CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id sigradi2006_k002
id sigradi2006_k002
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2006
title Creative Collaborations
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 27-29
summary The teaching of design is typically an individual process. Theories of learning, imperatives of assessmentand traditional teaching models set individual tasks that are intendedto lead to individual submissions. With attitudes of training and instruction, the focus is typically on skill acquisition and demonstration of such skills through successful completion of project tasks.The context of studio teaching, however, is one that is immensely powerful and makes a substantial contribution to the intellectual approaches to comprehending our realities and, more importantly, our futures. In this paper I will focus on three aspects of studio that warrant attention, among the many that demand it, especially as digital media and environments, beyond tools, are pervasive in design. This paper will consider the importance of studio education as the context for design education from the aspects of design as asocial act, design as an expert act, design as an engagement of data.
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
email tkvan@usyd.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id 2006_494
id 2006_494
authors Mizban, Nawara and Andrew Roberts
year 2006
title The Place of E-learning in Architectural Education - A Critical Review
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 494-501
summary E-learning is rapidly becoming a key element of institutional teaching and learning strategies with many academic departments seizing the opportunity to use technology to enhance their educational provision. This review aims to investigate the effects of E-learning on design teaching in schools of architecture. In order to achieve those aims, the outcome of a number of academic experiences conducted to explore E-learning in architectural design teaching, were analysed. The role of E-learning was critically analysed in design teaching, and consideration was given to the way in which E-learning might promote new learning environments, and learning methods. The review attempt to identify the barriers that might face schools of architecture when integrating E-learning in the design teaching, and resulting in short-lived project. The review formulated important findings that explain the reasons, which underpin the schools’ attempts to use E-learning in design teaching and how schools integrated different technologies in their learning.
keywords E-learning; Remote collaboration; Virtual design studio
series eCAADe
email RobertsAS@cf.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e165b
id sigradi2006_e165b
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Optimization in the Balance between the Production Effort of E-learning Tutorials and their related Learning Outcome
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 122-126
summary This paper provides evidence on the level of media richness that may be cost effective in the development of e-learning tutorials for teaching and learning computer visualization techniques. For such a purpose the author provides an analysis of low-cost / high-impact media rich products, the effort and cost required in their development and the measurement of related learning outcomes. Circa twenty years of R&D of multimedia and hypermedia applications for instruction have demonstrated the benefits of communicating relevant information to learners using engaging media. Based on this evidence, this paper assumes that due to the cognitive style of design students, the instructional packages for learning computer techniques for design visualization that are rich in media content, tend to be more effective. Available visualization technologies make the development of e-learning tutorials feasible and apparently the logical way to implement our instructional packages. However the question in the development of e-learning tutorials becomes a more strategic one when we are called to reach a level of optimization between producing a package with a basic standard, namely; text & still-graphic based tutorials, or a state-of-the-art package that is based on video demonstrations (more than enough?) that can accommodate the students’ learning requirements and also our production costs. The costs include the human resources (instructor, producers, assistants and others) and the material resources (hardware and software, copies, and others) involved in the creation of the e-learning tutorials. The key question is: What is good enough, and what is clearly superfluous? In order to confirm our hypothesis and propose a relevant balance between media richness and learning effectiveness, this paper describes an experiment in the use of two different levels of media richness as used to deliver instructions on the production of computer animations for design visualization. The students recruited for this experiment were fairly familiarized with the use of 3D modeling concepts and software, but had no previous knowledge of the techniques included in the tutorials; in specific; camera animation procedures. The students, separated in two groups, used one of the two methods; then they proceeded to apply their newly acquired skills in the production of an animation without using the help of any external means. The assessment of results was based on the quality of the final product and the students’ performance in the recall of the production procedures. Finally an interview with the students was conducted on their perception of what was accomplished from a metacognitive point of view. The results were processed in order to establish comparisons between the different levels of achievement and the students’ metacognitive assessment of learning. These results have helped us to create a clear set of recommendations for the production of e-learning tutorials and their conditions for implementation. The most beneficial characteristics of the two tested methods in relation to type of information, choice of media, method of information delivery, flexibility of production/editorial tools,! and overall cost of production, will be transferred into the development of a more refined product to be tested at larger scale.
keywords e-learning tutorials; media richness; learning effectiveness; cognitive style; computer visualization techniques
series SIGRADI
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e048c
id sigradi2006_e048c
authors Beck, Mateus Paulo; Brener, Rafael; Giustina, Marcelo and Turkienicz, Benamy
year 2006
title Light and Form in Design – A Computational Approach
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 254-257
summary Shape perception is strongly influenced by the reciprocal relation between light and form. Computational applications can increase the number of design alternatives taking into account possible variations in the relation between light and form. The aim of this study is to discuss a pedagogical experience carried out with 5th semester architectural students, based on a series of exercises prior to the term project. The exercises were concerned with the relation between light and form from an aesthetical point of view and should be understood as examples for the use of computers as tools to creatively accelerate the process of design and learning. The paper is divided in five parts. The first one describes the conceptual background for the exercises, a descriptive method for the identification of light effects in architectural objects based on ideas of shape emergence. The exercises’ methodology is explained in the second part, referring to the use of computational applications in 3-dimensional modeling, material and light simulation. The methodology includes different phases: –creation of bi-dimensional compositions according to symmetry operations; –creation of a minimal living space assigning functions to spaces originated from the former composition; –analysis of the impact of light on the form and spaces created; –alteration of form and materials creating new light effects considering the functions related to the spaces. The exercises alternate work in computational environment in two and three dimensions with the use of mockups, lamps and photography. In the third part the results –student’s design steps– are described. In the fourth part the results are analyzed and some conclusions are outlined in the fifth and last part. The use of emergent forms combined with computational tools has proved to be an effective way to achieve an accelerated understanding of the impact of light on forms as demonstrated by the evolution of the students work during the term and by their final results concerning the term project.
keywords Architectural Design; Lighting; Design Simulation; Virtual Environment
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_182
id 2006_182
authors Bridges, Alan
year 2006
title A Critical Review of Problem Based Learning in Architectural Education
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 182-189
summary There is limited research and discussion on pedagogical approaches in architectural education, simply because it is considered as one of the “unimportant” areas that researchers “do not bother studying” (Teymur, 2001). Problem Based Learning has been known to provide competent graduates in other professional disciplines, and, consequently, there have been attempts to utilise the same pedagogical approach in architectural education where PBL is seen as a potential solution to the problems encountered in architectural education. This paper critically reviews PBL implementations at TU Delft Netherlands and Newcastle University, N.S.W. Australia and draws conclusions with particular respect to the teaching of architectural computing
keywords PBL; architecture; computing
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_c161a
id sigradi2006_c161a
authors Corona Martínez, Alfonso and Vigo, Libertad
year 2006
title Archinet-MetaUniversidad: Proyecto ALFA en Fase3 para integración transversal [Archinet-MetaUniversity: Alfa Project on Phase 3 for Transversal Integration]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 52-55
summary Archinet Meta-University: Alfa-Project Phase three for transversal integration, According to the call for papers for Sigradi 2006, this work seeks the dissemination of the actions that have been developed in the first year of the Alfa-Project Meta University, Phase 3. This phase consists of the interchange of students and professors. We present a sample of the teaching/learning experiences, leaving aside the formal and bureaucratic aspects of the program. The use of CAD, digital media and multimedia resources in the student projects and research is an important factor for the success of the experience-The network includes eight schools of architecture: Strathclyde in Scotland; Seville in Spain; Sint- Lucas in Brussels, Belgium and TU/E in Eindhoven, Netherlands and four Latin American Schools: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Universidad de Belgrano in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Echeverria Institute in Havana, Cuba and the PU.Catholic University in Santiago, Chile.
series SIGRADI
email freedom59@fibertel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id d34b
id d34b
authors Horne M, Thompson E
year 2007
title Virtual Reality and 3D modelling in built environment education
source CONVR2007 7th Conference on Construction Applications of Virtual Reality, Penn State University, USA, 22-23 October 2007
summary This study builds upon previous research on the integration of Virtual Reality (VR) within the built environment curriculum and aims to investigate the role of Virtual Reality and three-dimensional (3D) computer modelling on learning and teaching in a school of the built environment. In order to achieve this aim a number of academic experiences were analysed to explore the applicability and viability of 3D computer modelling and Virtual Reality (VR) into built environment subject areas. Although two-dimensional representations have been greatly accepted by built environment professions and education, three-dimensional computer representations and VR applications, offering interactivity and immersiveness, are not yet widely accepted. The project builds on previous studies which focused on selecting and implementing appropriate VR strategies and technologies (Horne and Hamza, 2006) and offers an approach on how three-dimensional computer modelling and virtual reality may be integrated into built environment teaching. It identifies the challenges and perceived benefits of doing so by academic staff and reports on the systematic approach which was adopted by Northumbria University, School of the Built Environment, to raise awareness of VR technologies across the spectrum of built environment disciplines. A selection of case studies is presented which illustrate how VR and 3D modelling have been integrated to extend traditional forms of representation and enhance the students’ learning experience. The attitudes perceptions, opinions and concerns of academic staff in regards to use of 3D and VR technologies in their teaching are discussed
keywords Virtual Reality, 3D computer modelling, built environment, curriculum.
series other
type normal paper
email m.horne@unn.ac.uk
last changed 2008/03/13 23:08

_id ddss2006-pb-373
id DDSS2006-PB-373
authors Rohan Bailey
year 2006
title Towards a Digital Design Teaching Tool - A look at the ideas that should define a digital design primer
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 373-386
summary Architecture in the 21st century has become an increasingly complex affair. In addition to new social and cultural norms, architects are inundated with constantly changing information regarding new materials, sustainable processes, and complex building types. This state of affairs has also affected the expectations placed on architectural education. Critics (in diverse spheres) have expressed concerns about the lack of requisite skills of graduates that characterise good design thinking strategies as well as promote responsible design. It has been proposed by this author in other forums that by using digital technology to empower design learning, we can allow students to confidently use (through reading and analysis) their sketches to develop conceptual ideas that reconcile disparate elements into a habitable, environmentally friendly and architecturally responsible whole that is fit for purpose, cost effective, sustainable and a delight to clients and users. This paper will seek to discuss one of the concepts that govern such a tool. It will start by delineating the problem (discussed earlier in the abstract) before outlining the concepts or principles that a design teaching tool should adhere to. These concepts acknowledge the importance for the tool to reflect the nature of design tasks, facilitate learning and be accessible to all learning types. The paper will then focus on one concept - the nature of design tasks. The subsequent sections will describe an information structure borne from this idea and make mention of a current prototype of the tool. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the strengths of considering this concept.
keywords Design & decision support systems, Architectural education, Computer assisted learning, Design thinking
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id caadria2006_047
id caadria2006_047
authors SHAI YESHAYAHU, A.; B. MARIA VERA
year 2006
title CUT, COPY, PASTE SOCIETY
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 47-52
summary You and I were not born in the 1990’s thus our experience about the true modalities of circulation and communication that have substantially transformed the methods that form and inform us today, are not really “pure”. Why? Because we know how slow time was before the communication boom of this last decade and because some of us still believe that we must read to be inform and thus, visit a bookstore, library or friends house and get peeks inside a subject of matter. So experiencing life as we bypass the book _ that’s a story of a brand new era! Taking note of the enormous changes this era brings, is fundamental to our current pedagogic undertakings. We seek data about the differences that lie in the way individuals, which never knew a world before or between analogue and digital zones, process information. It signals a dramatic shift in cognitive realms that is deeply imbedded in our emerging socio-economic spheres. So, you say “hypothesizing that economic, technologic, and cultural fluxes fabricate new means to learn and think, is not a fresh idea”_ True. But, it led us to ask one fundamental question _What are the upcoming learning habits employed by the “post digital” society? We noted that the post digital generation is an avid cut, copy, paste society that is able to extract information from infinite resources and mix, remix in diversified modes, through time and in real-time. We think these abilities are strengths, which will permit students to multitask yet they strongly differ from the academic agendas that are concerned with meditative processes and qualitative interdisciplinary task. As aspiring academics interested in the reconfiguration of current pedagogic formats we seek a creative intervention for future design generations, one that can benefit both the upheavals of the cultural world and the integrity of the academic setting where a pedagogy that links extended fields of knowledge with shifting cognitive habits can emerge. In this arena where cognition plays an important role, our goals are challenging and difficult, especially in the beginning years when the foundations set forward leaves lasting impressions. Thus, letting go of familiar grounds and tuning to continual alterations of the immediate surroundings enables us to seek means that facilitate important readings for our current learning/teaching processes. Demystifying changes and embracing differences as design potentials for new interventions are basic programmatic elements that permit us to incorporate a rigorous research agenda in the design exercises. Our presentation will project the current state of our teaching modality and provide examples of current studio work. It will demonstrate how everyday rituals, journeys and research observations, are documented by a society that heralds a new academic setting.
series CAADRIA
email shaiy@siu.edu
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id caadria2006_323
id caadria2006_323
authors SHANG-YUAN CHEN, MAO-LIN CHIU
year 2006
title AGENT-BASED SMART SKINS: Fuzzy-logic and neuro-fuzzy approaches to smart house design
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 323-330
summary Recent developments in sensor, computing, and information and communication technologies have inspired the creation of new smart devices and environments. This paper proposes a “smart skin” that is capable of actively inferring and detecting normal or abnormal status, making optimal decisions, and learning to adapt its functions to map environmental variations to occupant needs. This paper explores the potential of smart skins and proposes three key elements for their integration: (1) intelligent agents, (2) context awareness, and (3) fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy systems. Prototypes are demonstrated and further discussion is made.
series CAADRIA
email shangyuanc@pchome.com.tw, mc2p@ms2.hinet.net
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ascaad2006_paper5
id ascaad2006_paper5
authors Yuan Chen, Shang
year 2006
title A Collaborative Digital Design Workshop: an ANN-based paradigm approach
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper relies on observation and analysis an internationally digital design exchange activity, “The FCU & Bartlett School of Architecture, university college London (UCL) digital architecture workshop” to propose an educational model based on the artificial neural network (ANN). We expect that the results of this work can lead to the establishment of a scoring mechanism that can "adapt" to the difficulty of assigned problems and assess students' progress. An international technological exchange workshop based on the theme of digital design is helpful to attain an accelerated heightening in the quality and experience of education. This is going to be an educational trend and increasingly prevalent in the future. A successful educational curriculum in digital design relies on a concerted effort amongst curriculum framework, learning activities, and course content. While, an internationally exchange digital design workshop is different from traditional "semester-based" units of curriculums. The short-term educational models are required high degrees interaction and collaboration. On the other hand, artificial neural network system that is context aware in ill-defined and complex environments is highly adaptive. It can extract, interpret and use the context information and adapt its functions to obtain an optimal correspondence between “context change” and “desired goal” efficiently. Therefore, an ANN-based pedagogical mechanism is able to encourage students to select relatively difficult design problems and promote more design originality, interaction and collaboration.
series ASCAAD
email Shangyuanc@pchome.com.tw
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_818
id 2006_818
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Communication in the Implementation of a Metacognitive Strategy for Learning to Design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 818-825
summary This paper describes an instructional communication strategy that makes use of time-based media techniques (story boarding and animation) in order to empower design studios with means to promote their students’ awareness on the acquisition of metacognitive knowledge and skills. This paper highlights the importance of including the communication of the design processes in the evaluation of learning outcomes. Moreover, the paper proposes that the students should be made constantly aware of their design processes and how effective are the methods they use. It is in this state of awareness that metacognitive knowledge is acquired: knowing how to learn to design. We can cultivate, exploit and enhance the capabilities of design learners, making them more confident and independent as learners as they understand what they need to know and what kind of strategies might work for different design problems and learning opportunities. In the development of an instructional strategy to accomplish this learning goal, the paper proposes it may be possible and potentially beneficial to transfer current metacognitive support strategies from a course on computer visualization techniques to the design studios. The paper elaborates on how these communication strategies could be transferred and implemented in a design studio setting. The results of a recent controlled experiment and considerations about the cognitive style of design students will be used in the preparation of recommendations for future full scale implementations in early design studios.
keywords Design learning; metacognitive learning strategy; time-based media
series eCAADe
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper29
id ascaad2006_paper29
authors Bennadji, A. and A. Bellakha
year 2006
title Evaluation of a Higher Education Self-learning Interface
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper is a follow-up to a previous paper published in ASCAAD 2004 (A. Bennadji et al 2005). The latter reported on CASD (Computer Aided Sustainable Design) a self-learning educational interface which assists the various building’s actors in their design with a particular attention to the aspect of energy saving. This paper focuses on the importance of software evaluation and how the testing is done to achieve a better human-machine interaction. The paper will go through the summative evaluation of CASD, presents the output of this evaluation and addresses the challenge facing software developers: how to make an interface accessible to all users and specifically students in higher education.
series ASCAAD
email a.bennadji@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_656
id 2006_656
authors Breen, Jack and Martijn Stellingwerff
year 2006
title De-coding the Vernacular - Dynamic Representation Approaches to Case-based Compositional Study
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 656-663
summary Representational approaches have always played an important role in the design-driven development of built environments, the analytical study of architectural compositions and their effects. With the introduction – and successive steady development – of computer-based platforms of visualization, the professional and intellectual palette of designers, as well as researchers, have expanded considerably. Nonetheless, in recent years the opportunities for systematic scrutiny and understanding of the expressive qualities of design proposals and artefacts have all too frequently been overshadowed by high-flying conceptual developments and seductive representation modes. It is time that the objective description and unravelling of architectural compositions – so to speak the discipline of Ekphrasis in design practice, education and research – is once again given more prominence in architectural discourse and debate. The central idea behind this contribution is that, by linking instruments of design with the methods of formal composition and decomposition, renewed opportunities for representation-driven study in a scholarly context, focusing upon elusive compositional attributes and their workings, may be given a new impulse. The project that is presented here concerns a case-based explorative study into the domains of aesthetic convention and invention, making use of a variety of virtual and physical representation techniques. These include digital as well as tangible modelling and sketching approaches (separately and in combination), in conjunction with computer-based image manipulation techniques, making use of systematic data identification and denotation. The opportunities, merits and shortcomings of the computer-based and physical visualization approaches, which were applied and tested, are discussed on the basis of results and findings from the ongoing AA Variations project.
keywords Design representation; Computer-based sketching; Virtual and physical modelling; Compositional variation; Contemporary aesthetics
series eCAADe
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_545
id caadria2006_545
authors DIETRICH ELGER, ANDREAS DIECKMANN, PETER RUSSELL, THOMAS STACHELHAUS
year 2006
title THE INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO: A VIEW BEHIND THE SCENES:Liquid Campus 3
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 545-548
summary Over 10 months ending in July 2005, architecture students from Aachen, Karlsruhe and Weimar took part in a design studio that differed significantly from other studios in that the result of the studio was a 1:1 realisation of the design. This is part of an evolution of the virtual faculty of architecture “Liquid Campus”, founded in 2001, which has seen the complexity of the projects steadily rise and this continued in the Project “Ein Fest: Ein Dach”. The integrated studio is arranged to encourage an active, economic and transparent learning process, which encompasses design, communication and cooperation issues. The stated goal at the beginning of the two-semester process is to build and although only a few of the ideas are realised, all participants are involved in the realisation. In this case, the project was to create “roofs” for an open-air concert for 200,000 people in Karlsruhe, Germany. The planning was carried out using the Netzentwurf platform, with which the authors have several years experience.
series CAADRIA
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_810
id 2006_810
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Knight,Michael
year 2006
title Pen or PC? - Is Sketching essential to architectural design?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 810-817
summary This paper reports on an ongoing student architectural design project that is investigating the differing effects of the use of PC’s or Pens in the design process. We are interested to see whether designing wholly on the computer with a volume modeling software would produce differing results to a traditional design process with a strong basis in 2D sketching. To minimize the influence of the participants previous experience in either the use of PC’s or the pen, we have been working with very young students that have not yet gone through a traditional training on architectural design and CAAD software. This is one of the key aspects of our experimental procedure. We have found that recent software developments in the field of CAAD clearly have and will influence the way architects design and brings the computer as a design tool to the “normal architect”. Until very recently the computer was seen as a design tool almost solely for “computer geeks” in the profession, the majority of architects still using it mainly as a drafting machine or to produce visualizations of their projects after a more ‘conventional’ design process had finished. It is now very clear to us that the ongoing change in technology will have a profound effect on the way all of us will work in future undertaking architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching methods and the curricula. We use the above mentioned ongoing educational project to find out about the benefits and risks of using the computer as a design tool for first year students.
keywords Early Design stages; Collaborative Design; Sketching
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_c192b
id sigradi2006_c192b
authors Fernández, Mónica Inés and Piegari, Ricardo Gustavo
year 2006
title Una experiencia en modalidad e-learning para el aprendizaje en arquitectura. Nuevas prácticas y actores en el mundo digital. [An experience in e-learning modality for the learning in architecture. New practices and actors in the digital world]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 147-152
summary As members of the Network ALFA-T-GAMEL3: Teaching computer Graphics And MultimEdia, LifeLongLearning, focused on the “Management of university outreach services”, and making use of the new digital technologies and to the instruction and pedagogic methods related to e-learning modality, the International Seminar “Digital Image and Sound.” has been organized, thus materializing a Pilot Course comprising four subjects and six workshops. For our course: “Digital Representation of Architecture”, an investigation was conducted about the transformations of teaching in the digital world for the learning of Architecture, focusing on the practices and players involved in this modality, as well as on the technologies involved in the coordination and distribution of knowledge. The main objectives of the paper were: revalorization of the format adopted by the practices related to the teaching/learning process in e-l, the contribution of the different “players” and the possibilities of the LMS as support platforms in the virtual campus.
series SIGRADI
email gidcad@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 2006_884
id 2006_884
authors Grasl, Thomas; Christoph Falkner and Christian Kühn
year 2006
title Easy access classes for three-dimensional generative design - Using a collaborative environment for e-learning
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 884-889
summary Part of an EU funded project to develop a “VIrtual campus for virtual space design Provided for European Architects (VIPA)” was the implementation of a practical run at the Vienna University of Technology. Therein we attempted to evaluate some of the concepts and technologies which were intended for the e-learning platform. After briefly introducing the didactical background, this paper concentrates on the technological setup accompanying the course. Especially the use of Croquet as an immersive three-dimensional environment to teach generative design is highlighted; its strengths and weaknesses in supporting our envisioned didactical concept are analysed. The practical run and its evaluation by the participating students are described, as well as some of the student work performed during and after the course. Concluding remarks elaborating on problems encountered in the software setup and in our didactical concept, followed by the description of future work to amend the above mentioned pitfalls, will mark the end.
keywords collaborative environment; croquet; generative design; learning platform, virtual space design
series eCAADe
email falkner@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_053
id caadria2006_053
authors HALIL ERHAN
year 2006
title LEARNING FROM MASTERS: ACADEMIC APPRENTICESHIP MODEL FOR COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN EDUCATION
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 53-61
summary Education is taking a new shape for the emerging needs of society. A considerable number of schools and disciplines are adapting active and cooperative learning to foster critical thinking and cognitive skill gaining. Design computation discipline also has to search for new models in education and experiment with these to evolve. This paper presents the current status in other disciplines. The lessons learned are used to develop the Academic Apprenticeship Model for teaching design computation courses.
series CAADRIA
email hierhan@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_e090b
id sigradi2006_e090b
authors Hanna, Sean and Turner, Alasdair
year 2006
title Teaching parametric design in code and construction
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 158-161
summary Automated manufacturing processes with the ability to translate digital models into physical form promise both an increase in the complexity of what can be built, and through rapid prototyping, a possibility to experiment easily with tangible examples of the evolving design. The increasing literacy of designers in computer languages, on the other hand, offers a new range of techniques through which the models themselves might be generated. This paper reviews the results of an integrated parametric modelling and digital manufacturing workshop combining participants with a background in computer programming with those with a background in fabrication. Its aim was both to encourage collaboration in a domain that overlaps both backgrounds, as well as to explore the ways in which the two working methods naturally extend the boundaries of traditional parametric design. The types of projects chosen by the students, the working methods adopted and progress made will be discussed in light of future educational possibilities, and of the future direction of parametric tools themselves. Where standard CAD constructs isolated geometric primitives, parametric models allow the user to set up a hierarchy of relationships, deferring such details as specific dimension and sometimes quantity to a later point. Usually these are captured by a geometric schema. Many such relationships in real design however, can not be defined in terms of geometry alone. Logical operations, environmental effects such as lighting and air flow, the behaviour of people and the dynamic behaviour of materials are all essential design parameters that require other methods of definition, including the algorithm. It has been our position that the skills of the programmer are necessary in the future of design. Bentley’s Generative Components software was used as the primary vehicle for the workshop design projects. Built within the familiar Microstation framework, it enables the construction of a parametric model at a range of different interfaces, from purely graphic through to entirely code based, thus allowing the manipulation of such non-geometric, algorithmic relationships as described above. Two-dimensional laser cutting was the primary fabrication method, allowing for rapid manufacturing, and in some cases iterative physical testing. The two technologies have led in the workshop to working methods that extend the geometric schema: the first, by forcing an explicit understanding of design as procedural, and the second by encouraging physical experimentation and optimisation. The resulting projects have tended to focus on responsiveness to conditions either coded or incorporated into experimental loop. Examples will be discussed. While programming languages and geometry are universal in intent, their constraints on the design process were still notable. The default data structures of computer languages (in particular the rectangular array) replace one schema limitation with another. The indexing of data in this way is conceptually hard-wired into much of our thinking both in CAD and in code. Thankfully this can be overcome with a bit of programming, but the number of projects which have required this suggests that more intuitive, or spatial methods of data access might be developed in the future.
keywords generative design; parametric model; teaching
series SIGRADI
email s.hanna@cs.ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

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