CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 612

_id cf2011_p163
id cf2011_p163
authors Park, Hyoung-June
year 2011
title Mass-Customization in the Design of 4,000 Bus Stops
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 265-278.
summary In Hawaii, ‚"TheBus‚" has been a main transportation system since 1971. Considering the high cost of living in Hawaii and the absence of a rail system, the use of ‚"TheBus‚" has been an instrumental vein of the city life in Honolulu with rhythmical pauses at about 4,000 bus stops in Honolulu. However, existing undifferentiated bus stops are developed from a cost effective mass production system so that they have been problematic for satisfying specific needs from various site conditions. In this research, an integrated computational method of mass-customization for designing 4,000 bus stops is introduced. According to various site conditions, the design of each bus stop is customized. Unlike the mass‚Äêproduced bus stops commonly seen in cities today, the proposed computational method in this paper produces bus stop design outcomes that fit into the physical characteristics of the location in which they are installed. Mass-customization allows for the creation and production of unique or similar buildings and building components, differentiated through digitally‚Äêcontrolled variation (Kolarevic, 2003). The employment of a computational mass‚Äêcustomization in architectural design extends the boundary of design solutions to the satisfaction of multi-objective requirements and unlimited freedom to search alternative solutions (Duarte, 2001; Caldas, 2006). The computational method developed in this paper consists of 1) definition of a prototype, 2) parametric variation, 3) manual deformation, and 4) simulation based deformation. The definition of a prototype is the development of a basic design to be transformed for satisfying various conditions given from a site. In this paper, the bus stop prototype is developed from the analysis of more than 300 bus stops and the categorization of the existing bus stops according to their physical conditions, contextual conditions, climatic conditions, and existing amenities. Based upon the outcome of the analysis, the design variables of a bus stop prototype are defined. Those design variables then guide the basic physical parameters for changing the physical configuration of the prototype according to a given site. From this, many possible design outcomes are generated as instances for further developments. The process of manual deformation is where the designer employs its intuition to develop the selected parametric variation. The designer is compelled to think about the possible implication derived from formal variation. This optional process allows every design decision to have a creative solution from an individual designer with an incidental quality in aesthetics, but substantiated functional quality. Finally the deformation of the selection is guided and controlled by the influence of sun direction/ exposure to the selection. The simulation based deformation starts with the movement of the sun as the trigger for generating the variations of the bus stop prototype. The implementation of the computational method was made within the combination of MEL (Maya Enbedded Language), autodesk MAYA and Ecotect environment.
keywords mass-customization, parametric variation, simulation based deformation
series CAAD Futures
email hjpark@hawaii.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2006_560
id 2006_560
authors Parraga-Botero, Carlos and Carlos Calderon
year 2006
title 3D Real-time design environments for interactive morphogenesis of architectural space
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 560-564
summary In this investigation we are concerned with rethinking and proposing the concept of space towards an enhanced interactive place where our spatial surroundings are no longer understood as fixed but as living organisms that adapt to our inter-actions inside of them. It is the aim of the research to show a space created by the interaction of the users with the building rather than the one generated by the personal interpretation of the designer. A place co-created by its inhabitant in real-time through a virtual prototype. Hereby, we are interested to investigate human-computer interactions inside of game engines as a morphogenetic process for potential architectural design and space conception. This research not only underlines theoretical concepts of architecture and folding as a spatio-structural diagrams that generate emergent processes in architecture design, but also proposes the creation and further development of a prototype based on these potentials that computer games and multimedia have brought to experiment and determine architectural environments. With the potentials of 3D Real-Time engines as design environments for the co-development of user driven spaces and folding as a design formation attitude we aim to determine space within the experience of a space prototype.
keywords Interactive architecture; 3D real-time design environments; Space Folding; User driven spaces; Virtual Collaborative Design
series eCAADe
email caparraga@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_730
id 2006_730
authors Paterson, Inga
year 2006
title Architectural Interiors and Exteriors in Computer Games
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 730-737
summary This paper looks at the design of place in a game environment. Many 3D video games have a strong orientation to streetscape and interior design. This paper questions what can be learned from architectural insights and examines how cultural references can be used in computer games to enhance the game experience by supporting game play through a deepened sense of immersion. Focusing on the cultural ideologies of play, this paper sets out to consider the suitability of real-world building design in the creation of game-world environments, with an emphasis on how level design can be enhanced through a deepened understanding of the virtual locations in which the game challenges are situated.
keywords Game-world; game-play; architectural-design; immersive environments
series eCAADe
email I.Paterson@abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia08_382
id acadia08_382
authors Peters, Brady; Xavier De Kestelier
year 2008
title Rapid Prototyping and Rapid Manufacturing at Foster + Partners
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 382-389
summary Over the last 15 years, rapid prototyping has been an integral part of the design process in the car and aerospace industry (Brad Fox 2006). Recently the architecture profession has started to use these techniques in its design process (Greg Corke 2006), and some architecture schools have begun experimenting with these technologies. ¶ Foster + Partners have been one of the first architecture practices to fully integrate rapid prototyping within its design process. The technology was initially seen as a sketch model making tool in the early stages of the design, in particular for projects with complicated geometries. It surpassed this purpose within a year and it is now seen an essential design tool for many projects and in for many project stages. The office’s rapid prototyping department now produces about 3500 models a year. ¶ Besides, or perhaps because of, rapid prototyping, Foster + Partners have started to experiment with rapid manufacturing. This first was done through the design and manufacture of a Christmas tree for the charity organisation Save the Children.
keywords Complex Geometry; Design; Generative; Process; Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ascaad2006_paper1
id ascaad2006_paper1
authors Petzold, Frank and Jan Frohburg
year 2006
title “Not Every new Monday…”: on using computer-games technology in architectural design education
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The application of new media is common practice in architectural offices and complements traditional forms of presentation such as drawings and physical ‘haptic’ models. Other interactive forms of presentation are also already available, for example in the realm of computer gaming, however the transfer and application of game engines to an architectural environment has not yet been explored in any depth. This paper looks at how “new media” can be used as a means of communicating architectonic information without simply emulating an already available traditional means of representation. We discuss the process of learning how “new media” (the computer as a multi media) can be used as a tool for the analysis and reconstruction of architecture. Using Mies van der Rohe’s unrealised project for a brick country house as a basis, a project was devised which communicates valuable design and analysis skills and also allowed us to explore the use of “new media” and to draw conclusions for teaching and research as well as to critically assess the opportunities, limitations and risks involved.
series ASCAAD
email petzold@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id caadria2006_641
id caadria2006_641
authors PIYABOON NILKAEW
year 2006
title ASSISTANT TOOL FOR ARCHITECTURAL LAYOUT DESIGN BY GENETIC ALGORITHM
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 641-643
summary Architectural design is a very complicated process. It contains many sequences within the design process that the architects have to take into considerations. Within the process, the architect will look for every feasible schematic to make the best decision for developing the final design process. However, the preliminary design involves both conceptual and schematic design that concern about quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. The objective of this research is to utilize an assistant method or tool to help form a preliminary design and a thinking process by using genetic algorithm to find the feasible solutions for conceptual and schematic design.
series CAADRIA
email tuan@mail.arc.cmu.ac.th
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2006_169
id caadria2006_169
authors RABEE M. REFFAT
year 2006
title A COMPUTATIONAL SYSTEM FOR ENRICHING DISCOVERY IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 169-177
summary This paper presents a computational system for enriching design discovery in the external 2D representation of architectural plans. Enriching discovery is achieved through an interpretative search process that involves emergent findings. The developed computational system employs a twofold discovery process, generative phase and an interpretative or explorative phase. In the generation phase the system allows designers to depict an initial building design in the form of 2D plans as a set of lines. The system recognizes possible components of the initial design by generating different forms of bounded shapes that are both explicit and implicit using the Hamiltonian circuit approach. In the interpretation phase the discovery process using the quest mechanism is invoked by selecting a geometrical semantic identified in the recognized shapes to generate possible alternative interpretations of the complete representation of initial design. This plays an important role in enriching discovery in the architectural design of buildings and provides a set of new moves and directions for the designer to pursue.
series CAADRIA
email rabee@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id fc73
id fc73
authors Rafi, A, Samsudin, K A, and Ismail, A
year 2006
title On Improving Spatial ability through computer-mediated engineering drawing instruction
source Journal of Educational Technology and Society 9 (3), 149-159.
summary This study investigates the effectiveness of computer-mediated Engineering Drawing instruction in improving spatial ability namely spatial visualisation and mental rotation. A multi factorial quasi experimental design study was employed involving a cohort of 138, 20 year old average undergraduates. Three interventional treatments were administered, namely Interactive Engineering Drawing Trainer (EDwgT), conventional instruction using printed materials enhanced with digital video clips, and conventional instruction using printed materials only. Using an experimental 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design, the research has found statistical significant improvements in spatial visualisation tasks. There appears to be no improvement in reaction times for Mental Rotation. The authors also have investigated the gender differences and the influence of prior experience of spatial ability.
keywords Spatial ability, Spatial visualisation, Mental rotation, Computer-mediated Engineering Drawing
series journal paper
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more http://www.ifets.info/
last changed 2007/09/07 06:49

_id 2006_276
id 2006_276
authors Rafi, Ahmad
year 2006
title ILUDS - An Interactive Land Use Database System for Intelligent Cities
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 276-279
summary This paper presents the i-putra business channel, a portal that has been completed with a comprehensive database of information relating to commercial and residential properties, and other on-going development components of Putrajaya, one of Malaysia’s intelligent cities. Designers were provided with multimedia-rich information of spaces before making a selection through the Interactive Land Use Database System (ILUDS) which hosted more than 67,000 units of residential and commercial areas in Putrajaya. The database was developed based on category searching features that aimed to be the one-stop brief explanatory system on the Internet. ILUDS depicts an innovative idea for city and urban development to prepare information and virtual interactivities for a better usage in a ‘soft city’ design. The system has the underlying structure that allows for partitioning and ease of handling within which the data can be structured under a graphical interface that facilitates editing, manipulation, attribution and updating. This attribute of city information and associate data offers users a different level of interactivity and provides effective use on architectural and city information.
keywords ILUDS; intelligent community; intelligent cities; database
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper17
id ascaad2006_paper17
authors Rahman, Rashidah AB. and Alan Day
year 2006
title A Comparative Study of Digital and Traditional Tools for Participative Design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Computer tools have been used by experts for a wide range of activities including design and planning, historical conservation, urban management, education, and marketing and promotion. However, the difficulty of using these tools has meant that they have only been used by experts and their benefits have not been available to the public when engaged in participative design exercises. This paper reviews the extent of computer tool usage within urban design and goes on to propose a new way of utilizing digital tools in order to involve non-experts. The work that is presented here takes the form of an experiment which compares the traditional participative design approach with one that employs a three-dimensional digital approach. The setting for the experiment is based on the design of student housing on the University of Bath campus in the United Kingdom. Findings from the experiment demonstrate that the digital toolkit that is proposed has considerable potential to aid the process of participatory design.
series ASCAAD
email abprar@bath.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ijac20064302
id ijac20064302
authors Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Spitz, Rejane
year 2006
title Archigram's Analogical Approach to Digitality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 3, 19-32
summary The Archigram Group produced a number of design projects on the subject of computers, either imagining how computers might affect the life of city dwellers, or investigating what changes such machines would bring to architecture. Working with analogical tools and thinking about an abstract digital future, the Archigram architects deployed concepts that would have come to be crucial in recent discussions in architecture based on digital reality. Their research into things digital - without the aid of computers - led them into inquiring about individuality, expendability, interactivity, customisation and even virtualisation. Rendered in some of their design projects we find a number of architectural proposals which offer a new approach towards the relationship between time, space and architecture - an approach which is currently central for contemporary architecture conceived in cyberspace.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2006_p260d
id sigradi2006_p260d
authors Ripper Kos, José and Machado, Denise Pinheiro
year 2006
title A cidade que nunca existiu: modelos 3D da história da cidade [The City that never Existed: 3D Models of the City History]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 381-385
summary Through the evaluation of advantages and limitations of 3D historic city models, this paper aims to analyze the contribution of those tools to the city history representation. One should overcome limitations such as incomplete information, impediments to acknowledge hypotheses representations, intense labor requirements or difficulties to encourage a deep reflection. We identify some significant characteristics of those systems based on historical facts’ location in 3D models, different files association, dynamic databases and interaction, which should prevail over some of the limitations. Finally, we illustrate those issues through the system Rio-H that presents an alternative for historical narratives.
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id sigradi2006_p033a
id sigradi2006_p033a
authors Rolim Andrés, Roberto
year 2006
title Por um Processo Interativo e Não-Fragmentado de Produção da Arquitetura [Towards an interactive and continuous design process in architectural practice]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 95-99
summary This paper investigates some possibilities of interactive design in architectural practices and presents an experiment using tools for increasing dialog with people connected to the project. The building is an Art Institute in a small city of 15,000 inhabitants at Minas Gerais State, Brazil, At first, the article describes the creation of the Institute, and the important role of the architect as someone who articulates different instances in the design process, and not just the design of the object. Then, this interactive design process is described and analysed, and some differences between "Participative Design" and "Interactive Design" are emphasized. The article concludes with a discussion about the change of architect's role, changing from "designer of products" to "designer of architectural interfaces".
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email andres@superficie.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id sigradi2006_e034d
id sigradi2006_e034d
authors Ryan, Rachel and Donn, Michael
year 2006
title A 3D, interactive, multilayered, web-enabled model as a tool for multiple sets of end user groups: A case study and end user analysis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 392-396
summary This research undertakes a case study involving focus groups of potential end users, to identify how a successful digital tool could be created using new and emerging technologies, to accommodate the multiple needs of these end users. 2005 saw the completion of a research paper, which proposed that a single, 3 dimensional digital model of a city forming a core for many different information systems, is a better approach to the needs of the city than many individual models optimised for each information system. The case for the single 3D model was evaluated through the research, development, delivery and analysis of a prototype 3 Dimensional model of Wellington City, New Zealand, presenting different ‘views’ of information in Wellington: a rendered visualisation in an animated “walkthrough”; the impact of planning constraints on daylight; interactive “plots” of property values. The development and delivery of the prototype model was analysed in regards to how complex, costly and time consuming it may be to exploit one base model for several purposes; and also therefore how beneficial, affordable and potentially successful a single model may be. The prototype model was created to test the idea, and therefore provided conclusions based on a limited feasibility analysis - with four potential information layers modelled and two potential delivery methods tested. The prototype model and user analysis results were presented in a research report that suggested further research and development of a single model could be very beneficial: Positive feedback from potential end users and data providers, and examples of potential data mining opportunities forming the basis of the need for continued research. 2006 sees the research continue as an 18 month research project in conjunction with an industry partner, Terralink International, (http://www.terralink.co.nz/). Terralink International Limited provides GIS and mapping solutions which according to their web site: “enable better business management.” The company maintains a national resource of “imagery, cartography, and spatial databases” and provides consultancy services linking these to company databases through GIS systems. The research investigates the potential for 3 dimensional, interactive, multilayered models to enhance delivery of information to multiple end user groups. The research method uses functional prototypes in end-user focus group workshops. These workshops, consisting of a combination of presentations, hands on interactive examples, group discussions, and individual feedback surveys, aim to establish how a tool might best be developed to communicate to a wide range of end users. The means of delivery whether a stand alone tool or web-based is a key element of the user group workshop assessment process. Note: The submission of the prototype tool (via video or interactive media) would greatly increase the effectiveness of the research presentation. Ability to include such media would be greatly appreciated.
keywords multilayered; 3D; end users; interactive; web-enabled
series SIGRADI
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id sigradi2006_e113b
id sigradi2006_e113b
authors Sanza, Paolo
year 2006
title The built environment revisited digitally: an approach to 2D and 3D CAD teaching
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 215-218
summary There is a characteristic that distinguishes the School of Architecture at Oklahoma State University from other architecture schools in the United States and that is the absence of a design studio in the spring semester of the third year. Among the various classes the students are required to take during this time is ARCH 3253_computer applications in architecture defined in the School catalog as an “introduction to 2D and 3D computer CAD topics and their application in the design process.” The absence of a design studio has allowed [me] to morph an otherwise technically oriented course to a course that weaves the learning of the basic of various computer programs with research, writing, graphic and physical explorations. This paper exposes the pedagogy of the course alongside sample of students’ work during the spring 2006 semester and will disclose its future development as web and film technologies are introduced to the course. The introduction of the “forth dimension” to the course will both augment and foster alternative means of architectural communication by promoting multimodal representations and will respond to the personal observation that in spite of the essentially total use of the computer in the daily creative life of students and professionals alike, the architectural representation output has virtually remained unchanged [and for the most part unchallenged] since the time when pens, pencils, and papers were the media of choice. In addition to its pedagogical character, the paper will also share the personal explorations that triggered following one of the assignments and led to the development and realization of a graphic piece for one of the summer 2006 exhibits at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Scottsdale, Arizona and prompted the initial development of the design of a restaurant, also in Scottsdale, Arizona [in its schematic design phase at the time of the writing of this abstract].
keywords virtual; representation; 4th dimension
series SIGRADI
email paolo.sanza@okstate.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ijac20064407
id ijac20064407
authors Sass, Lawrence; Botha, Marcel
year 2006
title The Instant House:A Model of Design Production with Digital Fabrication
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 109-123
summary Through a novel design production system, we have developed the ability to produce highly customized wood framed buildings for rural communities in need of designed environments. A definitive need exists for a system that rapidly deploys small buildings such as schools, small hospitals and houses while tailored for a specific design within a community. This paper describes the relationship of digital fabrication to materials and rules for design and fabrication. By example, this paper presents a process of construction of a small house on-site from an initial computer model in sequential stages. Our case study in this paper will express possibilities with digital fabrication for building with designed variation.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00008
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia06_544
id acadia06_544
authors Schindler, C., Braach, M., Scheurer, F.
year 2006
title Inventioneering Architecture: building a doubly curved section through Switzerland
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 544-545
summary Inventioneering Architecture is an exhibition of the four Swiss architecture schools that has been traveling the world during 2005/06. This doubly curved exhibition platform, resembling an abstract crosscut through Swiss topography, measures 40 by 3 meters. The authors proposed to assemble the hilly platform from 1000 individually curved rafters that were milled out of 40mm medium density fiberboard (MDF). By implementing a continuous digital chain from the definition of the surface geometry in the CAD software Maya to the control of the five-axis CNC-mill that manufactures the parts, production costs could be lowered significantly. The detailing was developed closely after the capabilities of a five-axis router. The platform is divided into 40 mm wide cross sections, each describing the upper surface path of one rafter. The milling tool follows this path and rotates around it at the same time, cutting out a so called “ruled surface” that follows the topography of the platform both along and across the section. In order to meet the budget requirements, the crucial point was to automate the translation of the platform geometry into the geometry of the single parts and finally into the steering code (G-Code) for the computer controlled mill.
series ACADIA
email schindler@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_176
id 2006_176
authors Schoch, Odilo
year 2006
title Teaching Pervasive Computing for Architects - A simple but powerful building simulator explaining the potential and power of pervasive computing through hands-on exercises
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 176-179
summary Pervasive Computing will soon be integrated part of the architectural education. The design of digital services and media enriched architecture is expected to become an important element for the architectural design within near future. This technology has an enormous spatial and creative impact. Pervasive computing is seen as the key technology for communication within mediated spaces. This paper introduces a successful approach of teaching the creative principles of pervasive computing. This reflects the ubiquitous quality of digital technologies and services in both today’s life and building industry. It described the aim, technical solution, scope and result of exercises carried out at ETH Zurich (bachelor program).
keywords pervasive computing; ubicomp; interactive architecture; education
series eCAADe
email schoch@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-hb-221
id DDSS2006-HB-221
authors Selma Celikyay
year 2006
title Research on New Residential Areas Using GIS - A case study
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 221-233
summary Planning is a decision-making process which is about 'the future'. In each scale of planning process, spatial rules of the social life are formed. In this process, firstly series of spatial analyses should be practised. Throughout the world, spatial planning strategies which focus on the sustainable development adapt an ecological approach and both the regional and urban planning processes are based upon ecological bases. Under the guidance of this notion, also in Turkey, spatial planning strategies should be urgently reviewed and any level of planning process should be directed to ecological bases. Furthermore, in all these steps, natural resources and ecological characteristics should be taken into consideration. In the city of Bartin, where Bartin River flows through, a case study has been carried out regarding the above mentioned planning strategies. The case study has three stages. These stages also frame the data, analysis and evaluation stages. In the case study, a combination of McHarg's ecological evaluation method and Kiemstedt's usage value analysis in planning has been employed. With the help of ecological analyses, in the rural areas that have not been settled yet, the potential of the natural resources has been examined for the new residential areas. As a result, in the city of Bartin, the potential residential areas have been defined on the unsettled regions. What is more, concerning the subject, a map has been formed on the scale of 1/25 000. As a result of the case study, it has been concluded that in Bartin city because of the physical planning which ignores the potential of the natural resources, some of the existing residential areas have been chosen improperly.
keywords Decision support systems, Ecological analysis, Geographical information systems, Residential areas, Spatial analysis
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

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