CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 614

_id ascaad2006_paper13
id ascaad2006_paper13
authors Ambrose, Michael A.
year 2006
title Plan is Dead: to BIM or not to BIM, that is the question
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Drawing, modeling and the explicit abstraction embedded in the traditions and conventions of visual communication through composition and representation are fundamental to the how, why and what of architectural design. BIM presents simulation as an antiabstract means of visual communication that seeks to displace the discreet representation of plan, section and elevation with the intelligent object model. If plan is dead, the implication is that the value of abstraction is dead or dying as well. How can architectural education prepare students for digital practice with such an assault on the underlying role of abstract representation of formal and spatial constructs that constitute architecture? This paper explores a possible path for engaging digital media in education that explores the gap between design theory and digital practice. The investigation centers on ways of exploring architecture by developing teaching methods that reprioritize ways of seeing, thinking and making spatial design. Digital architectural education has great opportunity and risk in how it comes to terms with reconceptualizing design education as the profession struggles to redefine the media and methods of architectural deliverables in the age of BIM.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_302
id acadia06_302
authors Clarke, Cory
year 2006
title Synthetic Dissemination
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 302-303
summary Synthetic Dissemination, within the context of architecture and information culture, offers seemingly contradictory possibilities. The ends of dissemination and synthesis are at odds. The purpose of the former being diffusion and distribution, and the byproduct of the latter being quite the opposite - namely the combination and association of information into a coherent whole. The conjoining of dissemination and synthesis implies these two contradictory operations can operate in a symbiotic or complementary manner.Relative to architecture and design the combination of dissemination and synthesis is potentially profound. The marriage of synthesis and dissemination presents a possibility that the method of distributing information could be, or have embedded within it, a synthetic process. In the simplest sense synthetic dissemination implies that the tools for design and synthesis could be the same as tools for documentation and dissemination; or more specifically that the fluidity and creativity of design software could be coupled with the practicality and meticulousness of building information modelers (BIM). More abstractly synthetic dissemination implies that the means of encoding and distributing information could propagate design. Architects have readily adopted digital tools for encoding and presenting their ideas, but have not fully recognized how the informational structures of these applications promote or hinder design. Developments in the information architecture of D software, such as the shift from geometrically based data structures to procedurally based directed action graphs (DAG) as seen in Maya and DMax, have opened up innovative methods of architectural design. Each new change in the information architecture of design software ushers in new approaches to design, raising the question - how does the production and storage of information affect design? More broadly, how can the tools of dissemination facilitate synthesis?
series ACADIA
email cory@tendercreative.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_262
id 2006_262
authors Ibrahim, Magdy
year 2006
title To BIM or not to BIM, This is NOT the Question - How to Implement BIM Solutions in Large Design Firm Environments
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 262-267
summary Building information modeling is the technology that is converting the workplace in design firms. The initial resistance to applying the concept has faded due to many reasons. Professional architects now see the feasibility and benefits of using the new technology. CAD managers in design firms are working toward the implementation of BIM packages in order to eventually, replace the conventional CAD platforms that are still widely used. However, there are still internal obstacles that slow down the process of the implementation. The change in the project management and the required proper training for the conversion are the two major internal obstacles. The current well organized work flow tailored around the conventional CAD platforms has to be changed in a way suitable for the new technology. The training firms provide for their employees should also be re-structured in a more vertical organization in order to guarantee that everyone understands the new concept and the new work flow. Architectural education usually reflects the needs of the work market. It is very important to understand the needs and identify the directions where the architectural education should go. What do we expect from newly graduated architects? How should we shift the focus toward BIM based CAD in design schools? And, what does it mean to teach modeling versus teaching drafting?
keywords Computer Aided Drafting; Building Information Modeling; Architectural Education
series eCAADe
email ibramag@iit.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_232
id acadia06_232
authors Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak
year 2006
title Bidirectional Interoperability Between CAD and Energy Performance Simulation Through Virtual Model System Framework
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 232-250
summary The paper describes a novel approach involving interoperability, data modeling technology, and application of the building information model (BIM) focused on sustainable architecture. They share relationships and multiple experiences that have existed for years but have never have been proven. This interoperability of building performance simulation maps building information and parametric models with energy simulation models, establishing a seamless link between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and energy performance simulation software. During the last four decades, building designers have utilized information and communication technologies to create environmental representations to communicate spatial concepts or designs and to enhance spaces. Most architectural firms still rely on hand labor, drafted drawings, construction documents, specifications, schedules and work plans in traditional means. 3D modeling has been used primarily as a rendering tool, not as the actual representation of the project.With this innovative digitally exchange technology, architects and building designers can visually analyze dynamic building energy performance in response to changes of climate and building parameters. This software interoperability provides full data exchange bidirectional capabilities, which significantly reduces time and effort in energy simulation and data regeneration. Data mapping and exchange are key requirements for building more powerful energy simulations. An effective data model is the bidirectional nucleus of a well-designed relational database, critical in making good choices in selecting design parameters and in gaining and expanding a comprehensive understanding of existing data flows throughout the simulation process, making data systems for simulation more powerful, which has never been done before. Despite the variety of energy simulation applications in the lifecycle of building design and construction projects, there is a need for a system of data integration to allow seamless sharing and bidirectional reuse of data.
series ACADIA
email pongsak_archenergy@sbcglobal.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2016_013
id ascaad2016_013
authors Belkis Öksüz, Elif
year 2016
title Parametricism for Urban Aesthetics - A flawless order behind chaos or an over-design of complexity
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 105-112
summary Over the last decade, paradigm shifts in the philosophy of space-time relations, the change from space-time to spatio-temporality, caused significant changes in the design field, and introduced new variations and discourses for parametric approaches in architecture. Among all the discourses, parametricism is likely the most spectacular one. The founder of parametricism, Patrik Schumacher (2009) describes it as “a new style,” which has “the superior capacity to articulate programmatic complexity;” and “aesthetically, it is the elegance of ordered complexity in the sense of seamless fluidity.” In its theoretical background, Schumacher (2011) affiliates this style with the philosophy of autopoiesis, the philosophy that stands between making and becoming. Additionally, parametricism concerns not only the physical geometry in making of form; but also discusses the relational and causal aspects in becoming of form. In other words, it brings the aesthetic qualities in making through the topological intelligence behind becoming. Regarding that, parametricism seems an effective way of managing /creating complex topologies in form-related issues. However, when it comes to practice, there are some challenging points of parametricism in large-scale design studies. Thus, this work underlines that the dominance of elegance for urban planning has the potential of limiting the flexible and dynamic topology of the urban context, and objectifying the whole complex urban form as an over-designed product. For an aesthetic inquiry into urban parametricism, this paper highlights the challenging issues behind the aesthetic premises of parametricism at the urban design scale. For that, Kartal Master Plan Design Proposal by Zaha Hadid Architects (2006) will be discussed as an exemplary work.
series ASCAAD
email elifb8807@gmail.com
last changed 2017/05/25 11:31

_id caadria2006_601
id caadria2006_601
authors BINSU CHIANG, MAO-LIN CHIU
year 2006
title PRIVATE/UN-PRIVATE SPACE: Scenario-based Digital Design for Enhancing User Awareness
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 601-603
summary Context awareness is important for human senses of places as well as human computer interaction. The aim of this research paper is focusing on controlling the user's privacy in a smart space which is adaptive to different users for enhancing the user's awareness in his diary life. In Environmental Psychology, the definition of privacy is that an individual has the control of deciding what information of himself is released to others, and under how he interact with others. (Westin 1970) And privacy is categorized as the linguistic privacy and visual privacy. (Sundstorm 1986). Solutions for privacy control: Plan Layout, Vision Boundary, Access Control and Architecture Metaphor - the transmission of information is not ascertainable for every single user. Although information are shown in public, but information is implied by cues and symbols. Only a certain user or a group of users have access to the full context of information. The methodology is to form an analytic framework to study the relationship between information, user and activities by using the computational supports derived from KitchenSense, ConceptNet, Python, 3d Studio Max and Flash; and to record patterns built up by users' behaviour and actions. Furthermore, the scenario-based simulation can envision the real world conditions by adding interfaces for enhancing user awareness.
series CAADRIA
email n7693103@mail.ncku.edu.twmc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_268
id 2006_268
authors Rajala, Marko and Hannu Penttilä
year 2006
title Testing 3D Building Modelling Framework In Building Renovation
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 268-275
summary The paper describes a process where digital measuring survey data is transferred into 3D building model to be used as a foundation for renovation design. The process and method is tested in a case study of an office building of 8 floors. Measuring survey data is more often documented to 2D plan drawings, whereas 3D-modelling was more preferable in the case project. The final aim of the case project is to further test building product model or building information model (BIM) based design methods in building renovation. Product modelling is one emerging framework to manage building related information in contemporary design & construction. Model based methods are more commonly used in new buildings, whereas renovation is usually done with more traditional techniques. Case project results underline the importance of measuring and modelling definition phase. Measuring and documenting objectives for 3D-model based design work are different than for traditional design work. Measuring survey has to be done under the coordination of the designer participants. Selecting and informing the proper and capable surveying partners is also important.
keywords 3D modelling; product modelling; building information modelling BIM; renovation; measuring surveys
series eCAADe
email marko.rajala@hut.fi
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id eaea2005_000
id eaea2005_000
authors Dechène, Sigrun und Manfred Walz (Eds.)
year 2006
title Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space
source Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4, 260 p.
summary Simulating the development and the image of architecture and urban design means to show how the environment of the future and the living conditions could develop. At the same time it is part of our task to explain our work to local people and to the public and to passion skills in methods, instruments and knowledge in planning to the next generation of architects, planners and last but not least to discuss and to renew them once more for ourselves. Our aim was also to reflect what we have done since starting the look through the key-hole of endoscopy. Meanwhile this look has been completed since the beginnings in 1993 much more by computer and monitor. It is not the question to take the endoscope or the computer as a methodical and instrumental approach. Nowadays we normally decide to take the endoscope and the computer. In preparing the conference and the workshop we thought that this should now also be the moment not only to inform each other and the participants on methods, tools and best practices in simulating and designing the environment but also to focus on the social and human consequences of perception, movement and use the present urban spaces and the urban space in future. So we proposed the theme “MOTION, E-MOTION and URBAN SPACE” and we invited a scientific expert in experimental psychology to give us some serious reflections and one or another hint on our research themes and methods. The contributions and discussions in the conference showed that the proposal has not only been accepted but has also been completed and enriched especially concerning the theme urban space, it’s processes of usage and it‘s atmosphere. Also in the themes of endoscopy and the research on modelling urban spaces and architecture, meanwhile nearly “traditional” ones, remarkable results were presented and discussed. A very important point of contributions and the following discussions was how to present our subjects to the interested public and to improve our own internal exchange. An object could be to enforce the research tasks in researching together even more.
series EAEA
email dechene@fh-dortmund.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id 2006_810
id 2006_810
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Knight,Michael
year 2006
title Pen or PC? - Is Sketching essential to architectural design?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 810-817
summary This paper reports on an ongoing student architectural design project that is investigating the differing effects of the use of PC’s or Pens in the design process. We are interested to see whether designing wholly on the computer with a volume modeling software would produce differing results to a traditional design process with a strong basis in 2D sketching. To minimize the influence of the participants previous experience in either the use of PC’s or the pen, we have been working with very young students that have not yet gone through a traditional training on architectural design and CAAD software. This is one of the key aspects of our experimental procedure. We have found that recent software developments in the field of CAAD clearly have and will influence the way architects design and brings the computer as a design tool to the “normal architect”. Until very recently the computer was seen as a design tool almost solely for “computer geeks” in the profession, the majority of architects still using it mainly as a drafting machine or to produce visualizations of their projects after a more ‘conventional’ design process had finished. It is now very clear to us that the ongoing change in technology will have a profound effect on the way all of us will work in future undertaking architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching methods and the curricula. We use the above mentioned ongoing educational project to find out about the benefits and risks of using the computer as a design tool for first year students.
keywords Early Design stages; Collaborative Design; Sketching
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_234
id 2006_234
authors Donath, Dirk and Christian Tonn
year 2006
title Complex design strategies using building information models - Evaluation and interpretation of boundary conditions, supported by computer software
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 234-243
summary The choice of a chord and its execution should be regarded as a must and not left to arbitrary wish or superficial speculation. (Johannes Itten, 1961) The paper describes a modular concept for the IT-support of planning practice using BIM (Building Information Modelling) and a parameterized building model. The platform used is the modularized software concept for architectural planning in existing built contexts (prototype software FREAK). The current progress in the development of a reasoned support of planning tasks is described in this paper in more detail. The system consists of a series of software prototypes which are linked to the BIM, utilize the specific data within and demonstrate the value of a consistent and extendable CAD-model. The “Colored Architecture” software prototype is one such design-support module of the software platform and enables the designer to experiment with the parameters colour, light and materials in architectural space. This module supports experimentation, assessment and realization of colours and materials in the architectural design process on a new quality. For instance, the integration of “live radiosity” light simulation allows a qualified and interactive assessment and evaluation of colours and materials in near-real lighting conditions. The paper also details further software prototypes, modules and concepts including building surveying and the design of self-supporting domed structures.
keywords Design; Parameterized Building Information Modelling; Plausibility; Planning Support; Colour, Material and Light Design
series eCAADe
email christian.tonn@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2006_paper12
id ascaad2006_paper12
authors Katodrytis, George
year 2006
title The Autopoiesis and Mimesis of Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The use of digital technology in architecture has proven to be more assertive than originally thought: it has reconditioned the nature of the design process, and established new practices and techniques of fabrication. The 21st century began with the technology of art. There is a new responsiveness to the reading and understanding of digital space, which is characterized by complexity and the uncanny. Recent applications in digital technology show inquisitiveness in the contentious subject Genetic Algorithms. This new architectural process is characterized by two main shifts: from poiesis (or poetry) to autopoiesis, and from authenticity to mimesis. Since evolutionary simulations give rise to new forms rather than design them, architects should now be artists and operators of both Inventive and Systematic design. Inventive design: The digital media should bring about poiesis (poetry). Digital spaces reveal and visualize the unconscious desires of urban spaces and bring forth new dreamscapes, mysterious and surreal. This implies a Freudian spatial unconscious, which can be subjected to analysis and interpretation. “Space may be the projection or the extension of the physical apparatus”, Freud noted1. Space is never universal, but subjective. A space would be a result of introjection or projection – which is to say, a product of the thinking and sensing subject as opposed to the universal and stable entity envisaged since the Enlighten. There is a spatial unconscious, susceptible to analysis and interpretation. Systematic Design: Digital media should bring about an autopoiesis. This approach calls into question traditional methods of architectural design – which replace the hierarchical processes of production known as “cause and effect” - and proposes a design process where the architect becomes a constructor of formal systems. Will the evolutionary simulation replace design? Is metric space dead? Is it replaced by the new definition of space, that of topology? The new algorithmic evolutionary conditions give architecture an autopoiesis, similar to biological dynamics. The use of algorithms in design and fabrication has shifted the role of the architect from design to programming. Parametric design has introduced another dimension: that of variation and topological evolution, breaking the authentic into the reused. Architecture now is about topology than typology, variation than authenticity, it is mimetic than original, uncanny and subconscious than merely generic. In a parallel universe, which is both algorithmic and metaphysical, the modeling machine creates a new abstraction, the morphogenesis of the “new hybrid condition”. The emphasis of the exploration is on morphological complexity. Architecture may become – paradoxically - rigorous yet more uncanny and introverted.
series ASCAAD
email gkatodrytis@aus.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e151c
id sigradi2006_e151c
authors Neumann, Oliver and Schmidt, Daniel
year 2006
title CNC Timber Framing – Innovative Applications of Digital Wood Fabrication Technology
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 304-307
summary The discourse on depleting natural resources and compromised environments have led to extended research on sustainable designs methods, building practices and materials. Beyond the actual performance of building products and components, research on sustainable building increasingly focuses on the long-term effects of the production, application and life cycle of building materials on the natural environment, human inhabitation and quality of life. Computer aided manufacturing technologies play a significant role not only in the transformation of design and building methods, but also in an extended discourse on cultural development. Globally available technologies connect the design and building process to a broad range of long-term ecological factors by creating a correlation between "the emergent political, economical and social processes and … architectural techniques, geometries and organization." Through this interrelationship to economy and culture, technology and its applications are also directly related to notions of place and territory as well as to fundamental ideas of ecology. The collaborative research and design study for an outdoor theater roof structure at the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest at Maple Ridge, B.C., Canada, focuses on the use of digital media in prefabrication and material optimization. By utilizing small square section timber and minimizing the use of alienating connectors the research on the wood roof structure illustrates the potential of a design culture that seeks innovation in a broader understanding of ecology routed in regional culture, environmental conditions, economy and tradition. Labor intensive manufacturing techniques are redefined aided by computer controlled machines and virtual modeling of complex geometries is translated into simple operations. The result is a more sensible and accurate response to the place’s demands. In order to generate innovative design interventions that make a constructive long-term contribution to the preservation, maintenance and evolution of the environment, design needs to be based on a comprehensive understanding of its context and the distinctive qualities of the materials used. Following the example of the outdoor roof structure, this paper aims to define innovative design as work that resonates at the intersection of the fields of technology, material science, manufacturing processes, techniques of assembly and context that constitute the expanded context or complex ecology that projects need to engage. It is in design research studies like for the outdoor theater roof structure with focus on CNC wood fabrication technologies that the common design and building discourse is put to question, boundaries are explored and expanded and the collective understanding is improved towards ecological design.
keywords CNC Wood Fabrication; Design Innovation; Ecology
series SIGRADI
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id caadria2006_047
id caadria2006_047
authors SHAI YESHAYAHU, A.; B. MARIA VERA
year 2006
title CUT, COPY, PASTE SOCIETY
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 47-52
summary You and I were not born in the 1990’s thus our experience about the true modalities of circulation and communication that have substantially transformed the methods that form and inform us today, are not really “pure”. Why? Because we know how slow time was before the communication boom of this last decade and because some of us still believe that we must read to be inform and thus, visit a bookstore, library or friends house and get peeks inside a subject of matter. So experiencing life as we bypass the book _ that’s a story of a brand new era! Taking note of the enormous changes this era brings, is fundamental to our current pedagogic undertakings. We seek data about the differences that lie in the way individuals, which never knew a world before or between analogue and digital zones, process information. It signals a dramatic shift in cognitive realms that is deeply imbedded in our emerging socio-economic spheres. So, you say “hypothesizing that economic, technologic, and cultural fluxes fabricate new means to learn and think, is not a fresh idea”_ True. But, it led us to ask one fundamental question _What are the upcoming learning habits employed by the “post digital” society? We noted that the post digital generation is an avid cut, copy, paste society that is able to extract information from infinite resources and mix, remix in diversified modes, through time and in real-time. We think these abilities are strengths, which will permit students to multitask yet they strongly differ from the academic agendas that are concerned with meditative processes and qualitative interdisciplinary task. As aspiring academics interested in the reconfiguration of current pedagogic formats we seek a creative intervention for future design generations, one that can benefit both the upheavals of the cultural world and the integrity of the academic setting where a pedagogy that links extended fields of knowledge with shifting cognitive habits can emerge. In this arena where cognition plays an important role, our goals are challenging and difficult, especially in the beginning years when the foundations set forward leaves lasting impressions. Thus, letting go of familiar grounds and tuning to continual alterations of the immediate surroundings enables us to seek means that facilitate important readings for our current learning/teaching processes. Demystifying changes and embracing differences as design potentials for new interventions are basic programmatic elements that permit us to incorporate a rigorous research agenda in the design exercises. Our presentation will project the current state of our teaching modality and provide examples of current studio work. It will demonstrate how everyday rituals, journeys and research observations, are documented by a society that heralds a new academic setting.
series CAADRIA
email shaiy@siu.edu
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id ascaad2006_paper11
id ascaad2006_paper11
authors Stanton, Michael
year 2006
title Redemptive Technologies II: the sequel (A Decade Later)
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Nearly ten years ago I published an article in the Dutch journal ARCHIS called "Redemptive Technologies." It derived from comments I made during a conference held in New Orleans in 1994. At that point the machine aesthetic associated with the "new technologies" generated by the computer had not established a precise formal vocabulary but were generating great excitement among the architectural avant-garde. It addressed the limits of the imagery and data produced by this machine and the simple but very political problem of cost and obsolescence. Now the millennium is well past and the somewhat apostolic fervor that accompanied the interaction of a very expensive consumer device with architecture has cooled. Discussion has generally moved from the titillating possibilities opened up by the device, many of which have so far not come to pass, to the sorts of hard and software available. An architectural language closely associated with the imagistic potential of new programs, biomorphism, has now come and gone on the runways of architectural taste. And yet, in recent articles rejecting the direct political effect of architectural work, the potential of new programs and virtual environments are proposed as alternative directions that our perpetually troubled profession may pursue. This paper will assess the last decade regarding the critical climate that surrounds cyber/technology. In the economic context of architectural education in which computers are still a central issue, the political issues that evolve will form a backdrop to any discussion. Furthermore, the problem of the "new" language of biomorphism will be reiterated as an architectural grammar with a 100-year history - from Catalan Modernismo and Art Nouveau, through Hermann Finsterlin and Eric Mendelsohn's projects of the 1920s, to Giovanni Michelucci and Italian work of the post-war, to Frederick Kiesler's Endless House of the late '50s, continuing through moments of Deconstructivism and Architectural Association salients, etc. These forms continue to be semantically simplistic and hard to make. Really the difference is the neo-avant-garde imagery and rhetoric involved in their continuing resurrection. Computer images, but also the ubiquitous machine itself, are omnipresent and often their value is assumed without question or proposed as a remedy for issues they cannot possibly address. This paper will underline the problem of the computer, of screens and the insistent imagistic formulas encourage by their use, and the ennui that is beginning to pervade the discipline after initial uncritical enthusiasm for this very powerful and expensive medium. But it will also propose other very valuable directions, those relating to reassessing the processes rather than the images that architecture engages, that this now aging "new" technology can much more resolutely and successfully address.
series ASCAAD
email ms22@aub.edu.lb
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id caadria2006_565
id caadria2006_565
authors CHEN CHIEN TUNG
year 2006
title DESIGN ON SITE: Portable, Measurable, Adjustable Design Media
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 565-567
summary Space designers usually look for information on site before proceeding design. They image any possibilities of design, while they are on site. Restricted to traditional design media, if they want to develop their ideas further, they have to go back to desks. This kind of design process can capture only part of information of the site. Why not do some developments directly when designers are on the site? That is the starting point of this paper. The whole situation of site is very complicated, so it is very difficult discussing all the possibilities. In order to understand how to design on site, reducing the variations is needed. Tsai and Chang (2005) proposed a prototype about design on site, which focuses on land forming. So I chose interior as the site to reduce the variation and have more controllable factors. Still there are many factors effecting design on site, scale is very unique and very important factor of them. Beginners are difficult to really feel how long it is on the plan drawing, and even most advanced VR equipment still can’t fully present the rich information on the site. To experience the site though body, the main idea is how to propose a portable device that can support space designer to do design on site directly, with intuitional body movement and precise scale, and get feedback immediately.
series CAADRIA
email Ton0216@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_e172c
id sigradi2006_e172c
authors Donath, Dirk and González Böhme, Luis Felipe
year 2006
title A Constraint-Based Building Bulk Design Support
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 278-282
summary We introduce an architecture practice-oriented implementation strategy of constraint-based methods called BDS (Building Bulk Design Support) to supporting bulk analysis during the architectural programming phase. We examine the optmization problem of site coverage and building massing according to a set of standard planning and zoning regulations, and try a problem solving approach based on the paradigm of constraint satisfaction problems. The case study, which is focused on the paticipatory planning of very low-income dwellings within the Latin American context, serves as testbed for a prototypical application of the adopted methodology. The BDS constitutes a novel approach on computer-aided bulk analysis, regarding this particularly relevant context of application. In the case of participatively planned low-income housing projects, efficiency regarding time and cost of planning directly affects dwellers’ quality of life, whereas elementary programming tasks such as bulk analysis lack appropriate state-of-the-art technological support. Traditional architectural planning methods demand a large domain-specific knowledge base and skillful planners. A planning process, which is mainly driven by the formulation of planning-relevant constraints and sets of solution alternatives, suggests to avoid architects’ traditional procedure of: 1. Create an (yet not necessarily valid) instance of the eventual design solution by directly choosing specific values for its shape parameters. 2. Evaluate its validity by confronting the designed model to a set of applicable constraints, which have to be satisfied. Instead, the constraint-based design methodology poses a search procedure that operates in a space of pertinent constraint sets. A computer-aided interactive search procedure to find more valid design solution alternatives in less time and with less effort is particularly qualified to supply efficient support for participatory planning activities carried out between dwellers and planners. The set of solutions for a building-bulk design problem is constrained by both a large complex system of planning and zoning regulations and the geometry of the eventual design solution itself. Given a considerable amount of such regulations, a regular size geometric constraint satisfaction system proved to be capable of providing a highly efficient, interactive modeling and evaluation tool for the formulation in real time of valid solution alternatives for an ordinary building-bulk design problem. A BDS implementation will constitute one system module of a larger integrated system model called Esther. A BDS tool shall interact with other functional modules, like e.g. the FLS (Floor plan Layout Support), which also uses constraint-based design methods.
keywords constraint-based design; bulk analysis; participatory planning; low-income housing; design theory; design proces
series SIGRADI
email luis-felipe.gonzalez@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id sigradi2006_e171c
id sigradi2006_e171c
authors González Böhme, Luis Felipe and Vargas Cárdenas, Bernardo
year 2006
title Foundations for a Constraint-Based Floor Plan Layout Support in Participatory Planning of Low-Income Housing
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 283-287
summary We introduce the foundations of a novel approach that deals with constraint-based design methods to supporting participatory planning processes of low-income dwellings. We examine the space allocation problem inside the architectural domain on the basis of graph theory and combinatorics, providing a concise mathematical background for an implementation strategy called FLS (Floor plan Layout Support), which is analyzed here for the first time regarding this particular context of application. The philosophy underlying a design method that is mainly driven by the formulation of distinct constraints suggests to avoid the traditional procedure of first to create a yet not necessarily valid instance of the eventual design solution by directly choosing specific parameter values of its shape, and later on to evaluate its validity by confronting the designed model to a set of applicable constraints. Instead, constraint-based design poses a search procedure that operates in a space of planning-relevant constraint sets. The FLS methodology integrates some few principles of constraint-based automated reasoning with high user interactivity, into a design environment where as much dwellers as planners can collaboratively work in solving spatial organization problems of housing projects. The FLS model of application makes use of a combination of dweller-specified constraints, planning and zoning regulations, and a small library of modular space units. Constraint-based design ! methods are particularly capable of supplying efficient support for the collaborative involvement of dwellers into the architectural programming process of her/his own home. Mainly, because dwellers themselves tend to describe their space need and design intentions as a set of constraints on room quantity, space utilization, circulation system, allocation of available furniture, available budget, construction time, and so forth. The goal is to achieve an integrated tool for finding and modelling topologically valid solutions for floor plan layout alternatives, by combining user-driven interactive procedures with automatic search and generative processes. Thus, several design alternatives can be explored in less time and with less effort than using mainstream procedures of architectural practice. A FLS implementation will constitute one system module of a larger integrated system model called Esther. A FLS tool shall interact with other functional modules, like e.g. the BDS (Building Bulk Design Support), which also uses constraint-based design methods. A preliminary procedural model for the FLS was tested on Chile’s official social housing standards (Chilean Building Code – OGUC. Art. 6.4.1) which are very similar to most Latin American housing programs currently in operation.
keywords constraint-based design; floor plan layout; participatory planning; low-income housing; design theory; design proces
series SIGRADI
email bernardo.vargas@bauing.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id acadia06_342
id acadia06_342
authors Kobayashi, Yosihiro
year 2006
title Self-Organizing Map and Axial Spatial Arrangement: Topological Mapping of Alternative Designs
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 342-355
summary This research attempts to formulate a computational framework for exploring spatial arrangements in the early phases of design. In the physical world, this could be compared to exploring spatial arrangements using cardboard cut-outs or simply a grid of spaces on paper. This research demonstrates the framework by means of a generative design system that introduces axial order in a plan parti made up of discrete 3D objects. The tool is designed to organize the 3D objects along an Axis specified by the user and also rearrange them following user-defined mathematical expressions. The numerical parameters (the dimensions and physical properties of the individual objects) are linked through the mathematical expressions to vary the spatial arrangement of objects. Implementation of the tool involves the Self Organizing Maps (SOMs) as the Graphical User Interface (GUI) in generative systems. This allows the user to select and dynamically view spatial arrangements that have been organized on a map based on their similarity. The application is implemented, tested, and its results are demonstrated using buildings designed by Louis I. Kahn, Frank Lloyd Wright and Mies van der Rohe.
series ACADIA
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ddss2006-pb-153
id DDSS2006-PB-153
authors Linda Ma, Theo Arentze, Aloys Borgers, and Harry Timmermans
year 2006
title A Multi-Agent Model for Generating Local Land-Use Plans in the Context of an Urban Planning Support System
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 153-168
summary In a multi-player urban planning process, the outcome of any individual decision of the actors is uncertain until a state where the plan is satisfactory for all. To support the plan generation phase, this paper develops a generic multi-agent system, in which agents represent particular land-uses. In the system, agents higher in the hierarchy have priority over agents lower in the hierarchy to claim units of land. This one-direction claim process may result in a plan that is not optimal for every agent. The system, therefore, allows agents to revise their plans in an iterative procedure. A case study illustrates centralized, semi-centralized and decentralized solutions for a plan area based on the outcomes of different strategies used by facility agents (retail, green, schools) and a housing agent. The results show that the proposed system is able to generate rational and realistic plan alternatives for new residential areas.
keywords Multi-agent system, Planning support system, Plan alternative, Land use planning
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

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