CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id ecaade2007_191
id ecaade2007_191
authors Cardoso, Daniel; Michaud, Dennis; Sass, Lawrence
year 2007
title Soft Façade: Steps into the Definition of a Responsive ETFE Façade for High-rise Buildings
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 567-573
summary Façade systems are to a great extent responsible for both the energy-performance and overall aesthetic qualities of a building. The study presented in this paper explores the tectonic integration of a distributed computer network and the façade of a high-rise tower through the use of ETFE cushions, exploiting the soft nature of this material to embed a sensor network to provide touch-responsive changes of opacity in the façade, potentially improving the energy-efficiency of a building, and promoting a novel kind of dialogue between a space and its inhabitants. We propose that the inclusion of computer networks and displays in the built environment necessarily leads to new design philosophies that solve tectonically the dialogue between traditional materials and technological devices, and we put forward the first results of a research into a novel implementation of electrochromic ‘smart’ cushions that allows for changing opacities of the façade elements of a building in response to human touch.
keywords Responsiveness: smart windows, interactive architecture, tangible interfaces
series eCAADe
email jmichaud@mit.edu, lsass@mit.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2007_027
id ascaad2007_027
authors Villalon, R. and J. Lobel
year 2007
title Materializing Design: contemporary issues in the use of cad/cam technology in the architectural design and fabrication process
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 317-326
summary While the ability to produce and quantify design and fabrication information has been greatly enhanced by advances in CAD/CAM technology over the last several decades, a practical link between what can be modelled virtually and what can be built physically has yet to be realized. The process of parsing complex design information and translating it into a format that can be utilized by those responsible for its fabrication is a many-stepped process, in some cases made increasingly difficult by the same technology intended to simplify the process. The use of CAD/CAM technology in the architectural design process requires ongoing consideration as its use becomes increasingly pervasive in the design process. Within the context of contemporary architectural practice and discourse, what is the degree of fidelity between design information and fabrication information? How are advances in accessibility to, and the capability of CAD/CAM technologies affecting the role of the architect in the overall building process? Does CAD/CAM offer unique and undiscovered possibilities to re-associate the designer with the builder, or simply a process of more efficiently automating the design and construction process? Our work builds upon issues of the fundamental differences that CAD/CAM technologies introduce to design practices; issues that were raised at the very outset of CAD/CAM’s introduction to architectural design. Employing parametric design software, we design and construct a speculative façade system for a high-rise tower which is then fabricated at a reduced-scale with various two-axis CAM technology. We use relational and constraint-based logics in order to create models of parametric assemblies of discrete components which are translated into machine-ready formats, fabricated and re-assembled, in a process modelled on that typically followed in the construction of a real building project.
series ASCAAD
email rvill@mit.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_353
id caadria2007_353
authors John, Elys
year 2007
title Digital Ornament
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Gaming and visualisation software has a history of developing economical and creative methods to deal with hardware limitations. Traditionally the visual representation of gaming has been a poor offspring of high-end architectural visualisation. In a twist of irony, the paper proposes that game production software leads the way into a new era of physical digital ornament. The toolbox of the rendering engine evolved rapidly between 1974-85 and it is still today 20 years later the main component of all visualisation programs. The development of the bump map is of particular interest; its evolution into a physical displacement map provides untold opportunities in the appropriation of the 2D image to a physical artifact. Contemporary Architects in tandem have been mapping to the façade a new era of complex three-dimensional sculptural representation. The Architect, Designer and Artist now have the opportunity to appropriate the image map and use advanced visualisation technologies in the application of digital ornament.
series CAADRIA
email esjohn@glam.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2007_519
id caadria2007_519
authors Porter, David; Raid Hanna
year 2007
title An Empirical Investigation into the Influence of Media Types on Design Cognition and Methodologies
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper reports on the findings of an empirical investigation into the impact of different media on design methodology. The statistical sample included 49 fourth year architecture students, divided into three groups: the drawing group, the physical model group and the computer group. They were given a problem of designing a façade in an urban context in Glasgow over a two week period. The design process of each group was monitored over that period through observations, recordings and attitude measurement via a questionnaire survey. The results were analysed using the Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS). The dendrograms from cluster analysis revealed that there were well established perceptual dimensions, or clusters, for the façade’s design variables within the three groups because of using different media. The impact of media on design creativity, both as a process and a product, was investigated. All three media types yielded a positive correlation between ‘media made design decisions more creative’ and ‘media made design scheme more creative’- with a correlation coefficient of 0.708 which was significant at the 0.01 level, p<0.05.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id acadia13_109
id acadia13_109
authors Thün, Geoffrey; Velikov, Kathy
year 2013
title Adaptation as a Framework for Reconsidering High-Performance Residential Design: A Case Study
source ACADIA 13: Adaptive Architecture [Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-926724-22-5] Cambridge 24-26 October, 2013), pp. 109-118
summary This paper outlines an approach to adaptive residential design explored through recent research and an executed prototype, the North House project (2007-2009), undertaken through an interdisciplinary collaboration of researchers and students from the University of Waterloo, Ryerson University and Simon Fraser University in concert with professional and industry partners. This project aimed to develop a framework for the delivery of adaptive detached residential buildings capable of net-zero energy performance in the temperate climate zone, or the near north. Within this project, the term “adaptive” is developed across several tracts of conceptualization and execution including site and climatically derived models for building material composition and envelope ratios, environmentally-responsive kinetic envelope components, intelligent HVAC controls and interactive interface design aimed at producing co-evolutionary behaviors between building systems and inhabitants. A provisional definition of adaptive architecture is outlined to address this range of considerations that calls into question the stable image of domestic architecture and its relationship to energy and contemporary assumptions regarding sustainable design. This paper also outlines computational approaches to design optimization, distributed building systems integration and the human-controls interfaces applicable to the home’s ecology of physical and information technologies.
keywords next generation technology, responsive buildings, high performance envelopes, sensing and feedback, passive and active systems, energy modeling, user interface
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email kvelikov@umich.edu
last changed 2014/01/11 08:13

_id ascaad2007_061
id ascaad2007_061
authors Fujita, H.; J. Hakura and M. Kurematsu
year 2007
title Cognitive Modeling in Design Based on Human Emotional reasoning: Computer based Cognitive interaction based on mimesis of human emotional behavior
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 783-798
summary This paper presents a progress development results of Virtual intelligent interface based on human facial and voice recognition. We this is new challenge for sensing the user emotional space and interact with it. It is part of the cognitive spatial design needed to have the mentality of the designer been part of the system recognition. This is experimental built prototype. We think that the practices reported in this work contribute to integrate (corporate) the cognitive intention of the designer with the knowledge of the system, The architect can use these design practices to inhale the emotional practices into the design using such experiment.
series ASCAAD
email issam@soft.iwate-pu.ac.jp
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_105
id ecaade2007_105
authors Matejovská, Dana; Achten, Henri
year 2007
title CAAD Restarted
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 409-414
summary In our faculty a new CAAD group has been started recently after a period of virtual non-existence of CAAD education. The responsibility of the group is twofold: to provide students with a basic competence in CAAD, and to develop a high standard of experimental studio work combined with research. In our philosophy, we aim to reach the first goal by giving a wide offer of basic skills teaching in many different CAAD softwares. Building on that, we offer more specialised classes for advanced modelling and integrate skills with design work in the design studio. Due to limited means, and a small staff, we develop this program step by step. Our preliminary scope therefore, is very modest, and mostly limited to the first years of CAAD education in the Bachelor studies. In this paper we summarise our goals and preliminary results. We monitor the progression of our educational program with an enquiry that was distributed among 200 students. In that way we can assess student response to our efforts. We report on the findings from the enquiry and formulate improvements and possible directions for our teaching.
keywords CAAD education, pedagogy
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email matejdan@fa.cvut.cz, achten@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2014/04/05 14:41

_id ecaade2007_086
id ecaade2007_086
authors Oxman, Neri
year 2007
title FAB Finding
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 785-792
summary The distinction between material behavior (mechanics) and material response (electronics) in the framework of responsive building skins has promoted unique design protocols for integrating sensor technologies into material components. Such a distinction results in the implementation of remote sensing devices post the process of material fabrication. Sensors are commonly perceived as electronic add-on patches which initiate mechanical output with response to electrical input. This work seeks to establish a novel approach to the integration of electronics in building skins which prioritizes material selection, behavior and fabrication given a required task, over post-production sensor application. The term “FAB Finding” is proposed to describe an instrumental methodology facilitating the coupling of CNC fabrication processes with material organization and behavior. It offers a design mentality which emphasizes the nature and the effects brought about by the use of specific fabrication processes which are by definition inherent in the design product and its behavior. A light-sensing inflatable skin system is developed as a working prototype demonstrating such an approach.
keywords Digital fabrication, material behavior, form-finding, sensors, responsive skin
series eCAADe
email neri@mit.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id acadia10_327
id acadia10_327
authors Vassigh, Shahin; Herrera, Silvana
year 2010
title Interactive Teaching through Simulation Environments
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 327-332
summary Spurring new and innovative building design will be critical to the urban energy and economic future of the nation. The operation of completed buildings account for 48% of the nation’s annual greenhouse gas emissions, and 76% of all electricity generated by U.S. power plants goes to supply the building sector. Therefore developing and applying new and innovative sustainable building design will have a measurable impact on the environment. Recent studies show sustainable building design is closely linked to system integration, where various components of a building work in confluence to produce synergetic benefits. As a result, a critical component of sustainable design involves a clear understanding of building systems operation, interaction, and the selection parameters. A consideration of suitable building systems, gauging their interaction, and proposing well integrated systems can lead to producing efficient models of sustainable buildings with minimal impact on the environment. The following paper outlines the progress on a project entitled “Building Literacy: the Integration of Building Technology and Design in Architectural Education.” The project develops a digital tool for teaching/learning architectural technology from an integrated systems perspective. The project attempts to immerse students in a simulated environment that is based on the real life practice of architecture. The project accomplishes this by harnessing the capabilities of simulation and dynamic modeling programs, as well as the state of art graphic media, to create compelling and rewarding reasons for students’ engagement in the lear ning process. The project involves a multidisciplinary team of faculty from Florida International University, University at Buffalo the State University of New York, and Iowa State University and is funded by the US Department of Education for the period of 2007-2011.
keywords educational software, interactive learning, interactive teaching, simulation programs, building performance, building integrated systems,
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email svassigh@fiu.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ascaad2007_016
id ascaad2007_016
authors Biloria, N.
year 2007
title Developing an Interactive Architectural Meta-System for Contemporary Corporate Environments: An investigation into aspects of creating responsive spatial systems for corporate offices incorporating rule based computation techniques
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 199-212
summary The research paper exemplifies upon an attempt to create a co-evolving (socio-cultural and technological) programmable spatiality with a strong underpinning in the domain of computation, interaction design and open system typologies for the generation of a constantly informed self-adaptive corporate office space (which addresses the behavioral patterns/preferences of its occupants). Architectural substantiations for such corporate bodies embodying dynamic business eco-systems usually tend to be rather inert in essence and deem to remain closed systemic entities, adhering to a rather static spatial program in accordance with which they were initially conceptualized. The research initiative, rather than creating conventional inert structural shells (hard components), thus focuses upon the development of a meta-system, or in other words the creation of a ‘soft’ computationally enriched open systemic framework (informational) which interfaces with the ‘hard’, material component and the users of the architectural construct (corporate offices). This soft space/meta system serves as a platform for providing the users with a democratic framework, within which they can manifest their own programmatic (activity oriented) combinations in order to create self designed spatial alternatives. The otherwise static/inert hard architectural counterpart, enhanced with contemporary technology thus becomes a physical interface prone to real-time spatial/structural and ambient augmentation to optimally serve its users.
series ASCAAD
email nimish.biloria@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2014_011
id ecaade2014_011
authors Marie Davidova
year 2014
title Ray 2:The Material Performance of Solid Wood Based Screen
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 153-158
summary The wood - humidity interaction of solid wood has been tested through generations on Norwegian traditional panelling. This concept has been further explored by Michael Hensel and Steffen Reichert with Achim Menges on plywood and laminates in basic research. Plywood or laminates are better programmable but they are less sustainable due to the use of glue. This research focused on predicting the performance of solid wood in tangential section which is applied to humidity-temperature responsive screen for industrial production. With the method Systems Oriented Design, the research evaluated data from material science, forestry, meteorology, biology, chemistry and the production market. Themethod was introduced by Birger Sevaldson in 2007 with the argument that the changes in our globalized world and the need for sustainability demands an increase of the complexity of the design process. (Sevaldson 2013)Several samples has been tested for its environmental interaction. The data has been integrated in parametric models that tested the overall systems. Based on the simulations, the most suitable concept has been prototyped and measured for its performance. This lead to another sampling of the material whose data are the basis for another prototype. Ray 2 is an environmental responsive screen that is airing the structure in dry weather, while closing up when the humidity level is high, not allowing the moisture inside.
wos WOS:000361385100016
keywords Material performance; solid wood; wood - humidity interaction
series eCAADe
email marie.davidova@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2007_119
id ecaade2007_119
authors Zupancic, Tadeja; Mullins, Michael
year 2007
title Reconfiguring Course Design in Virtual Learning Environments
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 647-654
summary Although many administrators and educators are familiar with e-learning programs, learning management systems and portals, fewer may have experience with virtual distributed learning environments and their academic relevance. The blended learning experience of the VIPA e-learning project for architectural students offers some innovative insights into experientially oriented educational interfaces. A comparative analysis of VIPA courses and project results are presented in the paper. Special attention in the discussion is devoted to the improvements of e-learning solutions in architecture. The criterion of the relation between the actual applicability of selected e-learning solutions and elements of collaborative educational interfaces with VR are taken into account. A system of e-learning applicability levels in program and course development and implementation of architectural tectonics in courseware is developed from the evaluation process and which contributes to the discussion of future trends in architectural education.
keywords Architectural education, e-learning, virtual space
series eCAADe
email tadeja.zupancic@fa.uni-lj.si
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2007_136
id ecaade2007_136
authors Dohmen, Philipp; Rüdenauer, Kai
year 2007
title Digital Chains in Modern Architecture
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 801-804
summary The “digital chain” is a continuous digital organization process, from the draft right into the manufacturing. Now one of these chains is applied on a mountain shelter. The individual steps are programmed and connected by universal interfaces. The computer is used not as passive digital drawing board, but as self-dependent tool that exerts influence on. Rules, dependence and aims, are formulated by the architect the computer can optimize due to its computing power. The role of the architect shifts thereby from the form designer to the role of a process designer. The aesthetics of the results is exciting and unusually, organically and self-evident - it is however always the result of given parameters. One topic is the complexity. The constructional modeling of the computers is a substantial support and easement. With programming techniques and parameterized construction, a high degree of individualizing becomes possible. A further point is efficiency. Construction with individual units, which former on was just realizable with high time and cost, become economically in this manner today. Furthermore computer-controlled machines work with precision and a detailing, which would be by workmanship neither temporally nor technically obtainable.
keywords Digital chain, mass customization, one of a kind production
series eCAADe
email dohmen@hbt.arch.ethz.ch, ruedenauer@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_070
id ecaade2007_070
authors Kirschner, Ursula; Ohler, Armin
year 2007
title Digitized Planning Processes in the Revitalization of Buildings by an Interdisciplinary Project Study
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 717-723
summary In the curricula for students of civil engineering and architecture software training courses have been integrated for long, but didactical training concepts with an application in practice including both the constructional and planning aspects are missing. This conference contribution shows the result of a research work carried out to empirically develop a manual for a constructional, digitally supported project work. It comprised the interdisciplinary teaching with a special focus on two examples of buildings in situ. Different types of presentation, picture software and CAD were used from the very beginning of the planning process in order to create a new form of didactics in teaching and learning. The basic local parameters and approaches are documented and analyzed. As a result of the empirical research work presented herein a manual was developed which is useful as a guideline for the digital interdisciplinary project development in the revitalization of buildings. It reflects the experiences gained in this empirical research work and formulates the steps to take to carry out the project. The paper is presented with a 3-D-video projection on the basis of stereoscope pictures.
keywords Digitized planning, revitalization, interdisciplinary project, practical project, manual
series eCAADe
email irschner@uni-lueneburg.de, ohler@uni-lueneburg.de
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id sigradi2008_080
id sigradi2008_080
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. At first, it describes and discusses different uses of art in architectural history. Through the analyzes of Le Corbusier’s artistic and architectural practices, it observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. More than bringing pictorial ‘inspiration’, art, as a experimental field, can change our architectural procedures and approaches - a much richer and powerful addition to the development of architecture. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. Very commonly present in our contemporary life, not only on the making of architecture – computer drawings and modeling of extravagant buildings – nor in ‘automated rooms’ of the millionaire’s houses. Televisions, telephones and computers leave the walls of our houses “with as many holes as a Swiss cheese”, as Flusser has pointed. The architecture has historically manipulated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Since is inevitable to think the contemporary world without them, it is extreme urgent that architects start dealing with this whole universe in a creative way. Important changes in architecture occur after professionals start to research and experiment with different artistic medias, not limiting their visions to painting and sculpture. The main hypothesis of this paper is that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. This confluence can only take form when architects rise questions about technology based interaction and automation during their creative process, embodying these concepts into the architecture repertoire. An educational experience was conducted in 2007 at UFMG Architecture School, in Brazil, with the intention of this activity was to allow students to research creatively with both information technology and architecture. The students’ goal was to create site-specific interventions on the school building, using physical and digital devices. Finally, the paper contextualizes this experience with the discussion above exposed. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some contemporary art modalities (specially the hybrid ones) in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture; Information and Communication Technologies; Digital Art; Site Specific Art; Architectural Learning.
series SIGRADI
email robertoandres@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2007_060
id ascaad2007_060
authors Gillispie, D. and C. Calderon
year 2007
title A framework towards designing responsive public information systems
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 767-782
summary "Evolving effective responsive systems, and creating a credible interface between the work and the user, requires an awareness of many different types of user, contexts and functions as well as the phenomenological aspects of social and environmental conditions." (Bullivant, 2006). Responsive design and interactive architecture operates at the intersection of Architecture, Arts, Technology, Media Arts, HCI and Interaction Design in a physical context suggesting ways in which the existing physical environments can be augmented and extended adding a greater level of depth, meaning and engagement with the world around us. Through a series of case studies, this paper explores a number of principles which may be applied to the design of responsive environments of which public information systems form part. Divided into three main sections, the paper first explains how responsive environments have addressed the application of public information systems, secondly, through a series of case studies, precedents are highlighted which lead to development of principles for developing designs for responsive environments. The third section discusses and elaborates on these principles which have been developed based upon our own interpretations and grouping of precedents and approaches towards interaction design. This paper contributes towards the field of responsive environments and interactive architecture through an analysis of case studies to infer a framework from which responsive environments may be created and developed.
series ASCAAD
email Carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id bsct_jiraschek
id bsct_jiraschek
authors Jiraschek, Roberta
year 2007
title Improving Child Safety in Residential Buildings via Architectural Design and Technology Integration
source Vienna University of Technology; Building Science & Technology
summary This work intends to create design guidelines based on the classification of design elements in residential buildings according to risk levels. It suggests the inclusion of safety aspects in children’s immediate environment by better design solutions and technologies which can help to prevent home accidents that mainly affect children aged between 0 and 4 years. The guidelines could help to create new building and design standards for architects and the building industry. They are based on research, conducted mainly in the European Union and the United States of America, into regulations and programs focusing on the prevention of home accidents. This work may be of benefit to parents, manufacturers, the building industry, architects and governments. Parents may benefit, obviously, because they get information on how to decrease the number of hazards within their children’s environment. It may help manufacturers improve their safety standards. Consumers may choose from a range of safer products. It may prompt the building industry to create safer designs and products thus avoiding liability claims. It may inspire architects to a more safety-oriented design. Finally governments could reduce health costs – in Austria alone, for example, more than € 3.4 billion a year are spent on home and leisure accidents.
keywords children, accident prevention, hazards, risk assessment, design guideline
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email buildingscience@tuwien.ac.at
more http://cec.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2007/07/16 15:55

_id acadia07_182
id acadia07_182
authors Oxman, Neri
year 2007
title Rapid Craft: Material Experiments towards an Integrated Sensing Skin System
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 182-191
summary The distinction between matter (mechanics) and information (electronics) in the context of responsive building skins has promoted unique design protocols for integrating sensor technologies into material components. Such a distinction results in applications of remote sensing after the process of material fabrication. Sensors are commonly perceived as electronic patches which initiate mechanical output with response to electrical input. This work seeks to establish a novel approach to the application of electronics in building skins, which prioritizes material selection, behavior, and fabrication technology in relation to the required task, over postproduction sensor integration. The term “Rapid Craft” is proposed to describe such design protocols which couple material behavior and fabrication in the design of responsive skins. Rapid Craft is a designation for the incorporation of craft materialization knowledge within the framework of CNC processes of fabrication. A light-sensing inflatable skin system is developed as a working prototype, which demonstrates such an approach.
series ACADIA
email neri@mit.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:13

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