CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 599

_id eaea2005_133
id eaea2005_133
authors Weber, Ralf
year 2006
title Urban space and architectural scale - Two examples of empirical research in architectural aesthetics
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 133-149
summary As one of the oldest schools of architecture in Germany, Dresden has a long and continuous tradition in the field of architectural aesthetics and building composition. Architects such as Fritz Schumacher initiated research and teaching in the field in the 1920s, and this was revitalised during the 1950s by Otto Schubert who laid the foundations for a scientific description of the correlation between optics and architectural design, and also worked towards a comprehensive theory of architectural composition. As a result of the architectural ideology of the East German regime, such studies were consigned to near oblivion and the main concern became interior decoration. With the appointment of Professor Ralf Weber, the institute was reestablished in 1994 under its original name, the Institute of Spatial Design (Raumgestaltung). Its new research agenda originated from Weber’s book “On the Aesthetics of Architectural Form - A Psychological Approach to the Structure and the Order of Perceived Architectural Space” (Ashgate 1994). In order to verify some of the hypotheses advanced in the book empirically, members of the institute have been carrying out a number of studies in the areas of oculomotor research and the perceptual foundations of design, and have been addressing issues that would help formulate principles of good architectural form and space applicable to the everyday practice of architectural design. Currently, the Institute of Spatial Design focuses on the further development of the psychological bases of experiencing architecture, as well as on theories of aesthetics and their application in practice. Specifically, attention is paid, on the one hand, to the perception and experience of architecture, i.e. aesthetics, and on the other, to the assemblage of various parts into an overall whole in a building, city or landscape – in other words, architectural composition. These two aspects are naturally inextricably intertwined: the one concerns the reception of architecture, the other, its production. Under these headings, various other areas of interest, such as architectural tectonics, systems of order and proportions, or the issue of scale in architecture, are tackled through dissertations, research projects and seminars. The institute has been cooperating on several studies with the Cognitive & Biological Psychology Unit at the University of Leipzig and the intention is eventually to establish an interdisciplinary research unit for architectural aesthetics.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email r.weber@mailbox.tu-dresden.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id eaea2005_103
id eaea2005_103
authors Giró, Héctor
year 2006
title Visualising emotions - Defining urban space through shared networks
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 103-111
summary Networks and new media and communication tools, in combination with other media like film, imaging, text and sound, make richer ways of expression possible and at the same time offer attractive possibilities to investigate and express designing. Architects, or their clients, in consequence become increasingly able to explore, develop and communicate their ideas in a better way. At the same time, most people find it difficult to describe their demands and needs in advance: it seems they react much better on something that is already there, a finished work. How then can designers get a better idea of people’s needs and wishes? In other words, how could designers –among others- get a better match between expectations and results? Consequently, what could be the significance of ‘new media’ within this process?
series EAEA
email h.h.giro@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id 2006_000
id 2006_000
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris (eds.)
year 2006
title Communicating Space(s)
source 24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-5-9], Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, 914 p.
summary The theme of this conference builds on and investigates the pre-existing and endlessly unfolding relationship between two domains of scientific inquiry: Architecture, urban design and planning, environmental design, geography and Social theory, media and communication studies, political science, cultural studies and social anthropology. Architectural design involves communication and could thus be partly considered a communicational activity. Designers (or not) see architectural designs, implicitly, as carriers of information and symbolic content; similarly buildings and urban environments have been “read” and interpreted by many (usu- ally not architects) as cultural texts. At the same time, social and cultural studies have studied buildings and cities, as contexts for social and cultural activities and life in general, from their mundane expression of “everyday life” (Highmore, 2001) to elite expressions of artistic creativity and performance. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) support both of these levels of scientific inquiry in many ways. Most importantly however, ICTs need design studies, architectural and visual design, social and cultural studies in their quest to create aesthetically pleasing, ergonomically efficient and functional ICT sys- tems; this need for interdisciplinarity is best articulated by the low quality of most on-line content and applica- tions published on the web.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email vas@uth.gr
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2006/08/16 16:55

_id ijac20064405
id ijac20064405
authors Calderon, Carlos; Nyman, Karl; Worley, Nicholas
year 2006
title The Architectural Cinematographer: Creating Architectural Experiences in 3D Real-time Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 71-90
summary This paper addresses the problem of creating new navigation paradigms for experiencing architectural designs in 3D real-time environments. The exploration of techniques other than still images or fly-through animations is complex and manifold, and requires the understanding and skills of many disciplines including cinematography, computer programming, architectural design and communication of 3D space. In this article, we present the Architectural Cinematographer (AC), a first step towards new navigation paradigms for real-time interactive virtual environments that are intended to enhance architectural walkthroughs with interactive camera effects. The AC is a fully developed modification (mod) of the game UnrealTournament2004™ using the Unreal™ game engine and relies on the notions of architectural concepts, cinematographic techniques and game level design to structure the virtual environment (VE) content in a way that facilitates a perception of design qualities in virtual architecture. AC addresses the current lack of either software or a structured approach to facilitate this in real-time architectural visualizations.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2006_295
id caadria2006_295
authors CHIUNG-HUI CHEN, MAO-LIN CHIU
year 2006
title TOWARDS A WEB-BASED URBAN STREET SIMULATOR FOR PEDESTRIAN BEHAVIORS STUDY WITH AGENT-BASED INTERFACES
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 295-302
summary The urban planning has largely placed the street users at the centre of infrastructural design, with significant implications for the perceived attractiveness of user environments. The urban designers faced with the task of designing such spaces and needs a tool that will allow different designs to be compared in terms of their attractiveness as well as their effectiveness. Therefore, this paper depicts an agent interface approach for creating a street simulator of user behaviors in urban street environments. We implemented the agent interface as individual-based simulation in the proposed project called "SCALE” (A Street Case Library for Environmental design). The project is demonstrated to find out differences between the simulation and the existed environment. The methodology and findings are reported.
series CAADRIA
email chchen@asia.edu.tw, mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2006_e183a
id sigradi2006_e183a
authors Costa Couceiro, Mauro
year 2006
title La Arquitectura como Extensión Fenotípica Humana - Un Acercamiento Basado en Análisis Computacionales [Architecture as human phenotypic extension – An approach based on computational explorations]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 56-60
summary The study describes some of the aspects tackled within a current Ph.D. research where architectural applications of constructive, structural and organization processes existing in biological systems are considered. The present information processing capacity of computers and the specific software development have allowed creating a bridge between two holistic nature disciplines: architecture and biology. The crossover between those disciplines entails a methodological paradigm change towards a new one based on the dynamical aspects of forms and compositions. Recent studies about artificial-natural intelligence (Hawkins, 2004) and developmental-evolutionary biology (Maturana, 2004) have added fundamental knowledge about the role of the analogy in the creative process and the relationship between forms and functions. The dimensions and restrictions of the Evo-Devo concepts are analyzed, developed and tested by software that combines parametric geometries, L-systems (Lindenmayer, 1990), shape-grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1971) and evolutionary algorithms (Holland, 1975) as a way of testing new architectural solutions within computable environments. It is pondered Lamarck´s (1744-1829) and Weismann (1834-1914) theoretical approaches to evolution where can be found significant opposing views. Lamarck´s theory assumes that an individual effort towards a specific evolutionary goal can cause change to descendents. On the other hand, Weismann defended that the germ cells are not affected by anything the body learns or any ability it acquires during its life, and cannot pass this information on to the next generation; this is called the Weismann barrier. Lamarck’s widely rejected theory has recently found a new place in artificial and natural intelligence researches as a valid explanation to some aspects of the human knowledge evolution phenomena, that is, the deliberate change of paradigms in the intentional research of solutions. As well as the analogy between genetics and architecture (Estévez and Shu, 2000) is useful in order to understand and program emergent complexity phenomena (Hopfield, 1982) for architectural solutions, also the consideration of architecture as a product of a human extended phenotype can help us to understand better its cultural dimension.
keywords evolutionary computation; genetic architectures; artificial/natural intelligence
series SIGRADI
email mail@maurocosta.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 2006_860
id 2006_860
authors Duarte, José P. and João Rocha
year 2006
title A Grammar for the Patio Houses of the Medina of Marrakech - Towards a Tool for Housing Design in Islamic Contexts
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 860-866
summary The goal of the research described in this paper is to develop a computational model of the Medina of Marrakech in Morocco. The ultimate goal is to develop a system that could capture some of the characteristics of traditional Muslim cities fabric and use it in contemporary urban planning. Previous papers have proposed the use of three grammars to encode the spatial complexity of the Medina: the urban grammar, the negotiation grammar, and the housing grammar, and addressed the development of the urban grammar. This paper proposes a grammar to describe the formal structure of the houses, the first step in the developments of the remaining two grammars. It describes the set of rules and then illustrates its application in the generation of an existing house. The basic formal structure consists of three concentric rectangular rings with the patio in the middle. The location of the entrance and the staircase are fundamental for the definition of the basic layout.
keywords Shape grammars; housing design; Islamic architecture
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_k004
id sigradi2006_k004
authors Dutta Madhu C.
year 2006
title The Myth of Cyberspace: Towards a New Technopolis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 41-44
summary Professor Madhu C. Dutta has worked professionally as an urban planner and architect and was an Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas at San Antonio before coming to Wentworth. She teaches a broad range of courses, from design studio and architectural history through digital media and advanced computer applications for architectural design. Some of her most significant works include a city-wide urban riverfront design project in Varanasi, India, and “Solar Sails” a renewable energy design for the U.S. Department of Energy competition (2000) for which she was awarded the second prize among 110 entries. She has presented her scholarly work at conferences in Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. Her research interests are eclectic; she has recently been exploring the expansion of our notions of architectural space to include hybridized and virtual milieus in the “new frontier” of digital architecture. Professor Dutta is deeply committed to the creative and performing arts as well. She studied and performed Indian classical dance for sixteen years. She holds a BArch from the Manipal Institute of Technology of Mangalore University, and a Master’s in Architecture, specializing in Urban Design, from the University of Texas at Austin.
keywords Technopolis, cyberspace, future, digital society
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
email duttam@wit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id ddss2006-hb-263
id DDSS2006-HB-263
authors Guido Vonk, Stan Geertman, and Paul Schot
year 2006
title Usage of Planning Support Systems - Combining three approaches
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 263-274
summary Although a wide range of Planning Support Systems (PSS) exists, their actual utilization in planning practice, to support planners in doing their planning tasks, stays behind. This is problematic since many see PSS capable of aiding planners to handle the complexity of their planning tasks. Our current study explains under usage of PSS from three different angles: the instrument, the user and the transfer of the instrument towards the user. The main conclusion is that usage of PSS is hampered by lack of awareness of and experience with PSS in planning practice as well as by instrumental quality problems and hampered user acceptance and diffusion. The main recommendation to enhance usage of PSS is that it should be made transparent which PSS types should be used for what planning tasks, by which kinds of users, in which kinds of organizations and under which external conditions.
keywords Planning support systems, Usage, Instrumental quality, User acceptance, Diffusion
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 2006_436
id 2006_436
authors Kaimakamis, Nikolaos and Dimitris Charitos
year 2006
title Computer mediated political communication: An empirical approach towards representing political action in the spatial context of Collaborative Virtual Environments - The rise of a virtual-space dependent public sphere
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 436-443
summary This study focuses on the creation of three-dimensional online spaces, known as Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs), where mediated social interaction amongst participants takes place in real time. It attempts to examine whether it is possible for political communication to flourish in such environments, as a case study of the design aspects needed to be taken into account in creating communicating spaces. We entered the collaborative virtual environment “There” as an avatar and monitored the agenda setting of its two major media. The fact that the whole world is designed as an island complex and holiday resort has an impact on the unwillingness of the avatars to talk about world politics, or even deal with the worlds’ political issues in the official media. Our main conclusion is that public sphere as conceived by those who enter a CVE relies heavily on the way that the world itself is designed. This leads to a series of questions concerning the role of architecture in creating virtual spatial contexts for communication.
keywords Collaborative Virtual Environments; political communication; virtual reality; public sphere
series eCAADe
email vedesign@otenet.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-pb-35
id DDSS2006-PB-35
authors M.C.G. te Brömmelstroet
year 2006
title Properly Equip Planners, Instead of Just Manning Equipment - A first step in a user-oriented PSS development approach as support for the integration of land use and transport planning
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 35-50
summary There is a growing need for planning support in planning practice, especially in land use and transport integration. Recent studies have shown that instruments that provide such are seldom implemented. Building on recommendations of those studies, this paper explores how to develop a planning support system (PSS) for this specific field of planning and shows some preliminary results of the first steps towards such a PSS. An qualitative assessment on the strengths and weaknesses of two recently developed instruments that share this goal; the VPR and the SDS+STE. Due to time constraints, the focus is on the background and framework of the study.
keywords Land use and transport, PSS, computer-aided planning, participatory design
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id eaea2005_199
id eaea2005_199
authors Martens, Bob
year 2006
title Dissemination of knowledge in architectural endoscopy
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 199-206
summary The first EAEA conference was hosted 1993 in Tampere (Finland) and subsequently a further six conferences have taken place. Future conferences are already pre-scheduled and a steadily rising number of papers has been written. So far, the conference proceedings have been published in a paperbased format and, as these were published in small numbers, it is rather hard to take stock of preceding entries. However, the published proceedings can be regarded as capital for the EAEA-Association and it is both necessary and worthwhile to preserve this collective memory by means of an archived e-collection. At the time of the formation of the EAEA, electronic publishing was not yet widely used. Since then, computerbased infrastructure and related (web-based) software tools have become widely available. There is even an ongoing debate within the associations dedicated to electronic publishing, as to whether conference proceedings should be solely distributed in a digital format. Doubtless, a discussion towards the value of electronic publication output in the framework of research assessments etc. would be a step too far for this paper. Still, a dual strategy for the EAEA could be aiming at the production of a limited number of paperbased copies, which would mainly be distributed to the conference participants (and the remaining part being made available resp. free library copies to make this output more visible). However, the high commercial interest derived by financial revenues is not given and dissemination by digital means is far more in the interest of both the participants and the EAEA-association. Today, the creation of an electronic version of the conference proceedings costs very little extra. In both cases (analogue and digital) the materials should not only be “deposited” on the desktop of individuals, but also be capable of reaching more public destinations. As the conference host is changing biennially, it has to be confirmed that the hosting institution will handle the delivery of metadata. Local printing houses arrange the printing work, and no further interests (concerning copyright, revenues etc) from the side of publishing houses are in charge. The import of the provided metadata is supported by way of self-organisation on a shoestring budget, as it does not require extensive work if properly defined. This means that minimal effort is needed to make the material available and to achieve a certain level of sustainability.
series EAEA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id 2006_358
id 2006_358
authors McMeel, Dermott
year 2006
title Carnival and Construction - Towards a Scaffolding for the Inclusion of ICT in the Construction Process
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 358-363
summary In this paper we explore the process of construction, we consider the construction site as a mediated collaborative environment in which many specialist crafts and esoteric skills are present and negotiated. Concrete information when pass onto a construction site becomes part of a fluid morphing object, the validity and meaning of information can change—or be lost—depending on where and when it is. We look at current models of construction and actual construction process and we explore the notion of Carnival as a tool to reconcile the concrete and fluid aspects to communication dynamics of mediated group working in general and of construction site practice specifically.
keywords Carnival; ICT; Construction; Mediation
series eCAADe
email d.mcmeel@sms.ed.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2006_098
id 2006_098
authors Parthenios, Panagiotis
year 2006
title Critical points for change - A vital mechanism for enhancing the conceptual design process
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 98-105
summary The Conceptual design is not a linear process; it consists of sub-processes, levels of refinement, which are individual but interact with each other. Each level of refinement corresponds to the types of media and tools used during conceptual design. Architects take advantage of a broad palette of tools and media for design, because each tool has its own strengths and weaknesses and provides an additional value—an added level of vision—to the architect. This closely relates to the notion of Critical Points for Change (CPC) a contribution this study makes towards a better understanding of the uniqueness of the conceptual design process. CPC are crucial moments when the architect suddenly becomes able to “see” something which drives him to go back and either alter his idea and refine it or reject it and pursue a new one. They are crucial parts of the design process because they are a vital mechanism for enhancing design. This characteristic of the nature of the conceptual design process is independent of the tools. Nevertheless, the right tools play an extremely important role. The distinctive capabilities of each tool allow the architect to deal successfully with CPC and overcome the points in the design process where he or she feels “stuck.”
keywords Conceptual design; design process; tool; design ability; computational support
series eCAADe
email pparthen@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_724
id 2006_724
authors Pechlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia; Stelios C. Zerefos; Stamatina Mikrou and Mladen Stamenic
year 2006
title Perception and Cognition in Real and Virtual Computer Generated Architectural Space - An Experimental Approach
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 724-729
summary This paper investigates the difference of spatial perception and cognition between virtual and real architectural environments. Specifically, three different aspects have been studied, concerning the live perception and cognition of a complex actual building, the perception and cognition of a high quality rendered virtual space, as well as the perception and cognition of a non-photorealistic virtual environment. To study the differences between these three types a series of experiments were prepared, in which students of architecture participated and statistical results were drawn. Earlier studies have investigated the desirability of key simulation attributes for architectural design visualization, but extensive research on what contributes to a better spatial comprehension is still missing. This experiment is part of a series of experiments mainly focused on the perception and cognition in virtual spaces. The results of these experiments were correlated with each other, each one leading to new ideas of experimentation. Preliminary results confirm earlier findings from previous similar experiments. It was found that there was a statistically significant tendency of the students towards larger scatter in more luminous virtual space as well as a tendency to visit the lit part of virtual space. Visitors of the photorealistic spaces also seem to have better knowledge of the depth of space in comparison to those navigating in the non photorealistic space.
keywords Perception; Cognition; Virtual Architectural Space; Real-time Navigation
series eCAADe
email deste@central.ntua.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_557
id caadria2006_557
authors PREECHA MANESSATID, PETER J SZALAPAJ
year 2006
title THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING DESIGN TOOL
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 557-559
summary Environmental design implementations are generally applied within limited and specialised areas of environmental design making them difficult to use intuitively by designers (Maneesatid and Szalapaj, 2003). Building simulations have mostly focused on accurate parameters and physical properties of building elements. Such tools typically require numerous numerical data which is often only accurately known in the detail design stages. Conventional environmental building design systems (EBS) have typically required highly experienced users who are familiar with extensive qualitative input and output requirements. A successful architectural design solution that is both energy efficient and environmentally friendly, cannot be obtained simply by additively combining a set of discrete specialist analyses. A move towards better architectural design with environmental considerations can be achieved by allowing designers themselves to express relationships between salient environmental parameters that can subsequently be analysed in integrated ways. This presentation is concerned with the issues involved in developing a quick and intuitive interface for expression of relationships between environmental parameters.
series CAADRIA
email arp00pm@sheffield.ac.uk, arlps@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2006_495
id caadria2006_495
authors R. SATO, W. YEO, A. KAGA, M. OYAMA
year 2006
title NEW METHODS FOR URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE USING THE VR TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 495-501
summary Urban plan and architecture require the use of VR systems. We adapted the buildings into a VR system, and then performed a virtual realization in the world’s largest dome at Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Walking or flying through life-size space was enabled. We viewed the planned future scenes that featured real size, space composition, and a simulated environment. The construction, the materials and colors of the building were examined. In addition, VR system on PC was applied to city planning and architectural design and a number of novel functions were added to the VR system by plug-in, which assisted and facilitated the design process. The stereoscopic thinking mode in 3-D space can inspire and comprehend more directly the ideas of design, and confirm the intended effects. We accordingly carried out a further study on users operating the VR system to investigate their responses of “like” or “dislike” towards the real time adjustments of design effect at identical viewpoints. Fractals analysis was conducted to demonstrate physically the influence of real time 3-dimentional design and presentation on the psychological trends of subjective judgment. Our findings pave the way for future research on monitoring psychological impacts on observers of VR system during design process.
series CAADRIA
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id 2006_222
id 2006_222
authors Richter, Katharina and Dirk Donath
year 2006
title Towards a Better Understanding of the Case-Based Reasoning Paradigm in Architectural Education and Design
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 222-227
summary This paper presents the results of a detailed analysis of systems and concepts which make use of case-based reasoning, a paradigm from artificial intelligence (AI). The analysis focuses on the use of this paradigm in the support of design and education processes, so-called “case-based design aids”. The research aims to discover problem areas in current approaches and identify potential areas for further research with a view to improving the practical suitability of existing systems, which offer promising potential yet are rarely implemented in practice.
keywords Architectural Precedents; Databases; Architectural Education and Design; Case-Based Reasoning
series eCAADe
email katharina.richter@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-pb-373
id DDSS2006-PB-373
authors Rohan Bailey
year 2006
title Towards a Digital Design Teaching Tool - A look at the ideas that should define a digital design primer
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 373-386
summary Architecture in the 21st century has become an increasingly complex affair. In addition to new social and cultural norms, architects are inundated with constantly changing information regarding new materials, sustainable processes, and complex building types. This state of affairs has also affected the expectations placed on architectural education. Critics (in diverse spheres) have expressed concerns about the lack of requisite skills of graduates that characterise good design thinking strategies as well as promote responsible design. It has been proposed by this author in other forums that by using digital technology to empower design learning, we can allow students to confidently use (through reading and analysis) their sketches to develop conceptual ideas that reconcile disparate elements into a habitable, environmentally friendly and architecturally responsible whole that is fit for purpose, cost effective, sustainable and a delight to clients and users. This paper will seek to discuss one of the concepts that govern such a tool. It will start by delineating the problem (discussed earlier in the abstract) before outlining the concepts or principles that a design teaching tool should adhere to. These concepts acknowledge the importance for the tool to reflect the nature of design tasks, facilitate learning and be accessible to all learning types. The paper will then focus on one concept - the nature of design tasks. The subsequent sections will describe an information structure borne from this idea and make mention of a current prototype of the tool. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the strengths of considering this concept.
keywords Design & decision support systems, Architectural education, Computer assisted learning, Design thinking
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

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