CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 618

_id 2006_198
id 2006_198
authors Oxman, Rivka
year 2006
title Educating the Digital Design Thinker - What Do We Teach When We Teach Design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 198-205
summary Designerly ways of thinking have become a significant topic in design research. If indeed, contemporary phenomena of “digital design thinking” are different from traditional models, than there is emerging pressure to pioneer new teaching paradigms Theories and methods of digital design can no longer be conceptualized as the merging of computational tools with conventional formulations of design thinking. Within the framework of this orientation to a critical formulation of new educational agenda, pedagogical issues are considered. A new orientation to understanding the impact of digital media on “digital design thinking” and pedagogy is presented discussed and demonstrated
keywords Digital Design; Digital Architecture; Digital Design Studio; Design Thinking; Design Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email rivkao@tx.technion.ac.il
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2014_164
id sigradi2014_164
authors Moroni Dotoranda, Janaina Luisa da Silva; Paulo Edi Rivero Martins, Dr.Giuseppe Lotti
year 2014
title Estilo de herramientas didácticas que favorecen la creatividad. Tema: Nuevas metodologías de aprendizaje
source SIGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 245-249
summary Creativity is an important factor for innovators. According to Eguchi and Pinheiro (2008) the basis of design is innovation because of the use creative methodology. It’s important to remember that the word “project” comes from the Latin “proyectus”, meaning “a forward throwing action”. According to Ramos (2006), “educating for creativity is essential.” Beetlestone (2000), De Bono (1993), Munari (1997) and Pawlak (2000) argue that as we’re children we’re curious to find answers to everything, but that traditional schooling brakes the creativity. This research is a methodological test which aims to identify the reasons for student’s selection of specific creative tools used in university projects.
keywords Creativity; Innovation; Design; Education; Freedom
series SIGRADI
email Janaina.moroni@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id ascaad2006_paper21
id ascaad2006_paper21
authors Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2006
title The Relations Between Design Idea Emergence and Design Solution Direction: digital media use in mass exploration of architectural design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The unfolding of research is that design is a creative activity of problem-solving, directed to achieve what architecture should provide man with. The first part of the research investigates Design-Idea Exploration in the initial phases of design process, in terms of exploring the links between Design-Idea Emergence and Design-Solution Direction. The second part of the research presents a use of digital media in Design-Idea Exploration of three dimensional shapes throughout the initial phases of design process. The research has concluded the links between Design Ideas Emergence and Design Solution Directions, and presented the features of the program, which distinguish it from other standard modeling software.
series ASCAAD
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_532
id 2006_532
authors Abdelhameed, Wael
year 2006
title How Does the Digital Environment Change What Architects Do in the Initial Phases of the Design Process?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 532-539
summary Some researchers have tried to answer the question: do we need to think differently while designing in terms of the digital environment? This methodological question leads to another question: what is the range of this difference, if there is one? This research investigates the range of changes in how architects conduct and develop the initial design within the digital environment. The role offered by the digital environment in visual design thinking during conceptual designing through shaping: concepts, forms, and design methods, is identified and explored.
keywords Conceptual designing; architects; digital environment; design process; visual design thinking
series eCAADe
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper23
id ascaad2006_paper23
authors Ali, Rasha
year 2006
title Islamic Architecture and Digital Databases
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Epigraphy in Islamic architecture represented an indispensable element in its conceptual design and structure. Our research investigates this unique role, which epigraphy played in Islamic architecture as a tool singularizing this architecture and the sensuality it inspires inside a building while bestowing on it its particular identity. This how SADEPIG came to being: it is a virtual database regrouping all the information about the monumental epigraphy which date from the Sa‘dian period in Morocco (1527- 1660). The digital corpus of monumental Sa‘dian inscriptions provides also buildings plans, virtual tour within the monument, construction details, information about the identity of patron and builders.
series ASCAAD
email ruchii@aucegypt.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper13
id ascaad2006_paper13
authors Ambrose, Michael A.
year 2006
title Plan is Dead: to BIM or not to BIM, that is the question
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Drawing, modeling and the explicit abstraction embedded in the traditions and conventions of visual communication through composition and representation are fundamental to the how, why and what of architectural design. BIM presents simulation as an antiabstract means of visual communication that seeks to displace the discreet representation of plan, section and elevation with the intelligent object model. If plan is dead, the implication is that the value of abstraction is dead or dying as well. How can architectural education prepare students for digital practice with such an assault on the underlying role of abstract representation of formal and spatial constructs that constitute architecture? This paper explores a possible path for engaging digital media in education that explores the gap between design theory and digital practice. The investigation centers on ways of exploring architecture by developing teaching methods that reprioritize ways of seeing, thinking and making spatial design. Digital architectural education has great opportunity and risk in how it comes to terms with reconceptualizing design education as the profession struggles to redefine the media and methods of architectural deliverables in the age of BIM.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e160c
id sigradi2006_e160c
authors Andrade, Max and Cheng, Liang-Yee
year 2006
title Diretrizez Geométricas de Auxílio ao Processo de Projeto de Edifícios Residenciais [Geometrical Guidelines to Aid the Design of Floor Plants of Residential Buildings]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 243-247
summary This paper discusses the basic principles of a geometric method to aid the design process of residential buildings. It makes part of the initial phases of a research whose aim is to develop a computer system to aid the sketching and evaluation of floor plant design of multi-storied residential buildings. The fundamental idea of the research is the existence of some basic patterns of floor plants that reflect the designer’s mental models in this category of building. The models are regarding the usage of the space such as forms and dimensions, the elements for the circulation and the external skins. During the design process, architects work on each one of these models to generate the sketches of the floor plant layout. Generally, the layout of an apartment in multi-storied buildings depends basically on the internal dynamics of the users without the complex relationship with the neighborhood environment as in the case of houses. In this way, it would be easier to identify, to organize and to associate the mental models of multi-storied buildings on geometric basis, which, in their turns, might be effectively used as inputs for the layout planning of new design. By applying the geometric basis, the architects may reduce the universe of feasible alternatives into a small group of heuristic solutions that can be described by using few simple guidelines. In addition to this, the geometric bases of the existing buildings might be used to build a knowledge-based system to aid the architectural design. The objective of this paper is to show some initial results of the research obtained from a survey and the case studies of form, dimensions and topology of existing buildings. To limit the scope of the discussion, only residential buildings with two to three bedrooms are considered. At first, a survey of plants of residential buildings with two and three bedrooms, in Brazil, is carried out. In the next step, the dimensions, shape, external skin perimeter, circulation system and accessibility are analyzed. Finally, typical topologies of the building are investigated.
keywords Design process; geometric method; residential buildings
series SIGRADI
email maxandrade@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2012_30
id sigradi2012_30
authors Angeluzzi, Gustavo; Hanns, Daniela Kutschat
year 2012
title Um levantamento de requisitos gerais para o desenvolvimento e posicionamento de DOOTERS – um aplicativo lúdico de listas de tarefas para iPhone [A survey of general requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS - a to-do list application for iPhone]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 191-195
summary DOOTERS is a to-do list application for iPhone which entertains and motivates the user to get things done. It was developed based on requirements obtained trough: 1. the study of several personal information organizing methods (Covey, 1989; Allen, 2005; Foster, 2006); 2. answers to a task lists user focused questionnaire; 3. observation of to-do list users while creating lists and organizing tasks; 4. comparison of digital and non-digital task list media (paper, computer and mobile device); 5. analysis of profiles, behaviors and to-do list applications for iPhone. In this paper, the authors present the process of obtaining requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS.
keywords information and interface design, requirements, to-do list application, iPhone, DOOTERS
series SIGRADI
email dk.hanns@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e165b
id sigradi2006_e165b
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Optimization in the Balance between the Production Effort of E-learning Tutorials and their related Learning Outcome
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 122-126
summary This paper provides evidence on the level of media richness that may be cost effective in the development of e-learning tutorials for teaching and learning computer visualization techniques. For such a purpose the author provides an analysis of low-cost / high-impact media rich products, the effort and cost required in their development and the measurement of related learning outcomes. Circa twenty years of R&D of multimedia and hypermedia applications for instruction have demonstrated the benefits of communicating relevant information to learners using engaging media. Based on this evidence, this paper assumes that due to the cognitive style of design students, the instructional packages for learning computer techniques for design visualization that are rich in media content, tend to be more effective. Available visualization technologies make the development of e-learning tutorials feasible and apparently the logical way to implement our instructional packages. However the question in the development of e-learning tutorials becomes a more strategic one when we are called to reach a level of optimization between producing a package with a basic standard, namely; text & still-graphic based tutorials, or a state-of-the-art package that is based on video demonstrations (more than enough?) that can accommodate the students’ learning requirements and also our production costs. The costs include the human resources (instructor, producers, assistants and others) and the material resources (hardware and software, copies, and others) involved in the creation of the e-learning tutorials. The key question is: What is good enough, and what is clearly superfluous? In order to confirm our hypothesis and propose a relevant balance between media richness and learning effectiveness, this paper describes an experiment in the use of two different levels of media richness as used to deliver instructions on the production of computer animations for design visualization. The students recruited for this experiment were fairly familiarized with the use of 3D modeling concepts and software, but had no previous knowledge of the techniques included in the tutorials; in specific; camera animation procedures. The students, separated in two groups, used one of the two methods; then they proceeded to apply their newly acquired skills in the production of an animation without using the help of any external means. The assessment of results was based on the quality of the final product and the students’ performance in the recall of the production procedures. Finally an interview with the students was conducted on their perception of what was accomplished from a metacognitive point of view. The results were processed in order to establish comparisons between the different levels of achievement and the students’ metacognitive assessment of learning. These results have helped us to create a clear set of recommendations for the production of e-learning tutorials and their conditions for implementation. The most beneficial characteristics of the two tested methods in relation to type of information, choice of media, method of information delivery, flexibility of production/editorial tools,! and overall cost of production, will be transferred into the development of a more refined product to be tested at larger scale.
keywords e-learning tutorials; media richness; learning effectiveness; cognitive style; computer visualization techniques
series SIGRADI
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_p034e
id sigradi2006_p034e
authors Araujo Pires, Julie and Murad, Carlos
year 2006
title Inscrições hipertextuais: a escrita como imagem na criação visual contemporânea [Hypertext inscription: writing as image in contemporary visual creation]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 411-414
summary This paper discusses the creative imagination by the speech’s presence on the contemporary projects of art/design. Nowadays the digital era has shattered limits of the space and the user’s perception in a mix between images and texts, built by numeric language, witnessing possible new ways of writing as image. Considering on the duality between verbal and visual, some post-modern artists/projectors are redeeming the germinal quality of image from the alphabet. They use video and electronic technology incorporating the word written in their creation process. In this sense, Gaston Bachelard’s ideas on the philosophy of image and imagination could be helpful to understand that process. At first, looking through the representations accomplished by the artists gesture in their constructions. Afterwards, how those visual poetics explore the word on video project and electronic way as experimentation and on the creation project process.
series SIGRADI
email julieap@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_c159e
id sigradi2006_c159e
authors Aroztegui Massera, Carmen
year 2006
title Aprendiendo del cine: Evaluación de códigos formales y estrategias narrativas en una instalación de video. [Learning from the movie: Formal codes and narrative strategies in a video installation]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 415-419
summary Architectural animations often evidence limitations when trying to get across our design intensions in terms of the experiencing of a place. When architects design a space, they propose not only geometry and space functionality, All in all, any architectural design implies a way of experiencing the space. But how can we communicate it? Narrative films developed - in the last century - communication conventions that allow the audience to feel transported to the time and place of the movie. However, architects have barely introduced these conventions into their animations. The objective of this paper is to review two examples - a scene on a film and a video installation- that could help architects to use film codes creatively in when communicating the experiencing of a place.
series SIGRADI
email aroztegui@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2007_010
id ecaade2007_010
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Kourtis, Lampros
year 2007
title The House of Affects Project
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 777-784
summary The House of Affects is an experimental installation to be part of the PerFormaSpace project pursued at the University of Cambridge, UK (DIGIS) and Goldsmiths College London, U.C.L. (Digital Studios), currently partially funded by Arts&Business East 2006, in collaboration with Econavate, UK who will provide their technical expertise in fabrication using recycled materials. This paper presents project-specific information and theoretical discussion on the design process and the computational methods used to develop advanced adaptive structural components in relationship to behavioral goals, criteria and constraints.
keywords Optimization, computational architecture, architectonics, adaptability
series eCAADe
email george.artopoulos@gmail.com, kourtis@stanford.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia06_158
id acadia06_158
authors Barrow, Larry R.
year 2006
title Digital Design and Making 30 Years After
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 158-177
summary Current design studio pedagogy is undergoing significant change as the means and methods of ideation, representation and making evolve with digital tools; Computer-Aided-Design-Computer-Aided-Manufacturing (CADCAM) remains a contentious topic among many studio instructors and faculty in the academy. Computing is now nearing ubiquity; many processes and products have seen significant evolutionary trends, if not revolutionary transformations; this is no less the case in the academic and firm design studio. The impact of “digital” media and CADCAM, in the design-make process, remains obscure and formally unknown.In this paper, we will review our research and findings from the work of three students; two current students who were in our Digital Design II (DDII) spring 2006 course and the third student, the writer, will reflect on “design and making” from a “pre-architecture” and pre-studio/pre-computer (CADCAM) perspective of ‘making’ thirty-three years ago. The research findings provide universal precepts pertinent to current thinking about emerging studio pedagogy. Our findings suggest that computing technology should be introduced at the outset of design education for the beginning student in basic design studio; and moreover, advanced designers can partner with “digital” tools to ideate and realize their, heretofore unrepresentable and unconstructable, ideas in the early stages of design using CADCAM.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@coa.msstate.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e159b
id sigradi2006_e159b
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2006
title Digital Design Pedagogy - Basic Design - CADCAM Space Box Exploration
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 127-130
summary This proposed paper will highlight the work of a “pre-architecture” graduate student’s work produced in a “Digital Design II” course in Spring 06. This student has a bachelor’s degree in Architectural Technologies and hopes to attend a “professional” degree program in architecture after completing our Master of Science degree program. The student entered our “pre / post-professional” graduate program as a means of learning more about design, technology and architecture. This provided a rare opportunity to do “research” in the area of digital technology in the early formative phases of a new architecture / design students development. The student chose to study “shadows” as a means of design inquiry. The primary focus of the work was the study of various “4” x 4” x 4” “space-cubes.” The student was given various “design” constraints, and “transformative” operations for the study of positive-negative space relationships, light+shadows, and surface as a means of gaining in-sight to form. The CADCAM tools proved to be empowering for the student’s exploration and learning. With the recent emergence of both more user-friendly hardware and software, we are seeing a paradigm shift in design “ideation.” This is attributed to the evolving human-computer-interface (HCI) that now allows a fluidic means of creative design ideation, digital representation and physical making. Computing technology is now infusing early conceptual design ideation and allowing designers, and form, to follow their ideas. The argument will be supported with primary evidence generated in our pedagogy and research that has shown the visualization and representational power of emerging 2D and 3D CADCAM tools. This paper will analyze the basic “digital design” process used by the writer’s student. Architectural form concepts, heretofore, impossible to model and represent, are now possible due to CADCAM. Emerging designers are integrating “digital thinking” in their fundamental conceptualization of form. These creative free-forms are only feasible for translation to tectonic form using digital design-make techniques. CADCAM tools are empowering designers for form exploration and design creativity. Current computing technology is now infusing the creative design process; the computer is becoming a design “partner” with the designer and is changing form and architecture; thus, we are now seeing unprecedented design-make creativity in architecture.
keywords Basic Design; CADCAM; Digital Design; Virtual 3D Models; Physical 3D Printed Models
series SIGRADI
email lbarrow@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_k001
id sigradi2006_k001
authors Batty, Michael
year 2006
title Visualizing the City
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 23-26
summary In this lecture, I will describe the history of how cities have become the focus for visualization, for developing new ideas and tools as well as for demonstrating their wider applicability to design and policy-making processes. There are many variants on this theme of visualizing cities and I will attempt to set these in context as well as describing some of the challenges to the field which will dictate the research agenda in the coming years.
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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