CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id ascaad2007_007
id ascaad2007_007
authors Kaka, A.P.; Y. Ibrahim and T. Lukins
year 2007
title The Development of an Automated Progress Measurement System for Construction Work Packages
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 81-86
summary The challenges associated with collecting accurate data on the progress of construction have long been recognised. Traditional methods often involve human judgment, high costs, and are too infrequent to provide managers with timely and accurate control data. The aim of this study is to propose a prototype system that employs Computer Vision (CV) techniques to report on progress for components supplied from an integrated Building Information Model (BIM). This model stores and relates this feedback to a representation of the work breakdown structure (WBS) that assigns components to work packages. In this paper we present an overview of the actual system – from the theoretical and technical challenges encountered.
series ASCAAD
email A.P.Kaka@hw.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2007_042
id ecaade2007_042
authors Ozel, Filiz
year 2007
title Pattern Language and Embedded Knowledge in Building Information Modeling
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 457-464
summary When Christopher Alexander (1977), trained both as a mathematician and an architect, published his seminal work “The Pattern Language” in the 1970’s and introduced the concept of “pattern language”, computers were still in their infancy, CAD did not exist as we know it today, and computer information modeling was not even in the radar screen of researchers. Design communication simply meant manual drafting. With the concept of ‘pattern language” (http://www.patternlanguage.com/), Alexander proposed a systematic method for dealing with complexity, which proved itself to be more relevant than ever in the digital age. The concept is often cited by computer scientists as a precursor to object oriented modeling. This study explores the potential of “pattern language” for structuring building information and design knowledge within the framework of the recent developments in building information modeling (BIM). In this article, comparisons to the approach taken by the software engineering industry who embraced the idea of “patterns” as a systematic way to software development are also made. While Alexander’s pattern language proposes a method with which the designer can incorporate his/her experiences and design vision systematically into the process of designing, software industry’s approach to patterns describes a method for providing problem and solution patterns (i.e. prototypes) that can be used repeatedly during software development. There is obviously a significant difference between the original intent of the “pattern language” and the way it was later used in other fields including software engineering and business solutions. At the cross section of architectural design and software engineering, Building Information Modeling (BIM) software can benefit from carefully incorporating a combination of these two approaches into its structure as patterns.
keywords Building information modeling, Christopher Alexander, pattern language, software development
series eCAADe
email ozel@asu.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id caadria2007_511
id caadria2007_511
authors Rügemer, Jörg
year 2007
title Various Media in the Design Process and Methodology
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The paper describes the mergence of traditional architectural design processes with approaches that rely on digital media and software for the creation of architectural space. The depicted projects are part of a ‘work in progress’ process, with a recent studio that is set up to apply the so far accumulated experiences. Within the projects, focus is on those design phases where the applied media and methodology is changed and where the back and forth between different media and the depth of their implementation is perceptible in, and / or has a significant influence on the design itself. Through a line of successive experiments, the paper explains the development of a possible method that utilizes a variety of today’s accessible tools in architecture, making use of phenomena that appear when changing from one tool to another. Goal is to avoid limitations that are existent by the solely employment of one media or method, and to understand the fusion between different media as an inspiring momentum to develop the design further. The paper draws a line from an initially experienced and analyzed design method over several projects in practice and academia to conclude with a possible design method that could be established successfully in both fields of architectural teaching and practice. Initial experiences had been drawn from professional practice, in which the digital realm was limited to a support device of the design process. The first project that is described in the paper, explored the employment of digital media as a possible tool to drive the design process in a broader sense. The studio setting was organized as a laboratory for the exploration of the change of applied media. Focus was on the influence on the design progress. The design method required of the studios participants was not exclusively based on an architectural program, but on an initial, very conceptual process with an artistic approach, based on personal experiences of each participant. This was meant to detach the students entirely from architectural processes and mindsets they had picked up so far. Parallel to that kind of an intellectual process, studio participants learned to handle Maya as the 3D modeling software of their choice. Both the technical knowledge and the artistic projects were merged in a second project phase, in which participants had to further develop their work by applying a very effective mix of various design tools. Using digital media as a parametric design generator, subsequent projects were developed. The task for the designers here were to decide what kind of algorithm could be applied to which process and when it was to be stopped for the best result. Applying such an automatism successfully to the design process, the employment of traditional media and methodology remained, to adapt the digital driven schemes to the required design task. The diverse design experiments demonstrate important aspects when merging complex design and animation software with traditional design processes. To achieve good architectural design results, all examined projects showed that traditional design methods with its physical models are hardly replaceable to its full extent by other media, but digital media are able to strengthen design processes and invite designers to explore new means of design work.
series CAADRIA
email ruegemer@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_050
id ascaad2007_050
authors Techel, F., K. Nassar
year 2007
title Teaching Building Information Modeling (BIM) from a Sustainabilty Design Perspective
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 635-650
summary Building Information Modeling has recently gained significant attention both in academia and practice. BIM presents immense opportunities for increased efficiencies, coordination and quality of architectural design. One of the reasons that BIM offers a more comprehensive design approach is the fact that all aspect of the building are considered during the modeling phase. Rather than drawing the building using lines and circles actual object are used to model the building, which results in a more comprehensive underlying database model of the entire edifice being designed. The approach obviously has tremendous benefits in terms of coordination and systems integration, as well as, project control and management during the design and construction phases. Nevertheless BIM offers its own unique challenges vis-à-vis its introduction to students of architecture. The students in Architecture programs are usually introduced to BIM in two ways, either through a specialized course in CAD or via a shadow introduction in design studios and related courses. Careful positioning of the course within the architecture curriculum is crucial in order to gain maximum benefit in the synthesis of other course content. The reason being that students of architecture in earlier years of the design curriculum may not yet have developed the ability to synthesize and coordinate multiple systems required for complete BIM. This is an important consideration the design and pedagogy of introducing BIM to Architecture students. This paper argues for a new approach in teaching BIM for Architecture students. Instead of designing a course specifically for BIM/CAAD we present a paradigm whereas BIM can be presented within a larger more rigorous context. The experience of teaching BIM within a sustainable design framework is presented in this paper. Issues relating to the design of basic residential buildings were integrated into the course presenting BIM. A simplified set of design rules and guidelines under banner of sustainability were taught to the students in pre-defined doses and sequence throughout the course. The careful placement of these concepts permitted for BIM to be introduced in a more interesting and comprehensive manner than in the traditional CAD-course setting. Samples of student work are presented and critiqued in order to come up with recommendations and guidelines for incorporating BIM into a comprehensive and comprehensible course. The pedagogical advantages of and disadvantages of the approach are discussed within the paper, as well as, a detailed description of the course content and structure. Results from and outcome-based assessment of the objectives of the course are also illuminated which provided suggestions for future offerings of the course.
series ASCAAD
email techel@sharjah.ac.ae
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia07_164
id acadia07_164
authors Diniz, Nancy; Turner, Alasdair
year 2007
title Towards a Living Architecture
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 164-173
summary Interaction is the latest currency in architecture, as responsive components are now reacting to the inhabitant of the space. These components are designed and installed by the architect with a view to the phenomenology of space, where the experience of the environment is previewed and pre-constructed before it is translated into the conception of the space. However, this traditional approach to new technology leaves no scope for the architecture to be alive in and of itself, and thus the installed piece quickly becomes just that—an installation: isolated and uncontained by its environment. In this paper, we argue that a way to approach a responsive architecture is to design for a piece that is truly living, and in order to propose a living architecture first we need to understand what the architecture of a living system is. This paper suggests a conceptual framework based on the theory of Autopoiesis in order to create a “self-producing” system through an experiment entitled, “The Life of a Wall” (Maturana and Varela 1980). The wall has a responsive membrane controlled by a genetic algorithm that reconfigures its behaviour and learns to adapt itself continually to the evolutionary properties of the environment, thus becoming a situated, living piece.
series ACADIA
email n.diniz@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ascaad2007_014
id ascaad2007_014
authors Dritsas, S. and E. Rafailaki
year 2007
title A Computational Framework for Theater Design
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 165-182
summary This paper presents the results of an ongoing research on computational methods for the design of theatrical spaces. We demonstrate a systemic approach to design supported by a set of digital tools implemented for assisting the process. The primary purpose of the framework is to establish a formal basis for expressing and exploring explicit design criteria. At this stage the framework enables us to metrically access a range of design metrics that traditionally have been addressed through primarily architectural narrative. Moreover, our method strives in establishing a background where knowledge can be explicitly encoded and the results of analytical methods can be additively employed. In the future, the framework will assist as the platform for experimenting with generative or query-based design processes empowered by computation. We structured this paper / framework around three conceptual units: (a) a design intent toolkit assisting the processes of rapidly generating theater configurations; (b) an analytical system that evaluates a range of design metrics centered about aspects of visual comfort; and (c) a post-processing and visualization unit that binds the design metrics with existing data / studies and provide a range of representation methods. Overall, the methodology adopts existing knowledge in theatrical design, challenges traditional ideas of understanding the theater and proposes methods for evaluating its architectural performance. The conclusions focus on highlighting both the limitations and the potential of our system in the process of theater design. We also extend outside the boundaries of the current research into a brief discussion on the methodological impact of digital technology in architectural research. Finally we propose areas of future research and development.
series ASCAAD
email sdritsas@kpf.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_061
id ascaad2007_061
authors Fujita, H.; J. Hakura and M. Kurematsu
year 2007
title Cognitive Modeling in Design Based on Human Emotional reasoning: Computer based Cognitive interaction based on mimesis of human emotional behavior
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 783-798
summary This paper presents a progress development results of Virtual intelligent interface based on human facial and voice recognition. We this is new challenge for sensing the user emotional space and interact with it. It is part of the cognitive spatial design needed to have the mentality of the designer been part of the system recognition. This is experimental built prototype. We think that the practices reported in this work contribute to integrate (corporate) the cognitive intention of the designer with the knowledge of the system, The architect can use these design practices to inhale the emotional practices into the design using such experiment.
series ASCAAD
email issam@soft.iwate-pu.ac.jp
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_060
id ascaad2007_060
authors Gillispie, D. and C. Calderon
year 2007
title A framework towards designing responsive public information systems
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 767-782
summary "Evolving effective responsive systems, and creating a credible interface between the work and the user, requires an awareness of many different types of user, contexts and functions as well as the phenomenological aspects of social and environmental conditions." (Bullivant, 2006). Responsive design and interactive architecture operates at the intersection of Architecture, Arts, Technology, Media Arts, HCI and Interaction Design in a physical context suggesting ways in which the existing physical environments can be augmented and extended adding a greater level of depth, meaning and engagement with the world around us. Through a series of case studies, this paper explores a number of principles which may be applied to the design of responsive environments of which public information systems form part. Divided into three main sections, the paper first explains how responsive environments have addressed the application of public information systems, secondly, through a series of case studies, precedents are highlighted which lead to development of principles for developing designs for responsive environments. The third section discusses and elaborates on these principles which have been developed based upon our own interpretations and grouping of precedents and approaches towards interaction design. This paper contributes towards the field of responsive environments and interactive architecture through an analysis of case studies to infer a framework from which responsive environments may be created and developed.
series ASCAAD
email Carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id sigradi2007_af114
id sigradi2007_af114
authors Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Wael Abdelhameed
year 2007
title Designmap - A framework for a design environment through networking [Designmap - Un marco para un diseño ambiental mediante redes]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 225-231
summary The research endeavors to investigate the approaches and applications made in areas of online communities and forums in order to benefit from. The research proceeds to present an innovative contribution that could be described as a visual design library, a visual design community, and a novel use of networking in designing. The fields investigated by the research are: Online Communities and Forums, Networking and Collaborative Design, and Online Design Environment. The research contribution includes introducing a computer program called DesignMap that masters and presents a massive number of visual designs in two and three dimensions. The introduced software through its functions not only serves main applications of design disciplines of architecture and urban planning, but also combines significances of the investigated fields. Three comprehensive goals are investigated and introduced through this research: First, the proposed program is a means of getting architects and urban planners, who typically work in the domain of computationally introducing the design environment, involved in the creation and exploration of their designated forms for enhancing objects and spaces. Second, the program provides a design map for any architect and urban planner to search, visualize, modify, and then add designs through a wide range of form categories based on formal properties of objects relationship. Each user can have access to any part or category in this design map. Third, the research introduces the DesignMap as a tool to form and build up a networking community by bringing architects and urban planners with an interest in design area together to share in designing and to create design series.
series SIGRADI
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id ascaad2007_034
id ascaad2007_034
authors Kwee, V.
year 2007
title Architectural Presentation for Precedent-based Learning: Identifying opportunities and implications
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 415-430
summary This paper primarily deals with architectural information presentation intended to facilitate an understanding of an existing architectural work. The paper highlights issues of concern through an analysis of current architectural publications and identifies opportunities that require addressing. It also demonstrates visualization options through an illustrative digital prototype of The Arthur and Yvonne Boyd Education Centre, a building by Glenn Murcutt, Wendy Lewin and Reg Lark located in New South Wales, Australia, outlining the concept or approach of this prototype, and briefly reporting on a general assessment of its use. The outcomes refresh the perspective of current publications of notable buildings and question the implications that may result with the improvement of architectural information presentation. Could we possibly be missing opportunities afforded by the available technologies more than we realise? Could better integration of media help improve the quality of precedent-based learning? What is at stake and what should we be prepared for?
series ASCAAD
email verdy_kwee@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_182
id acadia07_182
authors Oxman, Neri
year 2007
title Rapid Craft: Material Experiments towards an Integrated Sensing Skin System
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 182-191
summary The distinction between matter (mechanics) and information (electronics) in the context of responsive building skins has promoted unique design protocols for integrating sensor technologies into material components. Such a distinction results in applications of remote sensing after the process of material fabrication. Sensors are commonly perceived as electronic patches which initiate mechanical output with response to electrical input. This work seeks to establish a novel approach to the application of electronics in building skins, which prioritizes material selection, behavior, and fabrication technology in relation to the required task, over postproduction sensor integration. The term “Rapid Craft” is proposed to describe such design protocols which couple material behavior and fabrication in the design of responsive skins. Rapid Craft is a designation for the incorporation of craft materialization knowledge within the framework of CNC processes of fabrication. A light-sensing inflatable skin system is developed as a working prototype, which demonstrates such an approach.
series ACADIA
email neri@mit.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id ascaad2007_029
id ascaad2007_029
authors Prichard-Schmitzberger, A.
year 2007
title Team-Working and Reverse Engineering: Teaching Methods for Complex Architecture
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 343-356
summary This paper contains research and details of a work in progress on the implementation of advanced 3D precision modelling in an undergraduate curriculum. Core to the investigation is the undergraduate course Digitally Enhanced Construction and Fabrication (D.E.C.A.F.) at the Department of Architecture, California State Polytechnic University Pomona. The course tests the application of Reverse Engineering (RE) in a team configuration, Hot-Swapping (HS), and precision modelling of complex geometries with minimal programming/scripting input, taking in consideration the limited resources common to small-scale architectural practices. Reverse Engineering particularly enables students to extract information building assembly and executed details with precision, based on existing documentation. It is conducted in teams not only to emphasize and investigate efficiency of protocols but also to observe problems in developing threads in digital modelling. Hot-Swapping identifies the principle of replacing components of a building during active design processes without altering its general appearance. As a teaching methodology, it allows the investigation of required modelling accuracy, creation of prototypes and various versions of assembly alternatives. The current paper focuses mainly on 1) engaged procedures in Reverse Engineering, 2) the educational aspects of such an approach, and 3) the advantages and disadvantages of conventional tools in a collaborative modelling exercise.
series ASCAAD
email schmitzberge@csupomona.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_008
id ascaad2007_008
authors Rafi A. and R. Mat Rani
year 2007
title Visual impact assessment (VIA): A review on theoretical frameworks for urban streetscape
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 87-94
summary This paper reviews several theoretical frameworks of visual analysis used in computer-based Visual Impact Assessment (VIA) for design decisions in architecture, urban landscape and urban planning. The discussion will focus on the underlying issues of preferences and predictions between designer and lay-public, methodologies of visual analysis, and computing media technologies due to fact that these components primarily contribute towards the result of VIA. Two different sets of visual analysis (i.e. designer’s and layman’s points of view) are presented based on Sanoff’s (1991) arguments that lay-public preferences are always become a second opinion compared to the judgments by designers. These theories will then be developed and used in the VIA experiments to understand the impact of the visuals in different media for viewers’ understanding. This paper concludes with a discussion and suggestion of analysis framework to be used for the visual experiments.
series ASCAAD
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia10_327
id acadia10_327
authors Vassigh, Shahin; Herrera, Silvana
year 2010
title Interactive Teaching through Simulation Environments
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 327-332
summary Spurring new and innovative building design will be critical to the urban energy and economic future of the nation. The operation of completed buildings account for 48% of the nation’s annual greenhouse gas emissions, and 76% of all electricity generated by U.S. power plants goes to supply the building sector. Therefore developing and applying new and innovative sustainable building design will have a measurable impact on the environment. Recent studies show sustainable building design is closely linked to system integration, where various components of a building work in confluence to produce synergetic benefits. As a result, a critical component of sustainable design involves a clear understanding of building systems operation, interaction, and the selection parameters. A consideration of suitable building systems, gauging their interaction, and proposing well integrated systems can lead to producing efficient models of sustainable buildings with minimal impact on the environment. The following paper outlines the progress on a project entitled “Building Literacy: the Integration of Building Technology and Design in Architectural Education.” The project develops a digital tool for teaching/learning architectural technology from an integrated systems perspective. The project attempts to immerse students in a simulated environment that is based on the real life practice of architecture. The project accomplishes this by harnessing the capabilities of simulation and dynamic modeling programs, as well as the state of art graphic media, to create compelling and rewarding reasons for students’ engagement in the lear ning process. The project involves a multidisciplinary team of faculty from Florida International University, University at Buffalo the State University of New York, and Iowa State University and is funded by the US Department of Education for the period of 2007-2011.
keywords educational software, interactive learning, interactive teaching, simulation programs, building performance, building integrated systems,
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email svassigh@fiu.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ascaad2007_058
id ascaad2007_058
authors Abdelhameed, W. and Y. Kobayashi
year 2007
title Developing a New Approach of Computer Use ‘KISS Modeling’ for Design-Ideas Alternatives of Form Massing: A framework for three-Dimensional Shape Recognition in Initial Design Phases
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 745-756
summary This research aims at developing a new approach called ‘KISS Modeling’. KISS is generally a rule of ‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ that will be applied in modeling process investigated and presented by the research. The new approach is implemented in a computer program ‘KISS Modeling’ that generates three dimensional forms based on simplifying the concept of shape recognition in design. The research, however, does not employ totally concepts of shape recognition or shape understanding in Artificial Intelligence and psychology. The research, in summary, investigates and describes: 1) a new approach of computer use contributing to generating design-ideas alternatives of form massing in initial design phases, within a simple way that any designer can understand at single glance, 2) implementation of shape recognition for generative three dimensional forms, 3) function to generate different outputs from different recognition, and 4) case studies introduced through applications and functions of the three dimensional modeling system presented by the research. The research concluded that the introduced processes help the user improve the management of conceptual designing through facilitating a discourse of his/her modeling of design-ideas massing.
series ASCAAD
email wael.abdelhameed@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_035
id ascaad2007_035
authors Al-Ali, A.I.
year 2007
title Readiness for the Use of Technology for effective learning via the vds: Case of the United Arab Emirates
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 439-456
summary Review of the literature indicated that today’s knowledge-driven economy demands a workforce equipped with complex skills and attitudes such as problem solving, meta-cognitive skills, critical thinking and lifelong learning. Such skills can be acquired if learning and teaching are guided by the constructivist and cognitive learning theories. In particular, the constructivist approach emphasises effective learning processes based on learning by doing and collaboration. This approach is congruent with use of technologies, such as Virtual Design Studio (VDS), for the purpose of architecture education in design courses, but such use is lacking in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is thus important to assess the extent to which the constructivist and cognitive theories are implemented in teaching design courses in the Architecture schools of the UAE. It is also important to assess the effectiveness of employing technology in general and VDS in particular in implementing these theories. The author intends to study the relationship between effective learning on one hand and using VDS in implementing the constructivist and cognitive approaches on the other hand. Thus, the author conducted a preliminary study to gain a basic understanding of the difficulties, approaches, attitudes, perceptions, and motivation related to the learning of design in architecture schools in the UAE. Second, the investigation was designed to assess the extent to which the students would be interested in the use of sophisticated technology in the teaching and learning environment in the UAE architecture education schools in order to achieve effective learning. The study has been conducted in the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU). Methodology used for this was the focus group method. In addition to the focus group interviews with the UAEU students, unstructured individual interviews with lecturers from UAEU and the American University of Sharjah (AUS) have been carried out. Data analysis showed that students were not satisfied with the current teaching methods based on traditional lectures. It was concluded that students were ready to practice effective learning of design via the intermarriage of VDS and the constructivist and cognitive approaches. An ambiguity that remained was whether students were ready for assessment methods which are consistent with the constructivist approach.
series ASCAAD
email aalali@glam.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_042
id ascaad2007_042
authors Ameireh, O.M.
year 2007
title Abstract Thinking: An Introduction to Creative Thinking in Basic Design
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 527-542
summary This paper critically examines the nature of the dramatic increase in the number of students accepted in schools of architecture in Jordan, and the contradictory decrease in their artistic, creative, thought process, projects problem solving and other skills. The paper also reviews architectural curriculum and courses to identify weaknesses in handling the changes and ultimately within these constraints and in order to handle the students variable potentials, abilities and contradictions, certain exercises in the basic design course are devised in ways that; reduces its dependency on learnable manual skills and conceptual thinking; uses teaching techniques that correlates and incorporates Arts, Architecture and Sciences as complementary topics; approaches and reaches creativity as a procedure not a gift; transfers and travels easily between complexities and simplicities, between natural and artificial intelligence, between abstract and relative thinking; employ geometries and design tools as the main structure of any composition; makes self evaluations of choices, decisions and variables easier. Taking Abstraction as a framework in solving the problem of the exercises gave answers and solution to many problems that was not easy solving under the conventional ways of design.
series ASCAAD
email oma_amir2000@yahoo.co.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

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