CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 2006_326
id 2006_326
authors Zisimopoulou, Katerina and Alexis Fragkiadakis
year 2006
title Constructing the String Wall - Mapping the Material Process
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 326-335
summary The String Wall is the emergent product of a study on technological applications in architecture. Our team attempted to test the limits of the common partition wall construction, challenging the standard notion of the partition screen wall that recedes behind the structures, spaces and objects as a background condition. Such vibrant a partition as the SW becomes the center to the formation of the space it defines. The story of the SW could be described as the organic combination of the bow and the twist. The latent materiality and geometry of the bow and the twist as composite systems that are mined for their structural, tectonic and programmatic potential are tested prior to final construction by 3D printed scaled models. The SW is composed of successive frames that consist of vertical twisted strips of plywood attached to wooden beams. These frames emulate the stud elements of the conventional dry wall partition systems and are manufactured entirely manually. On the other hand, the use of CNC milling machine is employed for the production of the bowed plywood strips that fill in the frame. Three fluctuated curvatures produce strips that are combined rhythmically to produce the striated effect of the SW. The material is manipulated in order to expose its hidden side, the sequence of the multiple layers of the different infilling conditions. The oblique perspective of the SW is achieved through a novel geometric transparency, thus offering constantly changing views to a moving observer. The manipulation of the position of the component bowed and twisted strips explore the application of a see-through condition that escapes the norm and reveals the back to the front in a unique whole. The void of the screen wall becomes ultimately programmatic through the use of light. A sequence of halogen lights situated at the top and bottom of the in-between the wooden strips void create the dumbfounded effect of the SW experience.
keywords Digital construction methods; shape studies; rapid prototyping; 3D printer models
series eCAADe
email aazisimopoulou@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_710
id 2006_710
authors Jemtrud, Michael; Philam Nguyen; James Hayes; Grant Oikawa and Ryan McLennan
year 2006
title A Theory of Artistry for 3D Data Fusion - The element of craft in digital reconstruction
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 710-713
summary The following paper will articulate through an urban renewal proposal project for an area in Montréal, Canada that uses a “3D imaging and modeling protocol” and that accounts for the interaction between mediation and making in digitizing and constructing existing conditions digital artifacts. The protocol incorporates multi-sensor technologies with modeling and rendering techniques through a process of interpolation between a heterogeneous set of existing photographic, physical, and 2D documentation. The mode of operation implemented is a multi-layered and hybrid approach that recognizes the interplay between human scale and perception, visualization and abstraction of data and geometric accuracy, space and time.
keywords 3D modeling; digital reconstruction; craft; urban re-development
series eCAADe
email mjemtrud@ccs.carleton.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_234
id 2006_234
authors Donath, Dirk and Christian Tonn
year 2006
title Complex design strategies using building information models - Evaluation and interpretation of boundary conditions, supported by computer software
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 234-243
summary The choice of a chord and its execution should be regarded as a must and not left to arbitrary wish or superficial speculation. (Johannes Itten, 1961) The paper describes a modular concept for the IT-support of planning practice using BIM (Building Information Modelling) and a parameterized building model. The platform used is the modularized software concept for architectural planning in existing built contexts (prototype software FREAK). The current progress in the development of a reasoned support of planning tasks is described in this paper in more detail. The system consists of a series of software prototypes which are linked to the BIM, utilize the specific data within and demonstrate the value of a consistent and extendable CAD-model. The “Colored Architecture” software prototype is one such design-support module of the software platform and enables the designer to experiment with the parameters colour, light and materials in architectural space. This module supports experimentation, assessment and realization of colours and materials in the architectural design process on a new quality. For instance, the integration of “live radiosity” light simulation allows a qualified and interactive assessment and evaluation of colours and materials in near-real lighting conditions. The paper also details further software prototypes, modules and concepts including building surveying and the design of self-supporting domed structures.
keywords Design; Parameterized Building Information Modelling; Plausibility; Planning Support; Colour, Material and Light Design
series eCAADe
email christian.tonn@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_342
id 2006_342
authors Lyon, Eduardo
year 2006
title Component Based Design and Digital Manufacturing - A DfM Model for Curved Surfaces Fabrication using Three Axis CNC Router
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 342-350
summary Through the use of design for manufacturing (DfM) method and looking at the relations between its potential application in architectural production and its implementation using digital manufacturing technologies, we analyze building construction processes and explore, in more detail curved surface fabrication using two dimensional cutting and three dimensional milling processes. Afterwards a DfM model for curved surfaces fabrication using three-axis computer numerical control (CNC) router is proposed. The proposed DfM model relies fundamentally in two supporting factors; the implementation of design heuristics that integrates production knowledge and the availability of some design related to production evaluation metrics. Subsequently, we test and refine the model using structured design experiences. This was accomplished by capturing new design heuristics and detecting useful evaluation metrics for production. In the final part of the research, a refined DfM model was tested in a component design case study. The case study is based on producing a curved surface module on wood for an existing proprietary component based wall system. As a summary, we conceptualize from this top-down development approach to create a design for manufacturing model that integrates design and construction in architecture, based on three possible applications fields: Design processes improvement, building production process improvement, CAD-CAM tools development. Our purpose is to provide better foundational constructs and approaches for integrating design with manufacturing in architecture.
keywords Design for Manufacturing; Design Cognition; Digital Fabrication
series eCAADe
email eduardo.lyon@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e068d
id sigradi2006_e068d
authors Catovic-Hughes, Selma
year 2006
title Digital Storytelling: "Memory….. Sarajevo, my personal story"
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 337-340
summary “It was a fresh summer night, sky deprived of stars, and hardly any signs of life. After hours of waiting, well passed midnight, they finally allowed us to enter. I couldn’t see or hear much, except movements of those in front of me, but judging by intense scent of mildew and worm-like smell of earth, I realized my mile long underground adventure had begun. There was no looking back, only the brave steps ahead into my new, and hopefully, safe and fruitful future.” [ from diary95 ] Just like many teens around the world, I too kept a journal. It began with playful thoughts of a teenage girl, living in Sarajevo, enjoying life. On my fifteenth birthday, those carefree moments were soon replaced with brutal facts of life under siege: Sarajevo and its citizens had been surrounded by the Serbs who took over all the roads leading in and out of the city. Three years later, I was weeks away from graduating high school, and instead of getting excited, I wondered about my future…”Yesterday was awesome -- we had both electricity and water for eight straight hours…hooray!! You could see the lights miles away…the entire city was awake, making pies and bread, washing clothes, watching movies.” [ from diary93 ] Was I going to spend the rest of my life anticipating the restricted electric and water timetable? Would I wake up the next day to see all my family alive? Would I ever have a chance to fulfill my dreams? This project captures the process of [re]tracing steps of my personal journey of leaving Sarajevo to come to the United States and [re]constructing memories as a sequence of spatial events using the artifacts and the text from my war journals. The intent of my project is to define that line between the old and the new, and intertwine and merge its current condition with the facts and memories from the past. Although there was never a permanent “Berlin-wall-like” divider, the natural contours of the river and invisible screens of the snipers served as impermeable walls and divided the city for four years. The implied boundary seemed to be more powerful than the massiveness of the concrete barricades. Is it possible to re-condition something [building, space, soul] to be and feel the same when it had been destroyed and deeply scarred on the inside? Instead of placing banal memorials engraved with the bare facts, how can we make a tribute to a series of events—a time period that changed the fabric of the city—in a more three-dimensional experience? How can we integrate digital phenomenon in the process of the post-war reconstruction to re-trace the past while creating necessary advanced improvements for the new contemporary society? The impact that social conditions have on architecture, art, culture, and ultimately, people can be told in a universal language – digital storytelling, containing pieces of history and personal memories to create representations of time and space of the past, present or future.
keywords memory; postwar; retrace; reconstruction; memorial
series SIGRADI
email selma977@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id ddss2006-pb-403
id DDSS2006-PB-403
authors Ting-Hau Yen
year 2006
title Space Cube: A 3D Puzzle for Study Model
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 403-414
summary In the process of architecture design, the manufacture of study model acts a procedure of swift transformation from concept to a visible model. Since the era of CAD/CAM approaches, the tool of constructing the model evolves from the traditional physical model to digital model in the mode of the manufacture of study model. The virtual model, which is utilized in the incipient concept discussion by the designer, has become a new intermediary material. However, the virtual model or physical model respectively acts its role that may not be substituted now. TUIS (Tangible User Interfaces) is the intuitional interface system of discussion on striding these two intermediary materials. By the information interchange between the physical model and virtual model, a designer can dedicate to the procedure of design development rather than be restricted to the operation and usage of these interfaces. However, there are many problems existing in applying such a system to the solid geometry model stack. This essay will discuss that a designer explores the incipient design application by manipulating physical model and virtual model.
keywords Tangible, Cube, Modeling, Interaction
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 2006_532
id 2006_532
authors Abdelhameed, Wael
year 2006
title How Does the Digital Environment Change What Architects Do in the Initial Phases of the Design Process?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 532-539
summary Some researchers have tried to answer the question: do we need to think differently while designing in terms of the digital environment? This methodological question leads to another question: what is the range of this difference, if there is one? This research investigates the range of changes in how architects conduct and develop the initial design within the digital environment. The role offered by the digital environment in visual design thinking during conceptual designing through shaping: concepts, forms, and design methods, is identified and explored.
keywords Conceptual designing; architects; digital environment; design process; visual design thinking
series eCAADe
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_454
id 2006_454
authors Bampanelos, Athanasios A.
year 2006
title Space time pixels
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 454-457
summary This paper reports the design and installation of a networked application that records body activity and generates a wall-projected, intermediate, shared, electronic space, which can support original interaction between multiple participants in two distant, physical spaces.
keywords Awareness; Ambient media; Body interfaces; Social interaction
series eCAADe
email bampanelos@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_228
id 2006_228
authors Barelkowski, Robert and Jerzy Chodor
year 2006
title The Visualization – Visual Comparative Analysis of Early Romanesque Churches
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 228-231
summary The paper presents educative aspects of visualization techniques performed in order to achieve the visual comparison of early romanesque or pre-romanesque churches of rotunda type. It explains and renders how computer techniques are used in order to achieve reliable basis for comparison of dimensions, volumetrics, material, proportions and other features.
keywords visualisation; computer aided education; computer aided research; reconstruction
series eCAADe
email robert@armageddon.com.pl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e048c
id sigradi2006_e048c
authors Beck, Mateus Paulo; Brener, Rafael; Giustina, Marcelo and Turkienicz, Benamy
year 2006
title Light and Form in Design – A Computational Approach
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 254-257
summary Shape perception is strongly influenced by the reciprocal relation between light and form. Computational applications can increase the number of design alternatives taking into account possible variations in the relation between light and form. The aim of this study is to discuss a pedagogical experience carried out with 5th semester architectural students, based on a series of exercises prior to the term project. The exercises were concerned with the relation between light and form from an aesthetical point of view and should be understood as examples for the use of computers as tools to creatively accelerate the process of design and learning. The paper is divided in five parts. The first one describes the conceptual background for the exercises, a descriptive method for the identification of light effects in architectural objects based on ideas of shape emergence. The exercises’ methodology is explained in the second part, referring to the use of computational applications in 3-dimensional modeling, material and light simulation. The methodology includes different phases: –creation of bi-dimensional compositions according to symmetry operations; –creation of a minimal living space assigning functions to spaces originated from the former composition; –analysis of the impact of light on the form and spaces created; –alteration of form and materials creating new light effects considering the functions related to the spaces. The exercises alternate work in computational environment in two and three dimensions with the use of mockups, lamps and photography. In the third part the results –student’s design steps– are described. In the fourth part the results are analyzed and some conclusions are outlined in the fifth and last part. The use of emergent forms combined with computational tools has proved to be an effective way to achieve an accelerated understanding of the impact of light on forms as demonstrated by the evolution of the students work during the term and by their final results concerning the term project.
keywords Architectural Design; Lighting; Design Simulation; Virtual Environment
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_890
id 2006_890
authors Calabrese, Antonio; Carlo Coppola; Luca Licenziato; Francesco Mele; Antonio Sorgente and Oliviero Talamo
year 2006
title Creation and editing of artifacts’ models by Generative Projects
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 890-896
summary In this paper we propose an aiding system for the creation of models of artifacts which is based on a methodology that has its foundations in a concept that we call generative projects. This methodology has been defined separating the design paradigm of the designer from the computational model, defined in order to implement the system that support the designer in the design process, and from the graphical engine of the specific rendering system, chosen for the visualization of the generated artifact. In this work we defined an user interface that assists the designer during the design process, translates the result of the design into the underlying computational model and carries out the access to the rendering system in a transparent way. The experimentation of the system was conducted on various artifacts domains, as jewels, glasses, lamps, cutlery, wireless headphones, aerosols, pots and plans.
keywords formal ontology; generative design
series eCAADe
email Carlo.Coppola@unina2.it
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_770
id 2006_770
authors Charbonneau, Nathalie; Dominic Boulerice; David W. Booth and Temy Tidafi
year 2006
title Understanding Gothic Rose Windows with Computer-Aided Technologies
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 770-777
summary This paper explains the parameters and methodology at the heart of an ongoing research project that seeks to verify whether one can trace back the genesis of any given artefact or work of art by means of computer-aided modeling. In its endeavour our research team Computer Assisted Design Research Group (GRCAO) aims to initiate and propose novel methods of modeling design processes. This approach is exemplified by a case study dealing with rose tracery designs adorning Gothic cathedrals of 12th and 13th Century Île-de-France. A computerized model reenacting their design process was developed along with an interface enabling the translation of the designer’s intentions into a virtual design space. The stated goal of this research project is to evaluate empirically to what extent our modeling strategies can grasp a given artefact as a logical and articulate ensemble. Furthermore, we seek eventually to determine whether this kind of software programme would prove an adequate tool in the development of the architectural designer’s cognitive abilities.
keywords Architectural modeling; architectural know-how; Gothic rose windows; functional programming
series eCAADe
email nathalie.charbonneau@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_190
id 2006_190
authors Chiu, Mao-Lin and Chien-Rung Lou
year 2006
title Teaching Tectonic Design Studio with A Digital Design Approach
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 190-197
summary Digital design education is shifting from software and hardware application to issue-based, methodology-driven and technology-driven exploration. The attempts in design education have to address the future needs for architects, for instance the tectonic design. Our design studio tries to structure the design process to help students understand the principles and use the digital technology to operate tectonic design issue in the process. The dialogue with the materials (virtual and physical ones) is integrated with the exercises. The attempts in the design studio undertaken in National Cheng Kung University provide the foundation for observation and discussion. The pedagogy and approaches are examined, and the potential directions are reported.
keywords Design studio; digital design; tectonic design; design education
series eCAADe
email mc2p@ms21.hinet.net
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_690
id 2006_690
authors Chuen-huei Huang, Joseph and Robert Krawczyk
year 2006
title i_Prefab Home - Customizing Prefabricated Houses by Internet-Aided Design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 690-698
summary The paper demonstrates a web-based system for use in the area of prefabricated housing to assist the customer and architect in selecting appropriate building components. By collecting and evaluating client’s requirements with web technology, a methodology can be developed that can generate design options based on the client’s needs and available modular components in the market, and simulate the final design before beginning manufacturing. In this proposed model, a process of providing mass-customized prefabricated housing based on computer-aided design and a web-based product configuration system will be presented. How prefabricated housing design can be evolved from a mass repetitive production level to a mass customization level to meet variability and personality is the primary issue to be explored in this research.
keywords Web-based design; clients input; mass customization; prefabrication
series eCAADe
email atelierh@gmail.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_840
id 2006_840
authors Ciblac, Thierry; Louis-Paul Untersteller and Pierre Macé
year 2006
title Restitution and Interpretation of Spatial Representations: A New Approach for Teaching Representation
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 840-847
summary The use of computers has changed the practice of spatial representations. The users are no longer drawers but modelers who need to be able to check the coherence of models. The teaching of representations has to adapt with this evolution, especially in Schools of Architecture. A pedagogical way is to give interpretation tools of spatial representations through projective properties (incidence or affine properties) and consequence of intrinsic constraints (parallelism, orthogonality, and symmetry). The application of this knowledge is essential for the rebuilding of existing 3D objects or for a design process, with the restitution of 3D models from sketches. These approaches are illustrated in a pedagogical way, using dynamic geometry, in the restitution of the polyhedron of the engraving “Melencolia I” of A. Dürer, and in a dynamic sketch of a skylight inspired of the Vitra museum of F. Ghery.
keywords restitution; perspective; teaching; geometric algebra; sketch
series eCAADe
email tciblac@paris-lavillette.archi.fr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_684
id 2006_684
authors De Bodt, Kathleen
year 2006
title SoundScapes & Architectural Spaces - Spatial sound research in digital architectural design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 684-689
summary The paper presents ongoing research focusing on the development of digital tools and methodologies for spatial design based on non-Euclidean geometries. It addresses the way sound can be used both conceptually and acoustically in the early stages of the design process, examining digital architectural design and modeling based on three-dimensional sound visualization and the acoustical analysis and evaluation of complex curved surface geometry. The paper describes SoundMatrix, the first part of a digital design tool created by using Max/Msp/Jitter, to assist in the preliminary design of building façades in small-scale urban environments, specifically studying the possibilities of curvature to decrease sound reflection between opposing street façades. Examples from a workshop with the SoundMatrix application illustrate the real-time 3D authoring and sound spatialisation processing currently implemented in the tool.
keywords graphical programming; performance-based design; generative design
series eCAADe
email k.debodt@ha.be
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_810
id 2006_810
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Knight,Michael
year 2006
title Pen or PC? - Is Sketching essential to architectural design?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 810-817
summary This paper reports on an ongoing student architectural design project that is investigating the differing effects of the use of PC’s or Pens in the design process. We are interested to see whether designing wholly on the computer with a volume modeling software would produce differing results to a traditional design process with a strong basis in 2D sketching. To minimize the influence of the participants previous experience in either the use of PC’s or the pen, we have been working with very young students that have not yet gone through a traditional training on architectural design and CAAD software. This is one of the key aspects of our experimental procedure. We have found that recent software developments in the field of CAAD clearly have and will influence the way architects design and brings the computer as a design tool to the “normal architect”. Until very recently the computer was seen as a design tool almost solely for “computer geeks” in the profession, the majority of architects still using it mainly as a drafting machine or to produce visualizations of their projects after a more ‘conventional’ design process had finished. It is now very clear to us that the ongoing change in technology will have a profound effect on the way all of us will work in future undertaking architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching methods and the curricula. We use the above mentioned ongoing educational project to find out about the benefits and risks of using the computer as a design tool for first year students.
keywords Early Design stages; Collaborative Design; Sketching
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_778
id 2006_778
authors Dritsas, Stylianos; Renos Charitou and Lars Hesselgren
year 2006
title Computational Methods on Tall Buildings - The Bishopsgate Tower
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 778-785
summary This paper summarizes the ongoing research done on The Bishopsgate Tower in the City of London using parametric design methodologies. The process is indicative of how computational methods will develop in the future and help designers find solutions for increasingly complex spaces.
keywords Tall Buildings; Computational Geometry; Building Information Management; Façade Optimization
series eCAADe
email sdritsas@kpf.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_352
id 2006_352
authors Fricker, Pia and Oskar Zieta
year 2006
title CNC Compliant Methods of Design - Understanding Technology
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 352-357
summary This paper investigates new design methods, showing the experimental use of new digital tools, CNC-techniques and technologies so as to expand the definition of contemporary architecture. This investigation of new technologies extends the traditional practice of architectural design to include issues of design, multimedia, programming, control systems and fabrication by using computer controlled machines. The main teaching and research focus of the Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture (MAS), Specialization in Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD), Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt, is the computer based architectural design and its automated production. The aim of our research and teaching project is to achieve a close connection between design and production by embedding the “digital chain” in the whole process. The digital chain is a design and production sequence with no analogue steps; the process offers high flexibility in terms of design and production. The use of new digital tools in architecture extends the profession beyond traditional design.
keywords Digital Methods of Construction; Representation; Integration of CNC technology in Education; Digital Chain
series eCAADe
email fricker@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

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