CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ascaad2006_paper7
id ascaad2006_paper7
authors Lömker, Thorsten M.
year 2006
title Designing with Machines: solving architectural layout planning problems by the use of a constraint programming language and scheduling algorithms
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote the poem “The Raven”, an act full of poetry, love, passion, mourning, melancholia and death. In his essay “The Theory of Composition” which was published in 1846 Poe proved that the poem is based on an accurate mathematical description. Not only in literature are structures present that are based on mathematics. In the work of famous musicians, artists or architects like Bach, Escher or Palladio it is evident that the beauty and clarity of their work as well as its traceability has often been reached through the use of intrinsic mathematic coherences. If suchlike structures could be described within architecture, their mathematical abstraction could supplement “The Theory of Composition” of a building. This research focuses on an approach to describe principles in architectural layout planning in the form of mathematical rules that will be executed by the use of a computer. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e. a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a design problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve problems in architectural layout planning. Two problem domains will be examined: the design of new buildings, as well as the revitalization of existing buildings. Mathematical and syntactical difficulties that arise from the attempt to extract rules that relate to the process of building design will be pointed out. To avoid conflicts relating to theoretical subtleness a customary approach has been chosen in this work which is adopted from Operations Research. In this approach design is a synonym for planning, which could be described as a systematic and methodical course of action for the analysis and solution of current or future problems. The planning task is defined as an analysis of a problem with the aim to prepare optimal decisions by the use of mathematical methods. The decision problem of a planning task is represented by an optimization model and the application of an efficient algorithm to aid finding one or more solutions to the problem. The basic principle underlying the approach presented herein is the understanding of design in terms of searching for solutions that fulfill specific criteria. This search will be executed by the use of a constraint programming language, which refers to mathematical as well as to integer and mixed integer programming. Examples of architectural layout problems will be presented that can be solved by the use of this programming paradigm. In addition to this, a second programming approach resulting from the domain of resource-allocation has been followed in this research. It will be demonstrated that it is as well possible, to aid architectural layout planning by the use of scheduling algorithms.
series ASCAAD
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2007/11/27 07:22

_id acadia07_284
id acadia07_284
authors Robinson, Kirsten; Gorbet, Robert; Beesley, Philip
year 2007
title Evolving Cooperative Behaviour in a Reflexive Membrane
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 284-293
summary This paper describes the integration of machine intelligence into an immersive architectural sculpture that interacts dynamically with users and the environment. The system is conceived to function as an architectural envelope that might transfer air using a distributed array of components. The sculpture includes a large array of interconnected miniature structural and kinetic elements, each with local sensing, actuation, and machine intelligence. We demonstrate a model in which these autonomous, interconnected agents develop cooperative behaviour to maximize airflow. Agents have access to sensory data about their local environment and ‘learn’ to move air through the working of a genetic algorithm. Introducing distributed and responsive machine intelligence builds on work done on evolving embodied intelligence (Floreano et al. 2004) and architectural ‘geotextile’ sculptures by Philip Beesley and collaborators (Beesley et al. 1996-2006). The paper contributes to the general field of interactive art by demonstrating an application of machine intelligence as a design method. The objective is the development of coherent distributed kinetic building envelopes with environmental control functions. A cultural context is included, discussing dynamic paradigms in responsive architecture.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email k.w.robinson@gmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id ddss2006-pb-373
id DDSS2006-PB-373
authors Rohan Bailey
year 2006
title Towards a Digital Design Teaching Tool - A look at the ideas that should define a digital design primer
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 373-386
summary Architecture in the 21st century has become an increasingly complex affair. In addition to new social and cultural norms, architects are inundated with constantly changing information regarding new materials, sustainable processes, and complex building types. This state of affairs has also affected the expectations placed on architectural education. Critics (in diverse spheres) have expressed concerns about the lack of requisite skills of graduates that characterise good design thinking strategies as well as promote responsible design. It has been proposed by this author in other forums that by using digital technology to empower design learning, we can allow students to confidently use (through reading and analysis) their sketches to develop conceptual ideas that reconcile disparate elements into a habitable, environmentally friendly and architecturally responsible whole that is fit for purpose, cost effective, sustainable and a delight to clients and users. This paper will seek to discuss one of the concepts that govern such a tool. It will start by delineating the problem (discussed earlier in the abstract) before outlining the concepts or principles that a design teaching tool should adhere to. These concepts acknowledge the importance for the tool to reflect the nature of design tasks, facilitate learning and be accessible to all learning types. The paper will then focus on one concept - the nature of design tasks. The subsequent sections will describe an information structure borne from this idea and make mention of a current prototype of the tool. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the strengths of considering this concept.
keywords Design & decision support systems, Architectural education, Computer assisted learning, Design thinking
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ascaad2006_paper2
id ascaad2006_paper2
authors Sharji, E. Amir and A. R. Mohd. Eshaq
year 2006
title The Significant Role of an Electronic Gallery to the Education Experience and Learning Environment
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Multimedia has brought new paradigms to education where users are able to use the technology to create compelling content that truly represents a new archetype in media experience. According to Burger (1995), the synergy of digital media is becoming a way of life where new paradigms for interactive audio-visual experiences of all communicative arts to date are mandatory. It potentially mixes technology and disciplines of architecture and art. Students can learn on their own pace and they can be tested in a non-linear way while interactivity allows the curious to easily explore related topics and concepts. Fundamental assumptions, theories and practices of conventional design paradigm are constantly being challenged by digital technology and this is the current scenario in architecture and art and design schools globally. Thus schools are enhancing the methods and improvising the technology of imparting knowledge to be in consistent with recent findings and knowledge. To be able to cater the use of digital media and information technology on architectural and art design education, four criteria are required, which are; the SPACE and place to accommodate the educational activities, the TOOLS that assist imparting of knowledge, the CONTENT of syllabus and information and the acceptance and culture of the receiving end users and HUMAN PERCEPTION. There is a need for the research of realization and activating the architectural space that has been equipped with multimedia tools and upgraded with recent technology to facilitate and support the community of learners and users. Spaces are now more interactive, multi functional, flexible and intelligent to suit the trend of computing in normal everyday life of the education sector, business and management, art and leisure, corporate and technological area. While the new concept of computing in education is still in the earlier phase, the conventional analogue paradigm still dominates the architectural design discourse which acts as a barrier to the development of digital designs and architectural education. A suitable approach is in need to bridge the gap between what theory has been explored and the practice of knowledge. A digital support environment with intelligent design and planning tools is envisioned to bridge the gap and to cater for the current scenario.
series ASCAAD
email elyna.amir@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id a3c8
id a3c8
authors Verdy Kwee, Dean Bruton, Antony Radford
year 2006
title Visual Expressiveness in Educative Architectural Animations
source Proceedings of the 4th international conference on Computer graphics and interactive techniques in Australasia and Southeast Asia. 2006, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia November 29 - December 02, 2006
summary Consider the current graphic capabilities of multimedia authoring tools. Many information technologies have been exploited to the fullest in the gaming and advertising industries. As far as educational materials produced to explain outstanding architectural and many heritage works, most publications still rely on print media. While much digital information has been propagated online through the Internet (and a few CD-ROM formats could also be found) the techniques of delivery have yet to take advantage of potential technologies, preferring only to digitally replicate and hyperlink the structure and content found in their printed cousins. The reason for this slow adoption is not clear and paradoxical since our society places abundant emphasis and stresses the importance of education over games. However, it seems that the industry and, more importantly, the architecture discipline themselves do not appear to promote architectural visualisations as a significant contributor to the education and learning process. Therefore, educative architectural information visualisation may have to set itself apart, especially to generate growth and interest in this area.

This paper does not deal with the technical aspects of visualisation creation processes but proposes to emphasise architectural visualisations – animations, in particular - as a heightened form of art that could be approached with grammatical lens more than merely a technical exercise that aims to serve an outcome or an industry as they are often perceived now. Digital architectural visualisations and their delivery techniques can be expanded much more as an artistic (architectural) expression like architectural writings are to authors, games to game designers. Although differences could be identified, there are numerous lessons that can be drawn from other forms of art to propel architectural visualisations to a new level beyond those seen in real-estate websites, architectural practices and most students’ works in reputed educational institutions.

Architectural information is peculiar to each building. In order to explicate the essences of architectural works (i.e. the vocabularies, designer’s intents, etc), in all fairness, their presentations cannot be generically produced and uniformly adapted. What one technique and approach could successfully achieve in explaining one building cannot exactly be re-applied to another building with the same expected results. Forms, scales, circulation paths, lighting assignments, designer’s intents, other information (and types) to be delivered differ from one building to another. As such, executions are also wide open to be explored to not only address the practical issues but also to express the intentions of the author/s or director/s to strengthen the architectural narratives.

This paper highlights and illustrates by examples, specifically in architectural flythroughs/animations, considerations that need to be addressed in order that the results would serve as an artistic/architectural expression with a degree of educative substance.

keywords Educative, education, animation, flythrough, expression, grammar, art,
series other
type short paper
email verdy.kwee@adelaide.edu.au
more http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1174429.1174461&coll=GUIDE&dl=%23url.coll
last changed 2007/01/03 23:14

_id eaea2005_133
id eaea2005_133
authors Weber, Ralf
year 2006
title Urban space and architectural scale - Two examples of empirical research in architectural aesthetics
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 133-149
summary As one of the oldest schools of architecture in Germany, Dresden has a long and continuous tradition in the field of architectural aesthetics and building composition. Architects such as Fritz Schumacher initiated research and teaching in the field in the 1920s, and this was revitalised during the 1950s by Otto Schubert who laid the foundations for a scientific description of the correlation between optics and architectural design, and also worked towards a comprehensive theory of architectural composition. As a result of the architectural ideology of the East German regime, such studies were consigned to near oblivion and the main concern became interior decoration. With the appointment of Professor Ralf Weber, the institute was reestablished in 1994 under its original name, the Institute of Spatial Design (Raumgestaltung). Its new research agenda originated from Weber’s book “On the Aesthetics of Architectural Form - A Psychological Approach to the Structure and the Order of Perceived Architectural Space” (Ashgate 1994). In order to verify some of the hypotheses advanced in the book empirically, members of the institute have been carrying out a number of studies in the areas of oculomotor research and the perceptual foundations of design, and have been addressing issues that would help formulate principles of good architectural form and space applicable to the everyday practice of architectural design. Currently, the Institute of Spatial Design focuses on the further development of the psychological bases of experiencing architecture, as well as on theories of aesthetics and their application in practice. Specifically, attention is paid, on the one hand, to the perception and experience of architecture, i.e. aesthetics, and on the other, to the assemblage of various parts into an overall whole in a building, city or landscape – in other words, architectural composition. These two aspects are naturally inextricably intertwined: the one concerns the reception of architecture, the other, its production. Under these headings, various other areas of interest, such as architectural tectonics, systems of order and proportions, or the issue of scale in architecture, are tackled through dissertations, research projects and seminars. The institute has been cooperating on several studies with the Cognitive & Biological Psychology Unit at the University of Leipzig and the intention is eventually to establish an interdisciplinary research unit for architectural aesthetics.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email r.weber@mailbox.tu-dresden.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id acadia06_483
id acadia06_483
authors Yan, Wei
year 2006
title Integrating Video Tracking and Virtual Reality in Environmental Behavior Study
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 483-488
summary One of the essential considerations in architectural design is how people use the built environments. Adequate study of environmental behavior can reveal significant information about that use. This research suggests applying new computing technologies to enhance environmental behavior study, in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. Specifically, this project will develop an integrated system of automatic video tracking and video-quality virtual reality. The integrated system will provide designers and behavioral scientists with substantial statistical measurements of end user behavior patterns. Furthermore it will enable them to walk through the virtual reality of the environments and interactively observe details of the behaviors from various viewpoints. Thus, this project can help obtain behavior data in different levels of details, and in a structured and planned way that can facilitate analysis of the data with maximum automation. The major significance of this project is an introduction of a rigorous new methodology into environmental behavior study to enhance first-person observation with state-of-the-art computing technologies. This research will be a novel application of virtual reality in environmental behavior study. We expect that it will fundamentally advance the methods behavioral scientists use to study human environmental behavior, and the ways architects evaluate architectural design in terms of human behavior.
series ACADIA
email wyan@archmail.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_278
id acadia06_278
authors Mathew, Anijo
year 2006
title Aesthetic Interaction A Model for Re-thinking the Design of Place
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 278-291
summary We live in a landscape of digital information and communication. Digital technology finds pervasive application in many aspects of modern habitable spaces— environmental control systems, internet based systems for information exchange, cellular systems for instant communication, and the list goes on. In fact, recent Intel studies show that every day we encounter at least 150 different computing devices in our living environments. As computing initiatives evolve intelligent devices that work in the background of our day to day living, several questions arise about how we interact with these devices. The design of “smart” places will eventually involve the seamless integration of both the physical and virtual. Such interventions will lead to a transformation in the way we design. Architects will increasingly find themselves using the computer in design as opposed to design. Over the last few years our lab has been working on several projects, from the level of a room to the level of urban design, that use embedded interactivity and computing as part of the design. This paper describes three such projects, completed at different times, which deal with different problems and the overall impact of computing on the way the designs were developed. The description and evaluation of these projects will be used to develop a theory for the use of pragmatist aesthetics for “information interchange” within architectural design. In short, the paper will explore the evolution of Computer “Aided” Design from a model for designing architecture to a model for designing computing within architecture through aesthetic interaction.
series ACADIA
email amathew@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ddss2006-hb-467
id DDSS2006-HB-467
authors A. Fatah gen. Schieck, A. Penn, V. Kostakos, E. O'Neill, T. Kindberg, D. Stanton Fraser, and T. Jones
year 2006
title Design Tools for Pervasive Computing in Urban Environments
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 467-486
summary In this paper we report on ongoing research in which the implications of urban scale pervasive computing (always and everywhere present) are investigated for urban life and urban design in the heritage environment of the city of Bath. We explore a theoretical framework for understanding and designing pervasive systems as an integral part of the urban landscape. We develop a framework based on Hillier's Space Syntax theories and Kostakos' PSP framework which encompasses the analysis of space and spatial patterns, alongside the consideration of personal, social and public interaction spaces to capture the complex relationship between pervasive systems, urban space in general and the impact of the deployment of pervasive systems on people's relationships to heritage and to each other. We describe these methodological issues in detail before giving examples from early studies of the types of result we are beginning to find.
keywords Urban space, Pervasive systems, Urban computing, Space Syntax, Interaction space
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id sigradi2006_c129b
id sigradi2006_c129b
authors Abad, Gabriel; Adriane Borde; Mónica Fuentes; Virginia Agrielav; Adriana Granero and Jacqueline Fernández
year 2006
title Producción colaborativa de material de enseńanza-aprendizaje de Gráfica Digital con aportes multidisciplinarios [Collaborative production for taught-learning materials for digital graphic with multidisciplinary contributions]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 117-121
summary For a contribution to problem solving processes at different areas, this paper presents the use of Digital Graphics as a knowledge object for a distance teaching/learning workshop. At the Learning Management System, different theoretical subjects with supporting tools were proposed, and exercises requiring collaborative work. An specific didactic situation using available technologies at Internet for 3D modelling, combined with satellite images and geographic information program was proposed. The final works were then shared by a 3D models repository. As a complement of this experience and in relation with their professional work, every student proposed a new didactic situation including Learning Objects, sharing them with the others members of the group, through conceptual maps built up in a co-operative way.
series SIGRADI
email gabad@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper23
id ascaad2006_paper23
authors Ali, Rasha
year 2006
title Islamic Architecture and Digital Databases
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Epigraphy in Islamic architecture represented an indispensable element in its conceptual design and structure. Our research investigates this unique role, which epigraphy played in Islamic architecture as a tool singularizing this architecture and the sensuality it inspires inside a building while bestowing on it its particular identity. This how SADEPIG came to being: it is a virtual database regrouping all the information about the monumental epigraphy which date from the Sa‘dian period in Morocco (1527- 1660). The digital corpus of monumental Sa‘dian inscriptions provides also buildings plans, virtual tour within the monument, construction details, information about the identity of patron and builders.
series ASCAAD
email ruchii@aucegypt.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddss2006-pb-101
id DDSS2006-PB-101
authors Aloys W.J. Borgers, I.M.E. Smeets, A.D.A.M. Kemperman, and H.J.P. Timmermans
year 2006
title Simulation of Micro Pedestrian Behaviour in Shopping Streets
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 101-116
summary Over the years, scholars have developed various models of pedestrian movement. These models can be used to assess the effects of detailed design decisions or to predict pedestrian behaviour under conditions of crowding. To date, not much attention has been paid to pedestrians' shopping behaviour at the micro level. Therefore, the main purpose of this project is to test a model that aims at simulating micro pedestrian behaviour in shopping streets, including entering shops. The model assumes a detailed network of links to represent the structure of street segments and entrances to the shops. The basic principle underlying the model is that a pedestrian moves from one link in the network to another, adjacent link. In fact, a pedestrian enters a segment at one side, heading for the other side of the segment. However, a pedestrian might enter the segment by leaving a shop as well. Then, the pedestrian might be heading for either side of the segment. While transferring from the current link to the next link, the pedestrian will be attracted by the shops along both sides of the street. The study area is Antwerp's main shopping street. During a one-week workshop in July 2004, students observed pedestrian movement in this shopping street. An inventory of some physical characteristics of the shopping street was made and pedestrians were tracked through two separate segments of the shopping street. In total, 334 pedestrians were tracked. A conventional multinomial logit model is used to simulate pedestrians' micro behaviour. The process of consecutively selecting links continues until the pedestrian has reached one of the terminal links or a shop. The model performs very well. Simulated routes were used to assess the validity of the model. Observed and simulated link loading correspond fairly well, however, the model seems to slightly mispredict the attraction of a number of shops.
keywords Micro pedestrian behaviour, Shopping street, Simulation
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id sigradi2006_e165b
id sigradi2006_e165b
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Optimization in the Balance between the Production Effort of E-learning Tutorials and their related Learning Outcome
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 122-126
summary This paper provides evidence on the level of media richness that may be cost effective in the development of e-learning tutorials for teaching and learning computer visualization techniques. For such a purpose the author provides an analysis of low-cost / high-impact media rich products, the effort and cost required in their development and the measurement of related learning outcomes. Circa twenty years of R&D of multimedia and hypermedia applications for instruction have demonstrated the benefits of communicating relevant information to learners using engaging media. Based on this evidence, this paper assumes that due to the cognitive style of design students, the instructional packages for learning computer techniques for design visualization that are rich in media content, tend to be more effective. Available visualization technologies make the development of e-learning tutorials feasible and apparently the logical way to implement our instructional packages. However the question in the development of e-learning tutorials becomes a more strategic one when we are called to reach a level of optimization between producing a package with a basic standard, namely; text & still-graphic based tutorials, or a state-of-the-art package that is based on video demonstrations (more than enough?) that can accommodate the students’ learning requirements and also our production costs. The costs include the human resources (instructor, producers, assistants and others) and the material resources (hardware and software, copies, and others) involved in the creation of the e-learning tutorials. The key question is: What is good enough, and what is clearly superfluous? In order to confirm our hypothesis and propose a relevant balance between media richness and learning effectiveness, this paper describes an experiment in the use of two different levels of media richness as used to deliver instructions on the production of computer animations for design visualization. The students recruited for this experiment were fairly familiarized with the use of 3D modeling concepts and software, but had no previous knowledge of the techniques included in the tutorials; in specific; camera animation procedures. The students, separated in two groups, used one of the two methods; then they proceeded to apply their newly acquired skills in the production of an animation without using the help of any external means. The assessment of results was based on the quality of the final product and the students’ performance in the recall of the production procedures. Finally an interview with the students was conducted on their perception of what was accomplished from a metacognitive point of view. The results were processed in order to establish comparisons between the different levels of achievement and the students’ metacognitive assessment of learning. These results have helped us to create a clear set of recommendations for the production of e-learning tutorials and their conditions for implementation. The most beneficial characteristics of the two tested methods in relation to type of information, choice of media, method of information delivery, flexibility of production/editorial tools,! and overall cost of production, will be transferred into the development of a more refined product to be tested at larger scale.
keywords e-learning tutorials; media richness; learning effectiveness; cognitive style; computer visualization techniques
series SIGRADI
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper19
id ascaad2006_paper19
authors Arjun, G. and J. Plume
year 2006
title Collaborative Architectural Design as a reflective Conversation: an agent facilitated system to support collaborative conceptual design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary In this paper, definitions of collaborative design are discussed and understood in terms of a designer’s cognitive collaborations to explore his/her experiential memory for remote idea associations. Based on Schon’s reflective practice theory, Valkenburg and Dorst’s (1998) description of collaborative team designing is adopted as a model for a proposed design conversation system. The design conversation system is aimed at triggering the experiential memory of the designer by associating significant ideas from different design domains to provide different perspectives of a design situation. The paper describes a proposed framework for the design conversation system incorporating computational agents in a blackboard architecture environment.
series ASCAAD
email j.plume@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac20064408
id ijac20064408
authors Ataman, Osman; Rogers, John; Ilesanmi, Adesida
year 2006
title Redefining the Wall: Architecture, Materials and Macroelectronics
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 125-136
summary As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of a new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology of its own.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00009
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2006_674
id 2006_674
authors Bates-Brkljac , Nada
year 2006
title Communicating urban development schemes through architectural representations - an investigation of perceptual responses
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 674-677
summary This paper presents the findings of a research project that investigates peoples’ perceptual responses to different forms of architectural representations as a means of communicating the proposed urban development schemes. By comparing traditional and computer-generated representations, the study aimed to establish whether some methods of architectural representation are perceived as more credible than others. Three concepts were used as the factors operating in credibility assessments, namely: accuracy, realism and abstraction. Analysis revealed significant differences in the assessed perceptions of representations’ accuracy and realism as contrasted with the four different forms of representation. The results relating to the concept of abstraction were chaotic and show highly polarized reactions to abstract representations that collapses the semantic space about a dominant single dimension.
keywords Architectural representations; mediated communication; perceived credibility; architects; professionals
series eCAADe
email Nada.Brkljac@uwe.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_868
id 2006_868
authors Becker, Mirco
year 2006
title Branches and Bifurcations - Building a framework for modeling with isosurfaces in Generative Components
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 868-873
summary An isosurface is a three-dimensional representation of a constant value of a field function within a given volume. They are normally used in computer graphics to visualize data in fluid dynamics, medical imaging, geophysics, and meteorology. The advantage of isosurfaces is that they can represent all sorts of topologies. That makes them a perfect tool for modeling, branching, forking, and bifurcating objects with smooth transitions. As they work of a field function, the surface is implicit, the polygonization an approximation. This is a good base for coupling performance with precision. The task was to define a set of handles to change and model an isosurface. It had to happen through the modeling of the field function in a way that is rather intuitive but without giving up the precision one is used to have from standard NURBS/BREP modeling. The paper shows how a modeling framework for isosurfaces is implemented as a plug-in for Bentley Systems Generative Components allowing an intuitive way of exploring design variations. The implementation is illustrated with a proof of concept showing a sketch design.
keywords Isosurface; Polygonization; Scalar field; Marching Cube; Generative Components
series eCAADe
email mbecker@kpf.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2016_013
id ascaad2016_013
authors Belkis Öksüz, Elif
year 2016
title Parametricism for Urban Aesthetics - A flawless order behind chaos or an over-design of complexity
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 105-112
summary Over the last decade, paradigm shifts in the philosophy of space-time relations, the change from space-time to spatio-temporality, caused significant changes in the design field, and introduced new variations and discourses for parametric approaches in architecture. Among all the discourses, parametricism is likely the most spectacular one. The founder of parametricism, Patrik Schumacher (2009) describes it as “a new style,” which has “the superior capacity to articulate programmatic complexity;” and “aesthetically, it is the elegance of ordered complexity in the sense of seamless fluidity.” In its theoretical background, Schumacher (2011) affiliates this style with the philosophy of autopoiesis, the philosophy that stands between making and becoming. Additionally, parametricism concerns not only the physical geometry in making of form; but also discusses the relational and causal aspects in becoming of form. In other words, it brings the aesthetic qualities in making through the topological intelligence behind becoming. Regarding that, parametricism seems an effective way of managing /creating complex topologies in form-related issues. However, when it comes to practice, there are some challenging points of parametricism in large-scale design studies. Thus, this work underlines that the dominance of elegance for urban planning has the potential of limiting the flexible and dynamic topology of the urban context, and objectifying the whole complex urban form as an over-designed product. For an aesthetic inquiry into urban parametricism, this paper highlights the challenging issues behind the aesthetic premises of parametricism at the urban design scale. For that, Kartal Master Plan Design Proposal by Zaha Hadid Architects (2006) will be discussed as an exemplary work.
series ASCAAD
email elifb8807@gmail.com
last changed 2017/05/25 11:31

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