CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id ijac20075110
id ijac20075110
authors Coyne, Richard; Lucas, Raymond; Li, Jia; Parker, Martin; Lee, John
year 2007
title Co-operation and Complicity Voices, Robots, and Tricksters in the Digital Marketplace
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 1, pp. 162-175
summary We advocate the theme of complicity, ahead of co-operation, as a means of understanding complex, interactive digital systems. Our case study of a market precinct known as the Barras, about one mile from the centre of the city of Glasgow, foregrounds the notion of complicity. Market places are characterized not only by co-operation in rule-governed environments, but complicity between actors as a means of breaking rules, working at the boundaries of formal frameworks, avoiding other actors, such as law enforcers, and even working with them in tacitly agreed evasion strategies. We present the human voice (as exercised in the case of market stall holders drawing attention to their wares) as a major medium of complicity. In our application of these ideas we deploy Lego Mindstorms TM RCX robot processing to explore interactions between a mobile sensing robot and simple environmental controls: movements of sliding screens in response to an autonomous mobile sensor. As well as their benign characteristics as co-operating agents, we argue for a consideration of robots as quintessential tricksters, plotting and scheming strategies of survival, evasion and opportunism. Traits that can be employed in the development of useful augmented environments.
series journal
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2007/06/14 10:11

_id ascaad2007_019
id ascaad2007_019
authors Morsy, S.M.
year 2007
title A Social Approach to Intelligent Buildings
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 229-242
summary Intelligent buildings were a hot topic since the 1980's. The vision was to share building telecommunication backbones with energy management systems, fire alarms, security systems and even office automation. The benefits were touted to include cost savings for cabling and long term maintenance, plus a future potential for interoperability between systems. The potential within these concepts and the surrounding technology is vast, and lives of users are changing from the effects of Intelligent Buildings developments on their living and working environments. In other words, the main aim of building intelligent building is merely a technological trend. But using intelligent buildings has wider effects on users than intended. Neglecting the human aspects of the users may be considered as a shortcoming. This paper considers the causes of this new trend in architecture in a larger social context, from which the rationalism of building intelligent buildings must arise. This will be done through exploring the concepts and applications of intelligent buildings, showing how all of them affect human life in such many ways.
series ASCAAD
email sahar_morsy@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_115
id ecaade2007_115
authors Seifried, Philipp; Hoog, Jochen; Falkner, Christoph
year 2007
title Teaching 3D Generative Virtual Architecture with VIPA CONSTRICTOR
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 751-756
summary CONSTRICTOR is a novel teaching and learning tool to introduce students of architecture to the fundamentals of computational design. It was developed within an EC funded e-learning project, VIPA (Virtual campus for virtual space design Provided for European Architects). In this paper, we describe the general structure and technology of CONSTRICTOR and its application within the course “Synthetic Constructions II”) that aims at familiarizing students with concepts like cellular automata, swarms, shape grammars, path finding etc. CONSTRICTOR allows students to observe simulations, navigate through them and change the parameters that define and control them, thereby developing an understanding for the rules that govern their virtual environments. They can also change the geometry used in the simulations and work with and export their results. Students can modify the simulations at code level, combine them or write entirely new simulations. Finally some of the student work performed during and after the course is described, and an outlook for future work and further developments around the VIPA courses and the constrictor software will be given.
keywords Blender, generative design, learning platform, virtual space design
series eCAADe
email hoog@atelierprozess.net, falkner@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id acadia07_025
id acadia07_025
authors Ascott, Roy
year 2007
title Architecture and the Culture of Contingency
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 25-31
summary A culture is a set of behaviours, attitudes and values that are shared, sustained and transformed by an identifi able community. Currently, we are bound up in a culture of consumerism, and of terror; there are also retro cultures and utopian cultures. What’s happening now that’s interesting is that many, if not all of these diff erent tendencies, tastes and persuasions are being re-aligned, interconnected and hybridised by a vast global community of online users, who are transdisciplinary in their approach to knowledge and experience, instinctively interactive with systems and situations, playful, transgressive and enormously curious. This living culture makes it up as it goes along. No longer do the institu- tions of state, church or science call the tune. Nor can any architectural schema contain it. This is a culture of inclusion and of self-creation. Culture no longer defi nes us with its rules of aesthetics, style, etiquette, normalcy or privilege. We defi ne it; we of the global community that maps out the world not with territorial boundaries, or built environments, but with open-ended networks. This is a bottom-up culture—non-linear, bifurcating, immersive, and profoundly human. Who needs archi- tecture? Any structural interface will do. Ours can be described as a contingent culture. It’s about chance and change, in the world, in the environment, in oneself. It’s a contingent world we live in, unpredictable, unreliable, uncertain and indeterministic. Culture fi ghts back, fi ghts like with like. The Contingent Culture takes on the contingency of life with its own strategies of risk, chance, and play. It is essentially syncretic. People re-invent themselves, create new relationships, new orders of time and space. Along the way, they create, as well as accommodate, the future. This culture is completely open-ended, evolving and transforming at a fast rate—just as we are, at this stage of our evolution, and just as we want it to be. Human nature, unconstrained, is essentially syncretic too.
series ACADIA
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2007_021
id ascaad2007_021
authors Grasl, T. and C. Kühn
year 2007
title Situated spatial awareness: Experimenting with spatial concepts for agents
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 253-260
summary The target of the project is to explore spatial awareness in situated agents. The concepts are tested with exhibition layout as use case and subsumption architecture as cognitive model. The agents in the implementation control the location and orientation of exhibits in a collaborative environment. The paper describes the implementation details and discusses the outcome.
series ASCAAD
email thomas@grasl.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id cf2007_031
id cf2007_031
authors Huang, Chih-Chieh Scottie
year 2007
title Conceptual Modeling Environment (COMOEN)
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 31-43
summary Conceptual modeling is an actively creative stage in a design process. Through hand modeling and manipulation of different kinds of modeling tool kits for specific materials, designers are able to generate forms. This article presents a tangible human-computer interface of a C-StressBall for form manipulation and a C-BenchWhirler for visual control. They create a new way of interaction between the virtual world and the physical space. They are aimed to ease the operation in design process by using CAD.
series CAAD Futures
email scottie.c.c.huang@gmail.com
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_007
id ascaad2007_007
authors Kaka, A.P.; Y. Ibrahim and T. Lukins
year 2007
title The Development of an Automated Progress Measurement System for Construction Work Packages
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 81-86
summary The challenges associated with collecting accurate data on the progress of construction have long been recognised. Traditional methods often involve human judgment, high costs, and are too infrequent to provide managers with timely and accurate control data. The aim of this study is to propose a prototype system that employs Computer Vision (CV) techniques to report on progress for components supplied from an integrated Building Information Model (BIM). This model stores and relates this feedback to a representation of the work breakdown structure (WBS) that assigns components to work packages. In this paper we present an overview of the actual system – from the theoretical and technical challenges encountered.
series ASCAAD
email A.P.Kaka@hw.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_158
id acadia07_158
authors Oatman, Devin; Senagala, Mahesh
year 2007
title Am I? Architecture of Ambient Intelligence
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 158-163
summary In its purest state, Ambient Intelligence is smart computing whose presence is not apparent to the human senses except in response and actions. The original intentions and origins of Ambient Intelligence began with the need for more efficient and unobtrusive management of our everyday activities. Synonymous with ubiquitous computing, Ambient Intelligence, or AmI, consists of: UbiComp: the integration of microchips and computers into everyday objects; UbiComm: the ability of these objects to communicate with each other and the user; and Intelligent User Interface which allows inhabitants of the environment to interact with the system with human gestures (Riva 2005). Put together, these components are basically personifi ed computers. The key factor in Ambient Intelligent communities is that the microscopic computers are aware of their surroundings and their purpose just as human beings are. With the ability to self-program and react to new software, they eliminate the need for humans to program them, decreasing maintenance and programming time. These concepts and technologies raise important questions. What happens when the system disappears? Are we ready as a society to see a certain degree of power taken away from us by anticipatory computers? This short paper will provide an overview of AmI and why it is important for architects to embrace, explore, and engage this emerging technology.
series ACADIA
email DNOatman@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ecaade2007_198
id ecaade2007_198
authors Oxman, Rivka; Hammer, Roey; Ari, Shoham Ben
year 2007
title Performative Design in Architecture
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 227-234
summary In view of current developments in the theory and technology of digital design, certain potential for novel direction in virtual prototyping is beginning to emerge. In this paper an approach for the employment of virtual prototyping as a generative environment for performance-based design is proposed. The term combines both the concepts of performance and digital generation. In creating digital design environments for design the generative capabilities are incorporated within performance-based simulations. The potential of performance-based simulation as a digital design methodology in architectural design is explored. Experiments in digital architectural design illustrate this approach. Works in a framework of an ‘experimental digital design’ are presented and illustrated.
keywords Digital design, performance-based design, design generation
series eCAADe
email rivkao@gmail.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ijac20075212
id ijac20075212
authors Papagiannakis, George; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia
year 2007
title Mobile Augmented Heritage: Enabling Human Life in Ancient Pompeii
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 2, pp. 396-415
summary We propose a new methodology for real-time mobile mixed reality systems that feature realistic simulations of animated virtual human actors (clothes, body, skin, face) who augment real environments and re-enact staged storytelling dramas. Although initially targeted at Cultural Heritage Sites, the paradigm is by no means limited to such subjects. The abandonment of traditional concepts of static cultural artifacts or rigid geometrical and 2D textual augmentations with 3D, interactive, augmented historical character-based event representations in a mobile and wearable setup, is the main contribution of the described work as well as the proposed extensions to AR Enabling technologies: a VR/AR character simulation kernel framework with character to object interaction, a markerless camera tracker specialized for non-invasive geometrical registration on heritage sites and a PRT mixed reality illumination model for more consistent real-virtual real-time rendering. We demonstrate a real-time case study on the actual site of ancient Pompeii.
series journal
last changed 2007/08/29 14:23

_id acadia16_254
id acadia16_254
authors Sharmin, Shahida; Ahlquist, Sean
year 2016
title Knit Architecture: Exploration of Hybrid Textile Composites Through the Activation of Integrated Material Behavior
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 254-259
summary The hybrid system in textile composites refers to the structural logic defined by Heino Engel, which describes a system that integrates multiple structural behaviors to achieve an equilibrium state (Engel 2007). This research explores a material system that can demonstrate a hybrid material behavior defined by the differentiated tensile and bending-active forces in a single, seamless knitted composite material. These behaviors were installed during the materialization phase and activated during the composite formation process. Here, the material formation involves two interdependent processes: 1) development of the knitted textile with integrated tensile and reinforced materials and 2) development of the composite by applying pre-stress and vacuuming the localized area with reinforcements in a consistent resin-based matrix. The flat bed industrial weft knitting machine has been utilized to develop the knitted textile component of the system with a controlled knit structure. This enables us to control the material types, densities, and cross sections with integrated multiple layers/ribs and thus, the performance of the textile at the scale of fiber structure. Both of these aspects were researched in parallel, using physical and computational methods informed and shaped by the potentials and constraints of each other. A series of studies has been utilized to develop small-scale prototypes that depict the potential of the hybrid textile composite as the generator of complex form and bending active structures. Ultimately, it indicates the possibilities of hybrid textile composite materials as self-structuring lightweight components that can perform as highly articulated and differentiated seamless architectural elements that are capable of transforming the perception of light, space, and touch.
keywords form-finding, programmable materials, composite forming processes, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email shahida@umich.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ascaad2007_050
id ascaad2007_050
authors Techel, F., K. Nassar
year 2007
title Teaching Building Information Modeling (BIM) from a Sustainabilty Design Perspective
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 635-650
summary Building Information Modeling has recently gained significant attention both in academia and practice. BIM presents immense opportunities for increased efficiencies, coordination and quality of architectural design. One of the reasons that BIM offers a more comprehensive design approach is the fact that all aspect of the building are considered during the modeling phase. Rather than drawing the building using lines and circles actual object are used to model the building, which results in a more comprehensive underlying database model of the entire edifice being designed. The approach obviously has tremendous benefits in terms of coordination and systems integration, as well as, project control and management during the design and construction phases. Nevertheless BIM offers its own unique challenges vis-à-vis its introduction to students of architecture. The students in Architecture programs are usually introduced to BIM in two ways, either through a specialized course in CAD or via a shadow introduction in design studios and related courses. Careful positioning of the course within the architecture curriculum is crucial in order to gain maximum benefit in the synthesis of other course content. The reason being that students of architecture in earlier years of the design curriculum may not yet have developed the ability to synthesize and coordinate multiple systems required for complete BIM. This is an important consideration the design and pedagogy of introducing BIM to Architecture students. This paper argues for a new approach in teaching BIM for Architecture students. Instead of designing a course specifically for BIM/CAAD we present a paradigm whereas BIM can be presented within a larger more rigorous context. The experience of teaching BIM within a sustainable design framework is presented in this paper. Issues relating to the design of basic residential buildings were integrated into the course presenting BIM. A simplified set of design rules and guidelines under banner of sustainability were taught to the students in pre-defined doses and sequence throughout the course. The careful placement of these concepts permitted for BIM to be introduced in a more interesting and comprehensive manner than in the traditional CAD-course setting. Samples of student work are presented and critiqued in order to come up with recommendations and guidelines for incorporating BIM into a comprehensive and comprehensible course. The pedagogical advantages of and disadvantages of the approach are discussed within the paper, as well as, a detailed description of the course content and structure. Results from and outcome-based assessment of the objectives of the course are also illuminated which provided suggestions for future offerings of the course.
series ASCAAD
email techel@sharjah.ac.ae
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_250
id acadia07_250
authors Wierzbicki-Neagu, Madalina; de Silva, Clarence W.
year 2007
title Development of Design Workflows for Kinetic Structures Using Fuzzy Logic
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 250-261
summary Kinetic structures offer the means to significantly expand the functional and performance features of traditionally static architectural solutions. However, the added element of motion creates considerable challenges during conceptualization and introduction into existing design workflows. Rigidly foldable shells offer tremendous potential for developing kinetic architectural structures. They require few support points, eliminate sliding overlaps and are relatively easy to mock up as initial concepts. Achieving the desired motion range, however, requires a significant design effort. If performed manually, the motion optimization is tedious and unpredictable. This paper examines possible optimization algorithmic strategies with the use of fuzzy logic. Specifically the paper focuses on the application of fuzzy logic as a tool for effectively negotiating modifications of complex linked geometries while using intuitive, high level statements and directives. Highlighted is the potential of fuzzy logic-based algorithms as tools that can help the transition of existing design workflows into environments that can handle extended challenges involving kinetic geometries.
series ACADIA
email madalina@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id cf2007_211
id cf2007_211
authors Zedlacher, Stefan
year 2007
title Spacensing: A new method sensitizing users and their interactive environments
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 211-222
summary In this article we introduce the research on finding solutions using a 3D motion capture system for architectural design purpose by sensitizing a physical space and its virtual counterpart for user interaction and human motion input. We separate this use in four major steps to get a deeper understanding about the processes of space perception and space constitution in architectural (design) tasks. With detailed information about the manner of movement and the structured workflow it is possible to get new insights into space interaction. Furthermore spacensing provides a toolbox for users to investigate virtual space conditions as well as it allows to draw out conclusions on space sociological assumptions.
series CAAD Futures
email zedlacher@tugraz.at
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id ascaad2007_058
id ascaad2007_058
authors Abdelhameed, W. and Y. Kobayashi
year 2007
title Developing a New Approach of Computer Use ‘KISS Modeling’ for Design-Ideas Alternatives of Form Massing: A framework for three-Dimensional Shape Recognition in Initial Design Phases
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 745-756
summary This research aims at developing a new approach called ‘KISS Modeling’. KISS is generally a rule of ‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ that will be applied in modeling process investigated and presented by the research. The new approach is implemented in a computer program ‘KISS Modeling’ that generates three dimensional forms based on simplifying the concept of shape recognition in design. The research, however, does not employ totally concepts of shape recognition or shape understanding in Artificial Intelligence and psychology. The research, in summary, investigates and describes: 1) a new approach of computer use contributing to generating design-ideas alternatives of form massing in initial design phases, within a simple way that any designer can understand at single glance, 2) implementation of shape recognition for generative three dimensional forms, 3) function to generate different outputs from different recognition, and 4) case studies introduced through applications and functions of the three dimensional modeling system presented by the research. The research concluded that the introduced processes help the user improve the management of conceptual designing through facilitating a discourse of his/her modeling of design-ideas massing.
series ASCAAD
email wael.abdelhameed@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id caadria2007_029
id caadria2007_029
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Ellen Yi-Luen Do
year 2007
title TangiCAD: Tangible Interface for Manipulating Architectural 3D Models
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper presents an interface for interacting with tangible objects to produce and edit architectural 3D models, called TangiCAD. TangiCAD is a tangible/virtual construction kit which allows architects to manipulate virtual models using easy hand control of tangible cubes, as an alternative interface for 3D modeling. It consists of a set of tangible cubes representing architectural elements, such as walls, columns, slabs,…etc., in addition to some editing operations. With more developed versions, the paper argues that architects could use tangible interfaces to carry out 3D modeling in an intuitive way, using their "flip-the-box" hands-on movement.
series CAADRIA
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_034b
id ascaad2007_034b
authors Ambrose, M.A.
year 2007
title Body|Form|Space: Geometric translations of the body in motion
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 431-438
summary This paper presents a novel approach to digital investigation of body, space, form and motion to expose issues of spatial perception. The spatial experience as generated from, and translated by, the human body is the focus of this work. The work explores the representational value of the body’s sense-image, the context and spatial/visual literacy of the learned sense of space-time generated from the study of the human body. Here the body is conceived not just in space but also in time, affording the ability to reinterpret the body and it’s dynamic motion engaged not as a static condition, but as a set of event spaces. Motion here is defined as a multiplicity of continuities that can be subdivided by artificial boundaries that describe space, time and body. The study of a series of bodies and movements is described that explore the human condition as a series of differential lines (form + time) and framed structures (bodies + motion). The intention is to examine the relationship between human form and metaphysical simultaneity as generators of architectural form. The work is structured by a research approach that dissects and isolates the representational concept/image from the body in a way that might offer an alternative description to the traditional historic models.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_276
id acadia07_276
authors Anders, Peter
year 2007
title Designing Mixed Reality: Principles, Projects and Practice
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 276-283
summary Mixed Reality is an increasingly prevalent technology that merges digital simulations with physical objects or environments. This paper presents principles for the design of mixed reality compositions. The principles are illustrated by projects and experiments by the author involving architecture and robotics.
series ACADIA
email ptr@andersassociates.net
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id caadria2007_611
id caadria2007_611
authors Arpornwicharnop, Kittisak; Pinyo Jinuntuya and Pizzanu Kanongchaiyos
year 2007
title Simulation Software Development for Urban Landscape Possibility Analysis
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This research paper proposes a simulation software development for possibility analysis of urban landscape development project. Normally, analysis of land potentiality and feasibility study for investment are necessary pre-processed for supporting urban planning, developing and architectural designing. However, most available tools are usually tailor made for each process individually, causing difficulties in information interchange between each processes. In this research, we propose a policy making support system for urban planning project development providing several functions such as testing land use and its physical character which are important to urban expansion and architectural design based on impact analysis of urban comprehensive plan. The proposed integrated system consists of a topological analysis module, constraint checking module and geographical information processing module. First, Geographical information stored in 3D graphic file format is converted to object-oriented data model and stored in a database. With several constraint and regulations, the stored information is then checked in the landscape topological analysis module. In evaluation process, the developed software is tested with geographical information of Bangkok area under constraints and regulations of Building Control Act of Thailand. While controlling building properties, the software can model the buildings and generate urban physical character. The result is then checked by several urban landscape planning experts. Experimental result shows that proposed system provides flexibility in information interchanging with constraints and regulations updating without system reconfiguration. The system also provides internet accessing for public participation in the process of making urban comprehensive plan.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email pizzanu@cp.eng.chula.ac.th
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

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