CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ascaad2007_001
id ascaad2007_001
authors Germen, M.
year 2007
title Virtual Architecture: Reconstructing Architecture Through Photography
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 1-16
summary The concept of construction in architectural design process is a temporary action that exists for a while and transforms itself into another product; i.e. the final building to be inhabited. Construction site can be taken as a podium where a play-to-remain-incomplete is being staged. The incompleteness causes us to dream, due to the fact that a complete building loses its narrative potential as it informs us about all the necessary pieces that constitute the whole: There is no puzzle to solve... Construction in this sense is like a historical ruin; Paul Zucker asserts that "ruins have held for a long time a unique position in the visual, emotional, and literary imagery of man. They have fascinated artists, poets, scholars, and sightseers alike. Devastated by time or willful destruction, incomplete as they are, they represent a combination of man-made forms and of organic nature." Architectural photography has the potential of re-creating this puzzle back again in order to bring an alternative representation to architecture. The architectural photographer is sometimes offered the freedom of reinterpreting, reconstructing architecture in order to be able to present a novel virtual perception to the audience. The idea here is to get some spatial clues that can later be used in other architectural projects. I was personally invited to two different concept exhibits in which I was given the freedom of inventing a virtual architecture through photography. The concept text written for one of these exhibits goes as follows: “I went, saw, stopped, attempted to grasp and enter it, looked at construction process and workers with respect, tried to internalize, wanted to claim it for a while, dreamed of creating a microcosm out of the macrocosm I was in, shot and shot and shot and finally selected: The created world, though intended for all, was probably quite a personal illusion...” Virtual architecture is a term used for architecture specifically created in the computer environment and never used in the realm of architectural photography. People like Piranesi, Lebbeus Woods, M.C. Escher, Marcos Novak, etc. previously dreamed about architectures that could exist virtually on paper, screen, digital environments. This paper will try to prove that this practice of (re)designing architecture virtually can be transferred to one of the most important realms of visuality: Photography. Various digital processes like stitching multiple photos together and mirroring images in image editing software like Photoshop, allow this virtual architecture to take place in the computer environment. Following this, I propose to raise the term “snap architecture” to connect it to the frequently referred concept of “paper architecture.”
series ASCAAD
email muratgermen@mail.sabanciuniv.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_025
id acadia07_025
authors Ascott, Roy
year 2007
title Architecture and the Culture of Contingency
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 25-31
summary A culture is a set of behaviours, attitudes and values that are shared, sustained and transformed by an identifi able community. Currently, we are bound up in a culture of consumerism, and of terror; there are also retro cultures and utopian cultures. What’s happening now that’s interesting is that many, if not all of these diff erent tendencies, tastes and persuasions are being re-aligned, interconnected and hybridised by a vast global community of online users, who are transdisciplinary in their approach to knowledge and experience, instinctively interactive with systems and situations, playful, transgressive and enormously curious. This living culture makes it up as it goes along. No longer do the institu- tions of state, church or science call the tune. Nor can any architectural schema contain it. This is a culture of inclusion and of self-creation. Culture no longer defi nes us with its rules of aesthetics, style, etiquette, normalcy or privilege. We defi ne it; we of the global community that maps out the world not with territorial boundaries, or built environments, but with open-ended networks. This is a bottom-up culture—non-linear, bifurcating, immersive, and profoundly human. Who needs archi- tecture? Any structural interface will do. Ours can be described as a contingent culture. It’s about chance and change, in the world, in the environment, in oneself. It’s a contingent world we live in, unpredictable, unreliable, uncertain and indeterministic. Culture fi ghts back, fi ghts like with like. The Contingent Culture takes on the contingency of life with its own strategies of risk, chance, and play. It is essentially syncretic. People re-invent themselves, create new relationships, new orders of time and space. Along the way, they create, as well as accommodate, the future. This culture is completely open-ended, evolving and transforming at a fast rate—just as we are, at this stage of our evolution, and just as we want it to be. Human nature, unconstrained, is essentially syncretic too.
series ACADIA
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id caadria2007_689
id caadria2007_689
authors Chung, Daniel Hii Jun
year 2007
title Best Practice for Achieving Real-Time Virtual Reality Architectural Visualization
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Real-time rendering is the most fundamental aspect of the virtual reality technology, which is always, a balance between hardware advancement and efficient software algorithm upgrades on the one hand and the demands of the quality output on the other. As architects who utilize this technology, what we can do as users is to optimize the parameters we can control in the files we input to run the simulation. Thus the identification of the few variables we can control to prevent a lagging performance or ghosting which is no longer realtime. The frame rate above all is the measurement to determine whether a simulation is real-time or not. The research aim is to identify the biggest contributing factors among the few identified. The intention is to save time and effort by optimizing the selected factors in projects so that we do not have to optimize all of them. The workflow will also be a lot faster and projects can be done efficiently. The final part is to run satisfaction tests among users to evaluate those biggest contributing factors and the qualities acceptable by users. This is to eliminate the added processing power needed to run bigger files if they do not contribute much to improved quality.
series CAADRIA
email g0500819@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2007_203
id caadria2007_203
authors Heidrich, Felix; Peter Russell and Thomas Stachelhaus
year 2007
title Intervision3D: Online 3D Visualisation and Conferencing
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The use of Internet communication technologies in distributed teams has been carried out for well over 10 years. In this time, various methods to communicate and transfer information have been developed. A large amount of effort has been placed on enabling normal conversation to take place and it could be said, that with technologies like Skype, this is established. This enables planning partners to discuss, but we still need to convey what they are discussing. In short, the contents are still lacking. Technologies exist to allow users to share files or images, however this does not nearly reach the intensity or quality of discussions when partners are sitting together in front of a drawing or model. At best, screen sharing allows participants to see the same image but with low resolution and bad system response. The goal of the Intervision3D project is to allow distributed team members to discuss design issues with a common 3D model where participants can manipulate the model together in real time. In contrast to screen-sharing solutions, the Intervision3D project uses a server, which delivers a copy of the model to each conference participant. The server then coordinates the perspective views of all conference participants. One of the participants (usually the first) is initially designated as the speaker and he or she controls the views of the model through an intuitive walk/fly-through interface. The speed of the system is also buttressed by the simplicity of the application: as a Java applet, it is possible to start the Intervision3D system in any browser or as a separate applet on any system. As such, none of the participants need to install anything. The resolution of the model is optimized for each participant's browser and computer display. Currently, Intervision3D can import .3ds files and then render them using the JOGL Engine (Java Bindings for Open GL). JOGL allows the full Open GL suite to be used in rendering the model including lighting and textures: even normal PCs can do this quite well. The first implementation of the system is within an existing internet-based Design Studio and the paper elucidates how the first uses of the system have (partially) helped to increase the exchange of design ideas over the Internet. Through the Intervison3D system, the participants who have been separated by distance can once again discuss the same 3D model.
series CAADRIA
email info@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2007_423
id caadria2007_423
authors Holzer, Dominik; Mark C. Burry and Richard Hough
year 2007
title Linking Parametric Design and Structural Analysis to Foster Transdisciplinary Design Collaboration
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The investigation presented in this paper focuses on the following questions: How can engineering and architectural expertise guide a process of digital optimisation and add structural ‘awareness’ in real time to aesthetic considerations (or vice versa)? How can building geometry be set up computationally in order to render it ‘sensitive’ to structural input? Which tools are required to foster this interaction? The authors of this paper form a team of researchers and practitioners from architectural and engineering background who combine their efforts to address the issue of interconnecting design intelligence across disciplines and advancing work methodologies in practice assisted by academic research. A live case study project is presented as a test scenario in order to find answers the above questions.
series CAADRIA
email dominik.holzer@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ascaad2007_040
id ascaad2007_040
authors Loemker, T.M.
year 2007
title Location Based Services in Revitalization: The Use of Commonly Available Techniques for a Client-Participation Model
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 505-516
summary This research concentrates on the combination of remote sensing devices, georeferenced data, web-based optimization techniques and Location Based Services in revitalization. Its aim is to enhance the delivery of information about the development potentialities of existing buildings. The present and idle stock of buildings is extensive. Nonetheless, significant data and information about existing buildings is hardly available. The real estate owners are usually not known by prospective clients and they can be elicited only with substantial effort. But even if data about a building is available it is difficult to valuate it precisely, because of missing standard classification techniques. The question whether or not a building is suitable for a certain subsequent use is therefore hard to answer. It involves an extensive expenditure of time and manpower. Recent publications however, demonstrate that requests for the re-use of buildings can be solved through the use of combinatorial optimization techniques (Loemker 2006a, 2006b, 2007). Within these approaches researchers mainly concentrate on the architect dealing with inquiries from clients. These inquiries typically address the question if specific buildings are suitable for particular future uses. With the aid of optimization engines the architect can solve these requests through a description of the existing buildings and the corresponding enquiries in terms of specific criteria such as number and size of rooms or adjacency between rooms. According to an unambiguous syntax these approaches can be applied to any building type. The building data is stored in databases which can be inquired through optimization engines which thereupon calculate suitable solutions to the demands made by the client. But even if these approaches demonstrate high potential, their bottleneck lies in the exclusive use through the architect. Neither can they be addressed to buildings that are not listed in the architects own inventory listings nor can they be used by the clients themselves. Furthermore, no reliable statement about a prospective reuse of a building can be made directly on site by prospective clients, i.e. buyers or renters. In our research we examined if ad-hoc analyses of existing buildings can be accomplished through the clients themselves with the aid of Location Based Services that can be accessed by common remote sensing devices. The aim is to give prospective clients the possibility to visit a building and run in-situ usability simulations. To accomplish this, building data will be transferred between the building and the client through the use of ordinary communication devices. These devices automatically connect to server-based applications, which compare the requirements of the client with the existing building and run remote simulations on concrete further utilization. The newly generated information will then be passed back to the client’s device. In the paper we address a scenario of a prospective client who visits a city where he hits on an unused building he might be interest in. The client wishes to gain immediate and accurate information if the building is able to meet his demands regarding the space needed for his company. Different techniques investigated, their assets and drawbacks will be described that could accomplish suchlike tasks.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ijac20075212
id ijac20075212
authors Papagiannakis, George; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia
year 2007
title Mobile Augmented Heritage: Enabling Human Life in Ancient Pompeii
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 2, pp. 396-415
summary We propose a new methodology for real-time mobile mixed reality systems that feature realistic simulations of animated virtual human actors (clothes, body, skin, face) who augment real environments and re-enact staged storytelling dramas. Although initially targeted at Cultural Heritage Sites, the paradigm is by no means limited to such subjects. The abandonment of traditional concepts of static cultural artifacts or rigid geometrical and 2D textual augmentations with 3D, interactive, augmented historical character-based event representations in a mobile and wearable setup, is the main contribution of the described work as well as the proposed extensions to AR Enabling technologies: a VR/AR character simulation kernel framework with character to object interaction, a markerless camera tracker specialized for non-invasive geometrical registration on heritage sites and a PRT mixed reality illumination model for more consistent real-virtual real-time rendering. We demonstrate a real-time case study on the actual site of ancient Pompeii.
series journal
last changed 2007/08/29 14:23

_id ascaad2007_036
id ascaad2007_036
authors Pratini, E.F.
year 2007
title Experimental Tools for the Teaching of Technical Graphics and Improving Visualization
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 457-468
summary This paper presents an updated evaluation of an experience of applying computer graphics, virtual reality and Internet resources in the teaching of technical graphics at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. It differs from a previous paper (Pratini, 2004) for the addition of an overview of the course, the context and the new teaching methodology. It is an extended, more detailed paper, which includes examples, and closes with some results of surveys on the didactic material and the methodology. Our motivation for this experiment is the fact that most of the students have a lack of previous knowledge on the basis of drawings, resulting difficulties in both understanding and visualizing technical drawings. In this experiment, we introduced VRML 3D modeling in addition to CAD and regular pencil-and-paper drawings study and practice. To support the learning of this broad knowledge not present in the technical graphics bibliography, we first provided a website with animations and virtual reality resources. Since 2003 we are providing a CD-ROM containing all the former website material which is updated each semester. At the present time, the CD-ROM contains almost all the needed didactic material and software for the one semester technical graphics course. This experience was intended to improve and to support learning in a way that motivates the students, young people who are used to play video and computer games. Classes, website and CD-ROM material were conceived to take advantage of computers´ interactivity and animated resources. The use of computers´ technology and new media to support the learning resulted a new methodology and several new unanswered questions.
series ASCAAD
email pratini@unb.br
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id sigradi2008_180
id sigradi2008_180
authors Vincent, Charles
year 2008
title Gulliver in the land of Generative Design
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The current trend in architectural design towards architectural computing has been treated both from a philosophical standing point and as an operational systems’ problem, in a quest for explications which could at last break ground for a more broad development and adoption of design tools. As Kostas Terzidis (2007) puts it, the intuitiveness that architects have put on so high a pedestal seems to be the central issue to be dealt with by both views. There seems to be no apparent shortcut toward the reconciliation between traditional practice and new media and most certainly it is not only a problem of interface design, but one of design method clarification and reinterpretation of those methods into computing systems. Furthermore, there’s no doubt left as to whether computing systems can generate such new patterns as to impact our own understanding of architecture. But even if computer algorithms can make possible the exploration of abstract alternatives to an abstract initial idea, as in Mathematica and Processing, the issue of relating abstract and geometric representations of human centered architecture lays in the hands of architects, programmers or, better yet, architect-programmers. What seems now to be the relevant change is that architectural design might escape from the traditional sequence embedded in the need – program – design iterations – solution timeline, substituted by a web of interactions among differing experimental paths, in which even the identification of needs is to be informed by computing. It is interesting to note that the computational approach to architectural design has been praised for the formal fluidity of bubbles and Bezier shapes it entails and for the overcoming of functionalist and serialization typical of modern architecture. That approach betrays a high degree of canonic fascination with the tools of the trade and very little connection to the day to day chores of building design. On the other hand, shall our new tools and toys open up new ways of thinking and designing our built landscape? What educational issues surface if we are to foster wider use of the existing technologies and simultaneously address the need to overtake mass construction? Is mass customization the answer for the dead end modern architecture has led us to? Can we let go the humanist approach begun in Renascence and culminated in Modernism or shall we review that approach in view of algorithmic architecture? Let us step back in time to 1726 when Swift’s ‘Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Lemuel Gulliver’ was first published. In Swift’s fierce critic of what seemed to him the most outrageous ideas, he conceived a strange machine devised to automatically write books and poetry, in much the same generative fashion that now, three centuries later, we begin to cherish. “Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politicks, law, mathematics and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study. He then led me to the frame, about the sides whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty foot square, placed in the middle of the room. The superficies was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a dye, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered on every square with paper pasted on them; and, on these papers were written all the words of their language in their several moods, tenses, and declensions, but without any order. The professor then desired me to observe, for he was going to set his engine at work. The pupils at his command took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down.” (Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, A Voyage to Balnibarbi) What astonishing forecast did Swift show in that narrative that, in spite of the underlying incredulity and irony, still clarifies our surprise when faced to what might seem to some of us just an abandonment of all that architects and designers have cherished: creativeness and inventiveness. Yet, we could argue that such a radical shift in paradigm occurred once when master builders left the construction ground and took seat at drafting boards. The whole body of design and construction knowledge was split into what now seem to us just specialties undertaken by more and more isolated professionals. That shift entailed new forms of representation and prediction which now each and all architects take for granted. Also, Cartesian space representation turned out to be the main instrument for professional practice, even if one can argue that it is not more than the unfolding of stone carving techniques that master builders and guilds were so fond of. Enter computing and all its unfolding, i.e. DNA coding, fractal geometry, generative computing, nonlinear dynamics, pattern generation and cellular automata, as a whole new chapter in science, and compare that to conical perspective, descriptive and analytical geometry and calculus, and an image begins to form, delineating a separation between architect and digital designer. In previous works, we have tried approaching the issues regarding architects education in a more consensual way. But it seems now that the whole curricular corpus might be changed as well. The very foundations upon which we prepare future professionals shall change, not only in College, but in High School as well. In this paper, we delve further into the disconnect between current curricula and digital design practices and suggest new disciplinary grounds for a new architectural education.
keywords Educational paradigm; Design teaching; Design methods;
series SIGRADI
email cvincent@mackenzie.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ascaad2007_034b
id ascaad2007_034b
authors Ambrose, M.A.
year 2007
title Body|Form|Space: Geometric translations of the body in motion
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 431-438
summary This paper presents a novel approach to digital investigation of body, space, form and motion to expose issues of spatial perception. The spatial experience as generated from, and translated by, the human body is the focus of this work. The work explores the representational value of the body’s sense-image, the context and spatial/visual literacy of the learned sense of space-time generated from the study of the human body. Here the body is conceived not just in space but also in time, affording the ability to reinterpret the body and it’s dynamic motion engaged not as a static condition, but as a set of event spaces. Motion here is defined as a multiplicity of continuities that can be subdivided by artificial boundaries that describe space, time and body. The study of a series of bodies and movements is described that explore the human condition as a series of differential lines (form + time) and framed structures (bodies + motion). The intention is to examine the relationship between human form and metaphysical simultaneity as generators of architectural form. The work is structured by a research approach that dissects and isolates the representational concept/image from the body in a way that might offer an alternative description to the traditional historic models.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_054
id ecaade2007_054
authors Angulo, Antonieta
year 2007
title A Technology-Enhanced Metacognitive Strategy
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 465-471
summary This paper describes the implementation of a technology-enhanced metacognitive strategy that seeks to improve the learning outcomes in beginners design studios. The implementation was based on the use of time-based rich-media tools that allowed the students to document and present the different stages of their design process. The results of the design assignment in the experimental group were compared with the results of the same assignment implemented without such a metacognitive strategy and this comparison has provided evidence about the potential benefits of the tested methods.
keywords Design education, design process, time-based media, metacognitive strategy, self-regulated learning
series eCAADe
email vasco@suddenlink.net
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_010
id ecaade2007_010
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Kourtis, Lampros
year 2007
title The House of Affects Project
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 777-784
summary The House of Affects is an experimental installation to be part of the PerFormaSpace project pursued at the University of Cambridge, UK (DIGIS) and Goldsmiths College London, U.C.L. (Digital Studios), currently partially funded by Arts&Business East 2006, in collaboration with Econavate, UK who will provide their technical expertise in fabrication using recycled materials. This paper presents project-specific information and theoretical discussion on the design process and the computational methods used to develop advanced adaptive structural components in relationship to behavioral goals, criteria and constraints.
keywords Optimization, computational architecture, architectonics, adaptability
series eCAADe
email george.artopoulos@gmail.com, kourtis@stanford.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ascaad2007_039
id ascaad2007_039
authors Bakr, A.F.; I. Diab and D. Saadallah
year 2007
title Detecting Inefficient Lighting Solutions: Step-by-Step Geographic information system (GIS) Technique
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 491-504
summary Outdoor lighting is used to illuminate roadways, parking lots, yards, sidewalks, public meeting areas, signs, work sites, and buildings. It provides us with better visibility and a sense of security. When well designed and properly installed, outdoor lighting can be and is very useful in improving visibility and safety and a sense of security, while at the same time minimizing energy use and operating costs. But, because nobody thought at this, most street lights shine light not only on the nearby ground, where is needed, but also miles away and skywards. Thus a large fraction of the light is lost, at consumer expense and without his/her consent. In the other hand, shortage in street light may cause more crimes as well as accidents. Most of the wasted or short light comes from the poorly designed street lights. Billboards, decorative lights, poorly shielded security lights are part of the problem too, but the main culprit for the waste and ugly glow one sees above one's head at nights is from the streetlights. Thus, recent computer technology gives us tools to be employed for testing the quality of light. Geographic Information System (GIS) software could be utilized to achieve that mission through applying mapping technique. This technique could analyze digital photographs and define light polluted areas as well as bad lighted. This paper reveals that step by step technique, which employs hybrid technologies to solve such problem for better planning decisions.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ascaad2007_016
id ascaad2007_016
authors Biloria, N.
year 2007
title Developing an Interactive Architectural Meta-System for Contemporary Corporate Environments: An investigation into aspects of creating responsive spatial systems for corporate offices incorporating rule based computation techniques
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 199-212
summary The research paper exemplifies upon an attempt to create a co-evolving (socio-cultural and technological) programmable spatiality with a strong underpinning in the domain of computation, interaction design and open system typologies for the generation of a constantly informed self-adaptive corporate office space (which addresses the behavioral patterns/preferences of its occupants). Architectural substantiations for such corporate bodies embodying dynamic business eco-systems usually tend to be rather inert in essence and deem to remain closed systemic entities, adhering to a rather static spatial program in accordance with which they were initially conceptualized. The research initiative, rather than creating conventional inert structural shells (hard components), thus focuses upon the development of a meta-system, or in other words the creation of a ‘soft’ computationally enriched open systemic framework (informational) which interfaces with the ‘hard’, material component and the users of the architectural construct (corporate offices). This soft space/meta system serves as a platform for providing the users with a democratic framework, within which they can manifest their own programmatic (activity oriented) combinations in order to create self designed spatial alternatives. The otherwise static/inert hard architectural counterpart, enhanced with contemporary technology thus becomes a physical interface prone to real-time spatial/structural and ambient augmentation to optimally serve its users.
series ASCAAD
email nimish.biloria@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2007_215
id ecaade2007_215
authors Boytscheff, Constantin; Sfeir, Marilu Kanacri
year 2007
title Experimental Results in Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR): Searching Critical Design Factors within IVR to Increase Architectural Space Qualities
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 91-98
summary The actual study in IVR (Immersive Virtual Reality) proposes a path which may provide meaningful information about the user’s behaviours and difficulties to articulate in immersive worlds. Beyond it, we are searching for parameters to improve design qualities in such an architectural space. Our interest is to use IVR as a medium to research the quality of spaces in particular the atmosphere of such spaces, on the basis of people’s interest and eagerness. Therefore it is important to comprehend the special conditions of the perception and the behaviour of the user in virtual spaces. The purpose is to understand the influence of an IVR environment upon the human being and to develop motivation for a personal use of virtual space as a learning environment. The aim of the analysis was to explore behaviour patterns in a simulated IVR environment. Moving from the dynamic of space, there arises a personal “space-time-system”.
keywords Urban planning, virtual reality, immersive, teaching
series eCAADe
email boytscheff@htwg-konstanz.de
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ijac20075402
id ijac20075402
authors Burry, Jane R.
year 2007
title Mindful Spaces: Computational Geometry and the Conceptual Spaces in which Designers Operate
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 4, pp. 611-624
summary Combinatorial computational geometry, while dealing with geometric objects as discrete entities, provides the means both to analyse and to construct relationships between these objects and relate them to other non-geometrical entities. This paper explores some ways in which this may be used in design through a review of six, one-semester-long design explorations by undergraduate and postgraduate students in the Flexible Modeling for Design and Prototyping course between 2004 and 2007. The course focuses on using computational geometry firstly to construct topologically defined design models based on graphs of relationships between objects (parametric design,) and concurrently to output physical prototypes from these "flexible models"(an application of numerical computational geometry). It supports students to make early design explorations. Many have built flexible models to explore design iterations for a static spatial outcome. Some have built models of real time responsive dynamic systems. In this educational context, computational geometry has enabled a range of design iterations that would have been challenging to uncover through physical analogue means alone. It has, perhaps more significantly, extended the students' own concept of the space in which they design.
series journal
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2008/02/25 19:30

_id ecaade2007_038
id ecaade2007_038
authors Campbell, Cameron
year 2007
title The Kino-eye in Digital Pedagogy
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 543-550
summary “I am the kino-eye” states Dziga Vertov in his classic movie The Man with the Movie Camera (1929). The relationship of the cameraman, the subject, and audience is a dynamic that he investigates through cinema. It is also a dynamic that inspires an innovative way for advanced digital media to be explored in architecture pedagogy. This paper is focused on three ways to translate the cinematic relationship developed in Dziga’s work to digital media in architecture: the way designers capture and manipulate digital media to make architecture; how the discourse of film and architecture can be informed by an understanding of the manipulation of digital media; and the role of digital media production as a form of research for architecture. The film is noteworthy because it is not a typical narrative screenplay, rather it is a visual experiment. In standard films the perceptions of space are manipulated through the camera and through other means, but the audience is rarely aware of it. However, Vertov is acutely aware of this dynamic and engages the audience by self-consciously using what would otherwise be considered a mistake – the viewer is aware that the camera looks at his/her own relationship with film not just the relationship of camera and scene. The translation of this into the classroom is that the same tools allow designers to be critical of their relationship with the medium and the way media is used to make architecture. This concept can be applied to any medium, but in this class it is applied to how students relate with produced motion images and editing that into a video production. The three elements described in this text are key aspects of not simply producing short films, but an opportunity to actually be introspective of architecture through an alternative media. Student projects include video montages that develop a cultural perspective on design and projects that are self-conscious of technology and how it impacts the production. The film-work necessary to achieve these productions is simultaneously conscious of the way in which the author relates to the scene and conscious of how that scene is edited in the context of the production.
keywords Pedagogy, video, hyperspace, film
series eCAADe
email cameronc@iastate.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id ecaade2007_174
id ecaade2007_174
authors Carrara, Gianfranco; Fioravanti, Antonio
year 2007
title X-House – A Game to Improve Collaboration in Architectural Design
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 141-149
summary The current research we are conducting refers to a general model of architectural design. The complexity of the present-day design process is such that new ICT tools are required to consciously and appropriately govern the design choices. In particular, the tools that involve the early phases of the design process, when the choices crucial to the entire building process are made. In this perspective we are developing, together with a general model of architectural design based on Collaborative Design (CD), a simplified version of it – the _-House game – that can be used to help university students appreciate the complexity of doing architecture and building. This “simplified version” of the general model is therefore a useful ‘design training tool’ in the case of complex problems that can be solved by means of iterations, trade-offs, creativity, and group work; and at the same time makes it possible to highlight, define and link relatively little known aspects of design, such as scheduling, relations among operators, decision-making mechanisms, and process and design priorities.
keywords Collaborative design, game, research and education, web based design
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email gianfranco.carrara@uniroma1.it, antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2008/06/16 08:46

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