CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id bsct_vaizidou
id bsct_vaizidou
authors Vaizidou, Martha
year 2007
title 4D Building Model - A Conceptual System of the Time Dimension in the Building’s Life
source Vienna University of Technology; Building Science & Technology
summary The research topic ”4D Building model: a conceptual system of the dimension of time in building’s life” is the concept of a web-based interface of a databank that stores and visualizes information of the building’s life process. It is an organization data model that brings together the serial steps of the lifetime of a building, following the design, construction and its operation time. Observing the aforementioned process as an entity, the model aims at approaching the passage of time during it, depicting the temporal relations between past, present and future steps. Visualized stored information depict the becoming of the building in time. It attempts to approach the idea of 4D architecture and explore how the dimension of time is incorporated into the model. It studies the role of information in architecture and building process observing it changing in time. The aim of this research project is to define the frame of a conceptual information system, that could develop in a plug-in by an existing design software. The model will support the design and building procedure operating as the building memory, and reporting its behaviour during its life time. In its data base, there will be reported the serial and parallel actions during the design and construction phase and additionally the reports of the monitoring evaluating system during its operational time. The final model should provide several possibilities of decision making, regarding the energy consumption, the materials life span, the costs, the participation of different firms and components.
keywords temporal changes, virtual, actual and real object, building’s life
series thesis:MSc
email buildingscience@tuwien.ac.at
more http://cec.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2007/07/16 15:51

_id sigradi2008_180
id sigradi2008_180
authors Vincent, Charles
year 2008
title Gulliver in the land of Generative Design
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The current trend in architectural design towards architectural computing has been treated both from a philosophical standing point and as an operational systems’ problem, in a quest for explications which could at last break ground for a more broad development and adoption of design tools. As Kostas Terzidis (2007) puts it, the intuitiveness that architects have put on so high a pedestal seems to be the central issue to be dealt with by both views. There seems to be no apparent shortcut toward the reconciliation between traditional practice and new media and most certainly it is not only a problem of interface design, but one of design method clarification and reinterpretation of those methods into computing systems. Furthermore, there’s no doubt left as to whether computing systems can generate such new patterns as to impact our own understanding of architecture. But even if computer algorithms can make possible the exploration of abstract alternatives to an abstract initial idea, as in Mathematica and Processing, the issue of relating abstract and geometric representations of human centered architecture lays in the hands of architects, programmers or, better yet, architect-programmers. What seems now to be the relevant change is that architectural design might escape from the traditional sequence embedded in the need – program – design iterations – solution timeline, substituted by a web of interactions among differing experimental paths, in which even the identification of needs is to be informed by computing. It is interesting to note that the computational approach to architectural design has been praised for the formal fluidity of bubbles and Bezier shapes it entails and for the overcoming of functionalist and serialization typical of modern architecture. That approach betrays a high degree of canonic fascination with the tools of the trade and very little connection to the day to day chores of building design. On the other hand, shall our new tools and toys open up new ways of thinking and designing our built landscape? What educational issues surface if we are to foster wider use of the existing technologies and simultaneously address the need to overtake mass construction? Is mass customization the answer for the dead end modern architecture has led us to? Can we let go the humanist approach begun in Renascence and culminated in Modernism or shall we review that approach in view of algorithmic architecture? Let us step back in time to 1726 when Swift’s ‘Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Lemuel Gulliver’ was first published. In Swift’s fierce critic of what seemed to him the most outrageous ideas, he conceived a strange machine devised to automatically write books and poetry, in much the same generative fashion that now, three centuries later, we begin to cherish. “Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politicks, law, mathematics and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study. He then led me to the frame, about the sides whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty foot square, placed in the middle of the room. The superficies was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a dye, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered on every square with paper pasted on them; and, on these papers were written all the words of their language in their several moods, tenses, and declensions, but without any order. The professor then desired me to observe, for he was going to set his engine at work. The pupils at his command took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down.” (Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, A Voyage to Balnibarbi) What astonishing forecast did Swift show in that narrative that, in spite of the underlying incredulity and irony, still clarifies our surprise when faced to what might seem to some of us just an abandonment of all that architects and designers have cherished: creativeness and inventiveness. Yet, we could argue that such a radical shift in paradigm occurred once when master builders left the construction ground and took seat at drafting boards. The whole body of design and construction knowledge was split into what now seem to us just specialties undertaken by more and more isolated professionals. That shift entailed new forms of representation and prediction which now each and all architects take for granted. Also, Cartesian space representation turned out to be the main instrument for professional practice, even if one can argue that it is not more than the unfolding of stone carving techniques that master builders and guilds were so fond of. Enter computing and all its unfolding, i.e. DNA coding, fractal geometry, generative computing, nonlinear dynamics, pattern generation and cellular automata, as a whole new chapter in science, and compare that to conical perspective, descriptive and analytical geometry and calculus, and an image begins to form, delineating a separation between architect and digital designer. In previous works, we have tried approaching the issues regarding architects education in a more consensual way. But it seems now that the whole curricular corpus might be changed as well. The very foundations upon which we prepare future professionals shall change, not only in College, but in High School as well. In this paper, we delve further into the disconnect between current curricula and digital design practices and suggest new disciplinary grounds for a new architectural education.
keywords Educational paradigm; Design teaching; Design methods;
series SIGRADI
email cvincent@mackenzie.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ascaad2007_043
id ascaad2007_043
authors Chen, G.-Y. M.
year 2007
title Tagging Your Body Virtually : Represent a place making process with social network
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 543-558
summary This research focuses on the virtual environment of place making. In this paper we would like to emphasize that the place making should be stressed collective views in order to obtain the design application of possibilities. However, in past researches there has been no study that tried to collect the collective views by digital ways. Accordingly, this paper proposes a response thought the Spatial Intention. It could be used to represent the human of body experience. The "moving" and "standing" are appropriate to two main considerations. Both of these could be connected to the action of "focus" and "choice." these leads to a sequential relationship of place production. The positive significance of the spatial intention lies in the convertibility of physical experience could be implied with a specific understanding. It also could be used to mold the place of knowledge structure. Thereby in order to verify the reliability of the above, we made a social network of virtual environment and used the rapid prototyping method to develop a prototype system. Implementing on the Chinese garden of the actual case, we found that the tag could concentrate as an entire sense in somewhere of place. These tags also could be shared remotely through the social network. Different tags in the sharing mechanism could collage out a place of collective views. This perspective would be used to assist designers to understand the sense of place. It also would be applied to find out the environmental design of possibilities in the future studies.
series ASCAAD
email mivochen@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_076
id ecaade2007_076
authors Coates, Paul S.; Derix, Cristian
year 2007
title Parsimonious Models of Urban Space
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 335-342
summary This paper sets out an approach to urban modelling derived from early work with cellular automata and agglomeration models. In these cases the models are an example of distributed representation, where the rules built in to the model are replicated in all the discrete components of the model be they cells or agents. This is the classic AI. / AL paradigm of emergent systems. The paper describes the main structure of the models, and presents examples of the use of this modelling process in design education, pointing out the way dynamic models allow mapping on to interesting speculations about the dynamic of the city, and its social systems. The paper ends with a report on the use of such models as a design decision support system and how they will be used in planned work in master planning in the London Thames gateway area under the UK govt. sustainable communities initiative.
keywords Urban modeling, space syntax, agent based modeling, cellular automata
series eCAADe
email p.s.coates@uel.ac.uk, c.derix@uel.ac.uk
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id sigradi2007_af56
id sigradi2007_af56
authors Dorta, Tomás
year 2007
title Ideation and Design Flow through the Hybrid Ideation Space [Ideación y flujo de Diseño a través de un Espacio de ideas Hibrido]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 418-422
summary This study assesses an innovative immersive sketching and model making system: the Hybrid Ideation Space (HIS). The system enables designers to sketch and make models all around them in real-time and real scale using a digital tablet (sketches), image capture (physical models) and a spherical projection device (immersion). We carried out an experiment to evaluate this system using the concept of Design Flow and workload with industrial design students working in teams during the ideation stage of the design of a car. The HIS was compared to analog tools and hybrid techniques.
keywords Ideation; Flow; Sketches; Models; Immersion
series SIGRADI
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id caadria2007_433
id caadria2007_433
authors Dounas, Theodore; Kotsiopoulos M. Anastasios
year 2007
title Generative Systems Based on Animation Tools: Structure and Form of Core Ideas in Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The goal of the research described in this paper is the formulation of a generative system for architectural design, where a structured core architectural idea is the input and alternatives to that idea are the output. Specifically we present a production pipeline of architectural / spatial configurations using the context of animation and time based design tools. Our model consists of “time” and space design constraints of boundaries / objects affecting a given architectural design, thus producing an alternative solution for every timeframe of the animation cycle. Initially the designer shapes an idea using animation software tools, where each tool is actually a constraint or a grammar rule defined informally by the user/designer. The influence of the tools can vary according to time, speed, location, configuration of the object and/or the constraint itself. In some of these animations the designer has the ability to sidestep partially the issue of emergence by providing specific key - frames for the solution to follow. The use of animation tools [shape driven curves, speed and time-line functions, parent child relationships] in the shape generation of our model empowers the user/designer to configure whole sets of shapes and designs interactively and without the need to define every solution independently. Simultaneously, a different, time-focused view of our model describes its use on designs that develop different configurations over time. Thus a duality of our model is established : the animated schema may be either a sum or a family of various designs or the animated time-line may represent a single design which changes over time. Finally the possibility of a structured graph representing each solution is discussed, where the designer can evaluate the merit of an individual solution in terms of conforming to the initial core idea or where alternative spatial configurations evolve in a different structure from the original design.
series CAADRIA
email kotsiop@arch.auth.gr
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2007_203
id caadria2007_203
authors Heidrich, Felix; Peter Russell and Thomas Stachelhaus
year 2007
title Intervision3D: Online 3D Visualisation and Conferencing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The use of Internet communication technologies in distributed teams has been carried out for well over 10 years. In this time, various methods to communicate and transfer information have been developed. A large amount of effort has been placed on enabling normal conversation to take place and it could be said, that with technologies like Skype, this is established. This enables planning partners to discuss, but we still need to convey what they are discussing. In short, the contents are still lacking. Technologies exist to allow users to share files or images, however this does not nearly reach the intensity or quality of discussions when partners are sitting together in front of a drawing or model. At best, screen sharing allows participants to see the same image but with low resolution and bad system response. The goal of the Intervision3D project is to allow distributed team members to discuss design issues with a common 3D model where participants can manipulate the model together in real time. In contrast to screen-sharing solutions, the Intervision3D project uses a server, which delivers a copy of the model to each conference participant. The server then coordinates the perspective views of all conference participants. One of the participants (usually the first) is initially designated as the speaker and he or she controls the views of the model through an intuitive walk/fly-through interface. The speed of the system is also buttressed by the simplicity of the application: as a Java applet, it is possible to start the Intervision3D system in any browser or as a separate applet on any system. As such, none of the participants need to install anything. The resolution of the model is optimized for each participant's browser and computer display. Currently, Intervision3D can import .3ds files and then render them using the JOGL Engine (Java Bindings for Open GL). JOGL allows the full Open GL suite to be used in rendering the model including lighting and textures: even normal PCs can do this quite well. The first implementation of the system is within an existing internet-based Design Studio and the paper elucidates how the first uses of the system have (partially) helped to increase the exchange of design ideas over the Internet. Through the Intervison3D system, the participants who have been separated by distance can once again discuss the same 3D model.
series CAADRIA
email info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ecaade2007_159
id ecaade2007_159
authors Heidrich, Felix; Russell, Peter; Stachelhaus, Thomas
year 2007
title Intervision3D: Online 3D Visualisation and Conferencing
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 757-764
summary The use of Internet communication technologies in distributed teams has been carried out for well over 10 years. In this time, various methods to communicate and transfer information have been developed. A large amount of effort has been placed on enabling normal conversation to take place and it could be said, that with technologies like Skype, this is established. This enables planning partners to discuss, but we still need to convey what they are discussing. In short, the contents are still lacking. Technologies exist to allow users to share files or images, however this does not nearly reach the intensity or quality of discussions when partners are sitting together in front of a drawing or model. At best, screen sharing allows participants to see the same image but with low resolution and bad system response. The goal of the project is to allow distributed team members to discuss design issues with a common 3D model where participants can manipulate the model together in real time.. The speed of the system is also buttressed by the simplicity of the application: as a Java applet, it is possible to start the Intervision3D system in any browser or as a separate applet on any system. Files can be imported and then rendered using the JOGL Engine (Java Bindings for Open GL). JOGL allows the full Open GL suite to be used in rendering the model including lighting and textures: even normal PCs can do this quite well. The first implementation of the system is within an existing internet-based Design Studio and the paper elucidates how the first uses of the system have (partially) helped to increase the exchange of design ideas over the Internet.
keywords Virtual design studio, shared models, CSCW
series eCAADe
email heidrich@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de, peter_russell@mac.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id caadria2007_113
id caadria2007_113
authors Li, Li; Jingwen Gu
year 2007
title Research of the Multimedia Courseware Creation System Application in Architecture Education
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary A new teaching model is constructed in the study, which can make students fully involved in the learning activity while keep the guidance from instructors. Compared with traditional courseware technology, it excels in following metrics:A framework to build multimedia courseware is constructed in the system, which helps instructors to customize their own courseware in a fast and convenient fashion _ The system can be used to build flexible knowledge structure and complicated information trees, which matches the practical architectural knowledge system and excels the traditional one-way flowing process_A flexible database is built within the system. The courseware created by this system can read from the database and take information out of the database at any time.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id sigradi2007_af24
id sigradi2007_af24
authors Monedero, Javier
year 2007
title Architectural eLearning: An inquiry into the fuzzy boundaries that separate education and instruction [Architectural eLearning. Una indagación sobre los límites borrosos que separan la educación y la instrucción]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 155-158
summary This communication is based on the development of a new subject to be imparted in collaboration with three Departments (Visual Communication, Projects and Construction) at the School of Architecture of Barcelona. It is a work that has been financed with a special grant from our university, aimed at the development of new teaching modalities and, in particular, of those that would develop the use of new technologies, collaboration among university departments and eLearning. The aim of the communication is twofold. First, to present some results that we consider valuable in themselves, as much for the techniques as for the methodology that we have used. Second, to propitiate a debate on the new situation that the teaching of architecture is moving to, due to the advance of a series of instruction methods where the methodological organization, the storing of informative material and the preparation of autonomous interactive systems, open more and more effective roads of learning but that, at the same time, point towards a new educational structure that fits badly within the traditional structures in which we have still to work daily. Regarding the first point, the main aspects to highlight are: a) the development of a selflearning system by means of a very complete series of tutorials that allow a gradual acquisition, depending on the necessities or interests of each student, of geometric modeling, parametric design, visual simulation and interactive animation techniques, b) the development of a system of general information supply and on line comments and corrections. Regarding the second point, a provisional theoretical framework has been elaborated based on the consideration of the ubiquitous visual communication media as misleading mediators of a personal relationship. This theoretical frame has been tested by a few experiences carried out with the collaboration of students implied in the project. The general conclusion is that both challenges must be faced at the same time: new educational technologies must be analysed and integrated in our curricula and a new theoretical framework, able to clarify the difference between instruction and education, must be developed in parallel with those technologies.
keywords Architecture; eLearning; Visual Communication
series SIGRADI
email javier.monedero@upc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia07_074
id acadia07_074
authors Peters, Brady
year 2007
title The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case-Study of Digital Design Processes
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 74-83
summary This paper outlines the processes involved in the design of the Smithsonian Institution’s Patent Office Building’s new courtyard enclosure. In 2004, Foster + Partners won an invited international competition to design the new courtyard enclosure in Washington, D.C. Early in the project, the Specialist Modelling Group (SMG), an internal research and design consultancy, was brought in to advise the project team on computer modelling techniques, develop new digital design tools, and help solve the complex geometric issues involved. Throughout the project, computer programming was used as one of the primary tools to explore design options. The design constraints were encoded within a system of associated geometries. This set-out geometry performed as a mechanism to control the parameters of a generative script. The design evolution involved the use of many different media and techniques and there was an intense dialog between a large team and many consultants. The computer script was a synthesis of the design ideas and was constantly modified and adapted during the design process. The close collaboration between architects, consultants, and fabricators was of key importance to the success of the project. This project, now named The Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard, will complete in late 2007.
series ACADIA
email brady.peters@fosterandpartners.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id ecaade2007_162
id ecaade2007_162
authors Ramirez, Joaquin; Russell, Peter
year 2007
title Second City
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 359-365
summary In the era of communication, the participation in internet-communities has grown to become a motor for innovation in software and community platforms. The paper describes the hypothesis that, by creating a virtual city (or a second city) a new type of social, economic and scientific network is established, which is supported through visual communication technologies. The various users bring, per se, their own intrinsic motivation and requirements to the system. Nonetheless, a personal identification with a city/neighbourhood/house/apartment can be used to awake awareness and to foster participation. This is especially important when dealing with the city inhabitants. City modelling itself has been carried out for over a decade. Projects such as the city model of Graz have shown how city models can be established so as to be scalable for new information (Dokonal et al 2000). Furthermore, these city models have been used in the education of future architects and urban planners. The project described here moves in the opposite direction: the model moves out of the classroom to an interdisciplinary city-model-platform. The work described here is the conceptual model for a multi-dimensional data set that models the city. This has spawned a host of other projects using the model as a foundation for further interactivity development and the extension of the model itself. The paper describes the structure of the conceptual model and the first experience of incorporating diverse projects such those mentioned above. The model also is structured so as to be compatible with the XML standards being developed for city information (CityGML). The goal of the project is to create a data set describing the city that not only describes the geometry, but also the history (including planned histories) and nature of the city. In contrast to virtual realities, which attempt to create a separate world (e.g. Second Life), the Second City is intended as an interdisciplinary repository for the geometrical, historical and cultural information of the city.
keywords City modelling, virtual environments, web 2.0
series eCAADe
email ramirez@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de, peter_russell@mac.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_075
id ecaade2007_075
authors Theodore, Dounas
year 2007
title Generative Systems Based on Animation Tools: Shaping Alternatives to Structure and Form in Architectural Design
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 245-251
summary Our system is based on computer animation tools, employed in the context of architectural synthesis. The pipeline of the tool consists of “time” and space design constraints of boundaries / objects affecting a given architectural design, with an output of alternative designs. The alternative designs vary from the original according to their temporal and/or spatial distance from the original object on the animation time-line. Specific tools [shape driven curves, speed and time-line functions,parent child relationships, boolean operations, arrays, lattices etc.] empower the designer with the ability to transform his original idea in almost every way the designer likes in a completely visual, interactive and straightforward manner. The solutions sets change according to time, speed, location, configuration of the objects and/or the constraints and rules the designer/user configures. Previous work on our tool stemmed from the rule based structure of shape grammars, but has evolved to a tool where the designer does not have to define a rule set beforehand but does so as his idea evolves during design. The animation tools used are form independent (that is the designer can use any two- or- three-dimensional form) and can represent structural decisions in a given design. The independence from form makes the tool suitable for almost every kind of architectural design, be it experimental, real or conventional while the ability to represent structural decisions and relations of parts in a design implicitly help the designer/user acquire a clear picture of each design and solution set. Finally the possibility of a structured graph representing each solution is discussed, where the designer can evaluate the merit of an individual solution in terms of conforming to the initial core idea or where alternative spatial configurations evolve in a different structure from the original design.
keywords Generative system, animation, geometry
series eCAADe
email dounas@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id caadria2015_092
id caadria2015_092
authors Wu, Chengde; Henan Li and Wei Yan
year 2015
title Fatal Fire Risk Checking for Residential Building Design
source Emerging Experience in Past, Present and Future of Digital Architecture, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2015) / Daegu 20-22 May 2015, pp. 303-312
summary Building fire puts great threat on people’s lives and causes huge numbers of fatalities each year. In 2007, total fire death in the United States alone was 3,430. The number of fatalities is distributed among residential 75.5%, non-residential 3.6%, vehicle 16.7%, outside 1.6%, and other 2.6%. Although much research has been done on building fire simulation to support designing safer buildings, all simulation systems currently available are focused on major factors in non-residential buildings such as bottlenecks, arching, pushing, etc. Residential building fires and non-residential fires are very different in many aspects. Therefore simulation systems focused on non-residential buildings have little effects on residential buildings. In this research, we analysed major factors causing deaths in residential building fires, and filtered out building design related factors. We then developed a system which shows the risk of fatal fire in residential building designs. This system is expected to help architects to easily detect potential risks of fatal fire and design safer residential buildings.
keywords Residential building fire; fire simulation; Building Information Modelling.
series CAADRIA
email chdwu22@gmail.com
last changed 2015/06/05 05:14

_id cf2007_211
id cf2007_211
authors Zedlacher, Stefan
year 2007
title Spacensing: A new method sensitizing users and their interactive environments
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 211-222
summary In this article we introduce the research on finding solutions using a 3D motion capture system for architectural design purpose by sensitizing a physical space and its virtual counterpart for user interaction and human motion input. We separate this use in four major steps to get a deeper understanding about the processes of space perception and space constitution in architectural (design) tasks. With detailed information about the manner of movement and the structured workflow it is possible to get new insights into space interaction. Furthermore spacensing provides a toolbox for users to investigate virtual space conditions as well as it allows to draw out conclusions on space sociological assumptions.
series CAAD Futures
email zedlacher@tugraz.at
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_058
id ascaad2007_058
authors Abdelhameed, W. and Y. Kobayashi
year 2007
title Developing a New Approach of Computer Use ‘KISS Modeling’ for Design-Ideas Alternatives of Form Massing: A framework for three-Dimensional Shape Recognition in Initial Design Phases
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 745-756
summary This research aims at developing a new approach called ‘KISS Modeling’. KISS is generally a rule of ‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ that will be applied in modeling process investigated and presented by the research. The new approach is implemented in a computer program ‘KISS Modeling’ that generates three dimensional forms based on simplifying the concept of shape recognition in design. The research, however, does not employ totally concepts of shape recognition or shape understanding in Artificial Intelligence and psychology. The research, in summary, investigates and describes: 1) a new approach of computer use contributing to generating design-ideas alternatives of form massing in initial design phases, within a simple way that any designer can understand at single glance, 2) implementation of shape recognition for generative three dimensional forms, 3) function to generate different outputs from different recognition, and 4) case studies introduced through applications and functions of the three dimensional modeling system presented by the research. The research concluded that the introduced processes help the user improve the management of conceptual designing through facilitating a discourse of his/her modeling of design-ideas massing.
series ASCAAD
email wael.abdelhameed@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_029
id caadria2007_029
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Ellen Yi-Luen Do
year 2007
title TangiCAD: Tangible Interface for Manipulating Architectural 3D Models
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper presents an interface for interacting with tangible objects to produce and edit architectural 3D models, called TangiCAD. TangiCAD is a tangible/virtual construction kit which allows architects to manipulate virtual models using easy hand control of tangible cubes, as an alternative interface for 3D modeling. It consists of a set of tangible cubes representing architectural elements, such as walls, columns, slabs,…etc., in addition to some editing operations. With more developed versions, the paper argues that architects could use tangible interfaces to carry out 3D modeling in an intuitive way, using their "flip-the-box" hands-on movement.
series CAADRIA
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_006
id ascaad2007_006
authors Afify, H.M.N. and Z. A. Abd ElGhaffar
year 2007
title Advanced Digital Manufacturing Techniques (CAM) in Architecture
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 67-80
summary Building projects today are not only born out digitally, but they are also realized digitally through "file-to-factory" processes of computer aided manufacturing (CAM) and computer numerically controlled (CNC) technologies. It was the challenge of constructability that brought into question, what new instruments of practice are needed to take advantage of the opportunities opened up by the digital modes of production, instead of whether a particular form is buildable. In this case of building construction, architects could design with attention to innovative details, afforded by unique shapes and sizes, knowing that whatever they created on their computer screen could be fabricated digitally for an affordable price. The aims of the research are to discuss and analyze the digital manufacturing techniques (CAM) in architecture and its fabrication, production process. To understand how these technologies fit within a broader context of architectural practice. The research begins with defining, what is digital manufacturing in architecture, its potentials, components and influences in the contemporary architecture. Further more it discusses the digital fabrication, Two- dimensional cutting, subtractive fabrication, additive fabrication and formative fabrication. The assembly technique, building skin, new materials and mass- customization in digital manufacturing techniques (CAM). That will be a hand in analyzing several case studies.
keywords Digital technology in architecture, Digital manufacturing, Formative fabrication, New materials, Fabrication machines and software.
series ASCAAD
email Hazemmafify@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_226
id ecaade2007_226
authors Agger, Kristian; Lassen, Michael; Knudsen, Nikolaj; Borup, Ruben; Rimestad, Jens; Norholdt, Peter; Bramsen, Nikolaj
year 2007
title B-processor
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 43-50
summary The B-processor is a redesign of the digital building information modelling/managing concept: Addressing the whole building industry participants and all phases in the building process. Offering a new “standard” for digital building information structure with generic modelling and evaluation tools in the B-model kernel. Plug-in structure for free extension of the B-processor system by the Building Industry. Kernel prototyped in Java to be downloaded for free – open source.
keywords Digital applications in construction, digital fabrication and construction, prediction and evaluation, design methodology, generative design
series eCAADe
email kristian.agger@aarch.dk
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id bsct_ahmeti
id bsct_ahmeti
authors Ahmeti, Flamur
year 2007
title Efficiency of Lightweight Structural Forms: The Case of Treelike Structures - A comparative Structural Analysis
source Vienna University of Technology; Building Science & Technology
summary This work addresses the structural efficiency of lightweight tree-like structures for three case studies: Stuttgart Airport, Beaverton Library, and Thermal Bad Oeyenhausen. The case studies are simulated using Build simulation software, to determine the stresses induced in each structure. The material efficiency and shapes areexplored in terms of load bearing structures. Hybrids of the above structures are formed to compare the pattern morphology used by various types of tree-like structure and assess the structural behavior. In addition, (steel, wood and concrete) materials are compared to determine which would have better structural performance. In order to show the resemblance between the growing trees and the tree-like structures, an example of both cases is simulated and stresses evaluated. Results show that, in general, the minimum stress and deformations are obtained for steel. Structures made out of this material also exhibit higher load bearing capability, optimum stability factors and the best geometric efficiency, inspite of higher specific weight (10 times wood, and 3 times concrete).
series thesis:MSc
email buildingscience@tuwien.ac.at
more http://cec.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2007/07/16 15:51

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