CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 618

_id eaea2005_221
id eaea2005_221
authors Gatermann, Harald
year 2006
title Media work in the educational training of architects to experiences with the postgraduate course “Architecture Media Management”
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 221-237
summary The perception of space, geometry, material and the influence of light is one of the core items of undergraduate courses in architecture. In Bochum we developed and still practise a consequent system of integrating drawing and photography as analytic tools of perception and sketching, descriptive geometry, computer aided design, digital visualisation and animation as synthetic items. The versatile use of digital media in the further studies is of essential significance - especially the synthesis between architectural photography (with all its special features concerning geometrical depicting) and CAD / visualisation / animation. Special emphasis is given to techniques for simulation and immersion such as digital panorama photography, combined with computer-based vr-modelling e.g. vrml as well as using online-cad-modeling and arial photography in processes of citizen participation.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email harald.gatermann@fh-bochum.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id ijac20064305
id ijac20064305
authors Sanguinetti, Paola
year 2006
title Utilization of Time-Based Techniques in Research and Teaching
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 3, 63-77
summary This article describes how computer animations, combined with cinematic techniques, have served as a teaching and research tool in architecture. Animations were used in the following areas: case studies of precedents in architecture using the animated modeling as a form of tectonic analysis; conceptualization of space through the study of film, specifically three approaches using film in the early stages of design: cinematic structure, film as site, and transcoding transparency; and mapping the urban fabric combining various time-based media.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2006_e185d
id sigradi2006_e185d
authors Geva, Anat and Mukherji, Anuradha
year 2006
title The Holy Darkness: A Study of Light in Brihadeshvara Hindu Temple, in Tanjore, Tamilnadu, India (1010 AD)
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 425-428
summary The study investigates how religious principles govern the treatment of light/darkness in sacred monument. Specifically, a digitized daylight simulation is used in the analysis of Brihadeshvara Hindu Temple, built in 1010 AD in Tanjore, Tamilnadu, India. This sacred monument, listed as one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites, is an intriguing case study since the treatment of the 'holy light' in the temple is the treatment of the 'holy darkness'.In spite of the importance given to sun in ancient Hindu scriptures, natural light was used very sparsely in Hindu temples. According to Hindu religious belief, when a worshipper is in the presence of the divine, there should be nothing to distract his/her senses (including vision). Therefore, the innermost sanctum is shrouded in total darkness and the progression into the temple is a ritual movement where the devotee goes through the dynamic experience of the darkening spaces of the temple before reaching the dark sacred chamber (see Fig.1). The dictation of the Hindu faith to create this spiritual procession toward the 'holy darkness' is examined in the historic Brihadeshvara Temple by using Lightscape -- computerized lighting simulation software. To run the program, a 3-D CAD surface model of the temple was created and imported into Lightscape. Then the model was assigned materials and its openings and lighting systems were defined. The simulations were run on four interior horizontal (floor) and vertical (walls) surfaces, along four spaces of the procession in the temple. The simulation targeted three time frames: sunrise, sunset and at high noon on March 21st (the equinox). The location of Tanjore, India was used for light conditions. The Lightscape simulations used the process of radiosity to generate single frame daylight renderings along with light analysis of each surface. A lighting animation was then produced in Quick Time.The results of this analysis demonstrate that the average illumination values for specific surfaces of the temple along the procession sequence correspond to the schematic expectation depicted in Figure 1, i.e., a progressively decreased luminance towards the dark innermost chamber. Furthermore, the simulated values were compared to the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) standards, which recommend ranges of luminance for specific visual tasks and areas. The comparisons showed that the average luminance in the temple, from the illuminated entrance in the east to the darker chamber in the west, is lower than the IES standards for 'public places with dark surroundings' for 'short temporary visits'. Finally, a morphological analysis of the temple along accepted daylight design guidelines corroborated the previous findings. The multi-method investigation of the relationship of light and darkness, light and objects, and the designated light quality in the Brihadeshvara Temple demonstrates the strong influence of the specific dictum of Hinduism on the light/darkness treatment in the temple. The paper concludes that digitized media such as computerized daylight simulations can examine the significance of light/darkness in sacred monuments as a spiritual experience. This quantitative investigation can augment the qualitative studies in the field of historic sacred architecture.
series SIGRADI
email ageva@archmail.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2006_e145a
id sigradi2006_e145a
authors Heiss, Leah
year 2006
title Empathy over distance: Wearables as tools for augmenting Remote Emotional Connection
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 66-69
summary Mainstream communication modes emphasise network speed, connection access, resolution, portability, and aesthetic design as primary to the success of their products. Within this vision a three by four centimetre screen and high resolution display are deemed adequate to emulate the intensities and complexities of face-to-face connection with loved ones. They allow us to ‘be there with you’ from wherever we might be. Yet interpersonal communication is a massively complex phenomenon. It involves a plethora of micro-activities which occur at a physical, physiological, and psychological level allowing us to recognise at a cellular scale intention, motive and emotional authenticity. Our conscious and non-conscious involvement in spatially collocated communication is substantial due to these myriad channels of real-time bi-directional information transfer. While contemporary communications technologies have the capacity to mediate our relationships, they fall short of encouraging the richness of spatially co-present interaction. The research discussed in this paper investigates the potential expansion of remote connection when electronically enhanced apparel is incorporated into the communications mix. Rather than pursuing the manifold functionalities of traditional communications media the garments discussed focus solely on the goal of enhancing empathy between physically distant individuals. This paper reports on the development and testing of a range of garments that conduct presence information between remotely located people. The garments sense, process, transmit and receive the heartbeat wavelength (ECG). They are enabled with ECG sensors, signal processing equipment, small vibration motors, and radio transceivers which allow users to ‘feel’ the heartbeat of a remote friend/lover/relative as vibration through their garment. The prototypes aim to enrich the remote communications experience through reintroducing an embodied, tactile dimension that is present in face-to-face communication. A range of user testing trials will be discussed which have been undertaken to assess the impact of the garments at a conscious and a non-conscious level. Conscious experiences were gauged through qualitative testing, by way of interviews and unsolicited written reactions, which have provided a range of engaging emotional responses. Non-conscious physiological reactions were assessed by recording ECG throughout user-testing periods. This data has been processed using HRV (heart rate variability) analysis software, running on MatLab. Preliminary results suggest that users have strong conscious and non-conscious reactions to the experience of wearing the prototype garments. The paper will describe the data processing techniques and findings of the user testing trials. The development of biosignal sensing garments has raised a range of issues including: innovative potentials for embedded peripheral awareness media; the expansion of the classical body to incorporate remotely sensed information; the issue of data semantics and the development of intensely personal non-verbal languages; and the issue of corporeal privacy when one’s biological information is exposed for potential download. They also bring into question how our bodily experiences might change when we incorporate remote sensory systems.
keywords Enabled apparel; emotional tools; biosignals
series SIGRADI
email leah.heiss@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ddss2006-hb-85
id DDSS2006-HB-85
authors J.A.M. Borsboom-van Beurden, R.J.A. van Lammeren, T. Hoogerwerf, and A.A. Bouwman
year 2006
title Linking Land Use Modelling and 3D Visualisation - A mission impossible?
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 85-101
summary Additional to the traditional land use maps 3D visualisation could provide valuable information for applications in the field of spatial planning, related to ecological and agricultural policy issues. Maps of future land use do not always reveal the appearance of the physical environment (the perceived landscape) as a result of land use changes. This means that 3D visualisations might shed light on other aspects of changed land use, such as expected differences in height or densities of new volume objects, or the compatibility of these changes with particular characteristics of the landscape or urban built environment. The Land Use Scanner model was applied for the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency's 'Sustainability Outlook' to explore land use changes, followed by GIS analyses to asses both the development of nature areas and the degree of urbanisation within protected national landscapes. Since it was felt that 3D visualisation could complement the resulting land use maps, the land use model output was coupled to 3D visualisation software in two different ways: 1) through Studio Max software in combination with iconic representation of the concerned land use types and 2) through 3D components of GIS software. However, the use of these techniques on a national scale level for the generation of semi-realistic 3D animations raised a number of conceptual and technical problems. These could be partly ascribed to the particular format and of the Land Use Scanner output. This paper discusses the methods and techniques which have been used to couple the output of the land use model to 3D software, the results of both approaches, and possible solutions for these problems.
keywords Land use models, 3D visualisation, Policy-making
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 2006_128
id 2006_128
authors Kouzeleas, Stelios Th. and Kimon D. Papadimitriou
year 2006
title Real-time remote 3D digitizing and modelling
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 128-131
summary This paper describes a procedure that feeds remotely a modelling system with geographical coordinates and the relative measurements taken in place in order to model dynamically new entities in real-time. The operation of this system is based on methodologies that are commonly used in telegeoprocessing – telegeomonitoring systems and its purpose is to simulate in real-time an existing environment using the captured measurements. The direct input of geographic data to the proposed system, which is adapted to a modelling environment (CAD or GIS), triggers the creation of new 3D entities in real-time (points, linear or area features), as it could be done with a traditional tablet digitizer. Simultaneously, the proposed system represents thematically the properties of the modelling entities (according to the measured values) over a 3D mesh. The aim of the suggested system is the remote registration of additional spatial information, their adequate treatment and adjustment via special developed interfaces, including their representation via developed software which is applied in the AutoCAD environment because of its programming development support and its use by a variety of engineers.
keywords Real-time modelling; Digitizing; Cartographic simulation; GIS
series eCAADe
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper24
id ascaad2006_paper24
authors Lerma, José and Salim A. Elwazani
year 2006
title Digital Rectified Imagery: a survey method for design and conservation projects
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Faced with the need for understanding the physical context of the projects that come under their jurisdiction, architects, urban designers, and conservationists strive to secure congruent information. Practicing professionals are not set to carry out the collecting of information themselves. As information “users,” they reach out to information “providers,” including surveyors, photogrammetrists, and GIS specialists, to secure needed information. Information providers employ a gamut of methods to survey and document design project contexts, including land surveying techniques, stereophotogrammetry, rectified imagery, laser scanning, and GIS. This study deals with digital rectified imagery (DRI) only and is aimed at creating an awareness of the method characteristics in the minds of the information users toward taking advantage of available DRI documentation opportunities offered by the information providers. As part of the methodology for this study, the authors have selected a subject building, captured a number of images through a digital camera, and processed the images using image processing software. The significance of this study resides in enabling the information users to understand RDI and to tap on its potential for consummating design, planning, and conservation projects.
series ASCAAD
email selwaza@bgnet.bgsu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e034d
id sigradi2006_e034d
authors Ryan, Rachel and Donn, Michael
year 2006
title A 3D, interactive, multilayered, web-enabled model as a tool for multiple sets of end user groups: A case study and end user analysis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 392-396
summary This research undertakes a case study involving focus groups of potential end users, to identify how a successful digital tool could be created using new and emerging technologies, to accommodate the multiple needs of these end users. 2005 saw the completion of a research paper, which proposed that a single, 3 dimensional digital model of a city forming a core for many different information systems, is a better approach to the needs of the city than many individual models optimised for each information system. The case for the single 3D model was evaluated through the research, development, delivery and analysis of a prototype 3 Dimensional model of Wellington City, New Zealand, presenting different ‘views’ of information in Wellington: a rendered visualisation in an animated “walkthrough”; the impact of planning constraints on daylight; interactive “plots” of property values. The development and delivery of the prototype model was analysed in regards to how complex, costly and time consuming it may be to exploit one base model for several purposes; and also therefore how beneficial, affordable and potentially successful a single model may be. The prototype model was created to test the idea, and therefore provided conclusions based on a limited feasibility analysis - with four potential information layers modelled and two potential delivery methods tested. The prototype model and user analysis results were presented in a research report that suggested further research and development of a single model could be very beneficial: Positive feedback from potential end users and data providers, and examples of potential data mining opportunities forming the basis of the need for continued research. 2006 sees the research continue as an 18 month research project in conjunction with an industry partner, Terralink International, (http://www.terralink.co.nz/). Terralink International Limited provides GIS and mapping solutions which according to their web site: “enable better business management.” The company maintains a national resource of “imagery, cartography, and spatial databases” and provides consultancy services linking these to company databases through GIS systems. The research investigates the potential for 3 dimensional, interactive, multilayered models to enhance delivery of information to multiple end user groups. The research method uses functional prototypes in end-user focus group workshops. These workshops, consisting of a combination of presentations, hands on interactive examples, group discussions, and individual feedback surveys, aim to establish how a tool might best be developed to communicate to a wide range of end users. The means of delivery whether a stand alone tool or web-based is a key element of the user group workshop assessment process. Note: The submission of the prototype tool (via video or interactive media) would greatly increase the effectiveness of the research presentation. Ability to include such media would be greatly appreciated.
keywords multilayered; 3D; end users; interactive; web-enabled
series SIGRADI
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ddss2006-hb-221
id DDSS2006-HB-221
authors Selma Celikyay
year 2006
title Research on New Residential Areas Using GIS - A case study
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 221-233
summary Planning is a decision-making process which is about 'the future'. In each scale of planning process, spatial rules of the social life are formed. In this process, firstly series of spatial analyses should be practised. Throughout the world, spatial planning strategies which focus on the sustainable development adapt an ecological approach and both the regional and urban planning processes are based upon ecological bases. Under the guidance of this notion, also in Turkey, spatial planning strategies should be urgently reviewed and any level of planning process should be directed to ecological bases. Furthermore, in all these steps, natural resources and ecological characteristics should be taken into consideration. In the city of Bartin, where Bartin River flows through, a case study has been carried out regarding the above mentioned planning strategies. The case study has three stages. These stages also frame the data, analysis and evaluation stages. In the case study, a combination of McHarg's ecological evaluation method and Kiemstedt's usage value analysis in planning has been employed. With the help of ecological analyses, in the rural areas that have not been settled yet, the potential of the natural resources has been examined for the new residential areas. As a result, in the city of Bartin, the potential residential areas have been defined on the unsettled regions. What is more, concerning the subject, a map has been formed on the scale of 1/25 000. As a result of the case study, it has been concluded that in Bartin city because of the physical planning which ignores the potential of the natural resources, some of the existing residential areas have been chosen improperly.
keywords Decision support systems, Ecological analysis, Geographical information systems, Residential areas, Spatial analysis
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e165b
id sigradi2006_e165b
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Optimization in the Balance between the Production Effort of E-learning Tutorials and their related Learning Outcome
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 122-126
summary This paper provides evidence on the level of media richness that may be cost effective in the development of e-learning tutorials for teaching and learning computer visualization techniques. For such a purpose the author provides an analysis of low-cost / high-impact media rich products, the effort and cost required in their development and the measurement of related learning outcomes. Circa twenty years of R&D of multimedia and hypermedia applications for instruction have demonstrated the benefits of communicating relevant information to learners using engaging media. Based on this evidence, this paper assumes that due to the cognitive style of design students, the instructional packages for learning computer techniques for design visualization that are rich in media content, tend to be more effective. Available visualization technologies make the development of e-learning tutorials feasible and apparently the logical way to implement our instructional packages. However the question in the development of e-learning tutorials becomes a more strategic one when we are called to reach a level of optimization between producing a package with a basic standard, namely; text & still-graphic based tutorials, or a state-of-the-art package that is based on video demonstrations (more than enough?) that can accommodate the students’ learning requirements and also our production costs. The costs include the human resources (instructor, producers, assistants and others) and the material resources (hardware and software, copies, and others) involved in the creation of the e-learning tutorials. The key question is: What is good enough, and what is clearly superfluous? In order to confirm our hypothesis and propose a relevant balance between media richness and learning effectiveness, this paper describes an experiment in the use of two different levels of media richness as used to deliver instructions on the production of computer animations for design visualization. The students recruited for this experiment were fairly familiarized with the use of 3D modeling concepts and software, but had no previous knowledge of the techniques included in the tutorials; in specific; camera animation procedures. The students, separated in two groups, used one of the two methods; then they proceeded to apply their newly acquired skills in the production of an animation without using the help of any external means. The assessment of results was based on the quality of the final product and the students’ performance in the recall of the production procedures. Finally an interview with the students was conducted on their perception of what was accomplished from a metacognitive point of view. The results were processed in order to establish comparisons between the different levels of achievement and the students’ metacognitive assessment of learning. These results have helped us to create a clear set of recommendations for the production of e-learning tutorials and their conditions for implementation. The most beneficial characteristics of the two tested methods in relation to type of information, choice of media, method of information delivery, flexibility of production/editorial tools,! and overall cost of production, will be transferred into the development of a more refined product to be tested at larger scale.
keywords e-learning tutorials; media richness; learning effectiveness; cognitive style; computer visualization techniques
series SIGRADI
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e048c
id sigradi2006_e048c
authors Beck, Mateus Paulo; Brener, Rafael; Giustina, Marcelo and Turkienicz, Benamy
year 2006
title Light and Form in Design – A Computational Approach
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 254-257
summary Shape perception is strongly influenced by the reciprocal relation between light and form. Computational applications can increase the number of design alternatives taking into account possible variations in the relation between light and form. The aim of this study is to discuss a pedagogical experience carried out with 5th semester architectural students, based on a series of exercises prior to the term project. The exercises were concerned with the relation between light and form from an aesthetical point of view and should be understood as examples for the use of computers as tools to creatively accelerate the process of design and learning. The paper is divided in five parts. The first one describes the conceptual background for the exercises, a descriptive method for the identification of light effects in architectural objects based on ideas of shape emergence. The exercises’ methodology is explained in the second part, referring to the use of computational applications in 3-dimensional modeling, material and light simulation. The methodology includes different phases: –creation of bi-dimensional compositions according to symmetry operations; –creation of a minimal living space assigning functions to spaces originated from the former composition; –analysis of the impact of light on the form and spaces created; –alteration of form and materials creating new light effects considering the functions related to the spaces. The exercises alternate work in computational environment in two and three dimensions with the use of mockups, lamps and photography. In the third part the results –student’s design steps– are described. In the fourth part the results are analyzed and some conclusions are outlined in the fifth and last part. The use of emergent forms combined with computational tools has proved to be an effective way to achieve an accelerated understanding of the impact of light on forms as demonstrated by the evolution of the students work during the term and by their final results concerning the term project.
keywords Architectural Design; Lighting; Design Simulation; Virtual Environment
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_738
id 2006_738
authors Chen, Chiung-Hui and Mao-Lin Chiu
year 2006
title Space Tags and User Behavior Modeling - Applying agents to detect navigational patterns in urban streets
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 738-745
summary Urban pedestrian studies on navigation have been conducted for developing applications to ease the task of exploring in a virtual environment. As navigation in virtual environments is evidently difficult and as many virtual worlds have been designed to be used by untrained visitors that explore the environment, navigational supports are critically needed. This study is aimed to collect information about the user needs in order to build a model of user preference and produce simulative scenarios that can reveal the navigational patterns related to street design. The study is based on the attention theory for studying people who are socially interacting with street activities and furniture within designated areas. Furthermore, the study attempts to apply agent interface develop a prototype system with space tags. Finally, the system and its applications, and major findings of these applications are reported
keywords space tags; navigational patterns; street; agent interface; user behavior
series eCAADe
email 7451616@ms94.url.com.tw
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_684
id 2006_684
authors De Bodt, Kathleen
year 2006
title SoundScapes & Architectural Spaces - Spatial sound research in digital architectural design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 684-689
summary The paper presents ongoing research focusing on the development of digital tools and methodologies for spatial design based on non-Euclidean geometries. It addresses the way sound can be used both conceptually and acoustically in the early stages of the design process, examining digital architectural design and modeling based on three-dimensional sound visualization and the acoustical analysis and evaluation of complex curved surface geometry. The paper describes SoundMatrix, the first part of a digital design tool created by using Max/Msp/Jitter, to assist in the preliminary design of building façades in small-scale urban environments, specifically studying the possibilities of curvature to decrease sound reflection between opposing street façades. Examples from a workshop with the SoundMatrix application illustrate the real-time 3D authoring and sound spatialisation processing currently implemented in the tool.
keywords graphical programming; performance-based design; generative design
series eCAADe
email k.debodt@ha.be
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_540
id acadia06_540
authors Diewald, J., Frederick, M.
year 2006
title Building Information Modeling: Interactive Versioning Experiment
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 540-541
summary Interactive Versioning, is the first experiment of an ongoing investigation into the conceptual role of parametric modeling in the design process. In this case, the form is defined by constrained floor-plate relationships. Originally testing methods using numerical values exported to excel, we obtained undesirable results and shifted our focus to the creation of an interactive model; restoring the direct influence of user input. The result is a 10-floor structure that allows the user to tweak point locations along the slab perimeters that in turn have global effect on the overall geometry of the architectural body. We are using four point definition types: reference above, interactive reference, reference below, and independent value. Interactive reference points use referential constraints defined as x and y distances from the global origin, which change on account of user inputs. Reference above points pull (x,y) values from an interactive point above. Reference below points pull (x,y) values from interactive points below. Independent points are unaffected by changes in any of the other points but may also be tweaked to adjust a form. On any given level, there are 2 interactive reference points, 2 reference above points, 2 reference below points, and 4 independent points. Additionally, 2 length constraints link interactive points with reference above points on the same level. This allows for changes to affect the entire structure rather than only the floor plates immediately above and below a given change. The addition of constraints to the floor outlines will yield a variety of formal results and offer the possibility to further control the output.
series ACADIA
email frederick.michael@gmail.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_810
id 2006_810
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Knight,Michael
year 2006
title Pen or PC? - Is Sketching essential to architectural design?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 810-817
summary This paper reports on an ongoing student architectural design project that is investigating the differing effects of the use of PC’s or Pens in the design process. We are interested to see whether designing wholly on the computer with a volume modeling software would produce differing results to a traditional design process with a strong basis in 2D sketching. To minimize the influence of the participants previous experience in either the use of PC’s or the pen, we have been working with very young students that have not yet gone through a traditional training on architectural design and CAAD software. This is one of the key aspects of our experimental procedure. We have found that recent software developments in the field of CAAD clearly have and will influence the way architects design and brings the computer as a design tool to the “normal architect”. Until very recently the computer was seen as a design tool almost solely for “computer geeks” in the profession, the majority of architects still using it mainly as a drafting machine or to produce visualizations of their projects after a more ‘conventional’ design process had finished. It is now very clear to us that the ongoing change in technology will have a profound effect on the way all of us will work in future undertaking architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching methods and the curricula. We use the above mentioned ongoing educational project to find out about the benefits and risks of using the computer as a design tool for first year students.
keywords Early Design stages; Collaborative Design; Sketching
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_392
id acadia06_392
authors Dorta, T., Perez, E.
year 2006
title Hybrid modeling revaluing manual action for 3D modeling
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 392-402
summary 3D modeling software uses conventional interface devices like mouse, keyboard and display allowing the designer to model 3D shapes. Due to the complexity of 3D shape data structures, these programs work through a geometrical system and a graphical user interface to input and output data. However, these elements interfere with the conceptual stage of the design process because the software is always asking to be fed with accurate geometries—something hard to do at the beginning of the process. Furthermore, the interface does not recognize all the advantages and skills of the designer’s bare hands as a powerful modeling tool.This paper presents the evaluation of a hybrid modeling technique for conceptual design. The hybrid modeling approach proposes to use both computer and manual tools for 3D modeling at the beginning of the design process. Using 3D scanning and rapid prototyping techniques, the designer is able to go back and forth between digital and manual mode, thus taking advantage of each one. Starting from physical models, the design is then digitalized in order to be treated with special modeling software. Then, the rapid prototyping physical model becomes a matrix or physical 3D template used to explore design intentions with the hands, allowing the proposal of complex shapes, which is difficult to achieve by 3D modeling software alone.
series ACADIA
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ijac20064203
id ijac20064203
authors Eng, Markus; Camarata, Ken; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen; Gross, Mark D.
year 2006
title FlexM: Designing a physical construction kit for 3d modeling
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 2, 27-47
summary We have designed a hub and strut kit that interfaces to a 3D graphics application. FlexM is a prototype flexible physical interface for manipulating and building 3D geometry. Using the FlexM hub and strut components, designers can build and explore 3D geometry with the ease of a toy and the power of a computer. The hubs transmit the model's topology and geometry to the computer, where the model is rendered on the screen in real time. The paper reports on the iterative development of several versions of the project.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ddss2006-hb-203
id DDSS2006-HB-203
authors Gerhard Zimmermann
year 2006
title Multi-Agent Model to Multi-Process Transformation - A housing market case study
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 203-219
summary Simulation is a means to help urban planners and investors to optimize inhabitant satisfaction and return on investment. An example is the optimal match between household preferences and property profiles. The problem is that not enough knowledge exists yet about dynamic user activity models to build reliable and realistic simulators. Therefore, we propose a modeling and software technique that produces simulator prototypes very efficiently for the development, test, and evaluation of many different user activity models, using executable models, code generation, and a domain specific software process. As a specific feature, the model is based on many agents acting independently from each other and that are mapped in several refinement steps into the same number of concurrent processes. The housing example is used as a case study to explain the process and show performance results.
keywords Agent technology, User activity modeling, User activity simulation, Software engineering, Code generation, Software process
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id ijac20064205
id ijac20064205
authors Hadjri, Karim
year 2006
title Experimenting with 3D Digitization of Architectural Physical Models using Laser Scanning Technology
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 2, 67-80
summary This paper assesses the use of 3D Digitization techniques by carrying out laser scanning of typical physical models produced by architecture students. The aim was to examine the product of laser scanning with respect to scanning and 3D modeling processes, and the effects of variables such as characteristics of the models, materials used, and design complexity. In order to assess the similarities and accuracies achieved by the scanning and 3D modeling processes, the research investigated human perception of differences between analogue and digital models. This enabled an assessment of the degree to which digital models were accurate representations of the real ones, and whether laser scanning can successfully be used as a medium to recreate and represent complex architectural physical models. The study presents a potential direction for digital translation in architectural education.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

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