ingenuity of their original construction process. The notion of mass-customization has been heavily theorized since the 1990’s, first appearing in the field of management and ultimately finding its way into the field of architecture. Greg Lynn used mass-customization in his design for the Embryological House in which thousands of unique houses could be generated using biological rules of differentiation (Lynn 1999). Other industries have embraced the premise that computer-numerically-controlled technologies allow for the production of variation, though it has not been thoroughly studied in architecture. While digital fabrication has been integral in the realization of several high-profile projects, the notion of large-scale mass-customization in the spec-housing market has yet to become a reality. Through the execution of an addition to a Cape Cod-style house, we examine the intersection between prefabricated standardized panels and digital fabrication to produce a mass-customized approach to housing design. Through illustrations and a detailed description of our design process, we will show how digital fabrication technologies allow for customization of mass produced products.
series ACADIA
email richard@emergence.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e090b
id sigradi2006_e090b
authors Hanna, Sean and Turner, Alasdair
year 2006
title Teaching parametric design in code and construction
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 158-161
summary Automated manufacturing processes with the ability to translate digital models into physical form promise both an increase in the complexity of what can be built, and through rapid prototyping, a possibility to experiment easily with tangible examples of the evolving design. The increasing literacy of designers in computer languages, on the other hand, offers a new range of techniques through which the models themselves might be generated. This paper reviews the results of an integrated parametric modelling and digital manufacturing workshop combining participants with a background in computer programming with those with a background in fabrication. Its aim was both to encourage collaboration in a domain that overlaps both backgrounds, as well as to explore the ways in which the two working methods naturally extend the boundaries of traditional parametric design. The types of projects chosen by the students, the working methods adopted and progress made will be discussed in light of future educational possibilities, and of the future direction of parametric tools themselves. Where standard CAD constructs isolated geometric primitives, parametric models allow the user to set up a hierarchy of relationships, deferring such details as specific dimension and sometimes quantity to a later point. Usually these are captured by a geometric schema. Many such relationships in real design however, can not be defined in terms of geometry alone. Logical operations, environmental effects such as lighting and air flow, the behaviour of people and the dynamic behaviour of materials are all essential design parameters that require other methods of definition, including the algorithm. It has been our position that the skills of the programmer are necessary in the future of design. Bentley’s Generative Components software was used as the primary vehicle for the workshop design projects. Built within the familiar Microstation framework, it enables the construction of a parametric model at a range of different interfaces, from purely graphic through to entirely code based, thus allowing the manipulation of such non-geometric, algorithmic relationships as described above. Two-dimensional laser cutting was the primary fabrication method, allowing for rapid manufacturing, and in some cases iterative physical testing. The two technologies have led in the workshop to working methods that extend the geometric schema: the first, by forcing an explicit understanding of design as procedural, and the second by encouraging physical experimentation and optimisation. The resulting projects have tended to focus on responsiveness to conditions either coded or incorporated into experimental loop. Examples will be discussed. While programming languages and geometry are universal in intent, their constraints on the design process were still notable. The default data structures of computer languages (in particular the rectangular array) replace one schema limitation with another. The indexing of data in this way is conceptually hard-wired into much of our thinking both in CAD and in code. Thankfully this can be overcome with a bit of programming, but the number of projects which have required this suggests that more intuitive, or spatial methods of data access might be developed in the future.
keywords generative design; parametric model; teaching
series SIGRADI
email s.hanna@cs.ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ascaad2006_paper18
id ascaad2006_paper18
authors Huang, Chie-Chieh
year 2006
title An Approach to 3D Conceptual Modelling
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This article presents a 3D user interface required by the development of conceptual modeling. This 3D user interface provides a new structure for solving the problems of difficult interface operations and complicated commands due to the application of CAD 2D interface for controlling 3D environment. The 3D user interface integrates the controlling actions of “seeing – moving –seeing” while designers are operating CAD (Schön and Wiggins, 1992). Simple gestures are used to control the operations instead. The interface also provides a spatial positioning method which helps designers to eliminate the commands of converting a coordinate axis. The study aims to discuss the provision of more intuitively interactive control through CAD so as to fulfil the needs of designers. In our practices and experiments, a pair of LED gloves equipped with two CCD cameras for capturing is used to sense the motions of hands and positions in 3D. In addition, circuit design is applied to convert the motions of hands including selecting, browsing, zoom in / zoom out and rotating to LED switches in different colours so as to identify images.
series ASCAAD
email scottie@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia07_040
id acadia07_040
authors Hyde, Rory
year 2007
title Punching Above Your Weight: Digital Design Methods and Organisational Change in Small Practice
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 40-47
summary Expanding bodies of knowledge imply expanding teams to manage this knowledge. Paradoxically, it can be shown that in situations of complexity—which increasingly characterise the production of architecture generally—the small practice or small team could be at an advantage. This is due to the increasingly digital nature of the work undertaken and artefacts produced by practices, enabling production processes to be augmented with digital toolsets and for tight project delivery networks to be forged with other collaborators and consultants (Frazer 2006). Furthermore, as Christensen argues, being small may also be desirable, as innovations are less likely to be developed by large, established companies (Christensen 1997). By working smarter, and managing the complexity of design and construction, not only can the small practice “punch above its weight” and compete with larger practices, this research suggests it is a more appropriate model for practice in the digital age. This paper demonstrates this through the implementation of emerging technologies and strategies including generative and parametric design, digital fabrication, and digital construction. These strategies have been employed on a number of built and un-built case-study projects in a unique collaboration between RMIT University’s SIAL lab and the award-winning design practice BKK Architects.
series ACADIA
email rory@b-k-k.com.au
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id acadia06_510
id acadia06_510
authors Johnson, Jason
year 2006
title Complexity as a Creative Force in Design Variegation, Heterogeneity, Diversity
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 510-517
summary This paper describes an experimental project that attempts to use complexity as a creative and vital force within the design process. The project seeks to release architecture from its conventional role as a static urban backdrop and to transform it into a vital, dynamic, and active participant within cities. The project, entitled “Energy Farm”, was instigated by the 2005 International Open Design Competition for a “Performing Arts Island” located within the Han River in Seoul, Korea. Through the exploration of the site and program elements as an interacting matrix of fields, forces, and flows (energy, program, water flow, infrastructure, etc.), our proposal emerged as a variegated landscape marked by its capacities to produce its own energy, interweave heterogeneous threads of structure and program, and instigate a diverse set of scenarios in which physical and virtual realms coalesce. Architecture, in its unique capacity to bridge these realms, can release the rich computation potential of complexity into the physical realm. Within this scenario, architecture becomes a creative and vital agent for productive change with profound social, political, and ecological implications.
series ACADIA
email johnson@future-cities-lab.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_046
id 2006_046
authors Karoussos, Katerina
year 2006
title Imagineering-A phenomenology of image, as an aesthetic mechanism of experimental media landscapes
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 46-48
summary Living in the world of sprawl, the way we define ourselves and our space, as we are moving continuously, is constituted of hybrid conditions. Sprawl expands itself through universal ready – made images that create homogeneous media landscapes. The proxy of our image fixed us in a region where we can not have the right to celebrate our own landscape views.
keywords Imagineering; sprawl; dislocation; mobility; diaspora
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email martket@hol.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper12
id ascaad2006_paper12
authors Katodrytis, George
year 2006
title The Autopoiesis and Mimesis of Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The use of digital technology in architecture has proven to be more assertive than originally thought: it has reconditioned the nature of the design process, and established new practices and techniques of fabrication. The 21st century began with the technology of art. There is a new responsiveness to the reading and understanding of digital space, which is characterized by complexity and the uncanny. Recent applications in digital technology show inquisitiveness in the contentious subject Genetic Algorithms. This new architectural process is characterized by two main shifts: from poiesis (or poetry) to autopoiesis, and from authenticity to mimesis. Since evolutionary simulations give rise to new forms rather than design them, architects should now be artists and operators of both Inventive and Systematic design. Inventive design: The digital media should bring about poiesis (poetry). Digital spaces reveal and visualize the unconscious desires of urban spaces and bring forth new dreamscapes, mysterious and surreal. This implies a Freudian spatial unconscious, which can be subjected to analysis and interpretation. “Space may be the projection or the extension of the physical apparatus”, Freud noted1. Space is never universal, but subjective. A space would be a result of introjection or projection – which is to say, a product of the thinking and sensing subject as opposed to the universal and stable entity envisaged since the Enlighten. There is a spatial unconscious, susceptible to analysis and interpretation. Systematic Design: Digital media should bring about an autopoiesis. This approach calls into question traditional methods of architectural design – which replace the hierarchical processes of production known as “cause and effect” - and proposes a design process where the architect becomes a constructor of formal systems. Will the evolutionary simulation replace design? Is metric space dead? Is it replaced by the new definition of space, that of topology? The new algorithmic evolutionary conditions give architecture an autopoiesis, similar to biological dynamics. The use of algorithms in design and fabrication has shifted the role of the architect from design to programming. Parametric design has introduced another dimension: that of variation and topological evolution, breaking the authentic into the reused. Architecture now is about topology than typology, variation than authenticity, it is mimetic than original, uncanny and subconscious than merely generic. In a parallel universe, which is both algorithmic and metaphysical, the modeling machine creates a new abstraction, the morphogenesis of the “new hybrid condition”. The emphasis of the exploration is on morphological complexity. Architecture may become – paradoxically - rigorous yet more uncanny and introverted.
series ASCAAD
email gkatodrytis@aus.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper24
id ascaad2006_paper24
authors Lerma, José and Salim A. Elwazani
year 2006
title Digital Rectified Imagery: a survey method for design and conservation projects
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Faced with the need for understanding the physical context of the projects that come under their jurisdiction, architects, urban designers, and conservationists strive to secure congruent information. Practicing professionals are not set to carry out the collecting of information themselves. As information “users,” they reach out to information “providers,” including surveyors, photogrammetrists, and GIS specialists, to secure needed information. Information providers employ a gamut of methods to survey and document design project contexts, including land surveying techniques, stereophotogrammetry, rectified imagery, laser scanning, and GIS. This study deals with digital rectified imagery (DRI) only and is aimed at creating an awareness of the method characteristics in the minds of the information users toward taking advantage of available DRI documentation opportunities offered by the information providers. As part of the methodology for this study, the authors have selected a subject building, captured a number of images through a digital camera, and processed the images using image processing software. The significance of this study resides in enabling the information users to understand RDI and to tap on its potential for consummating design, planning, and conservation projects.
series ASCAAD
email selwaza@bgnet.bgsu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_548
id acadia06_548
authors Lewis, K., Kentnar, J.
year 2006
title 110% Juice
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 548-549
summary New England’s seacoast is an active, working landscape. Here, with long history of whaling, sailing, and fishing, people have lived comfortably next to their economic infrastructure. Recent infrastructure projects, such as Deer Island Water Treatment Facility and the Big Dig, have embraced landscape as a way to facilitate modern “live / work” relationships.Wind turbines are part of the working landscape. So are ferries, commercial fishing, and cranberries. All clean, prosperous, and socially vibrant industry, we see the Cape Wind Project as a way to bring these landscape industries closer together, and to reestablish the vision of Cape Cod as a working landscape.The current wind proposal offers 100% efficiency with 0% consideration of the view. The turbines’ current configuration produces a view that is uneven and disorganized. Efficiency doesn’t have to be lost at the expense of aesthetics. By proposing a circle of turbines rather than a grid, an even perspective is provided for all of the cape and the islands (no strange bunches, as with the grid); the turbines are less dense, allowing one to see through them, and not just at them; service travel between turbines is shortened – 77 miles of travel for the grid versus 46 miles for the circle. By becoming larger, the effect of the circular array has become smaller.
series ACADIA
email klewi3@email.uky.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_064
id acadia06_064
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2006
title Synthetic Making
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 64-67
summary Various approaches of virtual and physical modeling have led to a synthetic form of making that is plastic and scalable in nature. This shift from traditional forms of representing and generating architecture now offers a better possibility of full-scale construction and fabrication processes and links transparently to industry. Architects are beginning to dynamically inform the visioning processes of assemblies and design through a range of precise subassemblies. Further to this end, the synthetic techniques and materials are opening up avenues for designers to investigate a range of fibers and fabrics that radically transform light and color renditions, and texture. Investigations in the realm of traditional materials such as stone, wood, and concrete continue to evolve, as do their associated methods of making. As a result of synthetic technologies, architects today have the possibility to work along side industry engineers and professionals to design castings, moldings, patterns, and tools that challenge not only the architectural work of art, but industrial and product design as well. This cultural shift from physical space to virtual space back to physical space and the combination of hand-, digital-, and robotic-making offers a unique juxtaposition of the built artifact to its manufacturing that challenges both spatial conventions and also the levels of precision and tolerance by which buildings are assembled. Traditional forms of documentation for example result typically in discrepancies between the drawn and the actualized which are now challenged by the level of precision and tolerance at the virtual level. It is within this context that leading-edge architects and designers operate today. Yet, how the profession and the academy respond to these opportunities remains an open line of inquiry and addressing these concerns opens up the rich potential enabled through synthetic making.
series ACADIA
email gregory.luhan@uky.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

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