CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 542

_id 9da7
id 9da7
authors Jong, S J, Soon, E H and Rafi, A
year 2007
title Exploring motion sequence of virtual characters: Experimenting motion-capture variables
source Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Geometric Modelling and Imaging (GMAI 07), ETH Zurich, Switzerland, 4-6 July, 91-96.
summary The purpose of the research is to study the detail of motion of various subjects with differences in physical attributes. The research outlines how different physique produces different behavioural patterns based upon mass and proportion. This research focuses on ‘walk motion’ to identify the differences in each subject’s physical attributes by sampling subjects of physical differences. This experiment employs Vicon8i® Optical Motion Capture system (MOCAP) to study the detail of human motion by extracting the subjects’ core motions for analysis with pre-defined actions. The research used the findings to establish the relationship between height and weight against motion frequencies in 3D space.
keywords human motion, actor physique, motion capture, motion editing, core motion
series other
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2007/09/11 00:31

_id sigradi2007_000
id sigradi2007_000
authors Maganda Mercado, Adriana Gómez (et. al)
year 2007
title Sigradi 2007: Communication in the Visual Society [La Comunicación en la Comunidad Visual]
source Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 13 978-968-7451-15-2] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, 467 p.
summary In a simple communication model we must talk about the understanding between participants. This is the result of a continuing connection and a dialog of agreements and disagreements in order to arrive at sharing an idea. However, society today is in an evolutionary lapse at an accelerated pace that interjects itself in this process. It is here where social forces distend and generate important ruptures between generations and individuals that fight to prevail or impose new languages and lifestyles. Today's society has become a visual society whose effect has been reinforced through technology in the devices that we use on a daily basis. The daily use of technology and its new languages has marked a disconnection between individuals that must be closed by using a new acculturation and teaching models. Disconnection is a omnipresent modern phenomenon that can be felt as the main effect in what specialists call the digital gap. This gap not only separates generations, but also ideologies with respect to the form in which we perceive, transmit and teach in our society today. This disconnection can be easily understood through a school system that has been designed for a manufacturing and agricultural world. However, many sectors within our society have been in state of constant change and evolution. This situation generates many opportunities where an agile society is required in response to these new local and global challenges. The students of today have, for example, multi-tasking abilities that better assimilate these changes. The researchers, Ian Jukes and Anita Dosaj refer to this disconnection as the result of poor communication between digital natives (our present-day students) and digital immigrants (many present-day adults). This phenomenon results in the fact that parents and educators speak the digital dialect as a second language, and because of that are lacking in their models of communication. For example, digital natives prefer a variety of sources with rapid access, while the digital immigrants prefer slower, more controlled sources that are limited and regulated. Nowadays, our educational or production activities in which we find ourselves immersed on a daily basis cause us to participate in a wide range of processes of production, dissemination and analysis of visual forms as part of our final product or service. Much of the work that we elaborate in movies, video and photography explore meaning, perception and communication in context as well as anthropological and ethnographic themes. Using this framework for our society today, the importance of the search for the promotion of the study of visual representation and the media for the greatest development and generation of benefits is brought to the fore. Through the use of images we can describe, analyze, communicate and interpret human behavior. All these settings, full of digital disconnections and reencounters, impact on all the visual aspects of culture, including art, architecture and material objects, influencing the bodily expressions of human beings. We have created a visual society when we put emphasis on the meaning and interpretation of all we receive through our visual sense. Wherever we look, we find objects that have been modified beyond their primary function to communicate messages. In this ecosystem we are consumers and suppliers. The communication and research needed to achieve reconnection, as well as the creation of new forms of production and visual understanding, are the themes on which the works contained in this edition are centered.
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
more http://www.sigradi.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id ascaad2007_059
id ascaad2007_059
authors Matsushima, S.; D. Sasaki and R. Takenaka
year 2007
title Embodying Architectural Form and Space by Coupling Computer and Human Performance Using Motion Capture Technology: Study on Application of Motion Capture to Design Process for Generating New Geometry
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 757-766
summary This research aims to develop fundamental design methodologies for human space and product design by motion capture of human activity. It is intended to generate new geometry using a motion capture system as design input device and then to develop it to design interior space and products such as furniture from data extracted from human motion. In order to produce a ubiquitous and comfortable environment, performance modeling focusing on the relationships between space and physical motion is needed. Making an object of complex shape is thought to be a new application of motion capture technology. This research proves that the numeric data of body actions can be transferred and developed to object shapes.
series ASCAAD
email shirom@tutrp.tut.ac.jp
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_158
id acadia07_158
authors Oatman, Devin; Senagala, Mahesh
year 2007
title Am I? Architecture of Ambient Intelligence
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 158-163
summary In its purest state, Ambient Intelligence is smart computing whose presence is not apparent to the human senses except in response and actions. The original intentions and origins of Ambient Intelligence began with the need for more efficient and unobtrusive management of our everyday activities. Synonymous with ubiquitous computing, Ambient Intelligence, or AmI, consists of: UbiComp: the integration of microchips and computers into everyday objects; UbiComm: the ability of these objects to communicate with each other and the user; and Intelligent User Interface which allows inhabitants of the environment to interact with the system with human gestures (Riva 2005). Put together, these components are basically personifi ed computers. The key factor in Ambient Intelligent communities is that the microscopic computers are aware of their surroundings and their purpose just as human beings are. With the ability to self-program and react to new software, they eliminate the need for humans to program them, decreasing maintenance and programming time. These concepts and technologies raise important questions. What happens when the system disappears? Are we ready as a society to see a certain degree of power taken away from us by anticipatory computers? This short paper will provide an overview of AmI and why it is important for architects to embrace, explore, and engage this emerging technology.
series ACADIA
email DNOatman@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id sigradi2008_180
id sigradi2008_180
authors Vincent, Charles
year 2008
title Gulliver in the land of Generative Design
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The current trend in architectural design towards architectural computing has been treated both from a philosophical standing point and as an operational systems’ problem, in a quest for explications which could at last break ground for a more broad development and adoption of design tools. As Kostas Terzidis (2007) puts it, the intuitiveness that architects have put on so high a pedestal seems to be the central issue to be dealt with by both views. There seems to be no apparent shortcut toward the reconciliation between traditional practice and new media and most certainly it is not only a problem of interface design, but one of design method clarification and reinterpretation of those methods into computing systems. Furthermore, there’s no doubt left as to whether computing systems can generate such new patterns as to impact our own understanding of architecture. But even if computer algorithms can make possible the exploration of abstract alternatives to an abstract initial idea, as in Mathematica and Processing, the issue of relating abstract and geometric representations of human centered architecture lays in the hands of architects, programmers or, better yet, architect-programmers. What seems now to be the relevant change is that architectural design might escape from the traditional sequence embedded in the need – program – design iterations – solution timeline, substituted by a web of interactions among differing experimental paths, in which even the identification of needs is to be informed by computing. It is interesting to note that the computational approach to architectural design has been praised for the formal fluidity of bubbles and Bezier shapes it entails and for the overcoming of functionalist and serialization typical of modern architecture. That approach betrays a high degree of canonic fascination with the tools of the trade and very little connection to the day to day chores of building design. On the other hand, shall our new tools and toys open up new ways of thinking and designing our built landscape? What educational issues surface if we are to foster wider use of the existing technologies and simultaneously address the need to overtake mass construction? Is mass customization the answer for the dead end modern architecture has led us to? Can we let go the humanist approach begun in Renascence and culminated in Modernism or shall we review that approach in view of algorithmic architecture? Let us step back in time to 1726 when Swift’s ‘Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Lemuel Gulliver’ was first published. In Swift’s fierce critic of what seemed to him the most outrageous ideas, he conceived a strange machine devised to automatically write books and poetry, in much the same generative fashion that now, three centuries later, we begin to cherish. “Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politicks, law, mathematics and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study. He then led me to the frame, about the sides whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty foot square, placed in the middle of the room. The superficies was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a dye, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered on every square with paper pasted on them; and, on these papers were written all the words of their language in their several moods, tenses, and declensions, but without any order. The professor then desired me to observe, for he was going to set his engine at work. The pupils at his command took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down.” (Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, A Voyage to Balnibarbi) What astonishing forecast did Swift show in that narrative that, in spite of the underlying incredulity and irony, still clarifies our surprise when faced to what might seem to some of us just an abandonment of all that architects and designers have cherished: creativeness and inventiveness. Yet, we could argue that such a radical shift in paradigm occurred once when master builders left the construction ground and took seat at drafting boards. The whole body of design and construction knowledge was split into what now seem to us just specialties undertaken by more and more isolated professionals. That shift entailed new forms of representation and prediction which now each and all architects take for granted. Also, Cartesian space representation turned out to be the main instrument for professional practice, even if one can argue that it is not more than the unfolding of stone carving techniques that master builders and guilds were so fond of. Enter computing and all its unfolding, i.e. DNA coding, fractal geometry, generative computing, nonlinear dynamics, pattern generation and cellular automata, as a whole new chapter in science, and compare that to conical perspective, descriptive and analytical geometry and calculus, and an image begins to form, delineating a separation between architect and digital designer. In previous works, we have tried approaching the issues regarding architects education in a more consensual way. But it seems now that the whole curricular corpus might be changed as well. The very foundations upon which we prepare future professionals shall change, not only in College, but in High School as well. In this paper, we delve further into the disconnect between current curricula and digital design practices and suggest new disciplinary grounds for a new architectural education.
keywords Educational paradigm; Design teaching; Design methods;
series SIGRADI
email cvincent@mackenzie.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ijac20075101
id ijac20075101
authors Hanna, Sean
year 2007
title Automated Representation of Style by Feature Space Archetypes: Distinguishing Spatial Styles from Generative Rules
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 1, pp. 2-23
summary Style is a broad term that could potentially refer to any features of a work, as well as a fluid concept that is subject to change and disagreement, yet approaches to representing it too often seek either a pre-defined set of generative rules or list of measurable features. Instead, a general and flexible method of retrospectively and automatically representing style is proposed based on the idea of an archetype, to which real designs can be compared, and tested with examples of architectural plans. Unlike a fixed, symbolic representation, both the measurements of features that define a style and the selection of those features themselves can be performed by the machine, making it able to generalise a definition automatically from a set of examples. This process is implemented in analysis, and coupled with a generative algorithm to produce plans in a learned style.
series journal
email s.hanna@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2007/06/14 10:11

_id ascaad2007_034b
id ascaad2007_034b
authors Ambrose, M.A.
year 2007
title Body|Form|Space: Geometric translations of the body in motion
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 431-438
summary This paper presents a novel approach to digital investigation of body, space, form and motion to expose issues of spatial perception. The spatial experience as generated from, and translated by, the human body is the focus of this work. The work explores the representational value of the body’s sense-image, the context and spatial/visual literacy of the learned sense of space-time generated from the study of the human body. Here the body is conceived not just in space but also in time, affording the ability to reinterpret the body and it’s dynamic motion engaged not as a static condition, but as a set of event spaces. Motion here is defined as a multiplicity of continuities that can be subdivided by artificial boundaries that describe space, time and body. The study of a series of bodies and movements is described that explore the human condition as a series of differential lines (form + time) and framed structures (bodies + motion). The intention is to examine the relationship between human form and metaphysical simultaneity as generators of architectural form. The work is structured by a research approach that dissects and isolates the representational concept/image from the body in a way that might offer an alternative description to the traditional historic models.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_025
id acadia07_025
authors Ascott, Roy
year 2007
title Architecture and the Culture of Contingency
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 25-31
summary A culture is a set of behaviours, attitudes and values that are shared, sustained and transformed by an identifi able community. Currently, we are bound up in a culture of consumerism, and of terror; there are also retro cultures and utopian cultures. What’s happening now that’s interesting is that many, if not all of these diff erent tendencies, tastes and persuasions are being re-aligned, interconnected and hybridised by a vast global community of online users, who are transdisciplinary in their approach to knowledge and experience, instinctively interactive with systems and situations, playful, transgressive and enormously curious. This living culture makes it up as it goes along. No longer do the institu- tions of state, church or science call the tune. Nor can any architectural schema contain it. This is a culture of inclusion and of self-creation. Culture no longer defi nes us with its rules of aesthetics, style, etiquette, normalcy or privilege. We defi ne it; we of the global community that maps out the world not with territorial boundaries, or built environments, but with open-ended networks. This is a bottom-up culture—non-linear, bifurcating, immersive, and profoundly human. Who needs archi- tecture? Any structural interface will do. Ours can be described as a contingent culture. It’s about chance and change, in the world, in the environment, in oneself. It’s a contingent world we live in, unpredictable, unreliable, uncertain and indeterministic. Culture fi ghts back, fi ghts like with like. The Contingent Culture takes on the contingency of life with its own strategies of risk, chance, and play. It is essentially syncretic. People re-invent themselves, create new relationships, new orders of time and space. Along the way, they create, as well as accommodate, the future. This culture is completely open-ended, evolving and transforming at a fast rate—just as we are, at this stage of our evolution, and just as we want it to be. Human nature, unconstrained, is essentially syncretic too.
series ACADIA
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id sigradi2007_af101
id sigradi2007_af101
authors Barci Castriota, Leonardo; Carla Viviane da Silva Angelo
year 2007
title Digital technology and accessibility: The Rede Latino-americana de Acervos de Arquitetura e Urbanismo (RELARQ) [Tecnologia digital e acessibilidade: A Rede Latino-americana de Acervos de Arquitetura e Urbanismo (RELARQ)]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 200-204
summary The new digital technologies offer new possibilities of interconnection and re-connection that are reconfiguring the diverse areas of knowledge and the diverse fields of human action. In this direction, this work reflects on the proposal of the creation of the Latin American Network or Architectural Archives (RELARQ), pioneering initiative in our continent that aims to create a basis of cooperation between the diverse Brazilian and Latin-American institutions, with the objective to congregate, in an online catalogue, accessible to all, the information contained in hundreds of institutions distributed all over the continent, that will count with a common methodological basis for digital treatment and access to the images. With the RELARQ, the area of the History of Architecture will have a new, powerful tool in as far as the researchers will be able to access archives in the most distant places of our continent.
keywords Architecture; digitalization; photography; accessibility; internet
series SIGRADI
email leocastriota@yahoo.com.br, carlasangelo@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2007_215
id ecaade2007_215
authors Boytscheff, Constantin; Sfeir, Marilu Kanacri
year 2007
title Experimental Results in Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR): Searching Critical Design Factors within IVR to Increase Architectural Space Qualities
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 91-98
summary The actual study in IVR (Immersive Virtual Reality) proposes a path which may provide meaningful information about the user’s behaviours and difficulties to articulate in immersive worlds. Beyond it, we are searching for parameters to improve design qualities in such an architectural space. Our interest is to use IVR as a medium to research the quality of spaces in particular the atmosphere of such spaces, on the basis of people’s interest and eagerness. Therefore it is important to comprehend the special conditions of the perception and the behaviour of the user in virtual spaces. The purpose is to understand the influence of an IVR environment upon the human being and to develop motivation for a personal use of virtual space as a learning environment. The aim of the analysis was to explore behaviour patterns in a simulated IVR environment. Moving from the dynamic of space, there arises a personal “space-time-system”.
keywords Urban planning, virtual reality, immersive, teaching
series eCAADe
email boytscheff@htwg-konstanz.de
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_191
id ecaade2007_191
authors Cardoso, Daniel; Michaud, Dennis; Sass, Lawrence
year 2007
title Soft Façade: Steps into the Definition of a Responsive ETFE Façade for High-rise Buildings
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 567-573
summary Façade systems are to a great extent responsible for both the energy-performance and overall aesthetic qualities of a building. The study presented in this paper explores the tectonic integration of a distributed computer network and the façade of a high-rise tower through the use of ETFE cushions, exploiting the soft nature of this material to embed a sensor network to provide touch-responsive changes of opacity in the façade, potentially improving the energy-efficiency of a building, and promoting a novel kind of dialogue between a space and its inhabitants. We propose that the inclusion of computer networks and displays in the built environment necessarily leads to new design philosophies that solve tectonically the dialogue between traditional materials and technological devices, and we put forward the first results of a research into a novel implementation of electrochromic ‘smart’ cushions that allows for changing opacities of the façade elements of a building in response to human touch.
keywords Responsiveness: smart windows, interactive architecture, tangible interfaces
series eCAADe
email jmichaud@mit.edu, lsass@mit.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_084
id ecaade2007_084
authors Cenani, Sehnaz; Cagdas, Gulen
year 2007
title Representation of User Movements with Multi Agent Systems: Shopping Malls
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 559-565
summary This study aims to analyze relationships of users and spatial configurations using agent-based simulation systems under certain circumstances in a virtual environment with agents that represent users of a shopping mall. Multi-agent simulation methods are used to study emergent behavior patterns. A computer model is generated to simulate user movements in a shopping mall. Today, it is feasible to simulate the movement patterns of human societies at catastrophes like fire and earthquake within the buildings. In this study, exposing the dynamics of user-space relationship will help both students in architectural design education and professionals in practice, to observe and solve design problems before the construction of malls.
keywords Artificial intelligence, agents, agent-based simulation, shopping mall, user movements
series eCAADe
email sehnazcenani@yahoo.com, cagdas@itu.edu.tr
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2007_373
id cf2007_373
authors Chan, Chiu-Shui
year 2007
title Does Color Have Weaker Impact on Human Cognition Than Material?
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 373-384
summary This project intends to develop a method for using virtual reality (VR) to represent a built environment for simulating environmental influences on occupants. Objectives of the project were to explore: (1) what environmental stimuli would affect habitants’ perception, and (2) what possible factors in the built environment would affect occupants’ cognition. An office was selected as the subject of study. Methods were to create a number of digital models, each containing an embedded variable, and then test the impact of environmental influences on visual perception. Results obtained in this study indicate that materials have stronger impact to human perception than colors, and VR has great potential for design decision making and post-occupancy evaluation.
series CAAD Futures
email cschan@iastate.edu
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id caadria2007_451
id caadria2007_451
authors Chan, Chiu-Shui
year 2007
title Evaluating the Cognition in a Work Space Virtually
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary In any built environment, there exist certain subtle stimuli that affect the occupants’ cognitive processes and performance. This research intends to identify: (1) what environmental stimuli an office building would generate that could affect the habitants’ cognitive ability, and (2) how the habitants react to these stimuli. The goals of the study are to develop a new method for using immersive virtual reality to represent a built environment for simulating environmental impact, and to discover factors that could influence habitants’ cognitive performance in a space. It is expected that the discoveries could advance the application of virtual reality to study human cognition in architecture.
series CAADRIA
email cschan@iastate.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_043
id ascaad2007_043
authors Chen, G.-Y. M.
year 2007
title Tagging Your Body Virtually : Represent a place making process with social network
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 543-558
summary This research focuses on the virtual environment of place making. In this paper we would like to emphasize that the place making should be stressed collective views in order to obtain the design application of possibilities. However, in past researches there has been no study that tried to collect the collective views by digital ways. Accordingly, this paper proposes a response thought the Spatial Intention. It could be used to represent the human of body experience. The "moving" and "standing" are appropriate to two main considerations. Both of these could be connected to the action of "focus" and "choice." these leads to a sequential relationship of place production. The positive significance of the spatial intention lies in the convertibility of physical experience could be implied with a specific understanding. It also could be used to mold the place of knowledge structure. Thereby in order to verify the reliability of the above, we made a social network of virtual environment and used the rapid prototyping method to develop a prototype system. Implementing on the Chinese garden of the actual case, we found that the tag could concentrate as an entire sense in somewhere of place. These tags also could be shared remotely through the social network. Different tags in the sharing mechanism could collage out a place of collective views. This perspective would be used to assist designers to understand the sense of place. It also would be applied to find out the environmental design of possibilities in the future studies.
series ASCAAD
email mivochen@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_273
id caadria2007_273
authors Chitchian, Davood; H.C. Bekkering
year 2007
title Sustaining Design Decision Makers in the AEC industry
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Today’s typical decision making problem such as strategic planning, portfolio analysis, resource allocation and human resource management involves a variety of tangible and intangible strategic goals, conflicting constraints, dozens or hundreds of alternative initiatives to be pursued, and limited resources. A decision maker cannot meaningfully combine all of this information to make right decisions. To sustain decision makers in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, this paper proposes a tool to transfers a complex problem into a concept of hierarchical structure consisting of goal and its criteria and sub-criteria. Irrespective of the applied domains, this tool provides a flexible means for tackling the complex decision making process. It embeds a mathematical model for prioritization and decision making which is based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP).
series CAADRIA
email D.Chitchian@tudelft.nl
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ijac20075110
id ijac20075110
authors Coyne, Richard; Lucas, Raymond; Li, Jia; Parker, Martin; Lee, John
year 2007
title Co-operation and Complicity Voices, Robots, and Tricksters in the Digital Marketplace
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 1, pp. 162-175
summary We advocate the theme of complicity, ahead of co-operation, as a means of understanding complex, interactive digital systems. Our case study of a market precinct known as the Barras, about one mile from the centre of the city of Glasgow, foregrounds the notion of complicity. Market places are characterized not only by co-operation in rule-governed environments, but complicity between actors as a means of breaking rules, working at the boundaries of formal frameworks, avoiding other actors, such as law enforcers, and even working with them in tacitly agreed evasion strategies. We present the human voice (as exercised in the case of market stall holders drawing attention to their wares) as a major medium of complicity. In our application of these ideas we deploy Lego Mindstorms TM RCX robot processing to explore interactions between a mobile sensing robot and simple environmental controls: movements of sliding screens in response to an autonomous mobile sensor. As well as their benign characteristics as co-operating agents, we argue for a consideration of robots as quintessential tricksters, plotting and scheming strategies of survival, evasion and opportunism. Traits that can be employed in the development of useful augmented environments.
series journal
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2007/06/14 10:11

_id ijac20075301
id ijac20075301
authors de Velasco, Guillermo Vasquez
year 2007
title A Group of Friends: The Las Americas Network, Virtual Studios, and Distance Education in Architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 3, pp. 455-468
summary This paper celebrates the human factor by describing how our collective vocation towards innovation in design education has inspired the development of an active network across the Americas. Ten years after its creation, the Las Americas Digital Research Network has generated a stream of innovative implementations. This is the first time that the main stream of these research activities is articulated into a peer-reviewed journal publication. The narrative of the paper follows a time-line that starts with the creation of the Las Americas Digital Research Network in 1996. Supported by such a framework the paper continues to describe the implementation of virtual design studios as collaborations nested at the core of the network. Finally, the paper explains how the virtual design studios provide fundamental feasibility for the development of network-mediated distance education curricula in architecture and the opening of a new dimension in the development and deployment of collaborative networks.
series journal
email GVasquez@archmail.tamu.edu
last changed 2007/11/20 17:06

_id acadia10_110
id acadia10_110
authors Di Raimo; Antonino
year 2010
title Architecture as Caregiver: Human Body - Information - Cognition
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 110-116
summary Recent studies in contemporary architecture have developed a variety of parameters regarding the information paradigm which have consequently brought different results and techniques to the process of architectural design. Thus, the emergence of an ecological thinking environment and its involvement in scientific matters has determined links moving beyond the conventional references that rely on information. It is characterized as an interconnected and dynamic interaction, concerning both a theoretical background and providing, at the same time, appropriate means in the architectural design process (Saggio, 2007, 117). The study is based on the assumption that Information Theory leads into a bidirectional model which is based on interaction. According to it, I want to emphasize the presence of the human body in both the architectural creation process and the use of architectural space. The aim of my study, is consequently an evaluation of how this corporeal view related to the human body, can be organized and interlinked in the process of architectural design. My hypothesis relies on the interactive process between the information paradigm and the ecological one. The integration of this corporeal view influences the whole process of architectural design, improving abilities and knowledge (Figure 1). I like to refer to this as a missing ring, as it occurs within a circular vital system with all its elements closely linked to each other and in particular, emphasizes architecture as a living being.
keywords Architecture, information paradigm, human body, corporeity, cognitive Science, cognition,circularity, living system
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email antonino.diraimo@nitrosaggio.net
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

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