CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id caadria2007_145
id caadria2007_145
authors Golda, Robert
year 2007
title The Global Collaborative Design Project: An Outline of Future Trends in Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Collaborative design in architecture has been researched heavily in the academic world, and has begun to infiltrate the profession of architecture. Due to the effects of globalization, many different industries have become involved in the current trend of outsourcing work, or collaborating globally with geographically distributed partners. Advances in information technologies and networking are making this possible, and it is proving itself extremely successful in the world of business. The academic world, however, has seen only limited experiments in distributed virtual design. Limiting factors include an emphasis on individual assessment, administrative and logistical hurdles, and an unclear system of academic benefit. To illustrate the potential of collaborative technologies and methods, I present in this paper conceptual frameworks, collectively termed “Global Collaborative Design Project” (GCDP) that can be deployed in academia as well as in professional practice.
series CAADRIA
email rag6@njit.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ecaade2007_073
id ecaade2007_073
authors Francis, Sabu
year 2007
title Web Based Collaborative Architectural Practice Using a Fractal System
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 727-734
summary I have been working on an architecture representation system in India since 1991; that markedly deviates from the need of traditional drawings as we know. Over three million square feet of work has been done that took advantage of this system as it was being developed. The system has now matured sufficiently to be put into practice as a comprehensive architectural system of practice. It takes advantage of creation of just-in-time dynamic multi-organizations that can get formed (and dismantled) over the Internet on a project to project basis. The raison d’être of the representation system is that it would expose the “source-code” (metaphorically) of any work of architecture to stakeholders, much the same way as an open-source software project exposes the internal representation to fellow developers. I believe the design of architecture must go through an “open source” process in order to produce socially responsible designs. Such a stance is explained in this paper. The paper also explains the system in detail; its mathematical basis and justifies the need for such an approach. It also explores how a collaborative practice can be put into place using the system in the context of Internet technologies.
keywords Collaborative practice, fractals, representation system
series eCAADe
email sf@sabufrancis.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2007_001
id ascaad2007_001
authors Germen, M.
year 2007
title Virtual Architecture: Reconstructing Architecture Through Photography
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 1-16
summary The concept of construction in architectural design process is a temporary action that exists for a while and transforms itself into another product; i.e. the final building to be inhabited. Construction site can be taken as a podium where a play-to-remain-incomplete is being staged. The incompleteness causes us to dream, due to the fact that a complete building loses its narrative potential as it informs us about all the necessary pieces that constitute the whole: There is no puzzle to solve... Construction in this sense is like a historical ruin; Paul Zucker asserts that "ruins have held for a long time a unique position in the visual, emotional, and literary imagery of man. They have fascinated artists, poets, scholars, and sightseers alike. Devastated by time or willful destruction, incomplete as they are, they represent a combination of man-made forms and of organic nature." Architectural photography has the potential of re-creating this puzzle back again in order to bring an alternative representation to architecture. The architectural photographer is sometimes offered the freedom of reinterpreting, reconstructing architecture in order to be able to present a novel virtual perception to the audience. The idea here is to get some spatial clues that can later be used in other architectural projects. I was personally invited to two different concept exhibits in which I was given the freedom of inventing a virtual architecture through photography. The concept text written for one of these exhibits goes as follows: “I went, saw, stopped, attempted to grasp and enter it, looked at construction process and workers with respect, tried to internalize, wanted to claim it for a while, dreamed of creating a microcosm out of the macrocosm I was in, shot and shot and shot and finally selected: The created world, though intended for all, was probably quite a personal illusion...” Virtual architecture is a term used for architecture specifically created in the computer environment and never used in the realm of architectural photography. People like Piranesi, Lebbeus Woods, M.C. Escher, Marcos Novak, etc. previously dreamed about architectures that could exist virtually on paper, screen, digital environments. This paper will try to prove that this practice of (re)designing architecture virtually can be transferred to one of the most important realms of visuality: Photography. Various digital processes like stitching multiple photos together and mirroring images in image editing software like Photoshop, allow this virtual architecture to take place in the computer environment. Following this, I propose to raise the term “snap architecture” to connect it to the frequently referred concept of “paper architecture.”
series ASCAAD
email muratgermen@mail.sabanciuniv.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_009
id ecaade2007_009
authors Gün, Onur Yüce
year 2007
title Composing the Bits of Surfaces in Architectural Practice
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 859-868
summary Emergent design tools; with enhanced modeling and parametric manipulation capabilities are encouraging the exploration of new geometric typologies in the field of architecture. Designers are not only finding more opportunities to work with geometries of higher complexities but also becoming able to update their designs with simple formulations. After a decade of proximity with free form modeling tools, architects now have to become more aware of the critical relationship of design and construction. When the design is performed without taking the constraints of the construction the inefficient method of geometric post-rationalization unavoidably has to take place. So, the knowledge of the rationale should be applied from the very beginning of the design processes, and the digital models should be informed and controlled while being developed. This paper will present analytical strategies and methods developed for working with non-standard geometries in a geometrically and parametrically controlled environment. Each method is supported with custom scripts which run in both parametric and non-parametric computer aided design (CAD) platforms. Each script and method is manipulated for the next project over time and the computational tools created build up a library of surface generation, manipulation and subdivision tools.
keywords Parametric, surface, construction, Generative Components, Rhino Script
series eCAADe
email ogun@kpf.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id acadia07_025
id acadia07_025
authors Ascott, Roy
year 2007
title Architecture and the Culture of Contingency
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 25-31
summary A culture is a set of behaviours, attitudes and values that are shared, sustained and transformed by an identifi able community. Currently, we are bound up in a culture of consumerism, and of terror; there are also retro cultures and utopian cultures. What’s happening now that’s interesting is that many, if not all of these diff erent tendencies, tastes and persuasions are being re-aligned, interconnected and hybridised by a vast global community of online users, who are transdisciplinary in their approach to knowledge and experience, instinctively interactive with systems and situations, playful, transgressive and enormously curious. This living culture makes it up as it goes along. No longer do the institu- tions of state, church or science call the tune. Nor can any architectural schema contain it. This is a culture of inclusion and of self-creation. Culture no longer defi nes us with its rules of aesthetics, style, etiquette, normalcy or privilege. We defi ne it; we of the global community that maps out the world not with territorial boundaries, or built environments, but with open-ended networks. This is a bottom-up culture—non-linear, bifurcating, immersive, and profoundly human. Who needs archi- tecture? Any structural interface will do. Ours can be described as a contingent culture. It’s about chance and change, in the world, in the environment, in oneself. It’s a contingent world we live in, unpredictable, unreliable, uncertain and indeterministic. Culture fi ghts back, fi ghts like with like. The Contingent Culture takes on the contingency of life with its own strategies of risk, chance, and play. It is essentially syncretic. People re-invent themselves, create new relationships, new orders of time and space. Along the way, they create, as well as accommodate, the future. This culture is completely open-ended, evolving and transforming at a fast rate—just as we are, at this stage of our evolution, and just as we want it to be. Human nature, unconstrained, is essentially syncretic too.
series ACADIA
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id caadria2007_301
id caadria2007_301
authors Barrow, Larry; Shaima Al Arayedh
year 2007
title Emerging Technololgy – Dilemma and Opportunities in Housing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Digital Technology has transformed industrial manufacturing and production; and an array of Industrial Design products provide increasing comfort and benefit to millions of global citizens via ergonomic and mass production/customization strategies. Yet, housing needs of a rapidly growing global population are rarely affected by digital technology. Shifts in societal demographics, from rural to urban city centres, and concurrently Global Warming and ecological changes are exacerbating the world housing situation. Millions are homeless, live in inadequate shelter, or as in the US Manufactured Housing (MH) market, live in nondurable poor quality “manufactured” houses that are detrimental to health, at best, or during extreme weather events, suffer catastrophic damages often resulting in death to occupants. Nevertheless, housing concepts and related living units have benefited very little when compared to architecture’s related manufacturing industries counter-parts (i.e. automotive, aerospace, marine industries, etc). While Technology has vividly expanded the shape language of architecture (i.e. Free-Form-Design), some may argue that Free-Form- Design buildings generally have beauty that is only “skin deep” and typically focus on providing signature statements for both the designer and elite clientele. In this paper, we will briefly review the role of the architect in the US Manufactured Housing industry; additionally, we will identify the major problems that plaque the US Manufactured Housing Industry. Further, we will review how architects and Industrial Designers use technology in their respective fields and draw larger designmanufacture principals for issues of global housing. Our findings and analysis suggest that an Industrial Design approach, applied in architecture for mass housing, offers a means of improving the architect’s role and technology in manufactured housing for the masses.
series CAADRIA
email skumar@caad.msstate.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ecaade2007_213
id ecaade2007_213
authors Correia, José; Romão, Luís
year 2007
title Extended Perspective System
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 185-192
summary This paper presents a new system of graphical representation, which has been given a provisional name: Extended Perspective System - EPS. It results from a systemic approach to the issue of perspective, sustained by several years of academic research and pedagogical experience with architecture students. The EPS aims to be a global and unified perspective system, gathering the current autonomous perspective systems and turning them into particular states of a broader conceptual framework. Through the use of in-built specific operations, which become particularly effective in a computational environment, the EPS creates and contains an unlimited set of in-between new states, which can also be considered legitimate and particular perspective systems. Considerations of its potential role in architectural descriptive drawing are discussed.
keywords Linear perspective, curvilinear perspective, graphical representation, conceptual drawing, visual perception
series eCAADe
email correia@fa.utl.pt, lromao@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_098
id ecaade2007_098
authors Heylighen, Ann; Neuckermans, Herman; Wolpers, Martin; Casaer, Mathias; Duval, Erik
year 2007
title Sharing and Enriching Metadata in Architectural Repositories
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 401-408
summary All over the world, students and teachers in architecture have been developing learning materials in various digital formats. Unfortunately, the material is not shared across school boundaries, and thus not exploited to its full extent. Mostly, technical and organisational limitations hamper the sharing and exchange of learning material, although this would benefit the global community of students and teachers in architecture. This paper presents a recently launched EU-initiative called MACE—Metadata for Architectural Contents in Europe—which aims at creating a European-wide space for the electronic descriptions of architectural information to be used in architectural education. The idea is to exchange and enhance the metadata of as many as possible digital repositories in order to allow searches by distant partners. Real access conditions to the data still remain those specific for each repository. By describing and discussing this initiative in its early stage, the paper aims to benefit from the exchange of ideas and experiences with similar initiatives, and to trigger the interest of new repository owners to join MACE.
keywords Digital repositories, metadata, architecture
series eCAADe
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id a38d
id a38d
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios
year 2007
title CONVERSION OF GPS DATA TO CARTESIAN COORDINATES VIA AN APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT ADAPTED TO A CAD MODELLING SYSTEM
source 2nd International Conference on Experiments/Process/System Modelling/Simulation & Optimization (2nd IC-EpsMsO), Athens, 4-7 July, 2007
summary Nowadays, common methodologies in telegeoprocessing–telegeomonitoring use telecommunication means such as the GPS in order to transmit geographical coordinates to modelling and simulation systems. These 3D geodetic coordinates (φ, λ, h) can be used by modeling systems via specifics interfaces in order to proceed to real-time modelling of the remotely transmitted data. A previous published work describes a real-time remote 3D digitizing and modelling procedure via transmitted Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the field towards to a CAD system. However, these GPS data must be converted to adequate coordinate’s format (x, y, z) so that the CAD system can use them. This paper presents the computing development of a specific application adapted to a CAD modelling system permitting the conversion of the geodetic coordinates to cartesian coordinates. It presents the relation between geodetic and cartesian coordinates, the options of the final developed application and finally some schematic aspects of the computing process. The application development is realized in AutoCAD modelling system environment via special developed interface in Visual Basic (VBA) and Visual Lisp programming language. The aim of this work is to give the possibility to a CAD modelling system to “translate” and receive automatically geographical coordinates or to convert manually and selectively geodetic coordinates φ, λ, h to cartesian coordinates x, y, z.
keywords Coordinates conversion ; CAD development ; GPS data ; CAD modelling and simulation
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://www.epsmso.gr/2nd_EpsMsO_2007/Frame_page.htm
last changed 2007/10/19 15:48

_id caadria2007_089
id caadria2007_089
authors Onishi, Yasunobu; Mitsuo Morozumi, Riken Homma and Takahiro Maruyama
year 2007
title Web-based Asynchronous Design Discussion Tool with Utilities for Attaching Comments to Image Data
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary In today’s global, multi-faceted society, architectural design has become a collaborative effort. Often, however, team members are separated by distance and difference in work hours. In order to keep team members connected, research groups have been developing groupware for communication and data sharing using information and communication technology. The results of recent research indicate that the systems developed are useful especially in the early phases of the architectural design process. While these systems cannot support the most important process in design collaboration— the decision making itself—they will enable team members to communicate effectively. The goal of this research is to develop a decision support groupware for the design team. As the first step, in order to enhance interaction among team members, we developed a web-based asynchronous design discussion tool named DesIBo: Design Interaction Board, such as Bulletin Board System. This paper deals with the development of DesIBo employing new concepts about entering and browsing comments and evaluating that system. In the future, we will add a decision-support function to DesIBo.
series CAADRIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id acadia07_156
id acadia07_156
authors O’dor, Ron; Stokesbury, Dr. Michael
year 2007
title The Ocean Tracking Network
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 156
summary The Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) is a large-scale global initiative that comprehensively monitors ocean conditions and marine life response to these conditions. Scientists are tagging sea creatures, from salmon to whales, with tiny transmitters so that their movements can be tracked for over 20 years by receivers placed at one-kilometre intervals along the ocean floor. Pressure sensors added to these receivers allow real-time measurements of ocean depth, temperature and salinity, all of which provide significant information about climate change and the likelihood of natural disasters such as tsunamis. On shore, scientists around the world can receive this information regularly and upload it to a central database, resulting in current and reliable international records.
series ACADIA
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id cf2007_265
id cf2007_265
authors Prousalidou, Elena; Sean Hanna
year 2007
title A Parametric Representation of Ruled Surfaces
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 265-278
summary This paper proposes a simple parametric system to generate an almost complete set of ruled surfaces that may be used to describe building geometry. The major classes of regular, named ruled surfaces can be generated from a limited set of curves. Each of these is shown to be reducible to a transformation of a single standard curve, a helix, and therefore represented by a limited set of six parameters. Six extra parameters can position each surface on a global coordinate system. The representation is designed to be flexible enough to represent both planar and curvilinear forms, producing a description of form from minimal data.
series CAAD Futures
email e.prousalidou@uclmail.net
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id e5a8
id e5a8
authors Saghafi, Mahmoud Reza; Jill Franz, Philip Crowther
year 2010
title Crossing the Cultural Divide: A Contemporary Holistic Framework for Conceptualising Design Studio Education
source CONNECTED 2010 – 2ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DESIGN EDUCATION 28 JUNE - 1 JULY 2010, UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
summary While the studio is widely accepted as the learning environment where architecture students most effectively learn how to design (Mahgoub, 2007:195), there are surprisingly few studies that attempt to identify in a qualitative way the interrelated factors that contribute to and support design studio learning (Bose, 2007:131). Such a situation seems problematic given the changes and challenges facing education including design education. Overall, there is growing support for re-examining (perhaps redefining) the design studio particularly in response to the impact of new technologies but as this paper argues this should not occur independently of the other elements and qualities comprising the design studio. In this respect, this paper describes a framework developed for a doctoral project concerned with capturing and more holistically understanding the complexity and potential of the design studio to operate within an increasingly and largely unpredictable global context. Integral to this is a comparative analysis of selected cases underpinned by grounded theory methodology of the traditional design studio and the virtual design studio informed by emerging pedagogical theory and the experiences of those most intimately involved – students and lecturers. In addition to providing a conceptual model for future research, the framework is of value to educators currently interested in developing as well as evaluating learning environments for design.
keywords design studio, learning environment, online education
series other
type normal paper
email saghafi@student.qut.edu.au
more http://eprints.qut.edu.au/32147/1/c32147.pdf
last changed 2010/11/16 07:26

_id ecaade2007_056
id ecaade2007_056
authors Spaeth, A. Benjamin; Schwägerl, Klaus; Stamm, Isolde
year 2007
title Parameters in the Design Process
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 869-877
summary “Ce n’est point le navire qui naît de la forge des clous et du sciage des planches. C’est la forge des clous et du sciage des planches qui naissent de la pente vers la mer et croissance du navire” (Saint-Exupéry, 1948). The paper describes and analyses a course held at Stuttgart University, Germany dealing with the application of parameters in an architectural design process and the transformation of this process into a relational digital model. The course is introduced with special emphasis on its tasks, aims and the implicit didactic concept. It is also investigated if and how a design approach resulting from the identification and determination of parameters can lead to a creation of a unique shape. Finally the impact of the practical exercises for the final design is evaluated. The course’s structure is enhanced by the “Vorklasse” from Bauhaus and the conviction that using software is taught most effectively by working on an own specific project. At the very beginning the students get the chance to gain experiences with parameters through preliminary practical exercises, like folding and modelling and analysing. Then the use of the software is taught in several compact sessions in parallel to the design process. The impact of the early practical exercises on the subsequent design process is remarkable. Special attention is therefore given to this aspect. The aim of the lessons is to produce a proposal for the design task. The proposal is then to be presented as a parametric model representing either the global shape or a constructive detail.
keywords Design education, digital project, parametrical design
series eCAADe
email spaeth@casino.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_095
id ecaade2007_095
authors Benton, Sarah
year 2007
title Mediating between Architectural Design Ideation and Development through Digital Technology
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 253-260
summary Negroponte (Negroponte 1969) described how the creative thinking of a designer can become affected by the ‘machine’ urging the designer to draw a distinction between ‘heuristics of form’ and ‘heuristics of method’. This ensured that by taking advantage of digital technology a symbiotic relationship was maintained between both of these. To date architects have investigated digital tools for generating form and imagery with increasing success, but have arguably fallen short of using those tools for advancing their design methods. The research presented here explores questions not solely focusing on the use of the tools, but on heuristic methods of the profession, to examine the interconnectiveness of the design method and the tool in a symbiotic fashion; to examine the nature of creativity. This paper is taking a critical standpoint about the place of digital tools in an architect’s method in the pursuit of poetic architecture and, in particular, its representation, to enable speculation, as opposed to prediction, of ideas in the design process from the early phases. The issue is discussed through the findings of my doctoral research case studies that have proved germane to my particular enquiry, that is, digital mediationbetween design ideation and design development.
keywords Ideation, development, design process, digital techniques, animation
series eCAADe
email benton@terroir.com.au
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2007_043
id ascaad2007_043
authors Chen, G.-Y. M.
year 2007
title Tagging Your Body Virtually : Represent a place making process with social network
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 543-558
summary This research focuses on the virtual environment of place making. In this paper we would like to emphasize that the place making should be stressed collective views in order to obtain the design application of possibilities. However, in past researches there has been no study that tried to collect the collective views by digital ways. Accordingly, this paper proposes a response thought the Spatial Intention. It could be used to represent the human of body experience. The "moving" and "standing" are appropriate to two main considerations. Both of these could be connected to the action of "focus" and "choice." these leads to a sequential relationship of place production. The positive significance of the spatial intention lies in the convertibility of physical experience could be implied with a specific understanding. It also could be used to mold the place of knowledge structure. Thereby in order to verify the reliability of the above, we made a social network of virtual environment and used the rapid prototyping method to develop a prototype system. Implementing on the Chinese garden of the actual case, we found that the tag could concentrate as an entire sense in somewhere of place. These tags also could be shared remotely through the social network. Different tags in the sharing mechanism could collage out a place of collective views. This perspective would be used to assist designers to understand the sense of place. It also would be applied to find out the environmental design of possibilities in the future studies.
series ASCAAD
email mivochen@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_657
id caadria2007_657
authors Chotsiri, Sirin; Siwarak Suwannasan, Wipaporn Lamool and Monchai Bunyavipakul
year 2007
title The Development of E-Groupware in the Collaborative Work of Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The emergence of the computer networking, especially the internet has been a very useful tool for the construction industry. The AEC (AEC: Architectural, Engineering and Construction) has adopted the computer technology to the collaboration design work (CSCW: Computer Support Collaborative Work). It used to be that people work together in the real physical space like an office or design studio but now in the virtual design place. This is to accommodate the work that is being done among the designers or construction teams that are far apart. Through Web Application these people can work together from different location.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id cf2007_000
id cf2007_000
authors Dong, Andy; Andrew vande Moere and John S. Gero (eds.)
year 2007
title Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2007
source Proceedings of the 12th International Conference [ISBN 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney 11-13 July 2007, 602 p.
summary CAAD Futures is a biennial Conference that aims to promote the advancement of Computer Aided Architectural Design in the service of those concerned with the quality of the built environment. The conferences are organised under the auspices of the CAAD Futures Foundation. The series of conferences started in 1985 in Delft, and has since travelled to Eindhoven, Boston, Zurich, Pittsburgh, Singapore, Munich, Atlanta, Tainan and Vienna. The book contains papers selected from the 11th CAAD Futures conference which took place at the University of Sydney. The papers in this book cover a wide range of subjects and provide an excellent overview of the state-of-the-art in research on Computer Aided Architectural Design.
series CAAD Futures
email a.dong@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_013
id ascaad2007_013
authors El Razaz, Z.M.
year 2007
title Virtual Heritage in the Digital Era
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 149-164
summary These instructions are intended to guide contributors to the Second International Conference of the Arab Society of Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007) when preparing papers. The abstract is in 10 pt Times with 11 pt leading. In the last years we have witnessed an enormous interest in the idea of the virtual, triggered by the increasing availability of advanced information technology. The capacity of this technology to model and simulate the behavior and the perception of environments have raised enormous expectations about the possibilities of producing synthetic, virtual environments that will eventually replace reality in the forms we know it. But if this virtual trend is a very recent phenomenon associated to the development of information technology, the idea of the virtual is not new. Virtual reality takes place, also, in architecture. Virtual architecture is not a design problem to which architecture and architects can offer any answer that they please. It is the condition, under which we have come to live in the 21st century through the physical and sensual encounter with the computer. It is only as a violence of this nature that virtual architecture can become a virtual thing and have the power to change the architectural thought of the era. Virtual reality could be used in different fields but essentially, the goal of this piece of work is the development of a generic set of tools that provide users with the means to recall represent and document the heritage in a new way, in order to preserve and make it accessible to as many people as possible.
series ASCAAD
email Drzeinabelrazaz@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_203
id caadria2007_203
authors Heidrich, Felix; Peter Russell and Thomas Stachelhaus
year 2007
title Intervision3D: Online 3D Visualisation and Conferencing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The use of Internet communication technologies in distributed teams has been carried out for well over 10 years. In this time, various methods to communicate and transfer information have been developed. A large amount of effort has been placed on enabling normal conversation to take place and it could be said, that with technologies like Skype, this is established. This enables planning partners to discuss, but we still need to convey what they are discussing. In short, the contents are still lacking. Technologies exist to allow users to share files or images, however this does not nearly reach the intensity or quality of discussions when partners are sitting together in front of a drawing or model. At best, screen sharing allows participants to see the same image but with low resolution and bad system response. The goal of the Intervision3D project is to allow distributed team members to discuss design issues with a common 3D model where participants can manipulate the model together in real time. In contrast to screen-sharing solutions, the Intervision3D project uses a server, which delivers a copy of the model to each conference participant. The server then coordinates the perspective views of all conference participants. One of the participants (usually the first) is initially designated as the speaker and he or she controls the views of the model through an intuitive walk/fly-through interface. The speed of the system is also buttressed by the simplicity of the application: as a Java applet, it is possible to start the Intervision3D system in any browser or as a separate applet on any system. As such, none of the participants need to install anything. The resolution of the model is optimized for each participant's browser and computer display. Currently, Intervision3D can import .3ds files and then render them using the JOGL Engine (Java Bindings for Open GL). JOGL allows the full Open GL suite to be used in rendering the model including lighting and textures: even normal PCs can do this quite well. The first implementation of the system is within an existing internet-based Design Studio and the paper elucidates how the first uses of the system have (partially) helped to increase the exchange of design ideas over the Internet. Through the Intervison3D system, the participants who have been separated by distance can once again discuss the same 3D model.
series CAADRIA
email info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

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