CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 61 to 80 of 615

_id ecaade2010_054
id ecaade2010_054
authors Wurzer, Gabriel; Fioravanti, Antonio; Loffreda, Gianluigi; Trento, Armando
year 2010
title Function & Action: Verifying a functional program in a game-oriented environment
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.389-394
wos WOS:000340629400041
summary The finding of a functional program for any kind of building involves a great amount of knowledge about the behavior of future building users. This knowledge can be gathered by looking at relevant building literature (Adler, 1999; Neufert and Neufert, 2000) or by investigating the actual processes taking place in similar environments, the latter being demonstrated e.g. by (Schütte-Lihotzky, 2004) or new functionalist approaches of the MVRDV group (Costanzo, 2006)). Both techniques have the disadvantage that the architect might assume a behavior which is seldom experienced in real life (either through lack of information or by failing to meet the building user’s expectations). What is needed is a verification step in which the design is tested on real users. We have devised a game-like environment (Figure 1a) in which it is possible to capture the behavior of future building users in order to verify the relevance of the design even at a very early stage. As result of applying our approach, we can find previously overlooked usage situations, which may be used to further adapt the design to the user’s needs.
keywords Requirements checking; Participative design
series eCAADe
email wurzer@iemar.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2006_537
id caadria2006_537
authors YASUNOBU ONISHI, MITSUO MOROZUMI, RIKEN HOMMA, YUJI MURAKAMI
year 2006
title IMAGE DATA ARCHIVE SYSTEM FOR REFERENCE MATERIALS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN EDUCATION
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 537-539
summary In architectural design education, timely referencing visual materials is important for stimulating students’ imaginations and design activities. In a lecture or design studio, teaching staff generally present various materials to students, such as photographs of cityscapes and architecture, environmental design handbooks, sketches drawn by famous architects or past works from the design studio. Most laboratories are filled with reference materials such as numerous photographic papers, books, drawing papers or colour slides. Because of the spread of digital cameras or scanners, the storage space required for reference materials has recently begun to decrease. However, the hard drives on the PCs used by each member of the teaching staff have generally been filled with huge amounts of image data files instead. With the increase in the volume of image data, handling such huge amounts of image data has generated the following problems.
series CAADRIA
email onishi@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp, moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp, homma@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp, ymura@ktokai-u.ac.jp
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2006_071
id caadria2006_071
authors YUJI MATSUMOTO, MICHITAKA KIRIKI, RYUSUKE NAKA, SHIGEYUKI YAMAGUCHI
year 2006
title SUPPORTING PROCESS GUIDANCE FOR COLLABORATIVE DESIGN LEARNING ON THE WEB:_Development of “Plan-Do-See cycle” based Design Pinup Board
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 71-80
summary This paper proposes the collaborative design education program on the web, based on “Plan-Do-See cycle” process model and develops the special Design Pinup Board system for running it. This program focuses on very limited environment; distributed collaboration beginners, asynchronous, first meeting, plural teams. The authors applied it to DCW2005 project and evaluated its effect from some questionnaire survey and fundamental analysis of logged data.
series CAADRIA
email matu@kit.ac.jp, krk04@kit.ac.jp, naka@kit.ac.jp, shige@kit.ac.jp
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_502
id 2006_502
authors Zupancic, Tadeja; Michael Mullins and Matevz Juvancic
year 2006
title Joint Curriculum Developments in the Field of Virtual Space Design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 502-505
summary The topic of joint degrees is high on the higher education policy agenda. The eCAADe 2006 theme offers the opportunity to investigate the topic from the aspect of virtual space design, especially within the second conference topic: communicating within mediated spaces (CVE-s). The paper proposed initiates a discussion-forum to raise and discuss open questions of joint curriculum development in the field of virtual space design, especially where CVE-s take the key role within the educational process. The starting points of the discussion can be found in the ongoing endeavours of the e-Learning project entitled VIPA and the current curricular changes in the ‘new’ EU countries following relevant directives and declarations. The main goal of this forum is the development of the specific criteria for quality assurance, to enhance the motivation of joint curricular developments in the field mentioned.
keywords Architectural Education; E-Learning; Virtual Space
series eCAADe
email tadeja.zupancic@arh.uni-lj.si
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_c129b
id sigradi2006_c129b
authors Abad, Gabriel; Adriane Borde; Mónica Fuentes; Virginia Agrielav; Adriana Granero and Jacqueline Fernández
year 2006
title Producción colaborativa de material de enseñanza-aprendizaje de Gráfica Digital con aportes multidisciplinarios [Collaborative production for taught-learning materials for digital graphic with multidisciplinary contributions]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 117-121
summary For a contribution to problem solving processes at different areas, this paper presents the use of Digital Graphics as a knowledge object for a distance teaching/learning workshop. At the Learning Management System, different theoretical subjects with supporting tools were proposed, and exercises requiring collaborative work. An specific didactic situation using available technologies at Internet for 3D modelling, combined with satellite images and geographic information program was proposed. The final works were then shared by a 3D models repository. As a complement of this experience and in relation with their professional work, every student proposed a new didactic situation including Learning Objects, sharing them with the others members of the group, through conceptual maps built up in a co-operative way.
series SIGRADI
email gabad@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e159b
id sigradi2006_e159b
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2006
title Digital Design Pedagogy - Basic Design - CADCAM Space Box Exploration
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 127-130
summary This proposed paper will highlight the work of a “pre-architecture” graduate student’s work produced in a “Digital Design II” course in Spring 06. This student has a bachelor’s degree in Architectural Technologies and hopes to attend a “professional” degree program in architecture after completing our Master of Science degree program. The student entered our “pre / post-professional” graduate program as a means of learning more about design, technology and architecture. This provided a rare opportunity to do “research” in the area of digital technology in the early formative phases of a new architecture / design students development. The student chose to study “shadows” as a means of design inquiry. The primary focus of the work was the study of various “4” x 4” x 4” “space-cubes.” The student was given various “design” constraints, and “transformative” operations for the study of positive-negative space relationships, light+shadows, and surface as a means of gaining in-sight to form. The CADCAM tools proved to be empowering for the student’s exploration and learning. With the recent emergence of both more user-friendly hardware and software, we are seeing a paradigm shift in design “ideation.” This is attributed to the evolving human-computer-interface (HCI) that now allows a fluidic means of creative design ideation, digital representation and physical making. Computing technology is now infusing early conceptual design ideation and allowing designers, and form, to follow their ideas. The argument will be supported with primary evidence generated in our pedagogy and research that has shown the visualization and representational power of emerging 2D and 3D CADCAM tools. This paper will analyze the basic “digital design” process used by the writer’s student. Architectural form concepts, heretofore, impossible to model and represent, are now possible due to CADCAM. Emerging designers are integrating “digital thinking” in their fundamental conceptualization of form. These creative free-forms are only feasible for translation to tectonic form using digital design-make techniques. CADCAM tools are empowering designers for form exploration and design creativity. Current computing technology is now infusing the creative design process; the computer is becoming a design “partner” with the designer and is changing form and architecture; thus, we are now seeing unprecedented design-make creativity in architecture.
keywords Basic Design; CADCAM; Digital Design; Virtual 3D Models; Physical 3D Printed Models
series SIGRADI
email lbarrow@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_c056b
id sigradi2006_c056b
authors Díaz Bonilla, Jaime; Marchant, Hernán and Vergara, Mariana
year 2006
title Hacia una lógica de incorporación de los Medios Digitales en la Enseñanza Proyectual [Towards a logical involvement of digital medias in the projective taught]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 142-146
summary This work shows the development of a digital aids incorporation strategy for the improvement of teaching and learning in the areas of architecture, urbanism, design and geography. Its objective is to present a logical construction for the implementation of formative and computer-based support that allows the development and upkeep of cross-disciplinary and collaborative processes.
series SIGRADI
email bonilla@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 236c
id 236c
authors Hamuy Pinto, Eduardo; Galaz Lorca, Mirtha
year 2008
title Evaluación de Participación e Interacción en LMS MOODLE [Assessment of Participation and Interaction in LMS MOODLE]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008, pp. 164-167.
summary Learning Management Systems (LMS) embody spaces that combine Virtual Classrooms, learning communities, repositories of educational resources and communication devices. The use by faculty members and students, in a campus containing the schools of Architecture, Design and Geography, of Open Source LMS MOODLE, during the years 2005-2006, was assessed. An analysis of the Digital Vestiges, the metadata in the logs database, distinguished between the levels of informative and communicational interaction. The results draw attention to a trend, similar to previous measurements in Latin America, of more use of ICT educational resources for informational purposes than communicational interactions between teachers and students.
keywords LMS, MOODLE, Meaningful Interactions
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email ehamuy@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 2006_114
id 2006_114
authors Hirschberg, Urs; Allen Sayegh; Martin Frühwirth and Stefan Zedlacher
year 2006
title 3D Motion Tracking in Architecture - Turning Movement into Form - Emerging Uses of a New Technology
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 114-121
summary Tracking in space is an important bridge between physical and virtual environments. Optical 3D motion capture systems have become standards in the special effects industry and are increasingly common in medical applications, as well as in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) set-ups. Beyond these applications, there are a number of emerging uses for such systems in architectural design. The possibility to track complex movements in space in real time and at high precision can open up new modes of interacting with spaces, and of generating movement as form as part of an architectural design process. What makes these possibilities particularly interesting for architectural investigations is that they don’t have to be limited to a single user, but can happen in a collaborative way, involving many users simultaneously. After briefly explaining the technical aspects of the technology, an overview of such emerging uses is discussed. As an illustration of this potential, the results of a recent workshop are presented, in which a group of architecture students explored the hidden beauty of everyday movements and turned them into sculptural objects.
keywords Motion Tracking; Animation; Design Process; Augmented Reality; Digital Fabrication
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ecaade2017_256
id ecaade2017_256
authors Symeonidou, Ioanna
year 2017
title Reinventing Design-Build projects with the use of digital media for design and construction - A survey of 120 educational pavilions
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 231-240
summary During the last decade the hype for digitally fabricated educational pavilions has become very popular among architecture schools. A survey with the aim to catalogue and classify educational pavilions revealed more than 120 cases of digitally fabricated pavilions within the last decade. The analysis of the sample of 120 Design-Build projects built during the period 2006-2016 revealed, apart from obvious similarities and differences, the prevailing trends relating to the materials and the technology used for the design, manufacturing and assembly. From the processing of the gathered data a set of typologies emerge, which relate both to morphological characteristics as well as to the design process. The paper concludes by discussing the advantages and critical points of this educational practice and the learning outcomes for both students and educators.
keywords Design-Build; Digital fabrication; architectural education; CAD / CAM; pavilions
series eCAADe
email ioanna.symeonidou@gmail.com
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id 2006_206
id 2006_206
authors Tunçer, Bige and Sevil Sariyildiz
year 2006
title Design Analysis Network - An educational environment for architectural analysis
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 206-214
summary Design Analysis Network (DAN) is a web-based environment for the construction and presentation of a body of architectural analyses in the context of a design studio. We use DAN in order to achieve an extensible and cooperative library of architectural design analyses; searchable by content, and instructional for coming generations of students. DAN also acts as a presentation environment for students, where they can present their analyses to their design instructors. DAN has been used in two iterations of instruction in the second year design studio at the Faculty of Architecture. After its use, we carried out an extensive evaluation of the use of DAN, its usefulness and how it fits into the educational process, in a laboratory environment. The evaluation results provided valuable insights. In this paper, we describe the DAN environment and its tools, and we discuss its use in the design studio. We also describe its evaluation process and results, the analysis of these results and their conclusion. We conclude with recommendations for improvement to the application and its implementation within the design studio.
keywords Architectural analysis; conceptual design; extensible library; design studio education; precedent-based learning
series eCAADe
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-hb-467
id DDSS2006-HB-467
authors A. Fatah gen. Schieck, A. Penn, V. Kostakos, E. O'Neill, T. Kindberg, D. Stanton Fraser, and T. Jones
year 2006
title Design Tools for Pervasive Computing in Urban Environments
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 467-486
summary In this paper we report on ongoing research in which the implications of urban scale pervasive computing (always and everywhere present) are investigated for urban life and urban design in the heritage environment of the city of Bath. We explore a theoretical framework for understanding and designing pervasive systems as an integral part of the urban landscape. We develop a framework based on Hillier's Space Syntax theories and Kostakos' PSP framework which encompasses the analysis of space and spatial patterns, alongside the consideration of personal, social and public interaction spaces to capture the complex relationship between pervasive systems, urban space in general and the impact of the deployment of pervasive systems on people's relationships to heritage and to each other. We describe these methodological issues in detail before giving examples from early studies of the types of result we are beginning to find.
keywords Urban space, Pervasive systems, Urban computing, Space Syntax, Interaction space
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id sigradi2006_e160c
id sigradi2006_e160c
authors Andrade, Max and Cheng, Liang-Yee
year 2006
title Diretrizez Geométricas de Auxílio ao Processo de Projeto de Edifícios Residenciais [Geometrical Guidelines to Aid the Design of Floor Plants of Residential Buildings]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 243-247
summary This paper discusses the basic principles of a geometric method to aid the design process of residential buildings. It makes part of the initial phases of a research whose aim is to develop a computer system to aid the sketching and evaluation of floor plant design of multi-storied residential buildings. The fundamental idea of the research is the existence of some basic patterns of floor plants that reflect the designer’s mental models in this category of building. The models are regarding the usage of the space such as forms and dimensions, the elements for the circulation and the external skins. During the design process, architects work on each one of these models to generate the sketches of the floor plant layout. Generally, the layout of an apartment in multi-storied buildings depends basically on the internal dynamics of the users without the complex relationship with the neighborhood environment as in the case of houses. In this way, it would be easier to identify, to organize and to associate the mental models of multi-storied buildings on geometric basis, which, in their turns, might be effectively used as inputs for the layout planning of new design. By applying the geometric basis, the architects may reduce the universe of feasible alternatives into a small group of heuristic solutions that can be described by using few simple guidelines. In addition to this, the geometric bases of the existing buildings might be used to build a knowledge-based system to aid the architectural design. The objective of this paper is to show some initial results of the research obtained from a survey and the case studies of form, dimensions and topology of existing buildings. To limit the scope of the discussion, only residential buildings with two to three bedrooms are considered. At first, a survey of plants of residential buildings with two and three bedrooms, in Brazil, is carried out. In the next step, the dimensions, shape, external skin perimeter, circulation system and accessibility are analyzed. Finally, typical topologies of the building are investigated.
keywords Design process; geometric method; residential buildings
series SIGRADI
email maxandrade@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_158
id acadia06_158
authors Barrow, Larry R.
year 2006
title Digital Design and Making 30 Years After
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 158-177
summary Current design studio pedagogy is undergoing significant change as the means and methods of ideation, representation and making evolve with digital tools; Computer-Aided-Design-Computer-Aided-Manufacturing (CADCAM) remains a contentious topic among many studio instructors and faculty in the academy. Computing is now nearing ubiquity; many processes and products have seen significant evolutionary trends, if not revolutionary transformations; this is no less the case in the academic and firm design studio. The impact of “digital” media and CADCAM, in the design-make process, remains obscure and formally unknown.In this paper, we will review our research and findings from the work of three students; two current students who were in our Digital Design II (DDII) spring 2006 course and the third student, the writer, will reflect on “design and making” from a “pre-architecture” and pre-studio/pre-computer (CADCAM) perspective of ‘making’ thirty-three years ago. The research findings provide universal precepts pertinent to current thinking about emerging studio pedagogy. Our findings suggest that computing technology should be introduced at the outset of design education for the beginning student in basic design studio; and moreover, advanced designers can partner with “digital” tools to ideate and realize their, heretofore unrepresentable and unconstructable, ideas in the early stages of design using CADCAM.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@coa.msstate.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_104
id acadia06_104
authors Barrow, Larry R.
year 2006
title Performance House: A CADCAM Modular House System
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 104-121
summary Millions of persons around the globe live in low quality indigenous, or Manufactured Housing (MH) systems that often result in low “performance” undesirable living environments and, at times, life threatening habitation. Our research has explored mass production principles in product design and architecture, currently at the single family housing scale, with a focus on the recent devastation along the US Gulf Coast as a result of hurricane impact, most notably hurricane Katrina.“Modern architecture” theoreticians have conceived, written, prototyped and even launched business ventures in an attempt to bring their manufactured housing “ideas” to fruition. However, architects have generally had little “long-term” impact in the area of manufactured housing strategies and the current manufactured housing industry remains archaic and problematic. This paper includes our research of other architects attempts to leverage technology in the manufactured housing industry; additionally, we analyzed current problems in the US mass housing industry. We then derived a set of “design criterion” as a means of anchoring our design inquiry for a proposed factory-built modular house system.Our research encompasses both process and product innovation; this paper reflects on our use of technology to leverage an Industrial Design (ID) process that is inclusive of many “design” partners and team members. We are using both virtual and physical output representation and physical prototyping for a factory-built house system; our Research and Development (R&D) is on-going with our collaborating design-manufacture engineering partners from the automotive, furniture and aerospace research labs here at Mississippi State University. Our goal is to use “industrial design” principles to produce mass housing components that provide durable-sustainable housing.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@coa.msstate.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ijac20064301
id ijac20064301
authors Bermudez, Julio; Agutter, Jim; Foresti, Stefano
year 2006
title Architectural Research in Information Visualization: 10 Years After
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 3, 1-18
summary As our civilization dives deeper into the information age, making sense of ever more complex and larger amounts of data becomes critical. This article reports on interdisciplinary work in Information Visualization addressing this challenge and using architectural expertise as its main engine. The goal of this research is to significantly improve real time decision making in complex data spaces while devising a new architecture that responds to complex information environments. Although we have been reporting in aspects of this work for the past 7 years, this paper covers unpublished knowledge, design methods, operational strategies, and other details that bring together all the material published by our group thus far into a comprehensive and useful whole. We conclude by presenting our latest InfoVis design work in Network Security.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia06_489
id acadia06_489
authors Bonswetch, T., Kobel, D., Gramazio, F., Kohler, M.
year 2006
title The Informed Wall: applying additive digital fabrication techniques on architecture
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 489-495
summary In this work in progress report we present the results of a four week design studio with graduate students as part of a broader research project on investigating digital additive fabrication processes and their implications on architectural design.In a simple test arrangement we realized the digital design and additive fabrication of two by three meters brick walls. The use of bricks, being the primary module for construction, and at a relatively coarse resolution, allowed us to concentrate on the design of completely programmed walls encompassing material-dependent parameters. The resulting prototypes depict the great potential of the integration of the design and the fabrication process. Non-standardized solutions can be easily accomplished as the design data is directly used to control the fabrication process. In using an additive digital fabrication process, a novel architectural product of the kind “brick wall” emerged, which could not have been conceived or fabricated manually.
series ACADIA
email bonwetsch@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_000
id 2006_000
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris (eds.)
year 2006
title Communicating Space(s)
source 24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-5-9], Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, 914 p.
summary The theme of this conference builds on and investigates the pre-existing and endlessly unfolding relationship between two domains of scientific inquiry: Architecture, urban design and planning, environmental design, geography and Social theory, media and communication studies, political science, cultural studies and social anthropology. Architectural design involves communication and could thus be partly considered a communicational activity. Designers (or not) see architectural designs, implicitly, as carriers of information and symbolic content; similarly buildings and urban environments have been “read” and interpreted by many (usu- ally not architects) as cultural texts. At the same time, social and cultural studies have studied buildings and cities, as contexts for social and cultural activities and life in general, from their mundane expression of “everyday life” (Highmore, 2001) to elite expressions of artistic creativity and performance. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) support both of these levels of scientific inquiry in many ways. Most importantly however, ICTs need design studies, architectural and visual design, social and cultural studies in their quest to create aesthetically pleasing, ergonomically efficient and functional ICT sys- tems; this need for interdisciplinarity is best articulated by the low quality of most on-line content and applica- tions published on the web.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email vas@uth.gr
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2006/08/16 16:55

_id 2006_786
id 2006_786
authors Burry, Jane and Mark Burry
year 2006
title Sharing hidden power - Communicating latency in digital models
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 786-793
summary As digital spatial models take on the complex relationships inherent in a lattice of dependencies and variables, how easy is it to fully comprehend and communicate the underlying structure and logical subtext of the architectural model: the metadesign? The design of a building, the relationships between a host of different attributes and performances was ever a complex system. Now the models, the representations, are in the early stages of taking on more of that complexity and reflexivity. How do we share and communicate these modelling environments or work on them together? This paper explores the issue through examples from one particular associative geometry model constructed as research to underpin the collaborative design development of the narthex of the Passion Façade on the west transept of Gaudi’s Sagrada Família church, part of the building which is now in the early stages of construction.
keywords Design communication; CAD CAM; mathematical models
series eCAADe
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2this is page 3show page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8... show page 30HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_958572 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002