CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 542

_id ecaade2007_139
id ecaade2007_139
authors Lonsing, Werner
year 2007
title Combining GPS and CAD
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 655-661
summary Combining CAD and GPS in architecture is a challenging task. Both technologies have not much in common. While GPS is used for mapping, CAD is used for modeling and virtual constructing. The request to design an application, the AmbiViewer, which can be used as design tool in an outdoor environment, brought the technologies together. This paper gives an overview about the GPS-technology and the integration into the modeling software.).
keywords GPS, CAD, augmented reality, interactive modeler, graphic format
series eCAADe
email lonsing@mac.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id a38d
id a38d
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios
year 2007
title CONVERSION OF GPS DATA TO CARTESIAN COORDINATES VIA AN APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT ADAPTED TO A CAD MODELLING SYSTEM
source 2nd International Conference on Experiments/Process/System Modelling/Simulation & Optimization (2nd IC-EpsMsO), Athens, 4-7 July, 2007
summary Nowadays, common methodologies in telegeoprocessing–telegeomonitoring use telecommunication means such as the GPS in order to transmit geographical coordinates to modelling and simulation systems. These 3D geodetic coordinates (φ, λ, h) can be used by modeling systems via specifics interfaces in order to proceed to real-time modelling of the remotely transmitted data. A previous published work describes a real-time remote 3D digitizing and modelling procedure via transmitted Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the field towards to a CAD system. However, these GPS data must be converted to adequate coordinate’s format (x, y, z) so that the CAD system can use them. This paper presents the computing development of a specific application adapted to a CAD modelling system permitting the conversion of the geodetic coordinates to cartesian coordinates. It presents the relation between geodetic and cartesian coordinates, the options of the final developed application and finally some schematic aspects of the computing process. The application development is realized in AutoCAD modelling system environment via special developed interface in Visual Basic (VBA) and Visual Lisp programming language. The aim of this work is to give the possibility to a CAD modelling system to “translate” and receive automatically geographical coordinates or to convert manually and selectively geodetic coordinates φ, λ, h to cartesian coordinates x, y, z.
keywords Coordinates conversion ; CAD development ; GPS data ; CAD modelling and simulation
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://www.epsmso.gr/2nd_EpsMsO_2007/Frame_page.htm
last changed 2007/10/19 15:48

_id lasg_whitepapers_2019_367
id lasg_whitepapers_2019_367
authors Atelier Iris van Herpen
year 2019
title Exploring New Forms of Craft
source Living Architecture Systems Group White Papers 2019 [ISBN 978-1-988366-18-0] Riverside Architectural Press: Toronto, Canada 2019. pp.367 - 392
summary Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen and Canadian architect Philip Beesley have been united by friendship and a mutual interest in esoteric, experimental craft since 2012. Together they collaborated on various dresses, techniques and materials, featured in six of Iris van Herpen's Couture collections. Since her first show in 2007, van Herpen has been preoccupied with inventing new forms and methods of sartorial expression by combining the most traditional and the most radical materials and garment construction methods into her unique aesthetic vision.
keywords living architecture systems group, organicism, intelligent systems, design methods, engineering and art, new media art, interactive art, dissipative systems, technology, cognition, responsiveness, biomaterials, artificial natures, 4DSOUND, materials, virtual projections,
email iris@irisvanherpen.com
last changed 2019/07/29 12:02

_id caadria2007_191
id caadria2007_191
authors Li, Biao
year 2007
title A Generic House Design System: Expertise of Architectural Plan Generating
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper presents the process and decision of producing software named “Gen_house” that generates high quality sketches of architectural design tasks. The result of a successful project combining research, development and education in both Europe and Asia is achieved in order to ease the practice demand of considering multiple aspects within a design process. The software employs principles and methods of self- organization, agent based solutions and natural sciences, which brings them to the field of architectural design.
series CAADRIA
email Jz_studio@126.com
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id cf2007_447
id cf2007_447
authors Maher, Mary Lou; Kathryn Merrick and Rob Saunders
year 2007
title From Passive to Proactive Design Elements
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 447-460
summary Agent technology has been used as an organising mechanism for software systems that focus on modularity and autonomy. This paper presents two applications that explore the potential of combining agent technologies with physical building design elements to change the nature of the built environment from a passive space to one that proactively engages with its inhabitants. We focus on how these curious places sense the state of the environment and the activities of the humans in the environment and enhance the human experience, thus going beyond the concept of supporting human activities in traditional approaches to intelligent rooms.
series CAAD Futures
email m.maher@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_033
id ascaad2007_033
authors Sheta, S.A.
year 2007
title Collaborative Design as an Experimental Multidisciplinary Approach to Develop Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) Courses
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 399-414
summary This study demonstrates an overview of the state of teaching Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) in the Department of Architecture, Misr Academy for Engineering and Technology (MET). This course is basically designed to enable students to explore new ways of design using Computer Aided Architectural Design software. In hypothetical valuation analysis, the study examines the necessity of combining ICT with architectural courses’ teaching in a collaborative design manner. In this sense, it tackles an experimental multidisciplinary approach to develop CAAD courses. It focuses on the innovation of the course by the introduction of ICT both in the contents of the course and as a means of education. To attain its goals stated above, the paper discusses the differences between teaching CAAD by using standard software and teaching the principles of CAAD. It distinguishes four-interdisciplinary system of application for collaborative design in education: social systems, professional systems, educational systems, and innovative systems. This exploration is seldom backed up from a design methodological viewpoint. The conclusion shows how the developed CAAD course, when taught in combination with ICT and collaborative design approaches may result in favorable learning outcomes.
series ASCAAD
email sheriefsheta@mans.edu.eg
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_019
id ecaade2007_019
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 2007
title Evolution of CAAD Teaching Methods
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 393-399
summary In this paper evolution of CAAD teaching at architectural faculties will be presented. The CAAD will be considered as one of the components of skills and knowledge needed to support Design Studio. The paper is focused on the question “How architectural design may be combined with CAD teaching?” Formulation of this question results from opinion that position of CAAD in teaching of architectural design curriculum is different than other disciplines being taught at architectural schools. Introduction of CAAD to teaching schedules unquestionably and explicitly uncovered the need for changes within the whole schedule of study. Although great number of computer equipment is used, the students are still being taught as in the XIX century. In terms of achieved results it proves ineffective. Analyses have shown that evolution of teaching methods may be divided into four stages: software teaching, “personal involvement”, “replacement” and integration.
keywords CAAD education, design curriculum
series eCAADe
email asanowicz@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_088
id ecaade2007_088
authors Bechthold, Martin
year 2007
title Teaching Technology: CAD/CAM, Parametric Design and Interactivity
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 767-775
summary The paper discusses a project-based approach to technology teaching, and examines the case of the mobile information unit (MIU) for Harvard University and its art museums. A student competition was held to explore design alternatives for this unit. The winning entry proposed an interactive, pixilated fiber-optics display as well as touch screens. Parametric digital modeling was used in the design and design development of the scheme. Research included the study of structural alternatives, fabrication methods and the modes of interaction between users and the MIU.
keywords Computer-aided design and manufacturing, fabrication, simulation, prototype, fiber optics
series eCAADe
email mbechthold@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2008_022
id ecaade2008_022
authors Einar Larsen, Knut; Schindler, Christoph; Scheurer, Fabian; Stori, Simen
year 2008
title The Ringve Botanical Garden Viewing Platform
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 783-790
summary Since 2006 the Faculty of Architecture of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has organized the ‘1-2-TRE’ workshops on digital timber fabrication. The annual one-semester courses explore the possibilities and conditions of file-to-factory processes in cooperation with professional carpentries. The 2007 course focused on adding varied simple elements to a complex whole. Within a full semester course, a permanent viewing platform for the Botanical Garden of Trondheim was designed, produced and built by the participating students.
keywords Teaching project 1:1, Industry cooperation, Digital fabrication, CAD/CAM, Ringve Botanical Garden Viewing Platform
series eCAADe
email knut.e.larsen@ntnu.no, schindler@designtoproduction.com
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id caadria2010_049
id caadria2010_049
authors Fukuda, Tomohiro and Hitoshi Takeuchi
year 2010
title Development of use flow of 3D CAD / VR software for citizens who are non-specialists in city design
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 521-530
summary The purpose of this study is the development of a tool by which citizens who are non-specialists can design a regional revitalisation project. Therefore, a 3D CAD / VR (3-dimensional computer-aided design / virtual reality) combination system was developed by using SketchUP Pro, GIMP, and UC-win / Road. This system has the advantages of low cost and easy operation. The utility of the system was verified as a result of applying the developed prototype system in the Super Science High School program for high school students created by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. It has been used for two years, since 2007. In addition, the characteristics of the VR made by the non-specialists were considered.
keywords Urban renewal design; participatory planning; 3D CAD; VR; design by non-specialists
series CAADRIA
email fukuda@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia07_066
id acadia07_066
authors Gün, Onur Yüce ; Wallin, Nicholas J.
year 2007
title Composing the Bits of Surfaces in Architectural Practice
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 66-73
summary Emergent design tools, with enhanced modeling and parametric manipulation capabilities, are encouraging the exploration of new geometric typologies in the field of architecture. Designers are not only finding more opportunities to work with geometries of higher complexities but are also becoming able to manipulate their designs with simple formulations. After a decade of familiarity with free form modeling tools, architects must now become more aware of the critical relationship between design and construction. When a design is performed without taking the constraints of construction into account the inefficient method of geometric post-rationalization becomes necessary. Thus, the knowledge of the rationale should be applied from the very beginning of the design processes, and digital models should be informed and controlled while being developed. This paper will present analytical strategies and methods for working with nonstandard geometries in a geometrically and parametrically controlled environment. Each method is supported with custom scripts which run in both parametric and non-parametric computer aided design (CAD) platforms. Each script and method is manipulated for the next project and the computational tools created build up a library of surface generation, manipulation, and subdivision tools. This library later becomes a source for office-wide use of surface manipulation.
series ACADIA
email ogun@kpf.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ecaade2007_009
id ecaade2007_009
authors Gün, Onur Yüce
year 2007
title Composing the Bits of Surfaces in Architectural Practice
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 859-868
summary Emergent design tools; with enhanced modeling and parametric manipulation capabilities are encouraging the exploration of new geometric typologies in the field of architecture. Designers are not only finding more opportunities to work with geometries of higher complexities but also becoming able to update their designs with simple formulations. After a decade of proximity with free form modeling tools, architects now have to become more aware of the critical relationship of design and construction. When the design is performed without taking the constraints of the construction the inefficient method of geometric post-rationalization unavoidably has to take place. So, the knowledge of the rationale should be applied from the very beginning of the design processes, and the digital models should be informed and controlled while being developed. This paper will present analytical strategies and methods developed for working with non-standard geometries in a geometrically and parametrically controlled environment. Each method is supported with custom scripts which run in both parametric and non-parametric computer aided design (CAD) platforms. Each script and method is manipulated for the next project over time and the computational tools created build up a library of surface generation, manipulation and subdivision tools.
keywords Parametric, surface, construction, Generative Components, Rhino Script
series eCAADe
email ogun@kpf.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id caadria2009_016
id caadria2009_016
authors Hemsath, Timothy L. ; Ronald Bonnstetter, Leen-Kiat Soh and Robert Williams
year 2009
title Digital CADCAM Pedagogy
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 277-284
summary Prototype manufacturing as an educational tool has been very successful at the college level in architecture and engineering design. This paper discusses an innovative inquiry-based learning approach rather than the problem-based learning models commonly utilized by other similar programs. For example, several research-funded technology projects (e.g., Cappelleri et al. 2007) look at involving students in problembased learning exercises (e.g., building robots); however, these exercises (while providing valuable experiences) have predetermined outcomes ingrained by the teachers, the project structure, and the components used to construct the devices. Therefore, inquisitive and creative problem solving is limited to the “kit-of-parts” in their approach to solving the problem. The inquiry-based CADCAM pedagogy model is more concerned with the process of solving a problem through the vehicle of prototyping than with the specificity of the design project itself. This approach has great potential. First, the need to solve the problem drives learning on multiple levels, integrating interdisciplinary ideas into the problem and solution. Second, the problem interlocks disciplines through inquiry knowledge building in team exercises. Finally, it encourages diversity and flexibility by allowing students to look at problems from multiples perspectives and points of view.
keywords Inquiry-based education: CAD; CAM; pedagogy
series CAADRIA
email themsath3@unl.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia08_458
id acadia08_458
authors Hemsath, Timothy; Robert Williams; Ronald Bonnstetter; Leen-Kiat Soh
year 2008
title Digital CADCAM Pedagogy Model: Intelligent Inquiry Education
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 458-463
summary Prototype manufacturing as an educational tool has been very successful at the college level in architecture and engineering design. This paper discusses an innovative inquiry-based learning approach rather than the problem-based learning models commonly utilized by other similar programs. For example, several research-funded technology projects (e.g., Cappelleri et al. 2007) look at involving students in problem-based learning exercises (e.g., building robots); however, these exercises (while providing valuable experiences) have predetermined outcomes ingrained by the teachers, the project structure, and the components used to construct the devices. Therefore, inquisitive and creative problem solving is limited to the “kit-of-parts” in their approach to solving the problem. The inquiry-based CADCAM pedagogy model is more concerned with the process of solving a problem through the vehicle of prototyping than with the specificity of the design project itself. This approach has great potential. First, the need to solve the problem drives learning on multiple levels, integrating interdisciplinary ideas into the problem and solution. Second, the problem interlocks disciplines through inquiry knowledge building in team exercises. Finally, it encourages diversity and flexibility by allowing students to look at problems from multiples perspectives and points of view.
keywords CAD; Education; Evaluation; Pedagogy; Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ecaade2007_004
id ecaade2007_004
authors Hofer, Michael; Asperl, Andreas
year 2007
title Geometry in the CAAD Curriculum
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 385-392
summary Modern architecture takes advantage of the greatly increasing design possibilities. Yet, architects are not just a new group of CAD users. Scale and construction technologies pose new challenges to engineering and design. We are convinced that those can be met more effectively with a solid understanding of geometry. Thus, an academic CAAD curriculum has to meet these requirements. We introduce our approach taken at TU Vienna and focus on the first-term mandatory course on geometry for architecture.
keywords Geometry, CAAD curriculum, geometric design
series eCAADe
email hofer@geometrie.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2007_031
id cf2007_031
authors Huang, Chih-Chieh Scottie
year 2007
title Conceptual Modeling Environment (COMOEN)
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 31-43
summary Conceptual modeling is an actively creative stage in a design process. Through hand modeling and manipulation of different kinds of modeling tool kits for specific materials, designers are able to generate forms. This article presents a tangible human-computer interface of a C-StressBall for form manipulation and a C-BenchWhirler for visual control. They create a new way of interaction between the virtual world and the physical space. They are aimed to ease the operation in design process by using CAD.
series CAAD Futures
email scottie.c.c.huang@gmail.com
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_051
id ascaad2007_051
authors Ibrahim, M.M.
year 2007
title Teaching BIM, what is missing? The challenge of integrating BIM based CAD in today’s architectural curricula
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 651-660
summary Building Information Modeling is the technology converting the workplace in design firms around the world. Now, professionals as well as academia see the feasibility and benefits of converting to such a new technology. Therefore, it seems inevitable to start teaching BIM to architecture students. And as we keep using and depending on computers the way we are, it also seems inevitable that programming will soon become one of the core curriculum classes for architecture students. However, the same problems facing professionals in design firms are those facing academic educators in schools of architecture, but with some different aspects. The misconceptions about the reality of BIM and the lack of understanding the full potential of the applications are the common issues. Few schools have started looking at the problem of preparing their students for a career in a BIM enabled work environment. The difficulty is due partly to the novelty of the technology and partly to the dilemma of teaching one application versus teaching the technology behind it. Besides the steep learning curve there should be the early introduction to how to interact deeply with the application to edit its content. The training required for BIM based CAD should focus on the core concepts rather than the application interface and functionalities. Therefore, building a course for teaching these systems should follow a different path than with conventional CAD. The training should be tied closely to the design curriculum in the design schools. A special version with different interface might empower the user. Hence, enhancing the experience and relieving some of the concerns attached with introducing BIM in the architecture curriculum.
series ASCAAD
email Magdy.mi@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_329
id caadria2007_329
authors Jacobs, Zhya
year 2007
title Capturing the Infinite: Bottom up CAD - CAM Technology for Regenerative Development
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary In most design practices there is a division between the generation of information to describe buildings and the production of information to construct them. Today architects are in charge of the design of the building (aesthetics) while the contractor is accountable for the means of construction (tectonics). The advent of digital technologies within the field of architecture however has begun to cause and will continue to cause fundamental changes within the AEC industry. The Paper describes a possible scenario where a Bottom – Up, part to whole approach to architecture can be adopted using the freedom afforded by Parametric Design within the CAD-CAM environment. This approach is explored through the design of a smart block in concrete that is integrated into a wall system.
series CAADRIA
email zjacobs@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2007_369
id caadria2007_369
authors Jeng, Taysheng; Hsuan-Cheng Lin, Yang-Ting Shen, Cheng-An Pan and Chun-I Chen
year 2007
title Modular Prototyping of Smart Space through Integration of CAD/CAM and Physical Computing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper outlines new techniques and methods for physical prototyping of interactive space. The proposed methods address three important issues: seamless integration, explicit representation, and physical prototyping. We report the experience and lessons learned from a research project called Smart Living Space. Our goal is not to propose a smart space in any detail, but rather to describe how the interactive techniques can be integrated into design practice. Finally, we illustrate how the methods can be deployed in a real-world example of interactive space.
series CAADRIA
email tsjeng@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

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