CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 617

_id caadria2006_111
id caadria2006_111
authors DAVID HARRISON, MICHAEL DONN
year 2006
title USING WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGIES TO PRESERVE DESIGN HISTORY AND IMPROVE COLLABORATION
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 111-117
summary This paper describes ongoing research into how emerging Internet concepts used in conjunction with existing Information Technologies (IT) can improve inter-project communication and understanding. The emphasis of the research is to use technology as an enabler to share personal thoughts and enhance the conversation that takes place within a development team. It stems from the observation that the emphasis of many new Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) technologies is to minimise and diffuse project conversation with highly complex, machine interpretable building information models.Project teams are usually brought together for a relatively short but intense period of time. Following project completion these unique teams are dissolved just as quickly and often are never formed again. As a consequence it is difficult to justify the investment in time and resources required to implement complex IT-based collaboration solutions. A further barrier to adoption is the differential application of IT skills across the AEC industry. Therefore in order for a new technology to gain broad acceptance and be most beneficial it must be applicable to the broadest audience with the minimum investment required from all parties. The primary objective of this research is to preserve the rich design history of a project from conception to completion. Submitted information can be intelligently searched using the meta-data sourced from syndicated data feeds about team members, project timelines, work diaries and email communication. Once indexed users can tag documents and messages in order to provide a further, far richer layer of meta-data to assist in searching, identification of issues and semantic clarification. This strategy of defining AEC semantics through social interaction differs greatly from that of more complex, computer interpretable solutions such as Industry Foundation Classes. Rather than abstracting information to suit a generic yet highly intelligent building model, the emphasis is on preserving the participant’s own thoughts and conversation about decisions and issues in order to create a forum for intelligent conversation as the design evolves.
series CAADRIA
email david.harrison@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2006_545
id caadria2006_545
authors DIETRICH ELGER, ANDREAS DIECKMANN, PETER RUSSELL, THOMAS STACHELHAUS
year 2006
title THE INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO: A VIEW BEHIND THE SCENES:Liquid Campus 3
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 545-548
summary Over 10 months ending in July 2005, architecture students from Aachen, Karlsruhe and Weimar took part in a design studio that differed significantly from other studios in that the result of the studio was a 1:1 realisation of the design. This is part of an evolution of the virtual faculty of architecture “Liquid Campus”, founded in 2001, which has seen the complexity of the projects steadily rise and this continued in the Project “Ein Fest: Ein Dach”. The integrated studio is arranged to encourage an active, economic and transparent learning process, which encompasses design, communication and cooperation issues. The stated goal at the beginning of the two-semester process is to build and although only a few of the ideas are realised, all participants are involved in the realisation. In this case, the project was to create “roofs” for an open-air concert for 200,000 people in Karlsruhe, Germany. The planning was carried out using the Netzentwurf platform, with which the authors have several years experience.
series CAADRIA
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_e172c
id sigradi2006_e172c
authors Donath, Dirk and González Böhme, Luis Felipe
year 2006
title A Constraint-Based Building Bulk Design Support
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 278-282
summary We introduce an architecture practice-oriented implementation strategy of constraint-based methods called BDS (Building Bulk Design Support) to supporting bulk analysis during the architectural programming phase. We examine the optmization problem of site coverage and building massing according to a set of standard planning and zoning regulations, and try a problem solving approach based on the paradigm of constraint satisfaction problems. The case study, which is focused on the paticipatory planning of very low-income dwellings within the Latin American context, serves as testbed for a prototypical application of the adopted methodology. The BDS constitutes a novel approach on computer-aided bulk analysis, regarding this particularly relevant context of application. In the case of participatively planned low-income housing projects, efficiency regarding time and cost of planning directly affects dwellers’ quality of life, whereas elementary programming tasks such as bulk analysis lack appropriate state-of-the-art technological support. Traditional architectural planning methods demand a large domain-specific knowledge base and skillful planners. A planning process, which is mainly driven by the formulation of planning-relevant constraints and sets of solution alternatives, suggests to avoid architects’ traditional procedure of: 1. Create an (yet not necessarily valid) instance of the eventual design solution by directly choosing specific values for its shape parameters. 2. Evaluate its validity by confronting the designed model to a set of applicable constraints, which have to be satisfied. Instead, the constraint-based design methodology poses a search procedure that operates in a space of pertinent constraint sets. A computer-aided interactive search procedure to find more valid design solution alternatives in less time and with less effort is particularly qualified to supply efficient support for participatory planning activities carried out between dwellers and planners. The set of solutions for a building-bulk design problem is constrained by both a large complex system of planning and zoning regulations and the geometry of the eventual design solution itself. Given a considerable amount of such regulations, a regular size geometric constraint satisfaction system proved to be capable of providing a highly efficient, interactive modeling and evaluation tool for the formulation in real time of valid solution alternatives for an ordinary building-bulk design problem. A BDS implementation will constitute one system module of a larger integrated system model called Esther. A BDS tool shall interact with other functional modules, like e.g. the FLS (Floor plan Layout Support), which also uses constraint-based design methods.
keywords constraint-based design; bulk analysis; participatory planning; low-income housing; design theory; design proces
series SIGRADI
email luis-felipe.gonzalez@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 5094
id 5094
authors d’Estrée Sterk, Tristan
year 2006
title Responsive Architecture: User-centered Interactions within the Hybridized Model of Control
source Proceedings of the GAME, SET, MATCH II, conference at the Technical University of Delft, Netherlands, 29 March - 1 April 2006, pp. 494-501
summary In the September 1969 issue of Architectural Design, Andrew Rabeneck wrote about the use of cybernetic devices within an automated architecture. He hypothesized that the concept of ‘flexibility’ was introduced to architecture because existing building technologies were inherently inflexible. He argued that architects should use cybernetic technologies to produce completely new types of increasingly flexible, user-centred, buildings.

Three years later, Yona Friedman wrote about the changing relationship between clients and architects. He said that a new design methodology was needed because architects could not assess the future spatial needs of building users accurately enough. Proposing a new model, he split architectural design in two complementary halves, hardware design and software design, reasoning that this would give users the opportunity to adapt built spaces to suit their needs.

Both of these ideas describe approaches to the production of an architecture that can change shape and configuration in response to changing patterns of use. Rabeneck’s approach illustrates the benefit of predictive technologies and automation, while Friedman’s model illustrates the benefit of user intervention and direct manipulation. This paper discusses developments in the field of responsive architecture in relation to two opposing user-centred interaction methodologies. It proposes methods for controlling responsive buildings and suggests that human computer interaction methodologies need to be re-thought and extended when applied within intelligent, responsive, architectures.

keywords Responsive architecture, User-centred design, HCI, Intelligent buildings
series other
type normal paper
email tsterk@sfu.ca
more admin
last changed 2017/04/10 11:08

_id ijac20064107
id ijac20064107
authors Elger, Dietrich; Russell, Peter
year 2006
title Crisis? What crisis? Approaching information space: New dimensions in the field of architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 1, 107-121
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with other engineers. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past years so that the skills that architects are able to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have seen their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields. The situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. For educators, it must be clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill to be taught alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which include Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Management; Computer Supported Design Studios; CSCW
series journal
email elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00008
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaadesigradi2019_027
id ecaadesigradi2019_027
authors Erzetic, Catherine, Dobbs, Tiara, Fabbri, Alessandra, Gardner, Nicole, Haeusler, M. Hank and Zavoleas, Yannis
year 2019
title Enhancing User-Engagement in the Design Process through Augmented Reality Applications
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 2, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 423-432
summary Augmented Reality (AR) technologies are often perceived as the most impactful method to enhance the communication between the designer and the client during the iterative design process. However, the significance of designing the User Interface (UI) and the User Experience (UX) are often underestimated. To intercede, this research aims to employ new and existing techniques to develop UI's, and comparatively assess "the accuracy and completeness with which specified users can achieve specified goals in particular environments" (Stone, 2005) - a notion this research delineates as 'effectiveness'. Prompted by the work of key scholars, the developed UI's were assessed through the lens of existing UI evaluation techniques, including: Usability Heuristics (Nielsen, 1994) and Visual and Cognitive Heuristics (Zuk and Carpendale, 2006). In partnership with PTW Architects, characteristics such as the rapidity and complexity of interactions, in conjunction with the interface's simplicity and intuitiveness, were extracted from 15 trials underwent by architectural practitioners. The outcomes of this research highlights strategies for the effective development of user interface design for mobile augmented reality applications.
keywords User Interface; Human Centered Design; User Experience; Heuristics; Usability Inspection Method
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email m.haeusler@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2019/08/26 20:26

_id acadia06_542
id acadia06_542
authors Faulders, Thom
year 2006
title Airspace Tokyo
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 542-543
summary Airspace Tokyo is designed to establish a screened buffer zone - a thin, super-compact artificial “yard” that protects the building’s occupants from the pressing context of the dense urban environment outside. The new white, minimalist four-story building, designed by a Tokyo architect, is a stacked four unit multi-family dwelling with a garage and two large professional photography studios for lease on its ground floor. Located in the Ota-ku area of the city, the site was previously occupied by the owner with a sprawling residence that was wrapped by a layer of dense vegetation, and was unique in a city where open space is rare amidst the high demand for built space. Since the entire site is to now be razed to accommodate construction for the new and much larger development, the design intention for the screen is to invent an architectural system that performs with similar attributes to the demolished green strip and creates an atmospheric zone of protection. In effect, the demolished two meters of setback width of open ground space is now to be reduced into a new zone with a width of only 20 cm.
series ACADIA
email thom@beigedesign.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id eaea2005_31
id eaea2005_31
authors Franke, Ronald
year 2006
title Space imagery - Model simulation as work equipment
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 31-36
summary The architectural design task involves the development of a building or an urban space, which communicates a social and cultural meaning and allows sensual experiences. Therefore, there is a need to design the building or urban space from the users view. In order to achieve this aim, architects use different methods and techniques of representation such as various kinds of drawings, models and images. The main impact of this is: Creating and developing the architectural form by drawing or modelling the architectural form. By using Video-Supported- Model-Simulation the benefits of representation can be utilised in a very simple way. The following report gives an introduction to - the method of Video-Supported-Model-Simulation - the principles for organisation the process of architectural design
series EAEA
email ronald.franke@mailbox.tu-dresden.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id eaea2005_221
id eaea2005_221
authors Gatermann, Harald
year 2006
title Media work in the educational training of architects to experiences with the postgraduate course “Architecture Media Management”
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 221-237
summary The perception of space, geometry, material and the influence of light is one of the core items of undergraduate courses in architecture. In Bochum we developed and still practise a consequent system of integrating drawing and photography as analytic tools of perception and sketching, descriptive geometry, computer aided design, digital visualisation and animation as synthetic items. The versatile use of digital media in the further studies is of essential significance - especially the synthesis between architectural photography (with all its special features concerning geometrical depicting) and CAD / visualisation / animation. Special emphasis is given to techniques for simulation and immersion such as digital panorama photography, combined with computer-based vr-modelling e.g. vrml as well as using online-cad-modeling and arial photography in processes of citizen participation.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email harald.gatermann@fh-bochum.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id eaea2005_103
id eaea2005_103
authors Giró, Héctor
year 2006
title Visualising emotions - Defining urban space through shared networks
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 103-111
summary Networks and new media and communication tools, in combination with other media like film, imaging, text and sound, make richer ways of expression possible and at the same time offer attractive possibilities to investigate and express designing. Architects, or their clients, in consequence become increasingly able to explore, develop and communicate their ideas in a better way. At the same time, most people find it difficult to describe their demands and needs in advance: it seems they react much better on something that is already there, a finished work. How then can designers get a better idea of people’s needs and wishes? In other words, how could designers –among others- get a better match between expectations and results? Consequently, what could be the significance of ‘new media’ within this process?
series EAEA
email h.h.giro@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2006_081
id caadria2006_081
authors JÖRG RÜGEMER
year 2006
title WEB BASED DESIGN AND COMMUNICATION PEDAGOGY : Group pedagogy and the implementation of web-based technologies within the design process
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 81-90
summary The success of the international Zollhof project in Düsseldorf, Germany, in which virtual communication played a crucial role, was the catalyst for introducing interdisciplinary digital methods in the field of teaching. The firm of Frank O. Gehry and Associates, Santa Monica, California, served as an initial field of experimentation in order to bring together a heterogeneous group of project partners to participate in the design and construction phases of the Zollhof project. The design development, construction document, and construction phase was considerably enhanced by the employment of digital media as a communication and information tool. Parallel to the design process in the office in Santa Monica, a line of information flow and management had to be established to connect the local design team with consultants that were located in Europe and specifically in Germany. This line of communication required the team to send precise descriptions of project steps to the participants abroad, as well as receiving and processing a flow of responses returning to the Santa Monica office in very short intervals. By advancing and documenting each design and development step, the project progression was clearly documented by the project teams and thus understandable to everybody involved. The process demanded a highly articulated project description in text and images that were refined and exchanged daily. This helped to strengthen the cooperation between the design team and the project consultants and started to dissolve the role of the prime architect or designer toward a more team-related and democratic structure. All participants had quick access to all necessary information, which set aside the vertical hierarchy in favor of transparent communication tools and platforms.
series CAADRIA
email joerg@ruegemer.de
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2006_503
id caadria2006_503
authors KAGA, ATSUKO; ATSUSHI MIYAGAWA, MASAHIRO KAWAGUCHI, WOOKHYUN YEO, TOMOHIRO FUKUDA
year 2006
title LANDSCAPE EVALUATION SYSTEM USING A 3D SPACE MODEL AND A CELLULAR PHONE WITH GPS CAMERA
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 503-512
summary In recent years there has been a demand that local residents take part in the planning of environmental designs from the initial stages. On the issue of understanding the local environment, it is desirable to accumulate and share information and to enable it to be reused. To this end, attention has been focused on the cellular phone which can provide position information and picture information in addition to serving as a tool of general communication. For several years now it has been increasingly common for cellular phones to be equipped with an E-mail function, a web browsing function, a camera function, a GPS function, etc. Using such cellular phones, it will become possible to quickly accumulate local information with detailed picture information and position information. On the other hand, it is desirable to look at and understand an environment interactively from various points of view from the initial stage of a project. For that purpose, examination using 3D space which makes real-time simulation possible is required. In this research, using a cellular phone with a GPS camera, scene image data is collected with the aim of constructing a local scene evaluation system which can perform a picture display using a 3D space model.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id caadria2006_000
id caadria2006_000
authors Kaga, Atsuko; Naka, Ryusuhe (eds.)
year 2006
title CAADRIA '06
source Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (ISBN 4-907662-01-7 / Kumamoto, Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 649 p.
summary It is apparent that recent development of digital technology has shifted the paradigm of the socio-economic system of the world as well as the style of day-to-day communication in our lives, as professor Mitchell suggested in his book. In the field of architecture, there have been many prospective studies on the development and applications of digital technology to architectural design practice and education. However, the reactions of the architecture community to such technological development have been slower and weaker than researchers initially expected. Is this because developed technology has overlooked some of essential needs of the community while seeking tasks for itself or because present technology is still insufficiently developed to attract people to new ideas? One of Japan's great samurai sword masters, Musashi Miyamoto, spent the last years of his life in Kumamoto where he wrote The Book of Five Rings. The most important element of his work was his concept of rhythm and harmony; how all things are in harmony, and how by working with the rhythm of a situation we can turn it to our advantage with little effort. The conference aims to provide the participants with an opportunity to explore visions and ideas on the digital technology that could enhance Rhythm and Harmony in architectural design practice and education.
series CAADRIA
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id eaea2005_39
id eaea2005_39
authors Kardos, Peter
year 2006
title The visual context of architectural and urban design processes
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 39-47
summary When designing, an architect in his imagination generates images, topics and drafts in various combinations. He is supported by his imagination, experience, know - how and ideological creative intentions. He is driven by the need to externally transmit, illustrate or explain his visualizations. The basis of the external communication is on one side the figurative interpretation of spatial manifestation of the conceptual suggestion and on the other hand the vision, perception or experience of the given solution projection by eyes of participants to the visual presentation. The above-mentioned process of verification or consensual examination is a principal requirement for creative progressing in finding solutions to an architectural problem. In the process of architectural education this phenomenon in studio conditions becomes a platform for students to gather professional experience in practical application of theoretical knowledge and in iterative verification of predication value quality of architectural or urbanistic proposal itself.
series EAEA
email kardos@fa.stuba.sk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id ascaad2006_paper12
id ascaad2006_paper12
authors Katodrytis, George
year 2006
title The Autopoiesis and Mimesis of Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The use of digital technology in architecture has proven to be more assertive than originally thought: it has reconditioned the nature of the design process, and established new practices and techniques of fabrication. The 21st century began with the technology of art. There is a new responsiveness to the reading and understanding of digital space, which is characterized by complexity and the uncanny. Recent applications in digital technology show inquisitiveness in the contentious subject Genetic Algorithms. This new architectural process is characterized by two main shifts: from poiesis (or poetry) to autopoiesis, and from authenticity to mimesis. Since evolutionary simulations give rise to new forms rather than design them, architects should now be artists and operators of both Inventive and Systematic design. Inventive design: The digital media should bring about poiesis (poetry). Digital spaces reveal and visualize the unconscious desires of urban spaces and bring forth new dreamscapes, mysterious and surreal. This implies a Freudian spatial unconscious, which can be subjected to analysis and interpretation. “Space may be the projection or the extension of the physical apparatus”, Freud noted1. Space is never universal, but subjective. A space would be a result of introjection or projection – which is to say, a product of the thinking and sensing subject as opposed to the universal and stable entity envisaged since the Enlighten. There is a spatial unconscious, susceptible to analysis and interpretation. Systematic Design: Digital media should bring about an autopoiesis. This approach calls into question traditional methods of architectural design – which replace the hierarchical processes of production known as “cause and effect” - and proposes a design process where the architect becomes a constructor of formal systems. Will the evolutionary simulation replace design? Is metric space dead? Is it replaced by the new definition of space, that of topology? The new algorithmic evolutionary conditions give architecture an autopoiesis, similar to biological dynamics. The use of algorithms in design and fabrication has shifted the role of the architect from design to programming. Parametric design has introduced another dimension: that of variation and topological evolution, breaking the authentic into the reused. Architecture now is about topology than typology, variation than authenticity, it is mimetic than original, uncanny and subconscious than merely generic. In a parallel universe, which is both algorithmic and metaphysical, the modeling machine creates a new abstraction, the morphogenesis of the “new hybrid condition”. The emphasis of the exploration is on morphological complexity. Architecture may become – paradoxically - rigorous yet more uncanny and introverted.
series ASCAAD
email gkatodrytis@aus.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 2006_384
id 2006_384
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2006
title Recognizing architectural representations
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 384-391
summary The paper presents an overview of mechanisms underlying architectural perception and recognition. These include both general perceptual principles and specific domain constraints. The former determine the objective identification of elements and relationships in any visual scene, while the latter make architectural styles recognizable even to perceivers without extensive acquaintance with architecture. This is because many of the architectural constraints underlying a style have a firm foundation in general principles.
keywords Representation; recognition; perception; architectural style
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_678
id 2006_678
authors Lefantzis, Michaelis
year 2006
title From Survey to Representation of ancient monuments: new methodology and technology - The cases of the Golgotha site in Jerusalem and the Stoa of Eumenes at the South Slope of the Acropolis of Athens
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 678-682
summary The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics of laser scanning technology, based on two examples for the modeling at the reconstruction of the Golgotha site in Jerusalem and the ancient Stoa of Eumenes II, located at the South Slope of the Athens Acropolis. Terrestrial 3D laser scanning is a new methodology for three dimensional object modeling. Especially, the reconstruction of the ancient Stoa of Eumenes II comprises one of the most important restoration programs of the Greek Ministry of Culture. This paper will focus on the main steps of the laser scanning processing chain, starting from the acquisition of the data and ending with the evaluation of the 3D models.
keywords Golgotha; Eumenes Stoa; Laser scanning; archeological architectural documentation
series eCAADe
email mlefan@panafonet.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id c7e6
id c7e6
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2006
title Digital Tools for Sustainable Revitalization of Buildings - Finding new Utilizations through Destructive and Non-Destructive Floor Space Relocation
source Proceedings of the International Conference on Urban, Architectural and Technical Aspects of the Renewal of the Countryside IV., Bratislava, May 2006
summary In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote the poem “The Raven”, an act full of poetry, love, passion, mourning, melancholia and death. In his essay “The Theory of Composition” which was published in 1846 Poe proved that the poem is based on an accurate mathematical description. Not only in literature are structures present that are based on mathematics. In the work of famous musicians, artists or architects like Bach, Escher or Palladio it is evident that the beauty and clarity of their work as well as its traceability has often been reached through the use of intrinsic mathematic coherences. If suchlike structures could be described within architecture, their mathematical abstraction could supplement “The Theory of Composition” of a building. This research focuses on an approach to describe layout principles of existing buildings in the form of mathematical rules. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e. a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a design problem, two exemplary methods will be described to apply new utilizations to existing buildings through the use of these rules.
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 12:06

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