CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 612

_id acadia06_555
id acadia06_555
authors Kudless, A., Vukcevich, I.
year 2006
title Flexible Formwork Research (FPR)
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] p. 555
summary FFR investigates the self-organization of plaster and elastic fabric to produce evocative visual and acoustic effects. Inspired by the work of the Spanish architect Miguel Fisac and his experiments with flexible concrete formwork in the 1960-70s, FFR continues this line of research by exploring aspects of pattern generation and recognition in relation to self-organized form. In line with the theme of the current exhibition, Digital Exchange, the work can be understood as a dialog between physical and digital computation. The form is a result of a negotiation between the digital manipulation of images and the physical deformations of materials under stress. Both digital and physical processes play an equal role in the final form of the plaster tiles.Reflecting on Miguel Fisac’s flexible concrete formwork, there was a desire to investigate the potential for more differentiated patterns while still using the same basic fabrication technique. This was accomplished through the use of a custom-designed script in Rhino that analyzes a given image and translates it into a field of points. These points establish areas of constraint in the elastic membrane of the mould. Through numerous physical tests, the minimum and maximum distances between constraint points was determined and these were entered into the script as limits for the point creation. If the points are too close, large wholes with very thin and weak plaster form whereas if the points are too far apart the amount of elastic deformation is so great that the weight of the plaster can cause failures to occur in the fabric mould. One of the most important aspects of the project is its resonance with the body and our natural attraction and repulsion for certain forms. Through exploring the natural self-organization of material under stress, FFR unintentionally reminds us of our own flesh. The plaster tiles resonate with our own body’s material as it sags, expands, and wrinkles in relationship with gravity, structure, and time.
series ACADIA
email akudless@gmail.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id caadria2006_581
id caadria2006_581
authors KUO-HSIEN HUANG, CHING-HUI HUANG
year 2006
title APPLICATIONS OF THE DIGITAL MODEL DATABASE FOR TAIWAN CITY AND ARCHITECTURE: The interactive entertainment platform
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 581-583
summary In Taiwan, the National Science Council (NSC) has launched the “National Digital Archives Program” (NDAP) since 2002. We participated in two projects: “The 3D digital museum of Taiwan city and architecture” and “Digital model database and professional service for Taiwan city and architecture”. The first one attempted to build a virtual museum for Taiwan city and architecture through the past four hundred years. The second one was a value-added project which intended to further apply the digital contents of the previous one. This project was consisted of 3D refined data, digital knowledge database, and architecture professional service. We were responsible for the 3D refined data. As a result, the digital model database included three cities: Hsinchu, Chiayi, and Tainan, as well as sixty-four architecture models. The interactive entertainment platform is an important leisure in our daily life. In general, the interactive entertainment includes five types: arcade game, PC game, on-line game, TV game, and mobile entertainment. This research pays attentions to the arcade game which presents dynamic interactions between machine and users. Following the improvements of design techniques, we have opportunities to experience many arcade games with different purposes, such as drum game, dance game, and fishing simulator. However, we further apply the digital model database to create an interactive entertainment platform for a racing arcade game.
series CAADRIA
email junefif@giga.net.tw, b3017987@ms22.hinet.net
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_k002
id sigradi2006_k002
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2006
title Creative Collaborations
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 27-29
summary The teaching of design is typically an individual process. Theories of learning, imperatives of assessmentand traditional teaching models set individual tasks that are intendedto lead to individual submissions. With attitudes of training and instruction, the focus is typically on skill acquisition and demonstration of such skills through successful completion of project tasks.The context of studio teaching, however, is one that is immensely powerful and makes a substantial contribution to the intellectual approaches to comprehending our realities and, more importantly, our futures. In this paper I will focus on three aspects of studio that warrant attention, among the many that demand it, especially as digital media and environments, beyond tools, are pervasive in design. This paper will consider the importance of studio education as the context for design education from the aspects of design as asocial act, design as an expert act, design as an engagement of data.
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
email tkvan@usyd.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id 2006_458
id 2006_458
authors Laskari, Iro
year 2006
title Automatic production of paths within audiovisual “narrative space” by making use of genetic algorithms
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 458-461
summary This paper documents the theoretical aspect of a research project that deals with the application of an artificial life (AL) approach to engraving coherent paths within the narrative space of video fragments. These paths, which are constituted by the succession of short video segments, represent the best way to juxtapose isolated elements in the overall narrative landscape. In this case the notion of space is being used in a metaphorical way. Once this has been clarified, the concept of “narrative space” is used as a metaphorical representation of a database comprising all the fragmented/autonomous narrations that are being used. Therefore, the creation of an “intelligent” system that will be able to automatically create cinematographic narration is being examined. This project in particular investigates the possibility and the consequences of producing an autonomous cinematographic narration system, in which meaning results from a kind of hypermontage (Hakola, http://www.kromaproductions.net/HYPERMONTAGE.htm: Jan 2003) conditioned by genetic algorithms. A different type of spatial experience emerges when the video fragments used are automatically “put together” by the system. Video as a medium could be considered as representing crystallized shortcuts within physical reality. Since video fragments constitute the database, different elements of constructed space are parts of the same ensemble. From the composition of such fragments, there emerge new paths within the same spatial context and certain spatial experiences are formulated which are different from the ones experienced by actors during the shootings.
keywords Non - linear narrative; cinematic language; Artificial Life
series eCAADe
email ilaskar@media.uoa.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-hb-187
id DDSS2006-HB-187
authors Lidia Diappi and Paola Bolchi
year 2006
title Gentrification Waves in the Inner-City of Milan - A multi agent / cellular automata model based on Smith's Rent Gap theory
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 187-201
summary The aim of this paper is to investigate the gentrification process by applying an urban spatial model of gentrification, based on Smith's (1979; 1987; 1996) Rent Gap theory. The rich sociological literature on the topic mainly assumes gentrification to be a cultural phenomenon, namely the result of a demand pressure of the suburban middle and upper class, willing to return to the city (Ley, 1980; Lipton, 1977, May, 1996). Little attempt has been made to investigate and build a sound economic explanation on the causes of the process. The Rent Gap theory (RGT) of Neil Smith still represents an important contribution in this direction. At the heart of Smith's argument there is the assumption that gentrification takes place because capitals return to the inner city, creating opportunities for residential relocation and profit. This paper illustrates a dynamic model of Smith's theory through a multi-agent/ cellular automata system approach (Batty, 2005) developed on a Netlogo platform. A set of behavioural rules for each agent involved (homeowner, landlord, tenant and developer, and the passive 'dwelling' agent with their rent and level of decay) are formalised. The simulations show the surge of neighbouring degradation or renovation and population turn over, starting with different initial states of decay and estate rent values. Consistent with a Self Organized Criticality approach, the model shows that non linear interactions at local level may produce different configurations of the system at macro level. This paper represents a further development of a previous version of the model (Diappi, Bolchi, 2005). The model proposed here includes some more realistic factors inspired by the features of housing market dynamics in the city of Milan. It includes the shape of the potential rent according to city form and functions, the subdivision in areal submarkets according to the current rents, and their maintenance levels. The model has a more realistic visualisation of the city and its form, and is able to show the different dynamics of the emergent neighbourhoods in the last ten years in Milan.
keywords Multi agent systems, Housing market, Gentrification, Emergent systems
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 73ae
id 73ae
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2006
title Revitalization of Existing Buildings through Sustainable Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source GBEN 2006, Global Built Environment Network: Towards an Integrated Approach for Sustainability, P. 181-189
summary The revitalisation of existing buildings is getting more and more important. We are facing a situation where in many cases there is no need to design new buildings because an increasing number of existing buildings is not used anymore. The most ecological procedure to revitalise these buildings would be through a continuous usage and by making few or no alterations to the stock. Thus, the modus operandi could be named a “non-destructive” approach. From the architects’ point of view, non-destructive redesign of existing buildings is time-consuming and complex. The methodology we developed to aid architects in solving such tasks is based on exchanging or swapping utilisation of specific rooms to converge in a design solution. With the aid of mathematical rules, which will be executed by the use of a computer, solutions to floor space relocation problems will be generated. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e., a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve such problems.
keywords Revitalisation, Optimisation, Floor Space Relocation, Constraint Programming
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 11:57

_id c7e6
id c7e6
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2006
title Digital Tools for Sustainable Revitalization of Buildings - Finding new Utilizations through Destructive and Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source Proceedings of the International Conference on Urban, Architectural and Technical Aspects of the Renewal of the Countryside IV., Bratislava, May 2006
summary In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote the poem “The Raven”, an act full of poetry, love, passion, mourning, melancholia and death. In his essay “The Theory of Composition” which was published in 1846 Poe proved that the poem is based on an accurate mathematical description. Not only in literature are structures present that are based on mathematics. In the work of famous musicians, artists or architects like Bach, Escher or Palladio it is evident that the beauty and clarity of their work as well as its traceability has often been reached through the use of intrinsic mathematic coherences. If suchlike structures could be described within architecture, their mathematical abstraction could supplement “The Theory of Composition” of a building. This research focuses on an approach to describe layout principles of existing buildings in the form of mathematical rules. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e. a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a design problem, two exemplary methods will be described to apply new utilizations to existing buildings through the use of these rules.
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 12:06

_id 2006_342
id 2006_342
authors Lyon, Eduardo
year 2006
title Component Based Design and Digital Manufacturing - A DfM Model for Curved Surfaces Fabrication using Three Axis CNC Router
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 342-350
summary Through the use of design for manufacturing (DfM) method and looking at the relations between its potential application in architectural production and its implementation using digital manufacturing technologies, we analyze building construction processes and explore, in more detail curved surface fabrication using two dimensional cutting and three dimensional milling processes. Afterwards a DfM model for curved surfaces fabrication using three-axis computer numerical control (CNC) router is proposed. The proposed DfM model relies fundamentally in two supporting factors; the implementation of design heuristics that integrates production knowledge and the availability of some design related to production evaluation metrics. Subsequently, we test and refine the model using structured design experiences. This was accomplished by capturing new design heuristics and detecting useful evaluation metrics for production. In the final part of the research, a refined DfM model was tested in a component design case study. The case study is based on producing a curved surface module on wood for an existing proprietary component based wall system. As a summary, we conceptualize from this top-down development approach to create a design for manufacturing model that integrates design and construction in architecture, based on three possible applications fields: Design processes improvement, building production process improvement, CAD-CAM tools development. Our purpose is to provide better foundational constructs and approaches for integrating design with manufacturing in architecture.
keywords Design for Manufacturing; Design Cognition; Digital Fabrication
series eCAADe
email eduardo.lyon@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_261
id acadia06_261
authors Lömker, Thorsten M.
year 2006
title Revitalization of Existing Buildings through Sustainable Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 261-268
summary The revitalization of existing buildings is gaining importance. We are facing a development where, in many cases, there is no need to design new buildings because an increasing number of existing buildings are not used anymore. The most ecological procedure to revitalize these buildings would be through a continued usage and by making few or no alterations to the stock. Thus, the modus operandi could be called a “non-destructive” approach.From the architect’s point of view, non-destructive redesign of existing buildings is time-consuming and complex. The methodology we developed to aid architects in solving such tasks is based on exchanging or swapping utilization of specific rooms in order to reach a design solution. With the aid of mathematical rules, which will be executed by the use of a computer, solutions to floor space relocation problems will be generated. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e., a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve such problems.The design of the model developed is related to problems in logistics (e.g., the loading in trans-shipment centers). The model does not alter geometric proportions or locations of rooms, but solely changes their occupancy such that a new usage could be applied to the building. From our point of view, non-destructive models can play an important role in floor space relocation processes. Our examinations demonstrate that new patterns of utilization could be found through the use of this model.
series ACADIA
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2007/11/27 07:22

_id caadria2006_209
id caadria2006_209
authors MARCEL BOTHA, LAWRENCE D. SASS
year 2006
title THE INSTANT HOUSE: Design and digital fabrication of housing for developing environments
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 209-216
summary Through a novel method, it is possible to provide mass customized, designed housing to emergency and poverty stricken locations. A definitive need exists for a system that is rapidly deployable and scalable while fostering individuality within the larger rebuilt community. This paper describes the relationship of digital fabrication to materials and design rules by example. The paper ends with different iterations of the Instant house and an explanation of its construction method and execution.
series CAADRIA
email mbotha@mit.edu, lsass@mit.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_574
id 2006_574
authors Mark, Earl
year 2006
title Animating the Design Studio
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 574-581
summary Computer animation is based on software that is optimized to show transformation or change. For the animator, such change may represent the movement of people, objects or light, or a series of events comprising a short story. Studying change is also a designer’s interest in objects made to transform or respond to varied environmental or phenomenal conditions. In addition, the study of change can be focused on the process of design itself, a series of steps taken in the making of a geometrical model for a building project. In this last sense of change, animation technology offers a means to retain and rework the distinct history of how one “upstream” or early design decision impacts the evolution of a design as it is refined “downstream”. Moreover, when customized through a macro program, animation technology can more easily allow for early “upstream” design decisions to be revisited and modified with minimal disruption to “downstream” moves that had initially followed. That is, a designer can revise a geometrical modeling decision made at an earlier moment in a design process without having to completely redo other dependent changes to the model that had previously followed that moment. This paper reports on how animation software, rather than more typical CAD software, was harnessed to facilitate a design studio Macro programming an animation system exploited its core technology to provide access to a more process based approach to modeling.
keywords Computer Animation; Design Decision Making; Key Frames; Macro Level Programming; Geometrical Modeling; Design Studio
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia07_138
id acadia07_138
authors Mathew, Anijo Punnen
year 2007
title Beyond Technology: Efficiency, Aesthetics, and Embodied Experience
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 138-145
summary The spaces we live in are increasingly entwined in a complex weave of architecture and technology. With the evolution of intelligent devices that work in the background, design of place will eventually be a seamless integration of not just efficient but also experiential and virtual technologies. This signals a paradigm shift because “smart” architecture affords users a new interaction with architecture. In spite of such promises, we have seen interactive architecture ideas and “smart” environments only within laboratory walls or in the form of simplistic implementations. Perhaps the reason is simple. Rachael McCann asks if the integration of technology within the context of an increasingly information-driven modern era has abandoned the body in favor of the mind (McCann 2006). If we acknowledge that “smart” computing has the opportunity to transcend an efficient backbone to generator of experiences, perhaps we, as designers, must reconsider our position and strategy in this modern world. This paper is designed as a critical essay—one which evaluates interactive architecture and “smart” environments within the context of today’s socio-cultural climate. The paper hopes to open a discussion about the role of computing as architecture and the role of the architect in the design of such architecture.
series ACADIA
email amathew@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 2006_548
id 2006_548
authors Matsunaga, Naomi; Tomohiro Fukuda and Atsuko Kaga
year 2006
title Systemization of Architectural Design through Advancement of Information and Communication Technology: Possibilities of a Life-theory Approach
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 548-551
summary The design and implementation processes of architecture changed radically in the late 20th century. Architects began to apply computer programs to design and conceptualise processes. This study classifies and analyzes some of these techniques, and demonstrates processes by which architecture came to establish an organic relationship with the environment while being influenced by the theories of life.
keywords Induction Design; Mathematics-based Structural Design; Ubiquitous Computing
series eCAADe
email naomi-m@lemon.co.jp
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_c109b
id sigradi2006_c109b
authors Muñoz, Patricia and López Coronel, Juan
year 2006
title Integración de medios didácticos digitales y tradicionales en la enseñanza de morfología en la carrera de diseño industrial. [Integration of digital and traditional instructional media for morphological studies in Industrial Design]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 176-180
summary This paper describes an educational project in the area of Morphology in Industrial Design, traversed by Digital Media in three different situations: in explanations, in the generation of shapes and in communication and feedback. This project is just an example of a long and nutritious relation between these areas of knowledge. The didactical sequence describes the ways in which virtual and traditional resources are combined through educational activities. Finally, the main outcomes of this experience are explained, concluding that professional, research and educational practices become part of the same inquiry, tightly linked by digital media. In this association they enable remarkable and challenging explorations on morphology.
series SIGRADI
email patricia@plm.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id sigradi2006_p056a
id sigradi2006_p056a
authors Mônaco dos Santos, Denise and Tramontano, Marcelo
year 2006
title Interfaces comunitárias_ construções colaborativas [Communitarian interfaces_Collaborative constructions]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 70-74
summary This paper aims at examining some issues related to the conception of interfaces whose structures work at anchoring local based community networks. It points out that the countless variables that should be considered when structuring these interfaces connect offline collaborative activities, an aspect usually forgotten in this practice. It tries to denote and propose some theoretical tools which can be an aid in the task to bring offline collaborative activities near the constitution of virtual communities place based. This paper is regarded as part of researches which aim at building a wider theoretical understanding of the constitution of hybrid and virtual spaces, and also the implications of ICT Information and Communication Technologies in daily life, taking place at Nomads. usp Center for Interactive Studies - at the Department of Architeture and Urbanism of the Engeneering School of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo.
series SIGRADI
email demonaco@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id sigradi2006_e011c
id sigradi2006_e011c
authors Narahara, Taro and Terzidis, Kostas
year 2006
title Optimal Distribution of Architecture Programs with Multiple-constraint Genetic Algorithm
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 299-303
summary A genetic algorithm (GA) is a search technique for optimizing or solving a problem based on evolutionary biology, using terms and processes such as genomes, chromosomes, cross-over, mutation, or selection. The evolution starts from a population of completely random individuals and happens in generations. In each generation, the fitness of the whole population is evaluated, multiple individuals are stochastically selected from the current population (based on their fitness), modified (mutated or recombined) to form a new population, which becomes current in the next iteration of the algorithm. In architecture, GAs are of special interest mainly because of their ability to address a problem offering a multiplicity of possible solutions. Contrary to other algorithms where the objective is to accommodate a manually conceived diagram, GAs are emergent procedures that evolve over time through multiple attempt cycles (i.e. generations) and therefore offer a bottom-up approach to design. In addition, by using the computational power of computers they can resolve complex interactions between multiple factors and under multiple constraints offering solutions that occasionally surprise the designer. One of the main problems in architecture today is the quantity of the information and the level of complexity involved in most building projects. As globalization and economic development has started to arise at unprecedented levels, the need for large urban developments have become commonplace. Housing projects for a few hundreds to thousands of people have started to emerge over large urban areas. In such cases, the old paradigm for housing design was the development of high rises that served as stacking devices for multiple family housing units. Such a direction was unfortunately the only way to address excessive complexity using manual design skills mainly because it was simple to conceive but also simple to construct. The unfortunate nature of this approach lies rather in the uniformity, similarity, and invariability that these projects express in comparison to individuality, discreteness, and identity that human beings and families manifest. One of the main areas of complexity that could benefit architecture is in housing projects. In these projects there is a typology of residential units that need to be combined in various schemes that will fulfill multiple functional, environmental, and economic constraints. In this paper, the design of a 200-unit residential complex on a corner of two streets in an urban context was investigated as a case study. Recent advancement in tectonics and structural engineering enables the realization of buildings in mega scales and starts to introduce another layer of complexity into the building programs. Conventional design methods relying on the preconceived knowledge based approaches are no longer reliable. Beyond the certain quantitative factors and the complexity of the problems, search occasionally enters into the unpredictable domain of the human perception. Computational approaches to design allows us to go through thousands of iterations in a second and find the solution sets beyond the reach of designers’ intuitive search spaces. Genetic Algorithm can be a potential derivative for finding optimum design solution from indeterminate search spaces constrained by multi dimensional factors.
keywords Genetic Algorithm; Housing Design; Multiple-constraint
series SIGRADI
email narahara@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 2006_284
id 2006_284
authors Nardelli, Eduardo Sampaio
year 2006
title The use of ICT – Information and Communication Technologies to support decisions in the area of heritage and landscape preservation
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 284-287
summary This work presents an experience of Information and Communication Technologies – ICTS used in heritage and landscape preservation activities. The focus is a special enterprise in the city of São Paulo. The proposal is to build a new building on the backyard of an historical mansion as a way of getting financial resources to the revival and maintenance of this building. We describe, step by step, the entire path, using computing tools, to get the necessary documentation to demonstrate the interferences range of the new building on the existing one.
keywords town planning; heritage and landscape preservation; digital modeling
series eCAADe
email nardelli@mackenzie.com.br
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e151c
id sigradi2006_e151c
authors Neumann, Oliver and Schmidt, Daniel
year 2006
title CNC Timber Framing – Innovative Applications of Digital Wood Fabrication Technology
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 304-307
summary The discourse on depleting natural resources and compromised environments have led to extended research on sustainable designs methods, building practices and materials. Beyond the actual performance of building products and components, research on sustainable building increasingly focuses on the long-term effects of the production, application and life cycle of building materials on the natural environment, human inhabitation and quality of life. Computer aided manufacturing technologies play a significant role not only in the transformation of design and building methods, but also in an extended discourse on cultural development. Globally available technologies connect the design and building process to a broad range of long-term ecological factors by creating a correlation between "the emergent political, economical and social processes and … architectural techniques, geometries and organization." Through this interrelationship to economy and culture, technology and its applications are also directly related to notions of place and territory as well as to fundamental ideas of ecology. The collaborative research and design study for an outdoor theater roof structure at the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest at Maple Ridge, B.C., Canada, focuses on the use of digital media in prefabrication and material optimization. By utilizing small square section timber and minimizing the use of alienating connectors the research on the wood roof structure illustrates the potential of a design culture that seeks innovation in a broader understanding of ecology routed in regional culture, environmental conditions, economy and tradition. Labor intensive manufacturing techniques are redefined aided by computer controlled machines and virtual modeling of complex geometries is translated into simple operations. The result is a more sensible and accurate response to the place’s demands. In order to generate innovative design interventions that make a constructive long-term contribution to the preservation, maintenance and evolution of the environment, design needs to be based on a comprehensive understanding of its context and the distinctive qualities of the materials used. Following the example of the outdoor roof structure, this paper aims to define innovative design as work that resonates at the intersection of the fields of technology, material science, manufacturing processes, techniques of assembly and context that constitute the expanded context or complex ecology that projects need to engage. It is in design research studies like for the outdoor theater roof structure with focus on CNC wood fabrication technologies that the common design and building discourse is put to question, boundaries are explored and expanded and the collective understanding is improved towards ecological design.
keywords CNC Wood Fabrication; Design Innovation; Ecology
series SIGRADI
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id ascaad2006_paper27
id ascaad2006_paper27
authors Nubani, Linda N.
year 2006
title Using Space Syntax Software in Explaining Crime
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Space syntax provides methods for analyzing spaces using recent developments in computer programs. This paper reports a study that was undertaken to investigate the role of space syntax in identifying geographical patterns of crime in Ypsilanti, Michigan. All the spaces in the city were analyzed using the Spatialist, a computer program developed by Georgia Tech. The Spatialist computes the accessibility level of all the spaces in a spatial system. Sociodemographic variables such as median income, racial composition, youth concentration and level of education were available from the U.S. Census. The crime report was obtained from the Ypsilanti Police Department and Eastern Michigan University. It includes data on four types of crime at an address level with the exact date and time. Both sociodemographic variables and crime data were merged with the Spatialist map using ArcGIS. The data was analyzed using SAS, an advanced statistical package. Findings showed strong relationships between attributes of space and crime locations.
series ASCAAD
email lnubani@aud.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_168
id 2006_168
authors Papalexopoulos, Dimitris
year 2006
title Digital Territories and the Design Construction Continuum
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 168-174
summary The purpose of the paper is to bring together the two newly elaborated concepts of Digital Territories (DT) and Design Construction Continuum (DCC) in order to approach the design of evolving – intelligent environments.Digital Territories is a concept elaborated 2005 by a Core Expert Group, conceived as an ephemeral Ambient Intelligence (AmI) space. DTs formed through the interconnection of physical objects embedding digital technologies, postulate the integration of the physical and the digital world, searching for operative definitions of new evolving in time functionalities. In DT’s, bridges between the physical and the digital are discrete elements disposing of certain autonomy in their conception and internal structure. Bridges have to be designed and located. The DCC proposes to relate design, fabrication and construction through information networks (it is in fact a DT). Through the DCC approach, design information is becoming construction information and industrial fabrication information. The DCC has to integrate interaction design and respond to questions posed by DTs design. DTs are integrated to DCC by constituting an intermediate level between building programming and design. Intelligent Building Components, that is AmI components operating as bridges between the physical and the digital in Digital Territories formations, cooperating to develop swarm intelligence applications to architectural space, are elements managed by the DCC. DT’s are about spaces communicating and the DCC is about communicating (design) space.
keywords Digital Territories; Design Construction Continuum; Interaction Design; Evolving Environments; Intelligent Environments; Location Diagrams; Building Programming
series eCAADe
email dplxs@otenet.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

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