CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 505

_id ascaad2007_040
id ascaad2007_040
authors Loemker, T.M.
year 2007
title Location Based Services in Revitalization: The Use of Commonly Available Techniques for a Client-Participation Model
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 505-516
summary This research concentrates on the combination of remote sensing devices, georeferenced data, web-based optimization techniques and Location Based Services in revitalization. Its aim is to enhance the delivery of information about the development potentialities of existing buildings. The present and idle stock of buildings is extensive. Nonetheless, significant data and information about existing buildings is hardly available. The real estate owners are usually not known by prospective clients and they can be elicited only with substantial effort. But even if data about a building is available it is difficult to valuate it precisely, because of missing standard classification techniques. The question whether or not a building is suitable for a certain subsequent use is therefore hard to answer. It involves an extensive expenditure of time and manpower. Recent publications however, demonstrate that requests for the re-use of buildings can be solved through the use of combinatorial optimization techniques (Loemker 2006a, 2006b, 2007). Within these approaches researchers mainly concentrate on the architect dealing with inquiries from clients. These inquiries typically address the question if specific buildings are suitable for particular future uses. With the aid of optimization engines the architect can solve these requests through a description of the existing buildings and the corresponding enquiries in terms of specific criteria such as number and size of rooms or adjacency between rooms. According to an unambiguous syntax these approaches can be applied to any building type. The building data is stored in databases which can be inquired through optimization engines which thereupon calculate suitable solutions to the demands made by the client. But even if these approaches demonstrate high potential, their bottleneck lies in the exclusive use through the architect. Neither can they be addressed to buildings that are not listed in the architects own inventory listings nor can they be used by the clients themselves. Furthermore, no reliable statement about a prospective reuse of a building can be made directly on site by prospective clients, i.e. buyers or renters. In our research we examined if ad-hoc analyses of existing buildings can be accomplished through the clients themselves with the aid of Location Based Services that can be accessed by common remote sensing devices. The aim is to give prospective clients the possibility to visit a building and run in-situ usability simulations. To accomplish this, building data will be transferred between the building and the client through the use of ordinary communication devices. These devices automatically connect to server-based applications, which compare the requirements of the client with the existing building and run remote simulations on concrete further utilization. The newly generated information will then be passed back to the client’s device. In the paper we address a scenario of a prospective client who visits a city where he hits on an unused building he might be interest in. The client wishes to gain immediate and accurate information if the building is able to meet his demands regarding the space needed for his company. Different techniques investigated, their assets and drawbacks will be described that could accomplish suchlike tasks.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_139
id ecaade2007_139
authors Lonsing, Werner
year 2007
title Combining GPS and CAD
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 655-661
summary Combining CAD and GPS in architecture is a challenging task. Both technologies have not much in common. While GPS is used for mapping, CAD is used for modeling and virtual constructing. The request to design an application, the AmbiViewer, which can be used as design tool in an outdoor environment, brought the technologies together. This paper gives an overview about the GPS-technology and the integration into the modeling software.).
keywords GPS, CAD, augmented reality, interactive modeler, graphic format
series eCAADe
email lonsing@mac.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2007_055
id ascaad2007_055
authors Mallasi, Z.
year 2007
title Applying generative modeling procedure to explore architectural forms
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 697-712
summary Computer generated 3D forms using generative procedures have matured in the last decade and now considered as a tangible approach for realizing architectural design ideas. As fascinating as the approach might be, it is still lacking actual application in the early architectural design process. There are many reasons for this, among them: it has many implications over the architectural design process mainly the practicality of design during the conceptual design stage; it is cumbersome to develop construction drawings for complex architectural forms; and the necessity for producing conceptual designs quickly in less time as design requirements and decisions are constantly being changed. This paper initially reports on a practical development of a computer program which generates architectural massing designs based on integrating forms generation technique in a design scheme. The influence for this development was inspired by Spirolaterals technique used in generating complex 3D architectural forms that are based on parametric shape configuration. The development has three goals: to review the principles for constructing generative forms in the conceptual design stage using simple CAD tools, to assist in the production of design schemes based on a few basic shapes and rules, and to explore 3D forms finding and generation without the need to write a complicated computer program that are difficult to produce by hand. The development resulted in generating an interesting number of 3D compositions. The author applied this technique to experiment during the production of a design scheme. The paper hence describes the current development of ArchiGen tool to produces generative 3D forms utilizing ArchiCAD © GDL programming language. The tool is embedded within ArchiCAD for generating 3D shapes. One of the main features of this implementation is that users are able to sketch 2D shapes and the tool will deform its three dimensional generation. Moreover, the user being able to abstract the architectural character from the resulting complex 3D shapes. This development extends current related work by allowing the designer to load shapes into ArchiGen which acts as vocabulary of shapes for a design scheme constraints. It is intended from this work to inspire future work focusing on using generative tools in the early conceptual design stages.
series ASCAAD
email zaki.mallasi@perkinswill.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_021
id ecaade2007_021
authors Mannan, Ashik Vaskor; Uddin, M. Saleh
year 2007
title Natural Behavior and Computational Logic for Optimization of Architectural Design
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 493-498
summary In recent years much avant-garde architectural work has been dominated by a process based theoretical paradigm, inspired largely by various thinkers, critics, and philosophers. This particular ‘process practice’ attempts to address the paradox at the heart of contemporary production, by looking dialectically at the relationship between structure and ornament in nature with brainstorming and use of computer simulation. The goal of this paper is to develop a computer optimized system that can generate solutions for defining spaces involving a number of contextual relationships of activities. In particular, this research undertakes a pilot study (working team: Ashik Vaskor Mannan, Masrur Mamun Mithun, Lau Hon Yee Damien) on pattern and behavior in nature and implements the findings in to an architectural problem. The Initial Research focuses on Theory of emergence, Analysis of swarm behavior, and Analysis of ant system. Specific urban sites with different behavior patterns are chosen in Barcelona where this process is implemented to examine how they response to this course of action. This Bottom up method provides an optimum solution instead of a top down solution for an architectural problem
keywords Design optimization, computational logic, natural behavior
series eCAADe
email suddin@spsu.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id d939
id d939
authors Marc Aurel Schnabel
year 2007
title 8448cubed
source The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, NSW, Australia www.arch.usyd.edu.au ISBN: 978-0-9581221-2-2
summary 8448cubed is an architectural design exhibition showcasing creative digital design techniques. It explores how the coupling of architectural designs with digital modelling and manufacturing methods allow for a deeper comprehension and experience of space and form. The core of this collection is held together by the idea of spatial concepts within constraints of a cube 8448 millimetres3 in volume. Materials are creatively cut using computer-aided architectural design tools, parametric design techniques and digital manufacturing processes.
keywords digital modelling, parametric modeling, digital manufacturing, form generation, exhibition
series book
type normal paper
email marcaurel@usyd.edu.au
more http://8448cubed.tk/
last changed 2007/11/17 15:07

_id cf2007_279
id cf2007_279
authors Marques, Davis; Robert Woodbury
year 2007
title Managing Contingency in Parametric Models through Implicit Relational Modeling
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 279-288
summary Modeling and maintaining relationships in a parametric model compounds the work of the designer. When major changes in design direction take place, the work invested in the modeled relations is often lost. We contend that an implicit relational modeling approach provides for loosely coupled relations between the 'parts' of a design and mitigates the loss of work that occurs when changes take place. In our implemented system, implicit relations participate in a pattern of interaction known as the Dynamic Proxy.
series CAAD Futures
email dmarques@sfu.ca
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id acadia07_138
id acadia07_138
authors Mathew, Anijo Punnen
year 2007
title Beyond Technology: Efficiency, Aesthetics, and Embodied Experience
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 138-145
summary The spaces we live in are increasingly entwined in a complex weave of architecture and technology. With the evolution of intelligent devices that work in the background, design of place will eventually be a seamless integration of not just efficient but also experiential and virtual technologies. This signals a paradigm shift because “smart” architecture affords users a new interaction with architecture. In spite of such promises, we have seen interactive architecture ideas and “smart” environments only within laboratory walls or in the form of simplistic implementations. Perhaps the reason is simple. Rachael McCann asks if the integration of technology within the context of an increasingly information-driven modern era has abandoned the body in favor of the mind (McCann 2006). If we acknowledge that “smart” computing has the opportunity to transcend an efficient backbone to generator of experiences, perhaps we, as designers, must reconsider our position and strategy in this modern world. This paper is designed as a critical essay—one which evaluates interactive architecture and “smart” environments within the context of today’s socio-cultural climate. The paper hopes to open a discussion about the role of computing as architecture and the role of the architect in the design of such architecture.
series ACADIA
email amathew@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ascaad2007_059
id ascaad2007_059
authors Matsushima, S.; D. Sasaki and R. Takenaka
year 2007
title Embodying Architectural Form and Space by Coupling Computer and Human Performance Using Motion Capture Technology: Study on Application of Motion Capture to Design Process for Generating New Geometry
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 757-766
summary This research aims to develop fundamental design methodologies for human space and product design by motion capture of human activity. It is intended to generate new geometry using a motion capture system as design input device and then to develop it to design interior space and products such as furniture from data extracted from human motion. In order to produce a ubiquitous and comfortable environment, performance modeling focusing on the relationships between space and physical motion is needed. Making an object of complex shape is thought to be a new application of motion capture technology. This research proves that the numeric data of body actions can be transferred and developed to object shapes.
series ASCAAD
email shirom@tutrp.tut.ac.jp
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2017_265
id ecaade2017_265
authors Motalebi, Nasim and Duarte, José Pinto
year 2017
title A Shape Grammar of Emotional Postures - An approach towards encoding the analogue qualities of bodily expressions of emotions
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 485-492
summary This paper is concerned with the translation of analogue qualities of human emotions into digital readings. Human body postures are considered as one of the main behavioral conduits for non-verbal communication and emotional expressions (Shan et.al., 2007). This research is the first step towards identifying and detecting emotions through posture analysis of users moving through space; leading towards generating real time responses in the form of spatial configurations to users' emotions. Such spatial configurations would then help inhabitants reach certain emotional states that would enhance their life quality. In order to achieve this goal, we propose a methodology for developing a comprehensive shape grammar algorithm that could evaluate and predict bodily expressions of emotions. The importance of this study lies under the embodied interactions (Streech et.al., 2011) in space. As the circumfixed space impacts the embodied mind, the body impacts its surrounding including the architectural space.
keywords Shape Grammar; Computation; Emotion; Posture; Interactive Architecture
series eCAADe
email nfm5140@psu.edu
last changed 2017/09/13 13:31

_id sigradi2007_af72
id sigradi2007_af72
authors Muniz da Silva, Erivelton
year 2007
title An Urban Project Memory as a Hypertext [O Hiperdocumento como Memória do Projeto Urbano]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 350-354
summary The theme of this paper was conceived after observing the dificulty in access information about urban plans developed or contracted by public or governmental entities. We assume that, in governmental public programs with similar goals, recreating solutions is a daily action, which is, clearly, an unnecessary loss of time and resources, even more when someone is assigned to do something already done. The system presented in this paper aims at concentrating and organizing those informations in order to allow urban planners and designers to search for existing solutions to their projects and answers to their current needs.
keywords Urbanism; database; Multimidia; Internet; Pattern
series SIGRADI
email eriveltoms@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia07_158
id acadia07_158
authors Oatman, Devin; Senagala, Mahesh
year 2007
title Am I? Architecture of Ambient Intelligence
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 158-163
summary In its purest state, Ambient Intelligence is smart computing whose presence is not apparent to the human senses except in response and actions. The original intentions and origins of Ambient Intelligence began with the need for more efficient and unobtrusive management of our everyday activities. Synonymous with ubiquitous computing, Ambient Intelligence, or AmI, consists of: UbiComp: the integration of microchips and computers into everyday objects; UbiComm: the ability of these objects to communicate with each other and the user; and Intelligent User Interface which allows inhabitants of the environment to interact with the system with human gestures (Riva 2005). Put together, these components are basically personifi ed computers. The key factor in Ambient Intelligent communities is that the microscopic computers are aware of their surroundings and their purpose just as human beings are. With the ability to self-program and react to new software, they eliminate the need for humans to program them, decreasing maintenance and programming time. These concepts and technologies raise important questions. What happens when the system disappears? Are we ready as a society to see a certain degree of power taken away from us by anticipatory computers? This short paper will provide an overview of AmI and why it is important for architects to embrace, explore, and engage this emerging technology.
series ACADIA
email DNOatman@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ecaade2007_086
id ecaade2007_086
authors Oxman, Neri
year 2007
title FAB Finding
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 785-792
summary The distinction between material behavior (mechanics) and material response (electronics) in the framework of responsive building skins has promoted unique design protocols for integrating sensor technologies into material components. Such a distinction results in the implementation of remote sensing devices post the process of material fabrication. Sensors are commonly perceived as electronic add-on patches which initiate mechanical output with response to electrical input. This work seeks to establish a novel approach to the integration of electronics in building skins which prioritizes material selection, behavior and fabrication given a required task, over post-production sensor application. The term “FAB Finding” is proposed to describe an instrumental methodology facilitating the coupling of CNC fabrication processes with material organization and behavior. It offers a design mentality which emphasizes the nature and the effects brought about by the use of specific fabrication processes which are by definition inherent in the design product and its behavior. A light-sensing inflatable skin system is developed as a working prototype demonstrating such an approach.
keywords Digital fabrication, material behavior, form-finding, sensors, responsive skin
series eCAADe
email neri@mit.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id acadia07_182
id acadia07_182
authors Oxman, Neri
year 2007
title Rapid Craft: Material Experiments towards an Integrated Sensing Skin System
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 182-191
summary The distinction between matter (mechanics) and information (electronics) in the context of responsive building skins has promoted unique design protocols for integrating sensor technologies into material components. Such a distinction results in applications of remote sensing after the process of material fabrication. Sensors are commonly perceived as electronic patches which initiate mechanical output with response to electrical input. This work seeks to establish a novel approach to the application of electronics in building skins, which prioritizes material selection, behavior, and fabrication technology in relation to the required task, over postproduction sensor integration. The term “Rapid Craft” is proposed to describe such design protocols which couple material behavior and fabrication in the design of responsive skins. Rapid Craft is a designation for the incorporation of craft materialization knowledge within the framework of CNC processes of fabrication. A light-sensing inflatable skin system is developed as a working prototype, which demonstrates such an approach.
series ACADIA
email neri@mit.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id ecaade2007_198
id ecaade2007_198
authors Oxman, Rivka; Hammer, Roey; Ari, Shoham Ben
year 2007
title Performative Design in Architecture
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 227-234
summary In view of current developments in the theory and technology of digital design, certain potential for novel direction in virtual prototyping is beginning to emerge. In this paper an approach for the employment of virtual prototyping as a generative environment for performance-based design is proposed. The term combines both the concepts of performance and digital generation. In creating digital design environments for design the generative capabilities are incorporated within performance-based simulations. The potential of performance-based simulation as a digital design methodology in architectural design is explored. Experiments in digital architectural design illustrate this approach. Works in a framework of an ‘experimental digital design’ are presented and illustrated.
keywords Digital design, performance-based design, design generation
series eCAADe
email rivkao@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2008_137
id ecaade2008_137
authors Palmquist, Erik; Shaw, Jonathan
year 2008
title Collaborative City Modeling
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 249-256
summary This paper presents an approach to creating an online real time rendering environment, upon which a large-scale, urban 3D model can be produced as a collaborative effort between initial content creators and outside parties with an interest in simulation and visualization. In 2007, the City of Atlanta, Georgia organized a taskforce to provide recommendations on the future development and mobility along the city’s signature street, Peachtree Street. To aid in the visualization of this area, datasets were converted into low polygon textured 3D models for the entire study area. This content will serve as the foundation of a collaborative effort to complete a high quality real time environment. The process for this project will be described and the means to extend the boundaries, maintain, and collaborate with this content will be proposed.
keywords 3D model, collaborative design, real time, visualization, training
series eCAADe
email palmquist@coa.gatech.edu, jonathan.shaw@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia07_074
id acadia07_074
authors Peters, Brady
year 2007
title The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case-Study of Digital Design Processes
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 74-83
summary This paper outlines the processes involved in the design of the Smithsonian Institution’s Patent Office Building’s new courtyard enclosure. In 2004, Foster + Partners won an invited international competition to design the new courtyard enclosure in Washington, D.C. Early in the project, the Specialist Modelling Group (SMG), an internal research and design consultancy, was brought in to advise the project team on computer modelling techniques, develop new digital design tools, and help solve the complex geometric issues involved. Throughout the project, computer programming was used as one of the primary tools to explore design options. The design constraints were encoded within a system of associated geometries. This set-out geometry performed as a mechanism to control the parameters of a generative script. The design evolution involved the use of many different media and techniques and there was an intense dialog between a large team and many consultants. The computer script was a synthesis of the design ideas and was constantly modified and adapted during the design process. The close collaboration between architects, consultants, and fabricators was of key importance to the success of the project. This project, now named The Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard, will complete in late 2007.
series ACADIA
email brady.peters@fosterandpartners.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id eaea2009_piga
id eaea2009_piga
authors Piga, Barbara E.A.
year 2011
title The Urban Simulation and Projects Evaluation Laboratory at the Politecnico di Milano: An Educational and Research Facility
source Projecting Spaces [Proceedings of the 9th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 978-3-942411-31-8 ], pp. 115-120
summary At the beginning of 2007 an Italian Urban Simulation Laboratory was founded at the Politecnico di Milano. The laboratory, coordinated by prof. Fausto Curti, has been developed thanks to the one year presence of the visiting professor Peter Bosselmann, director of the Environmental Simulation Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley. The laboratory has an interdisciplinary approach and a threefold mission: experiment, using the laboratory setting to study urban projects at different scales; communicate, aiding public communication by making urban projects understandable to everyone; integrate and innovate, working on different kind of simulations techniques in an integrated way. In its initial experience the laboratory is primarily a didactic and research facility. Students can join the work and participate actively to the research. Until now about 40 students have worked with us, more than a half were foreign students from all over the world. The majority of the students did an internship of about 150 (three-year degree) or 300 (master degree) hours and some of them have continued working after this period developing a thesis. At the moment the case study, used as a pilot research, is about the Porta Nuova project at the Garibaldi- Repubblica area in Milan. The 300.000 mq of the total area and its well served central position make this place strategic for Milan. In this area the adopted urban transformation plan is creating a new business center that affects redevelopment projects, new infrastructures, and a park. The overall project will overhanging the surroundings city center with some of the highest buildings of its skyline. The importance of the site and the dimension of the project make this case significant to test the use of simulation for supporting evaluations about morphological aspects, comfort conditions, visual impacts, and other aspects that directly influence the quality of the new urban spaces. We are now applying different simulation methodologies in order to better understand the peculiar usefulness of each kind as a tool to support evaluation. As any kind has its own limits we work with different typologies at the same time. We are working with 1:500 scale physical model of a 1 km square of the area and different kind of static and dynamic simulations. We developed, with an external office, a micro-car to move a micro-camera in the maquette. We use this equipment to better explain the project implications to the students by producing subjective shot videos or showing a walk in real-time. To reproduce in a better way some relevant walks through the transformed site we have also produced some videos made of a superimposition of the real existing context and the virtual projects. To do this we used a rendered video of the project superimposed to the filmed promenade of the today condition, previously recorded using steadycam. A lot of static simulations has been employed to better understand the new city configuration from some representative points of view, as for example the roof of the Duomo cathedral. We are now developing some other kinds of analysis such as shadows impact; this is done by using a 1:1000 scale maquette in the Heliodon, but also with some digital tools. In the next future a work with the wind tunnel will help to understand some other comfort implications of the project at the micro-urban scale. The multilayer approach is the main aim of the laboratory and is an important tool to clarify the multidimensional project impacts to the students. In this way the laboratory can be a learning tool, it can stimulate the project process and support decision-making while improving the knowledge about the correct use of simulations for evaluating the cumulative implications of the proposed urban processes.
series other
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2011/03/04 07:45

_id sigradi2007_af34
id sigradi2007_af34
authors Pujol Romero, Monica; Monica Farkas
year 2007
title Digital Maps [Mapas Digitales]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 340-344
summary This work is based on a digital mapping of actors that build the territorial or conceptual relations between different believes, agents and identities of design. This dynamic map although they are connected with a territory, they are visible on a net that can be based on territory or not. Therefore nodes appear and not necessarily material relationships between them, building networks which will allow data to flow between new neighborhoods. From this framework, the project’s next step is to produce an interactive prototype map of design’s field in the city of Buenos Aires.
keywords Mapa; digital; interactividad; diseño; territorio
series SIGRADI
email mpujol@fibertel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id ijac20075106
id ijac20075106
authors Puusepp, Renee; Coates, Paul
year 2007
title Spatial Simulations with Cognitive and Design Agents
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 1, pp. 100-114
summary Agent based design systems could provide useful decision help for architects working on spatial planning tasks that involve large number of actors or deal with complex urban situations. These systems are especially helpful in bridging the gap between concrete design proposals and high-level design abstractions such as frequency and flow diagrams. Every attempt to use computational design agents in the planning process will automatically raise many fundamental issues about spatial perception and representation of the environment. The paper discusses these issues in the light of some recent agent based simulations. Two case studies are presented in order to demonstrate different uses of computational agents in urban design. The first study shows how a simple agent-based design system placed in an urban context becomes a creative production tool. The second one reveals analytical capabilities of an agent system in urban environments.
series journal
email puusepp1@hot.ee
last changed 2007/06/14 10:11

_id acadia07_230
id acadia07_230
authors Qian, Cheryl Z.; Chen, Victor Y.; Woodbury, Robert F.
year 2007
title Participant Observation Can Discover Design Patterns in Parametric Modeling
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 230-241
summary Our research aims to understand the mid-level patterns of work that recur across designers and tasks. Our users comprise active architects and civil engineers. The hypothesis is that making such patterns explicit will result in improved expert work practices, in better learning material and suggestions for improvements in parametric design. The literature shows that patterns express design work at a tactical level, above simple editing and below overall conception. We conducted a user experience study based on Bentley’s GenerativeComponents, in which geometry can be related, transformed, generated, and manipulated parametrically within a user-defined framework. After interviewing the system’s chief, we ran a participant-observer study in the January 2007 SmartGeometry workshop. We engaged designers through the role of tutor and simultaneously observed and discussed their design process. We found clear evidence of designers using patterns in the process and discerned several previously unknown patterns. In February at another 10-day workshop, we found more evidence supporting prior findings. The paper demonstrates that participant observation can be an efficient method of collecting patterns about designers’ work and introduces such new patterns. We believe these patterns may help designers work at more creative levels and may suggest new ideas of interest to CAD application developers.
series ACADIA
email cherylq@sfu.ca
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

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