CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 10 of 10

_id ascaad2007_002
id ascaad2007_002
authors Abdellatif, R. and C. Calderon
year 2007
title SecondLife: A Computer-Mediated Tool for Distance-Learning in Architecture Education?
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 17-34
summary Despite the importance of distance learning for its ability to reach a wide audience, easiness to access materials, and its lower cost compared to traditional learning, architecture education has not been well served by distance education. This is because it has a higher level of learning objectives, it is taught by coaching methodologies, and involves nonverbal forms of communication. One of the most common learning methods used in the design studio is the Criticism/Critique, which is a graphic and oral type of communication between the tutor and the students. In this investigation, Second Life, a massive multi-user online virtual environment that offers three-dimensional spatial capabilities via Avatars impersonation, is used as a computer-mediated tool for text and graphic-based communication in a distance learning situation. The study describes a demonstration experiment where students had to communicate with their tutor, display and describe their projects at a distance, in a purposely designed criticism space in SecondLife. The main objective of this paper is to observe and document the effects and the use of SecondLife virtual environment as an online 3D graphical-based tool of computer-mediated communication in distance learning in architecture education. The study also answers some questions: How well did the students use the tools of the medium provide? Was there a sense of personal communication and realism gained through using Avatars in the virtual environment? Did SecondLife provide a successful means of communication for a graphic-based context? And what are the students’ opinions about the learning environment? Using multiple methods of data collection, mainly based on an electronic observation of the experiment, questioning the participants before and after the experiment, and the analysis of the chat transcripts, the study presents descriptive results of the experiment, and discusses its main features. Proposals for modifications are made for future replications.
series ASCAAD
email Reham.Abdellatif@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_088
id ecaade2007_088
authors Bechthold, Martin
year 2007
title Teaching Technology: CAD/CAM, Parametric Design and Interactivity
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 767-775
summary The paper discusses a project-based approach to technology teaching, and examines the case of the mobile information unit (MIU) for Harvard University and its art museums. A student competition was held to explore design alternatives for this unit. The winning entry proposed an interactive, pixilated fiber-optics display as well as touch screens. Parametric digital modeling was used in the design and design development of the scheme. Research included the study of structural alternatives, fabrication methods and the modes of interaction between users and the MIU.
keywords Computer-aided design and manufacturing, fabrication, simulation, prototype, fiber optics
series eCAADe
email mbechthold@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id caadria2007_203
id caadria2007_203
authors Heidrich, Felix; Peter Russell and Thomas Stachelhaus
year 2007
title Intervision3D: Online 3D Visualisation and Conferencing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The use of Internet communication technologies in distributed teams has been carried out for well over 10 years. In this time, various methods to communicate and transfer information have been developed. A large amount of effort has been placed on enabling normal conversation to take place and it could be said, that with technologies like Skype, this is established. This enables planning partners to discuss, but we still need to convey what they are discussing. In short, the contents are still lacking. Technologies exist to allow users to share files or images, however this does not nearly reach the intensity or quality of discussions when partners are sitting together in front of a drawing or model. At best, screen sharing allows participants to see the same image but with low resolution and bad system response. The goal of the Intervision3D project is to allow distributed team members to discuss design issues with a common 3D model where participants can manipulate the model together in real time. In contrast to screen-sharing solutions, the Intervision3D project uses a server, which delivers a copy of the model to each conference participant. The server then coordinates the perspective views of all conference participants. One of the participants (usually the first) is initially designated as the speaker and he or she controls the views of the model through an intuitive walk/fly-through interface. The speed of the system is also buttressed by the simplicity of the application: as a Java applet, it is possible to start the Intervision3D system in any browser or as a separate applet on any system. As such, none of the participants need to install anything. The resolution of the model is optimized for each participant's browser and computer display. Currently, Intervision3D can import .3ds files and then render them using the JOGL Engine (Java Bindings for Open GL). JOGL allows the full Open GL suite to be used in rendering the model including lighting and textures: even normal PCs can do this quite well. The first implementation of the system is within an existing internet-based Design Studio and the paper elucidates how the first uses of the system have (partially) helped to increase the exchange of design ideas over the Internet. Through the Intervison3D system, the participants who have been separated by distance can once again discuss the same 3D model.
series CAADRIA
email info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_053
id ascaad2007_053
authors Islami, S.Y.
year 2007
title Surface-driven architecture: Moving Beyond the Ornament/Structure Opposition
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 671-682
summary Contemporary architecture has been influenced by a shift of interest from the dialectic Derridean theories of language to those of Deleuze and Guattari who put more emphasis on transitions, experimentation and material presence. New digital design tools as well as new construction materials have opened up more possibilities for architects. E-paper, digital screens, printed concrete, composite polymers and dynamic cladding systems, have allowed designers to relish architecture at the surface level. Moreover, the process of architectural design is shifting from the desktop to the virtual world of the computer. NURBS, Blobs, Metaforms, Isomorphic Surfaces and other complex geometries are now possible using surface-driven computer modelling software. Because of this, the resultant architecture display a much more distinct appreciation and mastery of surface-effects. The following article argues that contemporary architecture is becoming increasingly a process of surfacing, both as a process of revealing and as a process of concealing. Surface, in common parlance, is generally understood as the exterior boundary of things, the outer skin of any object. In this sense, surfaces are actual, material, textural entities that we often encounter first. The surface is also taken to be something that conceals: “it was not what it appeared to be on the surface.” However, it is when things surface that they become evident or apparent; they appear out of a previously concealed existence or latency. Thus, surfacing is a process of becoming explicit, of becoming experientially apparent in a movement from virtuality to actuality. This article argues that the use of emerging computer technologies in architecture, have resulted in a renewed prioritization of surface and surface-effects. It shall be concluded that the surface-driven nature of most contemporary modelling software has resulted in a new approach to architectural design, one that has the potential of subverting the traditional hierarchy between ornament and structure. As a result, this design strategy has allowed for a much more spirited and creative approach to architecture.
series ASCAAD
email IslamiY@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id cf2007_045
id cf2007_045
authors Kaga, Atsuko; Masahiro Kawaguchi and Tomohiro Fukuda
year 2007
title Simulation of an Historic Building Using a Tablet MR System
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 45-58
summary To depict characteristics of historical buildings, digital archives must display visual information about structures and their construction. This study defines the components used for three-dimensional (3D) models of framework construction. Framework construction has heretofore portrayed structures through animation using VHS or Hi-Vision video. This paper describes a method to facilitate exhibition through interactive simulation using animation and real-time images. Furthermore, a Tablet MR can be used as an effective simulation tool for studying historical buildings in on-site models. For education about historical wooden-framework architecture, increased interactive potential according to users’ needs will be increasingly necessary.
series CAAD Futures
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id caadria2007_577
id caadria2007_577
authors Moloney, Jules
year 2007
title Screen Based Augmented Reality for Architectural Design: Two Prototype Systems
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Augmented Reality (AR) technology has the potential to improve visualisation at the early stages of architectural design. The advantages of screen based AR systems over existing head mounted display AR, animation and virtual reality is discussed in terms of (1) improved contextual evaluation (2) social interaction and the integration of analogue media during design review. We describe two complimentary AR systems that explore these advantages: strollAR, a mobile set up for use on site; and video-datAR, a video database linked to a non-mobile three screen projection system. Outcomes from a prototype implementation are reported.
series CAADRIA
email jmoloney@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_009
id ascaad2007_009
authors Ryan, R. and M. Donn
year 2007
title 3 dimensional, digital, interactive, multilayered information models for enhancing decision making by two end-user groups within the Urban Planning industry: A Case Study to quantify the benefit or otherwise over alternative 2 dimensional systems
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 95-110
summary This research investigates the potential of 3 dimensional (3D), digital, interactive, multilayered information models, to enhance users’ understanding of sets of geographic and building information, allowing them to make quicker and more informed decisions, than when using alternative 2D methods. The research aims to quantify the benefit or otherwise of 3D methods of information interrogation over 2D methods by developing a test based around the decision making of two widely disparate user-groups within the Urban Planning industry. The underlying purpose of the research is to examine the human ability to interact with and understand datasets of information which are represented in the digital world. This paper specifically focuses on the methodology by which a robust test is developed to be carried out, thus proving or disproving the advantages of 3D display of information when compared to 2D. The ability to apply this same test to additional case studies in the future is a major consideration in the research design. There is a specific focus on integrating and testing a range of research instruments to best establish “language” of the industry and user groups within it, before conducting the major case study. The final research approach adopted is develop and present functional prototype models in a focus group scenario, involving hands-on interactive comparable 2D and 3D tasks, individual feedback surveys and group discussions.
series ASCAAD
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_026
id ascaad2007_026
authors Sarji, E.A.; A. Rafi and R. Mat Rani
year 2007
title Preparing a multimedia-based gallery for institute of higher learning: A case study of Malaysian experience
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 305-316
summary While the majority of medium and small sized institutions still rely on their physical or traditional content, it has been observed a pre-disposition usually by major, recently founded or contemporary art institutions to display net-based projects (Buiani, 2001) and to some extent established as a permanent display. This changing of exhibitions has penetrated in many Asian galleries and as a result many schools trying to re-position and present in such a way that it can be easily changed and adapted to host multimedia, Internet, interactive and computer-based content. This funded research project investigates the functions of gallery in IHL in Malaysia. A triangulated study was conducted to understand the potentials and issues faced by galleries in public and private universities focusing on design schools that include art and design, and architecture. This research starts with the understanding of gallery design theories. It is then followed by a qualitative method survey to all galleries in the IHL. This research continues with an in depth study and a survey on Electronic Gallery (e-Gallery), Faculty of Creative Multimedia (FCM), Multimedia University (MMU) to understand between the theories and design ideas. A set of questionnaires was developed based on Mathews (1991) and Stewart’s (2002) principles and guidelines on research methods and distributed to visitors throughout a period of time consisting of open-ended, close-ended, Likert Summated Rating Scale and Multiple-choice. This involved a controlled group of visitors comprises students and staff of the faculty. The results of these studies will be used as a reference to further conduct a wider scope of galleries worldwide towards designing a multimedia-based gallery framework for Institute of Higher Learning.
series ASCAAD
email elyna.amir@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_222
id ecaade2007_222
authors Turkienicz, Benamy; Bellaver, Bábara; Grazziotin, Pablo
year 2007
title CityZoom
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 375-382
summary In the last twenty years, computer tools have progressively enabled the modeling of buildings and cities in lesser time and cost, along with an increase in the results quality. A city modeled according to planning regulations usually present a correlation between plots and buildings dimensions. The representation of such correlation for a large number of plots requires repetitive work, thus suggesting the use of a computational tool to perform the task. Existing CAD, GIS, and VR software can generate accurate representations of the reality, but have no capabilities to simulate the impact of alternative urban regulations for large number of plots in a short period of time. CityZoom is a Decision Support System for urban planning, with a specific built-in city model, where data is represented in an object-oriented model representing the urban structure. CityZoom not only provide CAD tools, but a shell where different performance models can operate iteratively. It can simulate given urban regulations applied to a set of urban plots, as well as address environmental comfort issues such as shadow casting between buildings. Results can be displayed as tables, graphs, and in a 3D preview of the whole city or part of it. It’s also possible to export them to commercial GIS tools, to perform different data analysis. The graphical outputs make for an easy understanding of the results by laymen, an important feature for participatory planning, while the display of the correspondent numerical data enable correlations with indicators and parameters of urban quality.
keywords CityZoom, urban planning, building simulation
series eCAADe
email pablocg@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_034
id ecaade2007_034
authors Vamvakidis, Simos
year 2007
title The Sponge Epidermis : A Study on Minimal Surfaces & Porosity
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 927-934
summary Materializing the mathematical is, advertently or inadvertently, a fundamental procedure in the production of architecture. Pedagogical models such as H.A. Schwarz’s copper plate engravings from 1890 documenting minimal surface solutions as well as an extensive collection of plaster models assembled by Schwarz and Felix Klein in Gottingen in the early 1900’s are seminal examples. In architecture, works such as Corbusiers’ and Xenakis’ Philips Pavilion or the details of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia display the overt presence of materialized mathematical models. Our work focused on a basic design problem: how to produce an enclosure system that maximizes cavities and niches as opportunities for moving across a threshold; Conventionally mitigated by the goal of producing enclosure, porosity was used as a means to dematerialize and make more a intelligent (bi-directional/permeable) enclosure system. Repetition, modularity and the presence of cavities – all conventional aspects of masonry systems of construction – were incorporated into the design of prototypes for a small-scale building enclosure.
keywords Minimal surfaces: porosity, aggregation, prototype manufacturing
series eCAADe
email yerasimo@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

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