CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 549

_id cf2011_p035
id cf2011_p035
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Weber Markus, Petzold Frank, Liwicki Marcus, Dengel Andreas
year 2011
title Sketch-based Methods for Researching Building Layouts through the Semantic Fingerprint of Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 85-102.
summary The paper focuses on the early stages of the design process where the architect needs assistance in finding reference projects and describes different aspects of a concept for retrieving previous design solutions with similar layout characteristics. Such references are typically used to see how others have solved a similar architectural problem or simply for inspiration. Current electronic search methods use textual information rather than graphical information. The configuration of space and the relations between rooms are hard to represent using keywords, in fact transforming these spatial configurations into verbally expressed typologies tends to result in unclear and often imprecise descriptions of architecture. Nowadays, modern IT-technologies lead to fundamental changes during the process of designing buildings. Digital representations of architecture require suitable approaches to the storage, indexing and management of information as well as adequate retrieval methods. Traditionally planning information is represented in the form of floor plans, elevations, sections and textual descriptions. State of the art digital representations include renderings, computer aided design (CAD) and semantic information like Building Information Modelling (BIM) including 2D and 3D file formats such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) (IAI, 2010). In the paper, we examine the development of IT-technologies in the area of case-based reasoning (Richter et al., 2007) to provide a sketch-based submission and retrieval system for publishing and researching building layouts including their manipulation and subsequent use. The user interface focuses on specifying space and their relations by drawing them. This query style supports the spatial thinking approach that architects use, who often have a visual representation in mind without being able to provide an accurate description of the spatial configuration. The semantic fingerprint proposed by (Langenhan, 2008) is a description and query language for creating an index of floor plans to store meta-data about architecture, which can be used as signature for retrieving reference projects. The functional spaces, such as living room or kitchen and the relation among on another, are used to create a fingerprint. Furthermore, we propose a visual sketch-based interface (Weber et al., 2010) based on the Touch&Write paradigm (Liwicki et al., 2010) for the submission and the retrieval phase. During the submission process the architect is sketching the space-boundaries, space relations and functional coherence's. Using state of the art document analysis techniques, the architects are supported offering an automatic detection of room boundaries and their physical relations. During the retrieval the application will interpret the sketches of the architect and find reference projects based on a similarity based search utilizing the semantic fingerprint. By recommending reference projects, architects will be able to reuse collective experience which match the current requirements. The way of performing a search using a sketch as a query is a new way of thinking and working. The retrieval of 3D models based on a sketched shape are already realized in several domains. We already propose a step further, using the semantics of a spatial configuration. Observing the design process of buildings reveals that the initial design phase serves as the foundation for the quality of the later outcome. The sketch-based approach to access valuable information using the semantic fingerprint enables the user to digitally capture knowledge about architecture, to recover and reuse it in common-sense. Furthermore, automatically analysed fingerprints can put forward both commonly used as well as best practice projects. It will be possible to rate architecture according to the fingerprint of a building.
keywords new media, case-based reasoning, ontology, semantic building design, sketch-based, knowledge management
series CAAD Futures
email langenhan@tum.de
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2007_503
id caadria2007_503
authors Sat, Reika; Bin Lu, Mayumi, Oyama-Higa. Tsuneo Jozen and Katsuya Nagae
year 2007
title Impact of Design Tools with Game-Like Function on Designer
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Various visualization design tools such as CG and VR have been widely used in the process of architectural design and urban planning. The applications of these tools not only assist the designers but also make it possible to involve other relevant professionals and ordinary residents. In order to enable more convenient applications of the tools in the design process and instigate the interests of additional parties of relevance, we add entertainment function to the design tools. In order to test the results of such design tools resembling computer games, we examined the status of users during the design process when these tools being employed. Comparison of the results of questionnaire and collections of physiological data indicated the unique effectiveness of game-like design tools. Pulse detection at ear was used to check the changes of blood supply for left and right hemispheres. The data collected were then visualized by complex Chaos analysis. Comparison of the processed data indicated the different brain status when a user applies these tools in the design and showed the effectiveness of the tools and their impact on the designer. Our results support the usefulness of game-like design tools and may lead to further developments of contents and methods to advance such tools.
series CAADRIA
email sato@dg.osakac.ac.jp
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id 45f3
id 45f3
authors Russell Lowe
year 2007
title COMPUTER GAMING, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND ARCHITECTURE: EMBEDDING THE INTERSECTION WITHIN AN ARCHITECTURAL CURRICULUM.
source AASA2007
summary Today, leading computer games provide real time environments including spaces, objects and characters that range (by manipulating an enormous array of parameters and being subject to simulations of real world physics) from the super realistic to the super delirious. Biotechnology, although apparently unrelated, also requires the manipulation of information in space and time and promises to affect environments in a range of ways that is at least as extreme. The opportunities suggested by an intersection between Architecture, Computer Gaming and Biotechnology were instrumental in the creation of courses and topics for students in first year right through to students studying toward a Masters degree. This paper reflects on and critically reviews the implementation, strategies and outcomes of embedding the intersection between Computer Gaming and Biotechnology within an Architectural curriculum. It draws from the experience of over 500 students, two Universities and major technological shifts. It develops the notion of the experiment in design. In contrast with the introduction of computer gaming technology into a core first year course, that had the underlying aim of including these technologies as a part of a general design curriculum, the introduction of issues connecting architecture with biotechnology (through computer gaming technology) reflects the specific research agenda of the author and is not intended for general application across an architectural curriculum. For more general application it could be seen as a strategy to promote cross disciplinary collaboration through the concept of the ‘boundary object’.
keywords Architecture, Computer gaming, Biotechnology, Design Experiment, Boundary Object
series other
type normal paper
email russell.lowe@unsw.edu.au
more http://www.russelllowe.com/publications/aasa2007/aasa2007.htm
last changed 2008/04/28 05:48

_id ecaade2007_167
id ecaade2007_167
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang; Knight, Michael
year 2007
title Digital Design Tools vs. Sketching in Design
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 843-848
summary This paper reports on and updates a research project which seeks to address two fundamental questions. Does the current breed of user friendly 3D CAAD software really enhance our design abilities when compared to more traditional techniques like sketching and how might the use of such software inform how we teach the new generation of architectural students. It furthermore summarizes the results of a web questionnaire that tries to find out the current main tools in the early design phases amongst architectural practitioners in two European countries.
keywords Digital design, practice, early design stages
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at, m.w.knight@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2007_051
id ascaad2007_051
authors Ibrahim, M.M.
year 2007
title Teaching BIM, what is missing? The challenge of integrating BIM based CAD in today’s architectural curricula
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 651-660
summary Building Information Modeling is the technology converting the workplace in design firms around the world. Now, professionals as well as academia see the feasibility and benefits of converting to such a new technology. Therefore, it seems inevitable to start teaching BIM to architecture students. And as we keep using and depending on computers the way we are, it also seems inevitable that programming will soon become one of the core curriculum classes for architecture students. However, the same problems facing professionals in design firms are those facing academic educators in schools of architecture, but with some different aspects. The misconceptions about the reality of BIM and the lack of understanding the full potential of the applications are the common issues. Few schools have started looking at the problem of preparing their students for a career in a BIM enabled work environment. The difficulty is due partly to the novelty of the technology and partly to the dilemma of teaching one application versus teaching the technology behind it. Besides the steep learning curve there should be the early introduction to how to interact deeply with the application to edit its content. The training required for BIM based CAD should focus on the core concepts rather than the application interface and functionalities. Therefore, building a course for teaching these systems should follow a different path than with conventional CAD. The training should be tied closely to the design curriculum in the design schools. A special version with different interface might empower the user. Hence, enhancing the experience and relieving some of the concerns attached with introducing BIM in the architecture curriculum.
series ASCAAD
email Magdy.mi@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id sigradi2007_af114
id sigradi2007_af114
authors Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Wael Abdelhameed
year 2007
title Designmap - A framework for a design environment through networking [Designmap - Un marco para un diseño ambiental mediante redes]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 225-231
summary The research endeavors to investigate the approaches and applications made in areas of online communities and forums in order to benefit from. The research proceeds to present an innovative contribution that could be described as a visual design library, a visual design community, and a novel use of networking in designing. The fields investigated by the research are: Online Communities and Forums, Networking and Collaborative Design, and Online Design Environment. The research contribution includes introducing a computer program called DesignMap that masters and presents a massive number of visual designs in two and three dimensions. The introduced software through its functions not only serves main applications of design disciplines of architecture and urban planning, but also combines significances of the investigated fields. Three comprehensive goals are investigated and introduced through this research: First, the proposed program is a means of getting architects and urban planners, who typically work in the domain of computationally introducing the design environment, involved in the creation and exploration of their designated forms for enhancing objects and spaces. Second, the program provides a design map for any architect and urban planner to search, visualize, modify, and then add designs through a wide range of form categories based on formal properties of objects relationship. Each user can have access to any part or category in this design map. Third, the research introduces the DesignMap as a tool to form and build up a networking community by bringing architects and urban planners with an interest in design area together to share in designing and to create design series.
series SIGRADI
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id ascaad2007_003
id ascaad2007_003
authors Lee S. and Ö. Akin
year 2007
title The development of an augmented reality-based user interface to support maintenance fieldwork
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 35-42
summary This paper discusses computational support for the maintenance of Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) systems to more effectively use maintenance information. A common cause of inefficient and ineffective maintenance has been the difficulty in getting reliable, just-in-time information for in-situ maintenance work. To reduce this inefficiency in the maintenance environment, accessibility and accuracy of maintenance information must be improved. Our approach, therefore, is the development of a user interface that will produce superimposed computer graphics of equipment/facility-specific maintenance information onto a live video stream on portable computing devices, such as laptops and PDAs. This paper concentrates on elicitation of primary functions needed to support various maintenance activities as well as a prototype application being developed for the approach.
series ASCAAD
email shl1@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_230
id acadia07_230
authors Qian, Cheryl Z.; Chen, Victor Y.; Woodbury, Robert F.
year 2007
title Participant Observation Can Discover Design Patterns in Parametric Modeling
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 230-241
summary Our research aims to understand the mid-level patterns of work that recur across designers and tasks. Our users comprise active architects and civil engineers. The hypothesis is that making such patterns explicit will result in improved expert work practices, in better learning material and suggestions for improvements in parametric design. The literature shows that patterns express design work at a tactical level, above simple editing and below overall conception. We conducted a user experience study based on Bentley’s GenerativeComponents, in which geometry can be related, transformed, generated, and manipulated parametrically within a user-defined framework. After interviewing the system’s chief, we ran a participant-observer study in the January 2007 SmartGeometry workshop. We engaged designers through the role of tutor and simultaneously observed and discussed their design process. We found clear evidence of designers using patterns in the process and discerned several previously unknown patterns. In February at another 10-day workshop, we found more evidence supporting prior findings. The paper demonstrates that participant observation can be an efficient method of collecting patterns about designers’ work and introduces such new patterns. We believe these patterns may help designers work at more creative levels and may suggest new ideas of interest to CAD application developers.
series ACADIA
email cherylq@sfu.ca
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

_id caadria2007_273
id caadria2007_273
authors Chitchian, Davood; H.C. Bekkering
year 2007
title Sustaining Design Decision Makers in the AEC industry
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Today’s typical decision making problem such as strategic planning, portfolio analysis, resource allocation and human resource management involves a variety of tangible and intangible strategic goals, conflicting constraints, dozens or hundreds of alternative initiatives to be pursued, and limited resources. A decision maker cannot meaningfully combine all of this information to make right decisions. To sustain decision makers in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, this paper proposes a tool to transfers a complex problem into a concept of hierarchical structure consisting of goal and its criteria and sub-criteria. Irrespective of the applied domains, this tool provides a flexible means for tackling the complex decision making process. It embeds a mathematical model for prioritization and decision making which is based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP).
series CAADRIA
email D.Chitchian@tudelft.nl
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id cf2007_251
id cf2007_251
authors Grasl, Thomas; Athanassios Economou
year 2007
title Spatial Similarity Metrics: Graph theoretic distance measurement and floor plan abstraction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 251-263
summary Comparing space allocation programs computationally is a resource intensive task. This paper introduces a method which reduces the complexity of floor plan graphs to facilitate the problem. In a first step the nodes are labeled according to a laid out classification scheme. This in its own right reduces the complexity of the comparison by introducing more diversity among the nodes. Subsequently the graph can be coarsened in several steps based on the category information. This does not only further reduce the necessary computation, but can also offer a visualization of and additional insight into the essential structure of the space allocation program at hand.
series CAAD Futures
email thomas.grasl@gatech.edu
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_011
id ascaad2007_011
authors Reichrath, M. and P. Zeile
year 2007
title Illumination of urban space using digital simulation methods: Exemplified on the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bamberg
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 127-140
summary The photorealistic visualisation of lighting-scenarios with the help of virtual 3d city models is gaining importance as a tool, helping to make decisions in the process of planning. This form of presentation makes sense to every spectator very quickly and in a definite way, thus it makes collaboration easy especially in interdisciplinary planning teams. Moreover the light-planner has the possibility to check his design in a virtual surrounding and therefore gain additional reliability for his planning. The displayed, exemplary, workflow and the techniques belonging to it, allow to show situations during the course of planning and to present the current state of planning realistically. Hence the quality of planning can be enduringly improved, through experimental use of new materials and ideas. Moreover alternative planning that does not show the right results can be eliminated very early in planning process, with not need for special investments to do so.
series ASCAAD
email martin.reichrath@gmx.de
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id 16fe
id 16fe
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2007
title Tracking Design Development through Decomposing Sketching Processes
source Digital proceedings of the International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR 2007), Emerging Trends in Design Research, Hong Kong Polytechnic University School of Design, Hong Kong.
summary We conducted a protocol study of the architectural sketching process. We decompose the process into process flows to explore the extent to which it expresses concept development in schematic and refined design phases. We track the development of design concepts in these phases by following the process flows of individual sketched strokes. We argue that each stroke drawn by the designer reveals a probability of an embedded concept, and that this concept is either promoted and propagated throughout the design phases, or blocked while designing. We expand the notion of lateral and vertical transformation in design by introducing a set of processes described as cross propagation, lateral promotion and vertical promotion.
series other
type normal paper
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2010/01/30 06:19

_id ecaade2007_032
id ecaade2007_032
authors Bridges, Alan
year 2007
title Scenario-based Design
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 441-446
summary The concepts underlying “scenario-based” design are introduced and put forward as a computationally-supportable alternative to sketching in early-stage design. From the analysis of a number of structured interviews with practicing designers, key design scenarios are identified. These scenarios are then generalised and outline guidelines developed for structuring early stage design, making use of TRIZ methodologies.
keywords Scenario, TRIZ, architectural design
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2007_571
id cf2007_571
authors Chen, Zi-Ru
year 2007
title How to Improve Creativity: Can designers improve their design creativity by using conventional and digital media simultaneously?
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 571-583
summary From previous works, we know that the distinguishing characteristics of design media cause different influence on design creativity. However, the cognitive research about the application of conceptual sketches design by integrating both conventional and digital media simultaneously is absent. In this research, we would like to discuss that can it inspire more creative works if designers use conventional and digital media simultaneously as sketching media to generate conceptual sketches. The results show that using conventional and digital media simultaneously comparing with only using individual media can help arouse creative thinking, cognitive activity and design outcome in the stage of conceptual sketches design. The findings may suggest that the integration of various design media provides one feasible ways to inspire creativity, which can apply to the design training of creativity on education and to the designer’s practical operation, but initiates more possibility of new media to assist design.
series CAAD Futures
email Ru.zero@gmail.com
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ecaade2007_211
id ecaade2007_211
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 2007
title Mining a Collection of Animated Sketches
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 447-456
summary How can we make a set of digital assets useful for teaching and research? As we amass data, it is crucial to select and interpret what is presented. This paper describes how a collection of animated drawings has been made accessible through an iterative development process. It describes a Web matrix interface, interpreted lesson formats and an assessment method. The assessment method of tallying achievement on design criteria before a lesson reveals inherent challenges of the problem, tallying afterwards reveals the effectiveness of the lesson in addressing those challenges. Using space-planning layout problems, we found that students readily picked up simple graphic devices such as measurement grids, adjacency diagrams and thumbnail sketches. Students showed less immediate improvement on skills that require juggling of multiple criteria, such as meeting all programmed area size requirements.
keywords Sketching, design process, architectural education, animation, instruction
series eCAADe
email nywc@uoregon.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id sigradi2007_af56
id sigradi2007_af56
authors Dorta, Tomás
year 2007
title Ideation and Design Flow through the Hybrid Ideation Space [Ideación y flujo de Diseño a través de un Espacio de ideas Hibrido]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 418-422
summary This study assesses an innovative immersive sketching and model making system: the Hybrid Ideation Space (HIS). The system enables designers to sketch and make models all around them in real-time and real scale using a digital tablet (sketches), image capture (physical models) and a spherical projection device (immersion). We carried out an experiment to evaluate this system using the concept of Design Flow and workload with industrial design students working in teams during the ideation stage of the design of a car. The HIS was compared to analog tools and hybrid techniques.
keywords Ideation; Flow; Sketches; Models; Immersion
series SIGRADI
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id caadria2007_337
id caadria2007_337
authors Ho, Ting-Fung
year 2007
title The Spatial Interpretation of Freehand Sketch – Using Programming and Rapid Prototyping
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Freehand sketching has always been used in the conceptual design process. The importance of freehand sketching lies in its ability to freely represent various ambiguous drawing projections. This research implements a convenient sketch interpretation system called Spatial Charcoal to aid in the conceptual design process. The system interprets a designer’s sketch, generates a relative digital model and then fabricates it using a rapid prototyping machine.
series CAADRIA
email tyroneho69@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ijac20075401
id ijac20075401
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2007
title Fuzzy Modelling for Early Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 4, pp. 589-610
summary Fuzzy modelling is simultaneously an extension of existing modelling approaches and a negation of one of their main aspects, the crispness of their definition. As a digital equivalent of analogue sketching it allows designers to register and manipulate imprecise and uncertain information. In the framework of design representations fuzzy modelling supports the development of conceptual design models characterized by flexible definition and interaction. The main advantages of such models are fluency, abstraction and continuity, at a level similar to that of analogue techniques. In addition to that they offer the possibility of local autonomy, i.e. segmentation of a representation into self-regulating and cooperating components. Three alternative forms of fuzzy modelling are proposed: (1) Canonical objects with tolerances, (2) objects described by minimal and maximal values, and (3) point sets comprising discrete, autonomous particles that describe the object by their spatial or structural relationships.
series journal
email A.Koutamanis@tudelft.nl
last changed 2008/02/25 19:30

_id ecaade2007_189
id ecaade2007_189
authors Mark, Earl
year 2007
title Simulating Dynamic Forces in Design with Special Effects Tools
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 219-226
summary Special effects technology can facilitate dynamic sketching in the early stage of a design project without needing time-consuming effort. This form of sketching was tested in a design studio taught by the author. The study of dynamic materials and oceanfront site conditions set the stage at the beginning of a design process for a more comprehensive analysis later on. On the one hand, the risk of using special effects tools is that the visual look can seem convincing, but the apparent result is based upon an overly simplified set of assumptions. On the other hand, the use of such technology can be very stimulating to the design imagination without requiring complex analysis that may bog down the free flow of ideas. Once a greater commitment is made to a particular design proposal, more complete physical analysis and modeling can be undertaken to help avoid the risk of false first impressions. In the studio, cloth simulation was used to develop the design of tension membrane structures (tents) that retracted and unfurled in a series of complex movements. Fluid dynamics effects were used in the design and development of related boat dock facilities. A wind-tunnel simulation tool was used to explore the performance of the tension-membrane fabrics under varied wind loads. The visualization techniques were complemented by ¼ to ½ scale assembled components created by rapid prototyping. The use of an actual wind-tunnel further tested the prototypes in some cases. On the whole, quickly implemented special effects were the starting point for reacting to and developing some initial design concepts and served as the basis for more complete physical modeling of prototypes later on. Using animation as a design method is well established in other work (Hirschberg 06). Animation is also a helpful way to work out the step by step assembly of complex architectural form (Mark 95). The special effects tools permit a larger range of initial design alternatives to be initially considered that are subsequently narrowed down by physically based prototypes that are more predictive of real world performance.
keywords Cloth simulation, fluid dynamics effects, design sketching, special effects, tension membrane fabrics
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

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