CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 617

_id ijac20064102
id ijac20064102
authors Lee, Jackie Chia-Hsun; Hu, Yuchang; Selker, Ted
year 2006
title iSphere:A free-hand 3D modeling interface
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 1, 19-31
summary Making 3D models should be an easy and intuitive task like free-hand sketching. This paper presents iSphere, a 24 degree of freedom 3D input device. iSphere is a dodecahedron embedded with 12 capacitive sensors for pulling-out and pressing-in manipulation on 12 control points of 3D geometries. It exhibits a conceptual 3D modeling approach for saving mental loads of low-level commands. Using analog inputs of 3D manipulation, designers are able to have high-level modeling concepts like pushing or pulling 3D surfaces. Our experiment shows that iSphere saved steps in the selection of control points in the review of menus and leading to a clearer focus on what to build instead of how to build it. Novices saved significant time learning 3D manipulation by using iSphere to making conceptual models. However, one tradeoff of the iSphere is its lack of fidelity in its analog input mechanism.
keywords 3D Input Device; Proximity Sensing; Parametric Modeling; Human-Computer Interaction
series journal
email jackylee@media.mit.edu
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00003
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2006_c129b
id sigradi2006_c129b
authors Abad, Gabriel; Adriane Borde; Mónica Fuentes; Virginia Agrielav; Adriana Granero and Jacqueline Fernández
year 2006
title Producción colaborativa de material de enseñanza-aprendizaje de Gráfica Digital con aportes multidisciplinarios [Collaborative production for taught-learning materials for digital graphic with multidisciplinary contributions]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 117-121
summary For a contribution to problem solving processes at different areas, this paper presents the use of Digital Graphics as a knowledge object for a distance teaching/learning workshop. At the Learning Management System, different theoretical subjects with supporting tools were proposed, and exercises requiring collaborative work. An specific didactic situation using available technologies at Internet for 3D modelling, combined with satellite images and geographic information program was proposed. The final works were then shared by a 3D models repository. As a complement of this experience and in relation with their professional work, every student proposed a new didactic situation including Learning Objects, sharing them with the others members of the group, through conceptual maps built up in a co-operative way.
series SIGRADI
email gabad@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_840
id 2006_840
authors Ciblac, Thierry; Louis-Paul Untersteller and Pierre Macé
year 2006
title Restitution and Interpretation of Spatial Representations: A New Approach for Teaching Representation
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 840-847
summary The use of computers has changed the practice of spatial representations. The users are no longer drawers but modelers who need to be able to check the coherence of models. The teaching of representations has to adapt with this evolution, especially in Schools of Architecture. A pedagogical way is to give interpretation tools of spatial representations through projective properties (incidence or affine properties) and consequence of intrinsic constraints (parallelism, orthogonality, and symmetry). The application of this knowledge is essential for the rebuilding of existing 3D objects or for a design process, with the restitution of 3D models from sketches. These approaches are illustrated in a pedagogical way, using dynamic geometry, in the restitution of the polyhedron of the engraving “Melencolia I” of A. Dürer, and in a dynamic sketch of a skylight inspired of the Vitra museum of F. Ghery.
keywords restitution; perspective; teaching; geometric algebra; sketch
series eCAADe
email tciblac@paris-lavillette.archi.fr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_392
id acadia06_392
authors Dorta, T., Perez, E.
year 2006
title Hybrid modeling revaluing manual action for 3D modeling
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 392-402
summary 3D modeling software uses conventional interface devices like mouse, keyboard and display allowing the designer to model 3D shapes. Due to the complexity of 3D shape data structures, these programs work through a geometrical system and a graphical user interface to input and output data. However, these elements interfere with the conceptual stage of the design process because the software is always asking to be fed with accurate geometries—something hard to do at the beginning of the process. Furthermore, the interface does not recognize all the advantages and skills of the designer’s bare hands as a powerful modeling tool.This paper presents the evaluation of a hybrid modeling technique for conceptual design. The hybrid modeling approach proposes to use both computer and manual tools for 3D modeling at the beginning of the design process. Using 3D scanning and rapid prototyping techniques, the designer is able to go back and forth between digital and manual mode, thus taking advantage of each one. Starting from physical models, the design is then digitalized in order to be treated with special modeling software. Then, the rapid prototyping physical model becomes a matrix or physical 3D template used to explore design intentions with the hands, allowing the proposal of complex shapes, which is difficult to achieve by 3D modeling software alone.
series ACADIA
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_302
id 2006_302
authors Dounas, Theodoros and Anastasios M. Kotsiopoulos
year 2006
title Generation of alternative designs in architectural problems using Shape Grammars defined with animation tools - A computer implementation of shape grammars using modelling and animation software
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 302-307
summary We present a model of generation of alternative designs to selected architectural and spatial configurations of small complexity. Specifically we present a production pipeline of architectural / spatial configurations using the context of animation and time based design tools. Our model consists of time and space design constraints of boundaries / objects affecting a given architectural design, thus producing an alternative solution for every timeframe of the animation cycle. The alternative designs vary from the original according to their temporal and/or spatial distance from the original object on the animation time-line. The constraints placed upon the objects , used as actuators of Shape Grammars, are defined informally by the user/designer while their influence can vary according to time, speed, location, configuration of the object and/or the constraint itself. However the constraints further function as formal rules for the Shape Grammar creation so that our model tries to predict ahead of time the emergence of alternate designs. The employ of animation tools [shape driven curves, speed and time-line functions,parent child relationships] in the shape generation of our model empowers the user/designer to configure whole sets of shapes and designs interactively and without the need to define every solution independently. Simultaneously, a different, time-focused view of our model describes its use on designs that develop different configurations over time. Thus a duality of our model is established: either the animated schema may be a sum or family of various designs or the animated time-line represents a single design which changes over time. Finally the possibility of an automated analysis of every design is discussed, using Space Syntax diagrams so the designer can quickly evaluate the various spatial configurations produced by a single original.
keywords shape computation; shape grammar computer implementation; alternative designs; animation software techniques
series eCAADe
email dounas@gmail.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id acadia06_342
id acadia06_342
authors Kobayashi, Yosihiro
year 2006
title Self-Organizing Map and Axial Spatial Arrangement: Topological Mapping of Alternative Designs
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 342-355
summary This research attempts to formulate a computational framework for exploring spatial arrangements in the early phases of design. In the physical world, this could be compared to exploring spatial arrangements using cardboard cut-outs or simply a grid of spaces on paper. This research demonstrates the framework by means of a generative design system that introduces axial order in a plan parti made up of discrete 3D objects. The tool is designed to organize the 3D objects along an Axis specified by the user and also rearrange them following user-defined mathematical expressions. The numerical parameters (the dimensions and physical properties of the individual objects) are linked through the mathematical expressions to vary the spatial arrangement of objects. Implementation of the tool involves the Self Organizing Maps (SOMs) as the Graphical User Interface (GUI) in generative systems. This allows the user to select and dynamically view spatial arrangements that have been organized on a map based on their similarity. The application is implemented, tested, and its results are demonstrated using buildings designed by Louis I. Kahn, Frank Lloyd Wright and Mies van der Rohe.
series ACADIA
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id caadria2006_119
id caadria2006_119
authors MARY LOU MAHER , MIJEONG KIM
year 2006
title THE EFFECTS OF TANGIBLE USER INTERFACES ON DESIGNERS’ COGNITIVE ACTIONS
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 119-124
summary This paper presents a study of the comparison of tangible user interfaces and graphical user interfaces on designers’ cognitive actions. We conducted individual design experiments using the protocol analysis method. The results reveal that designers using the tabletop system with 3D blocks reasoned more about spatial relationships among 3D objects, while the designers using the keyboard and mouse reasoned more about individual 3D objects.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_618
id 2006_618
authors Oh, Sooyeon and Yutaka Kidawara
year 2006
title A real-space navigation system based on ubiquitous technology
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 618-625
summary In next-generation networking environments, ubiquitous networks will be available both indoors and outdoors. Various devices will be ubiquitously embedded in the surrounding environment, such as buildings and urban spaces. We will be able to browse digital contents on ubiquitous networks anywhere and at anytime. In our research, we have proposed several content-processing mechanisms for use in environment-enabled collaborative acquisition of embedded digital content in the real world situations. We have developed a network management device that makes it possible to acquire embedded content using coordinated ubiquitous devices. We have also developed two prototype systems using these devices. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a prototype system that can share 3D objects in a virtual 3D space based on a real-space environment. This system can be used not only as a virtual 3D browser in a private area, but also as an interactive digital poster in a public area. We tested our system in real situation, and explore the feasibility of applying our system in a ubiquitous environment.
keywords Ubiquitous technology; Navigation; Collaborative service; Embedded digital content; Real space
series eCAADe
email sooyeon@nict.go.jp
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_e145a
id sigradi2006_e145a
authors Heiss, Leah
year 2006
title Empathy over distance: Wearables as tools for augmenting Remote Emotional Connection
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 66-69
summary Mainstream communication modes emphasise network speed, connection access, resolution, portability, and aesthetic design as primary to the success of their products. Within this vision a three by four centimetre screen and high resolution display are deemed adequate to emulate the intensities and complexities of face-to-face connection with loved ones. They allow us to ‘be there with you’ from wherever we might be. Yet interpersonal communication is a massively complex phenomenon. It involves a plethora of micro-activities which occur at a physical, physiological, and psychological level allowing us to recognise at a cellular scale intention, motive and emotional authenticity. Our conscious and non-conscious involvement in spatially collocated communication is substantial due to these myriad channels of real-time bi-directional information transfer. While contemporary communications technologies have the capacity to mediate our relationships, they fall short of encouraging the richness of spatially co-present interaction. The research discussed in this paper investigates the potential expansion of remote connection when electronically enhanced apparel is incorporated into the communications mix. Rather than pursuing the manifold functionalities of traditional communications media the garments discussed focus solely on the goal of enhancing empathy between physically distant individuals. This paper reports on the development and testing of a range of garments that conduct presence information between remotely located people. The garments sense, process, transmit and receive the heartbeat wavelength (ECG). They are enabled with ECG sensors, signal processing equipment, small vibration motors, and radio transceivers which allow users to ‘feel’ the heartbeat of a remote friend/lover/relative as vibration through their garment. The prototypes aim to enrich the remote communications experience through reintroducing an embodied, tactile dimension that is present in face-to-face communication. A range of user testing trials will be discussed which have been undertaken to assess the impact of the garments at a conscious and a non-conscious level. Conscious experiences were gauged through qualitative testing, by way of interviews and unsolicited written reactions, which have provided a range of engaging emotional responses. Non-conscious physiological reactions were assessed by recording ECG throughout user-testing periods. This data has been processed using HRV (heart rate variability) analysis software, running on MatLab. Preliminary results suggest that users have strong conscious and non-conscious reactions to the experience of wearing the prototype garments. The paper will describe the data processing techniques and findings of the user testing trials. The development of biosignal sensing garments has raised a range of issues including: innovative potentials for embedded peripheral awareness media; the expansion of the classical body to incorporate remotely sensed information; the issue of data semantics and the development of intensely personal non-verbal languages; and the issue of corporeal privacy when one’s biological information is exposed for potential download. They also bring into question how our bodily experiences might change when we incorporate remote sensory systems.
keywords Enabled apparel; emotional tools; biosignals
series SIGRADI
email leah.heiss@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia07_284
id acadia07_284
authors Robinson, Kirsten; Gorbet, Robert; Beesley, Philip
year 2007
title Evolving Cooperative Behaviour in a Reflexive Membrane
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 284-293
summary This paper describes the integration of machine intelligence into an immersive architectural sculpture that interacts dynamically with users and the environment. The system is conceived to function as an architectural envelope that might transfer air using a distributed array of components. The sculpture includes a large array of interconnected miniature structural and kinetic elements, each with local sensing, actuation, and machine intelligence. We demonstrate a model in which these autonomous, interconnected agents develop cooperative behaviour to maximize airflow. Agents have access to sensory data about their local environment and ‘learn’ to move air through the working of a genetic algorithm. Introducing distributed and responsive machine intelligence builds on work done on evolving embodied intelligence (Floreano et al. 2004) and architectural ‘geotextile’ sculptures by Philip Beesley and collaborators (Beesley et al. 1996-2006). The paper contributes to the general field of interactive art by demonstrating an application of machine intelligence as a design method. The objective is the development of coherent distributed kinetic building envelopes with environmental control functions. A cultural context is included, discussing dynamic paradigms in responsive architecture.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email k.w.robinson@gmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2006_e165b
id sigradi2006_e165b
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2006
title Optimization in the Balance between the Production Effort of E-learning Tutorials and their related Learning Outcome
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 122-126
summary This paper provides evidence on the level of media richness that may be cost effective in the development of e-learning tutorials for teaching and learning computer visualization techniques. For such a purpose the author provides an analysis of low-cost / high-impact media rich products, the effort and cost required in their development and the measurement of related learning outcomes. Circa twenty years of R&D of multimedia and hypermedia applications for instruction have demonstrated the benefits of communicating relevant information to learners using engaging media. Based on this evidence, this paper assumes that due to the cognitive style of design students, the instructional packages for learning computer techniques for design visualization that are rich in media content, tend to be more effective. Available visualization technologies make the development of e-learning tutorials feasible and apparently the logical way to implement our instructional packages. However the question in the development of e-learning tutorials becomes a more strategic one when we are called to reach a level of optimization between producing a package with a basic standard, namely; text & still-graphic based tutorials, or a state-of-the-art package that is based on video demonstrations (more than enough?) that can accommodate the students’ learning requirements and also our production costs. The costs include the human resources (instructor, producers, assistants and others) and the material resources (hardware and software, copies, and others) involved in the creation of the e-learning tutorials. The key question is: What is good enough, and what is clearly superfluous? In order to confirm our hypothesis and propose a relevant balance between media richness and learning effectiveness, this paper describes an experiment in the use of two different levels of media richness as used to deliver instructions on the production of computer animations for design visualization. The students recruited for this experiment were fairly familiarized with the use of 3D modeling concepts and software, but had no previous knowledge of the techniques included in the tutorials; in specific; camera animation procedures. The students, separated in two groups, used one of the two methods; then they proceeded to apply their newly acquired skills in the production of an animation without using the help of any external means. The assessment of results was based on the quality of the final product and the students’ performance in the recall of the production procedures. Finally an interview with the students was conducted on their perception of what was accomplished from a metacognitive point of view. The results were processed in order to establish comparisons between the different levels of achievement and the students’ metacognitive assessment of learning. These results have helped us to create a clear set of recommendations for the production of e-learning tutorials and their conditions for implementation. The most beneficial characteristics of the two tested methods in relation to type of information, choice of media, method of information delivery, flexibility of production/editorial tools,! and overall cost of production, will be transferred into the development of a more refined product to be tested at larger scale.
keywords e-learning tutorials; media richness; learning effectiveness; cognitive style; computer visualization techniques
series SIGRADI
email angulo@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e159b
id sigradi2006_e159b
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2006
title Digital Design Pedagogy - Basic Design - CADCAM Space Box Exploration
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 127-130
summary This proposed paper will highlight the work of a “pre-architecture” graduate student’s work produced in a “Digital Design II” course in Spring 06. This student has a bachelor’s degree in Architectural Technologies and hopes to attend a “professional” degree program in architecture after completing our Master of Science degree program. The student entered our “pre / post-professional” graduate program as a means of learning more about design, technology and architecture. This provided a rare opportunity to do “research” in the area of digital technology in the early formative phases of a new architecture / design students development. The student chose to study “shadows” as a means of design inquiry. The primary focus of the work was the study of various “4” x 4” x 4” “space-cubes.” The student was given various “design” constraints, and “transformative” operations for the study of positive-negative space relationships, light+shadows, and surface as a means of gaining in-sight to form. The CADCAM tools proved to be empowering for the student’s exploration and learning. With the recent emergence of both more user-friendly hardware and software, we are seeing a paradigm shift in design “ideation.” This is attributed to the evolving human-computer-interface (HCI) that now allows a fluidic means of creative design ideation, digital representation and physical making. Computing technology is now infusing early conceptual design ideation and allowing designers, and form, to follow their ideas. The argument will be supported with primary evidence generated in our pedagogy and research that has shown the visualization and representational power of emerging 2D and 3D CADCAM tools. This paper will analyze the basic “digital design” process used by the writer’s student. Architectural form concepts, heretofore, impossible to model and represent, are now possible due to CADCAM. Emerging designers are integrating “digital thinking” in their fundamental conceptualization of form. These creative free-forms are only feasible for translation to tectonic form using digital design-make techniques. CADCAM tools are empowering designers for form exploration and design creativity. Current computing technology is now infusing the creative design process; the computer is becoming a design “partner” with the designer and is changing form and architecture; thus, we are now seeing unprecedented design-make creativity in architecture.
keywords Basic Design; CADCAM; Digital Design; Virtual 3D Models; Physical 3D Printed Models
series SIGRADI
email lbarrow@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2006_601
id caadria2006_601
authors BINSU CHIANG, MAO-LIN CHIU
year 2006
title PRIVATE/UN-PRIVATE SPACE: Scenario-based Digital Design for Enhancing User Awareness
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 601-603
summary Context awareness is important for human senses of places as well as human computer interaction. The aim of this research paper is focusing on controlling the user's privacy in a smart space which is adaptive to different users for enhancing the user's awareness in his diary life. In Environmental Psychology, the definition of privacy is that an individual has the control of deciding what information of himself is released to others, and under how he interact with others. (Westin 1970) And privacy is categorized as the linguistic privacy and visual privacy. (Sundstorm 1986). Solutions for privacy control: Plan Layout, Vision Boundary, Access Control and Architecture Metaphor - the transmission of information is not ascertainable for every single user. Although information are shown in public, but information is implied by cues and symbols. Only a certain user or a group of users have access to the full context of information. The methodology is to form an analytic framework to study the relationship between information, user and activities by using the computational supports derived from KitchenSense, ConceptNet, Python, 3d Studio Max and Flash; and to record patterns built up by users' behaviour and actions. Furthermore, the scenario-based simulation can envision the real world conditions by adding interfaces for enhancing user awareness.
series CAADRIA
email n7693103@mail.ncku.edu.twmc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_c048c
id sigradi2006_c048c
authors Bruscato Portella, Underléa
year 2006
title I+D _ Ideación Digital en la Arquitectura Actual [I+D_Digital ideas in contemporary architecture]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 258-262
summary Based on study of recent projects develop by reputed architectural firms, this paper reviews the role of digital techniques in the conception of design, describing mainly the proposals for Philarmonic Orchestra of Copenhagen by Jean Nouvel and the Harbour of Tenerife by Herzog and De Meuron, Both projects state innovative architectural concepts with diverse graphic resources. Digital media is not used as a specific tool, but as an integrated repertoire related to design issues, Image processing, photo-collages, 3D modelling, renderings, colored layouts and graphic sequences are applied to explore novelty shapes, spatial qualities, functional arrangements and constructive strategies. In these cases computer technologies are participating in design generation supporting overall architectural creativity. In order to benefit from new design media that approach express the relevance of firms' culture related to innovation and development (I+D).
series SIGRADI
email bruscatop@unisinos.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_c086a
id sigradi2006_c086a
authors Bustos Lopez, Gabriela Ilusion and Vélez Jahn, Gonzalo
year 2006
title Alternativas de Diseño: Sede virtual interactiva para el Taller Virtual de las Américas [Alternatives of Design: 3D Interactive Virtual Site to "Las Americas Virtual Design Studio"]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 47-51
summary Alternatives of Design is a course that aims to prepare architects from the Master Studies Department of Computing in Architecture (LUZ), in two ways: first, by expanding their perspective about potentialities of using new virtual reality technologies in architecture, and second, by qualifying them to apply this acquired theoretical knowledge in their professional environment, The goal of this research is to describe the products of the course Alternatives of Design 2005, which include: a methodology of designing to the cyberspace by using VRML and Java Script, in order to achieve a proposal of a Site to "Las Americas Virtual Design Studio". This site is projected as a digital manager to interactive simulation in multiuser virtual worlds, specifically to virtual architectonical workshops, With this proposal, it is possible to integrate many users, in real time, from different locations on the same virtual world in Internet.
series SIGRADI
email bustosgabriela@gmail.com, bustosgabriela@yahoo.es
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac20064405
id ijac20064405
authors Calderon, Carlos; Nyman, Karl; Worley, Nicholas
year 2006
title The Architectural Cinematographer: Creating Architectural Experiences in 3D Real-time Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 71-90
summary This paper addresses the problem of creating new navigation paradigms for experiencing architectural designs in 3D real-time environments. The exploration of techniques other than still images or fly-through animations is complex and manifold, and requires the understanding and skills of many disciplines including cinematography, computer programming, architectural design and communication of 3D space. In this article, we present the Architectural Cinematographer (AC), a first step towards new navigation paradigms for real-time interactive virtual environments that are intended to enhance architectural walkthroughs with interactive camera effects. The AC is a fully developed modification (mod) of the game UnrealTournament2004™ using the Unreal™ game engine and relies on the notions of architectural concepts, cinematographic techniques and game level design to structure the virtual environment (VE) content in a way that facilitates a perception of design qualities in virtual architecture. AC addresses the current lack of either software or a structured approach to facilitate this in real-time architectural visualizations.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2006_290
id 2006_290
authors Cenani, Sehnaz and Gulen Cagdas
year 2006
title Shape Grammar of Geometric Islamic Ornaments
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 290-297
summary Shape grammars are the algorithmic systems used to analyze existing designs or create new ones. In spite of using text or symbols to express abstract representations, shape grammars aid to create novel designs through computational effort with shapes and rules. Many probabilities of rule selections and applications of these rules may generate emergent design solutions or create new design objectives. This paper aims to present the characteristics, shape grammar rules and historical background of geometrical ornaments in Islamic culture and to point out the possibilities of mathematics of symmetry. The knowledge presented in this paper can be used to generate new depictions and to gain new application areas like typography, wallpaper, landscape, façade design, tiling, jewelry, and textile designs. Even, these types of shape grammar studies can be used to open a novel approach as in Jean Nouvel’s “Arab World Institute” in Paris. The role of shape grammar analysis of geometrical Islamic ornaments explained in this paper is to increase the efficiency of architectural design education by facilitating the formal understanding of historical patterns. Novel use of shape grammars in education can enrich the designer’s ability to generate original designs. In this paper variants of Islamic ornaments are created with a CAAD program. A selected geometrical bezeme (ornament) from Islamic ornamental design is generated by encoding with a computer programming language. According to the generated bezeme, interaction scenario is as follows: Computer has the main control over grammar application. Only, some of the rules can be selected by the user. Varieties of this ornament are generated randomly through their line weight, line colors, filling types and filling colors. The shape grammar rules outlined in this paper are simple, but the resulting figures can be very inspiring. Furthermore, the endless potential for future design innovations is unlimited.
keywords Computer-generated geometrical design; shape grammar rules; geometrical Islamic ornaments; Islamic patterns
series eCAADe
email sehnazcenani@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

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