CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 617

_id 2006_778
id 2006_778
authors Dritsas, Stylianos; Renos Charitou and Lars Hesselgren
year 2006
title Computational Methods on Tall Buildings - The Bishopsgate Tower
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 778-785
summary This paper summarizes the ongoing research done on The Bishopsgate Tower in the City of London using parametric design methodologies. The process is indicative of how computational methods will develop in the future and help designers find solutions for increasingly complex spaces.
keywords Tall Buildings; Computational Geometry; Building Information Management; Façade Optimization
series eCAADe
email sdritsas@kpf.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_406
id 2006_406
authors Germen, Murat; Selcuk Artut; Elif Ayiter; Selim Balcisoy and Yacov Sharir
year 2006
title The Representation and Navigation of Complex Data
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 406-410
summary In this paper we are attempting to address issues related to perception and consciousness deriving from the management of overwhelming data, utilizing artistic/design and sound production practices in virtual reality/environments. In the ordinary flow of day to day activities the self descriptive, self-reflexive, and recursive processes of data collection reveal themselves. These pairs are not encountered as binary oppositions in conflict, but in a continual management of data transformation. We converge with our own solutions—and the development of technological tools—and give birth to new scientific tools as well as intuitively artistically generated tools, literally and figuratively. A system prototype - ‘Vineta’ - has been developed at the IPP allowing navigation through scientific and technical data without typing and revising keyword-based queries. The chosen approach to visualizing documents and terms in navigational retrieval includes the representation of documents and terms as graphical objects, and dynamic positioning of these objects in a 3-dimensional virtual navigation space. Users can navigate through this virtual space examining individual documents and clusters of documents at various levels of detail.
keywords Data visualization representation, wearable computers, interaction, sound, overwhelming data management, immersion, search, graphs, drawing algorithms, collapsible modular spaces, scatterplot, sound spatialization, mixed augmented reality
series eCAADe
email muratgermen@sabanciuniv.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_074
id 2006_074
authors Gül, Leman Figen and Mary Lou Maher
year 2006
title The Impact of Virtual Environments on Design Collaboration
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 74-83
summary With recent developments in communication and information technology there has been increasing research into the role and the impact of computer media in collaborative design. This paper presents a case study that compares two designers collaborating in three different types of virtual environments with face to face (FTF) collaboration. The aim of the study is to identify similarities and differences between remote locations in order to have a better understanding of the impact of different virtual environments on design collaboration. Our results show that the architects had different designing behaviour depending on the type of external representation: they developed more design concepts, and had more design iterations through analysis-synthesis-evaluation while designing FTF and in a remote sketching environment; while the same architects focused on one design concept and making the design when designing in 3D virtual worlds.
keywords Collaborative design; virtual environments; remote sketching; 3D virtual worlds; face to face collaboration
series eCAADe
email lgul3679@mail.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e145a
id sigradi2006_e145a
authors Heiss, Leah
year 2006
title Empathy over distance: Wearables as tools for augmenting Remote Emotional Connection
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 66-69
summary Mainstream communication modes emphasise network speed, connection access, resolution, portability, and aesthetic design as primary to the success of their products. Within this vision a three by four centimetre screen and high resolution display are deemed adequate to emulate the intensities and complexities of face-to-face connection with loved ones. They allow us to ‘be there with you’ from wherever we might be. Yet interpersonal communication is a massively complex phenomenon. It involves a plethora of micro-activities which occur at a physical, physiological, and psychological level allowing us to recognise at a cellular scale intention, motive and emotional authenticity. Our conscious and non-conscious involvement in spatially collocated communication is substantial due to these myriad channels of real-time bi-directional information transfer. While contemporary communications technologies have the capacity to mediate our relationships, they fall short of encouraging the richness of spatially co-present interaction. The research discussed in this paper investigates the potential expansion of remote connection when electronically enhanced apparel is incorporated into the communications mix. Rather than pursuing the manifold functionalities of traditional communications media the garments discussed focus solely on the goal of enhancing empathy between physically distant individuals. This paper reports on the development and testing of a range of garments that conduct presence information between remotely located people. The garments sense, process, transmit and receive the heartbeat wavelength (ECG). They are enabled with ECG sensors, signal processing equipment, small vibration motors, and radio transceivers which allow users to ‘feel’ the heartbeat of a remote friend/lover/relative as vibration through their garment. The prototypes aim to enrich the remote communications experience through reintroducing an embodied, tactile dimension that is present in face-to-face communication. A range of user testing trials will be discussed which have been undertaken to assess the impact of the garments at a conscious and a non-conscious level. Conscious experiences were gauged through qualitative testing, by way of interviews and unsolicited written reactions, which have provided a range of engaging emotional responses. Non-conscious physiological reactions were assessed by recording ECG throughout user-testing periods. This data has been processed using HRV (heart rate variability) analysis software, running on MatLab. Preliminary results suggest that users have strong conscious and non-conscious reactions to the experience of wearing the prototype garments. The paper will describe the data processing techniques and findings of the user testing trials. The development of biosignal sensing garments has raised a range of issues including: innovative potentials for embedded peripheral awareness media; the expansion of the classical body to incorporate remotely sensed information; the issue of data semantics and the development of intensely personal non-verbal languages; and the issue of corporeal privacy when one’s biological information is exposed for potential download. They also bring into question how our bodily experiences might change when we incorporate remote sensory systems.
keywords Enabled apparel; emotional tools; biosignals
series SIGRADI
email leah.heiss@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 2006_626
id 2006_626
authors Rizopoulos, Charalampos and Dimitrios Charitos
year 2006
title Intelligence Technologies as a Means of Enhancing Spatial Experience
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 626-634
summary Following the evolution of human-computer interaction to date, intelligent user interfaces (IUIs) seem to be one of the most important paradigms for future research. “Intelligent” or quasi-intelligent behaviour may be applied to both virtual (intelligent virtual environments) and real space (Ambient Intelligence). This paper focuses on the augmentation of physical space as a characteristic of the latter case. More specifically, this paper briefly examines Ambient Intelligence and the concepts on which it is based, documents the importance of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) technologies for the formulation of the user’s spatial experience and attempts to outline some important theoretical approaches to human behaviour and communication that need to be considered during the design, implementation, and evaluation of Ambient Intelligence systems. Ultimately, this paper aims to outline the influence of said technologies on the users’ activity within the environment and their environmental experience in general.
keywords Ambient Intelligence; environmental design; activity theory; adaptation
series eCAADe
email harisrizopoulos@yahoo.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_022
id 2006_022
authors Veirum, Niels Einar; Mogens Fiil Christensen and Mikkel Mayerhofer
year 2006
title Hybrid Experience Space for Cultural Heritage Communication
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 22-30
summary Cultural heritage institutions like the museums are challenged in the global experience society. On the one hand it is more important than ever to offer “authentic” and geographically rooted experiences at sites of historic glory and on the other hand the audience’s expectations are biased by daily use of experience products like computer-games, IMAX cinemas and theme parks featuring virtual reality installations. “It’s a question of stone-axe displays versus Disney-power installations” as one of the involved museum professionals point it, “but we don’t want any of these possibilities”. The paper presents an actual experience design case in Zea Harbour, Greece dealing with these challenges using hybrid experience space communicating cultural heritage material. Archaeological findings, physical reconstructions and digital models are mixed to effectively stage the interactive experience space. The Zea Case is a design scenario for the Museum of the Future showing how Cultural Heritage institutions can reinvent the relation to the visitor and the neighbourhood. While Hybrid Experience Space can be used for Cultural Heritage Communication in traditional exhibitions we have reached for the full potential of on-site deployment as a hybrid experience layer using Google Earth and mobile technology.
keywords Hybrid Experience Space; Cultural Heritage Communication
series eCAADe
email nev@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_832
id 2006_832
authors El-Khoury, Nada; De Paoli Giovanni and Dorta Tomás
year 2006
title Digital Reconstruction as a means of understanding a building’s history - Case studies of a multilayer prototype
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 832-839
summary The experiments presented in this paper are situated at the crossroads of two fields: the understanding and communication of history to students and the field of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). More specifically, we aim to propose to students, ways of transferring information about lifestyles and techniques linked to the construction methods used in the past and which are present in ancient sites. It is not merely a question of proposing experiments for managing an inventory of knowledge such as that summarized in historical texts, but rather a means for understanding it: How do we communicate the invisible? How do we make visible what we cannot see but that we can imagine lies beneath the ruins of ancient sites? Lastly, how do we propose new approaches in the transferring of these historic skills and lifestyles? Such are the questions that the students’ experiments will attempt to answer while using computers as cognitive tools. In this case, these cognitive tools are designated as “multilayer prototypes” which aim to develop a dynamic virtual history space through augmented reality.
keywords ICT; Byblos; multilayer prototype; augmented reality; education research
series eCAADe
email giovanni.de.paoli@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_040
id 2006_040
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces-Interactive surface configurations
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 40-44
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture. The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes; the “Individuated”, the “Traditional”, the “Conflicted” and the “Assured”. (York and John, 1992) For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual; however, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure”. The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how it may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
keywords interaction; digital; environments; psychology; prototypes
series eCAADe
type normal paper
last changed 2006/09/11 16:22

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_280
id 2006_280
authors Barelkowski, Robert and Marcin Sajdak
year 2006
title Web-based virtual models in knowledge exchange forum - The reconstruction and restitution support techniques in WW
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 280-282
summary The article presents the web-based project which implements the idea of multidisciplinary information exchange related to historical objects and supports both research and studying activities. The proposed platform combines the concept of forum, information on resources, monitoring tools, as well as review and comment scientific oriented validation mechanisms.
keywords knowledge production; information exchange; web-based research; architectural research; reconstruction hypotheses
series eCAADe
email robert@armageddon.com.pl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_601
id caadria2006_601
authors BINSU CHIANG, MAO-LIN CHIU
year 2006
title PRIVATE/UN-PRIVATE SPACE: Scenario-based Digital Design for Enhancing User Awareness
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 601-603
summary Context awareness is important for human senses of places as well as human computer interaction. The aim of this research paper is focusing on controlling the user's privacy in a smart space which is adaptive to different users for enhancing the user's awareness in his diary life. In Environmental Psychology, the definition of privacy is that an individual has the control of deciding what information of himself is released to others, and under how he interact with others. (Westin 1970) And privacy is categorized as the linguistic privacy and visual privacy. (Sundstorm 1986). Solutions for privacy control: Plan Layout, Vision Boundary, Access Control and Architecture Metaphor - the transmission of information is not ascertainable for every single user. Although information are shown in public, but information is implied by cues and symbols. Only a certain user or a group of users have access to the full context of information. The methodology is to form an analytic framework to study the relationship between information, user and activities by using the computational supports derived from KitchenSense, ConceptNet, Python, 3d Studio Max and Flash; and to record patterns built up by users' behaviour and actions. Furthermore, the scenario-based simulation can envision the real world conditions by adding interfaces for enhancing user awareness.
series CAADRIA
email n7693103@mail.ncku.edu.twmc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ijac201715302
id ijac201715302
authors Borges de Vasconselo, Tássias and David Sperling
year 2017
title From representational to parametric and algorithmic interactions: A panorama of Digital Architectural Design teaching in Latin America
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 15 - no. 3, 215-229
summary This study focuses on the context of graphic representation technologies and digital design on Architectural teaching in Latin America. From categories proposed by Oxman and Kotnik and through a mapping study framed by a systematic review in CumInCAD database, it is presented a panorama of the state-of-art of the digital design on Architectural teaching in the region, between 2006 and 2015. The results suggest a context of coexistence of representational interaction and parametric interaction, as well as a transition from one to another and the emergence of the first experiments in algorithmic interaction. As this mapping shows an ongoing movement toward Digital Architectural Design in Latin America in the last decade, and points out its dynamics in space in time, it could contribute to strengthen a crowdthinking network on this issue in the region and with other continents.
keywords Computer-aided architectural design, Digital Architectural Design teaching, interaction with digital media, levels of design computability, Latin America, mapping study
series journal
email tassiav.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2019/08/07 12:03

_id eaea2005_49
id eaea2005_49
authors Breen, Jack
year 2006
title The Model Image
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 49-59
summary Designing is a specialized, unpredictable development process which is to a large extent visually generative and reflective – and, as such, predominantly pre-linguistic. Architectural designers make creative use of various imaging techniques, in order to elucidate design concepts that would otherwise remain ‘figments of the imagination’. By projecting their ideas, into readable information, these may be shared, communicated, evaluated and developed further. In this context, various types of models play an important role on different levels of design driven enquiry and representation. This contribution explores the dynamic conditions and potentials of models in architecture, in particular as a prerequisite for visual exploration and communication.
series EAEA
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id 2006_182
id 2006_182
authors Bridges, Alan
year 2006
title A Critical Review of Problem Based Learning in Architectural Education
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 182-189
summary There is limited research and discussion on pedagogical approaches in architectural education, simply because it is considered as one of the “unimportant” areas that researchers “do not bother studying” (Teymur, 2001). Problem Based Learning has been known to provide competent graduates in other professional disciplines, and, consequently, there have been attempts to utilise the same pedagogical approach in architectural education where PBL is seen as a potential solution to the problems encountered in architectural education. This paper critically reviews PBL implementations at TU Delft Netherlands and Newcastle University, N.S.W. Australia and draws conclusions with particular respect to the teaching of architectural computing
keywords PBL; architecture; computing
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ijac20064405
id ijac20064405
authors Calderon, Carlos; Nyman, Karl; Worley, Nicholas
year 2006
title The Architectural Cinematographer: Creating Architectural Experiences in 3D Real-time Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 71-90
summary This paper addresses the problem of creating new navigation paradigms for experiencing architectural designs in 3D real-time environments. The exploration of techniques other than still images or fly-through animations is complex and manifold, and requires the understanding and skills of many disciplines including cinematography, computer programming, architectural design and communication of 3D space. In this article, we present the Architectural Cinematographer (AC), a first step towards new navigation paradigms for real-time interactive virtual environments that are intended to enhance architectural walkthroughs with interactive camera effects. The AC is a fully developed modification (mod) of the game UnrealTournament2004™ using the Unreal™ game engine and relies on the notions of architectural concepts, cinematographic techniques and game level design to structure the virtual environment (VE) content in a way that facilitates a perception of design qualities in virtual architecture. AC addresses the current lack of either software or a structured approach to facilitate this in real-time architectural visualizations.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2006_e070c
id sigradi2006_e070c
authors Cardoso, Daniel
year 2006
title Controlled Unpredictability: Constraining Stochastic Search as a Form-Finding Method for Architectural Design
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 263-267
summary Provided with a strict set of rules a computer program can perform the role of a simple designer. Taking advantage of a computer’s processing power, it can also provide an unlimited number of variations in the form while following a given set of constraints. This paper delineates a model for interrelating a rule-based system based on purely architectural considerations with non-deterministic computational procedures in order to provide controlled variations and constrained unpredictability. The experimental model consists of a verisimilar architectural problem, the design of a residential tower with a strict program of 200 units of different types in a given site. Following the interpretation of the program, a set of rules is defined by considering architectural concerns such as lighting, dimensions, circulations, etc. These rules are then encoded in a program that generates form in an unsupervised manner by means of a stochastic search algorithm. Once the program generates a design it’s evaluated, and the parameters on the constraints are adjusted in order to produce a new design. This paper presents a description of the architectural problem and of the rule building process, images and descriptions of three different towers produced, and the code for the stochastic-search algorithm used for generating the form. The succesful evolution of the experiments show how in a computation-oriented design process the interpretation of the problem and the rule setting process play a major role in the production of meaningful form, outlining the shifting role of human designers from form-makers to rule-builders in a computation-oriented design endeavour.
keywords Architectural Design; Stochastic; Random; Rule-based systems; Form-generation
series SIGRADI
email dcardoso@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id sigradi2006_e033b
id sigradi2006_e033b
authors Castillo, Tim
year 2006
title Hybrid[s] : new pedagogical applications for designing our evolving spatial environment
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 131-136
summary The continual emergence of new informational and technological systems has impacted our cultural landscape. As society continues to evolve, we are becoming more connected to virtual systems that impact our spatial environment. The awareness and understanding of these invisible forces requires new curricular pedagogies in architectural education. This paper will document an ongoing course that was developed to research new methodologies for working with haptic environments and informational systems. Utilizing a high performance-computing center, students in the class are developing new adaptive intelligent spatial systems that engage a multiplicity of scales. They researched environments for PDA’s (Personal Data Assistance), I-Pods, cellular phones, GPS (Guidance Positioning Systems) and a new immersive virtual dome environment. The goal of the class was to reevaluate how architectural practice in the future will encompass a more holistic approach to both physical and virtual spatial development.
keywords Design tools and methods
series SIGRADI
email timc@unm.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id acadia06_232
id acadia06_232
authors Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak
year 2006
title Bidirectional Interoperability Between CAD and Energy Performance Simulation Through Virtual Model System Framework
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 232-250
summary The paper describes a novel approach involving interoperability, data modeling technology, and application of the building information model (BIM) focused on sustainable architecture. They share relationships and multiple experiences that have existed for years but have never have been proven. This interoperability of building performance simulation maps building information and parametric models with energy simulation models, establishing a seamless link between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and energy performance simulation software. During the last four decades, building designers have utilized information and communication technologies to create environmental representations to communicate spatial concepts or designs and to enhance spaces. Most architectural firms still rely on hand labor, drafted drawings, construction documents, specifications, schedules and work plans in traditional means. 3D modeling has been used primarily as a rendering tool, not as the actual representation of the project.With this innovative digitally exchange technology, architects and building designers can visually analyze dynamic building energy performance in response to changes of climate and building parameters. This software interoperability provides full data exchange bidirectional capabilities, which significantly reduces time and effort in energy simulation and data regeneration. Data mapping and exchange are key requirements for building more powerful energy simulations. An effective data model is the bidirectional nucleus of a well-designed relational database, critical in making good choices in selecting design parameters and in gaining and expanding a comprehensive understanding of existing data flows throughout the simulation process, making data systems for simulation more powerful, which has never been done before. Despite the variety of energy simulation applications in the lifecycle of building design and construction projects, there is a need for a system of data integration to allow seamless sharing and bidirectional reuse of data.
series ACADIA
email pongsak_archenergy@sbcglobal.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ijac20064101
id ijac20064101
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen
year 2006
title Learning design sketching from animations and storyboards
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 1, 1-17
summary A digital pen-and-paper system that generates stroke-by-stroke animations was used to compare the perception of interactive animations versus printed storyboards. Design students studied a space-planning example as either an animation or a storyboard and then emulated the example in doing a similar problem. Students viewing the animations rather than the storyboards performed marginally better in terms of matching the example steps and meeting design quality criteria. Students may understand the process of design sketching, but may lack the skills to copy the steps. Emulating the solution requires both cognitive skills and graphic facility. While beginners could logically organize spatial adjacencies, they often radically resized required program areas to streamline geometry. After organizing building spaces, they lacked the graphic conventions to articulate architectural features, so they could not copy refinement steps. Subjects at all levels used approximately the same number of strokes, with more productive sketching from advanced subjects.
keywords Teaching with Technology; Sketching; Design Teaching; Pen-Based Computing
series journal
email nywc@uoregon.edu
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00002
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2006_617
id caadria2006_617
authors CHING-CHIEN LIN
year 2006
title A GREATER SENSE OF PRESENCE: SPATIAL INTERFACE IN VR CAVE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 617-619
summary Virtual environments are three–dimensional spaces presented visually. They combine the user’s experience and sense of 'being there' in the virtual environment. Presence is a central element of virtual reality that it is seen as a part of its definition (Steuer, 1992). Direct interactions between participants and the virtual environment generate a more enhanced sense of immersion, thus making the participants feels they are part of that environment (Witmer & Singer, 1998).
series CAADRIA
email karenlin@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

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