CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 485

_id acadia08_182
id acadia08_182
authors Gibson, Michael; Kevin R. Klinger; Joshua Vermillion
year 2008
title Constructing Information: Towards a Feedback Ecology in Digital Design and Fabrication
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 182-191
summary As strategies evolve using digital means to navigate design in architecture, critical process-based approaches are essential to the discourse. The often complex integration of design, analysis, and fabrication through digital technologies is wholly reliant upon a process-basis necessitating the use of a design feedback loop, which reinforces critical decision-making and challenges the notions of how we produce, visualize, and analyze information in the service of production and assembly. Central to this process-based approach is the effective and innovative integration of information and the interrogation of material based explorations in the making of architecture. This fabrication ‘ecology’ forces designers to engage complexity and accept the unpredictability of emergent systems. It also exposes the process of working to critique and refine feedback loops in light of complex tools, methods, materials, site, and performance considerations. In total, strategies for engaging this ‘ecology’ are essential to accentuate our present understanding of environmental design and theory in relation to digital processes for design and fabrication. ¶ This paper recounts a design/fabrication seminar entitled “Constructing Information” in which architecture students examined an environmental design problem by way of the design feedback loop, where their efforts in applying digital design and fabrication methods were driven explicitly by material and site realities and where their work was executed, installed, and critically explored in situ. These projections raise important questions about how information, complexity, and context overlay and merge, and underscore the critical potential of visual, spatial, and material effects as part of a fabrication-oriented design process.
keywords Digital Fabrication; Ecology; Environment; Feedback; Performance
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id acadia08_066
id acadia08_066
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Moritz Fleischmann
year 2008
title Material & Space: Synthesis Strategies based on Evolutionary Developmental Biology
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 66-71
summary A material system can be defined as a set of self-organized materials, defining a certain spatial arrangement. In architecture, this material arrangement acts as a threshold for space, though space often only appears as a by-product of the material organization. Treating space as a resulting, therefore secondary, independent product minimizes the capacity to generate architecture that is astutely aware of concerns of functionality, environment and energy. An effective arrangement of material can only be determined in relation to the spaces that it defines. When proposing a more critical approach, a material system can be seen as an intimate inter-connection and reciprocal exchange between the material construct and the spatial conditions. It is necessary to re-define material system as a system that coevolves spatial and material configurations through analysis of the resultant whole, in a process of integration and evaluation. ¶ With this understanding of material system comes an expansion in the number of criteria that are simultaneously engaged in the evolution of the design. The material characteristics, as well as the spatial components and forces (external and internal), are pressures onto the arrangement of material and space. ¶ This brings a high degree of complexity to the process. Biological systems are built on methods that resolve complex interactions through sets of simple yet extensible rules. Evolutionary Developmental Biology explains how growth is an interconnected process of external forces registering fitness into a fixed catalogue of morphological genetic tools. Translating the specific framework for biological growth into computational processes, allows the pursuit of an architecture that is fully informed by the interaction of space and material.
keywords Biology; Computation; Material; Parametric; System
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ddss2008-32
id ddss2008-32
authors Chiaradia, Alain; Christian Schwander, Jorge Gil, Eva Friedrich
year 2008
title Mapping the intangible value of urban layout (i-VALUL): Developing a tool kit for the socio-economic valuation of urbanarea, for designers and decision makers
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary In this paper we present the development of a GIS tool kit for the socioeconomic valuation of urban areas towards the creation of sustainable communities, describing the project context, development process, the tool kit’s structure, its main tools and initial feedback from its use. We then present the plan for training sessions and pilot projects where the tool kit is going to be used, and conclude with the discussion of the development of a single integrated tool to be used beyond the life of the ‘i-VALUL’ project. This project was supported by the UCL led UrbanBuzz programme within which UEL is a prime partner.
keywords Urban planning, spatial analysis, design support tools, evaluation system, GIS
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id acadia08_072
id acadia08_072
authors Frumar, Jerome
year 2008
title An Energy Centric Approach to Architecture: Abstracting the material to co-rationalize design and performance
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 72-81
summary This paper begins by exploring matter as an aggregated system of energy transactions and modulations. With this in mind, it examines the notion of energy driven form finding as a design methodology that can simultaneously negotiate physical, environmental and fabrication considerations. The digital workspace enables this notion of form finding to re-establish itself in the world of architecture through a range of analytic tools that algorithmically encode real world physics. Simulating the spatial and energetic characteristics of reality enables virtual “form generation models that recognize the laws of physics and are able to create ‘minimum’ surfaces for compression, bending [and] tension” (Cook 2004). The language of energy, common in engineering and materials science, enables a renewed trans-disciplinary dialogue that addresses significant historic disjunctions such as the professional divide between architects and engineers. Design becomes a science of exploring abstracted energy states to discover a suitable resonance with which to tune the built environment. ¶ A case study of one particular method of energy driven form finding is presented. Bi-directional Evolutionary Structural Optimization (BESO) is a generative engineering technique developed at RMIT University. It appropriates natural growth strategies to determine optimum forms that respond to structural criteria by reorganizing their topology. This dynamic topology response enables structural optimization to become an integrated component of design exploration. A sequence of investigations illustrates the flexibility and trans-disciplinary benefits of this approach. Using BESO as a tool for design rather than purely for structural optimization fuses the creative approach of the architect with the pragmatic approach of the engineer, enabling outcomes that neither profession could develop in isolation. The BESO case study alludes to future design processes that will facilitate a coherent unfolding of design logic comparable to morphogenesis.
keywords Energy; Form-Finding; Morphogenesis; Optimization; Structure
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id caadria2008_73_session7a_601
id caadria2008_73_session7a_601
authors Gu, Ning; Jerry Jen-Hung Tsai
year 2008
title An Interactive Graphical System for Collaborative Architectural Design in 3D Virtual Environments
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 601-608
summary This paper presents the development of an interactive graphical system applicable to collaborative architectural design in 3D virtual environments and its preliminary application for a building design project. This interactive graphical system integrates the spatial system and the stylistic system and specialises in styles representation and exploration in architectural design.
series CAADRIA
email Ning.Gu@newcastle.edu.au, jerry.usyd@gmail.com
last changed 2008/05/06 11:22

_id acadia08_472
id acadia08_472
authors Key, Sora; Mark D Gross; Ellen Yi-Luen Do
year 2008
title Computing Spatial Qualities For Architecture
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 472-477
summary Computational representation of spatial qualities can lead us to a better understanding of how we construct spatial concepts. Analyses of spatial qualities can support architects in reasoning about the form of a configuration, helping them predict the consequences of a design. ¶ In this paper we present three definitions (enclosure, viewfield, continuity) that describe experiential qualities of architectural spaces. Our project aims to provide computable definitions to these qualities to describe common spatial experiences that are implicitly understood by architects. The description, using familiar terms, reveals the analytical structure of spatial qualities that is based on the geometry of the physical elements. ; We therefore introduce a graphic editor, Descriptor, that provides visualization of spatial qualities as the designer diagrams building elements. The system calculates perceived relationships (surrounded, visible, nearby, nearest) between a viewpoint and the architectural elements based on their geometric properties such as location and distance. The relationships are the components of the three qualities we define. We also present a use scenario to demonstrate how one might use our Descriptor system during early design. ¶ Descriptor is an attempt to formalize descriptions of the spatial qualities to help beginners understand how to make design decisions. In the future, we plan to extend the set of qualities and add detailed attributes of the physical elements to the system.
keywords Analysis; Computation; Environment; Representation; Spatial
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id caadria2008_21_session3a_174
id caadria2008_21_session3a_174
authors Lan, Ju-Hung Kai-Han Chung
year 2008
title Designing a Smart Workplace to Assist Design Activity from an Emotional Approach
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 174-179
summary In this paper, we are interested in developing a smart workplace to assist design activities during design processes from an emotional approach. A key problem in this study is how to design a smart environment, which is able to detect the designer’s emotional state and provides smart mechanism to assist design work. In the preliminary study, a spatial system prototype is developed to illustrate the design ideas of the smart workplace. Some triggered spatial events to describe the capabilities of assisting design activities from an emotional approach is introduced in the study. The framework of ubiquitous computing design in developing the smart workplace is introduced.
keywords Smart Space, Emotional Design, Ubiquitous Computing
series CAADRIA
email jhlan@ntit.edu.tw, g9434705@yuntech.edu.tw
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2008_20_session3a_168
id caadria2008_20_session3a_168
authors Lan, Ju-Hung
year 2008
title Smart Space for Office Daily Life: A Situated Life Pattern Approach
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 168-173
summary Researches in smart space design have been focused on using ubiquitous computing technologies to provide the visions of future lives in physical spaces. However, most researches have less concern for the logical usability in creating smart spaces for the occupants. The study is interested in designing a smart space which is occupant-centric and situated-life-oriented based on ubiquitous computing technologies. A spatial system prototype with smart door, smart wall, and smart table is developed from a situated life pattern approach to support typical office life events. The design problems of integrating ubiquitous computing devices with physical spatial components are explored and discussed.
keywords Smart space, ubiquitous computing, situated life pattern
series CAADRIA
email jhlan@ntit.edu.tw
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p035
id cf2011_p035
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Weber Markus, Petzold Frank, Liwicki Marcus, Dengel Andreas
year 2011
title Sketch-based Methods for Researching Building Layouts through the Semantic Fingerprint of Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 85-102.
summary The paper focuses on the early stages of the design process where the architect needs assistance in finding reference projects and describes different aspects of a concept for retrieving previous design solutions with similar layout characteristics. Such references are typically used to see how others have solved a similar architectural problem or simply for inspiration. Current electronic search methods use textual information rather than graphical information. The configuration of space and the relations between rooms are hard to represent using keywords, in fact transforming these spatial configurations into verbally expressed typologies tends to result in unclear and often imprecise descriptions of architecture. Nowadays, modern IT-technologies lead to fundamental changes during the process of designing buildings. Digital representations of architecture require suitable approaches to the storage, indexing and management of information as well as adequate retrieval methods. Traditionally planning information is represented in the form of floor plans, elevations, sections and textual descriptions. State of the art digital representations include renderings, computer aided design (CAD) and semantic information like Building Information Modelling (BIM) including 2D and 3D file formats such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) (IAI, 2010). In the paper, we examine the development of IT-technologies in the area of case-based reasoning (Richter et al., 2007) to provide a sketch-based submission and retrieval system for publishing and researching building layouts including their manipulation and subsequent use. The user interface focuses on specifying space and their relations by drawing them. This query style supports the spatial thinking approach that architects use, who often have a visual representation in mind without being able to provide an accurate description of the spatial configuration. The semantic fingerprint proposed by (Langenhan, 2008) is a description and query language for creating an index of floor plans to store meta-data about architecture, which can be used as signature for retrieving reference projects. The functional spaces, such as living room or kitchen and the relation among on another, are used to create a fingerprint. Furthermore, we propose a visual sketch-based interface (Weber et al., 2010) based on the Touch&Write paradigm (Liwicki et al., 2010) for the submission and the retrieval phase. During the submission process the architect is sketching the space-boundaries, space relations and functional coherence's. Using state of the art document analysis techniques, the architects are supported offering an automatic detection of room boundaries and their physical relations. During the retrieval the application will interpret the sketches of the architect and find reference projects based on a similarity based search utilizing the semantic fingerprint. By recommending reference projects, architects will be able to reuse collective experience which match the current requirements. The way of performing a search using a sketch as a query is a new way of thinking and working. The retrieval of 3D models based on a sketched shape are already realized in several domains. We already propose a step further, using the semantics of a spatial configuration. Observing the design process of buildings reveals that the initial design phase serves as the foundation for the quality of the later outcome. The sketch-based approach to access valuable information using the semantic fingerprint enables the user to digitally capture knowledge about architecture, to recover and reuse it in common-sense. Furthermore, automatically analysed fingerprints can put forward both commonly used as well as best practice projects. It will be possible to rate architecture according to the fingerprint of a building.
keywords new media, case-based reasoning, ontology, semantic building design, sketch-based, knowledge management
series CAAD Futures
email langenhan@tum.de
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2008_113
id ecaade2008_113
authors Montenegro, Nuno C.; Duarte , José Pinto
year 2008
title Towards a Computational Description of Urban Patterns
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 239-248
summary This study is concerned with the formulation of solutions for urban problems. It departs from Alexander’s pattern language theory and urban design guidelines, to create a system for generating specifications or the ingredients of a plan, given a scale, a site and a community. It takes into account strategies, regulations, guidelines, physical features of the site, and furthermore, the social, cultural and economic characteristics of the population. This system, sorted by a sequence of events, through stages, categories, methods and agents, describes taxonomic levels and their inner relations. Such an ontology provides a pattern encoding structure towards a computational model within the capabilities provided by the spatial data modeling of GIS (GIS-O). The urban formulation model is conceived to increase qualitative inputs, reducing ambiguities, through a flexible while automate process applied to urban planning.
keywords Urban Formulation, Ontology, Pattern Language, GIS interoperability
series eCAADe
email montenegroarquitectos@hotmail.com, jduarte@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id caadria2008_29_session3b_236
id caadria2008_29_session3b_236
authors Nakapan, Walaiporn; Somkidt Yindeeyoungyeon
year 2008
title Development of a Simple Web-based GIS System for Sustainable Housing Projects VisualizatioN
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 236-243
summary This paper presents a simple web-based GIS system for visualization of Baan Mankong, as known as sustainable housing projects for communities of low-incomers in Thailand. The Baan Mankong project has been so successful that numbers of projects initialized have been increasing during the past couple of years. The projects information is gathered in a huge database, but there is a lack of visualization tool to help the officers and executives to have a global view of the projects’ spatial distribution and to have a quick access to project information. GIS is proposed as a tool to be developed on the web for the visualization of this project. The Baan Mankong’s work flow and project information are studied in order to select only necessary information to be stored in the system. Then, the geographic visualization tool development process is presented.
keywords GIS; Google Maps; sustainable housing; project database
series CAADRIA
email walaiporn@rsu.ac.th, somukido@yahoo.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ijac20076203
id ijac20076203
authors Ophir, Yaniv
year 2008
title Go with the flow: particle systems for program modeling in high-rise buildings
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 2, pp. 171-196
summary This paper revisits the particle flow system, a time-based computational tool, which has received a lot of attention from the early pioneers of digital architecture. The use of particle flow systems in architecture enables designers to materialize what they term as site forces which can later be formalized into a building. The methods offered by various designers for using particle flow systems in architecture have kept the discourse purely formal by focusing on the exterior and neglecting the interior. This paper offers a different way of using and conceptualizing particle flow systems in architecture. Shifting the emphasis from the formal, the paper aims to show the potential of using particle flow systems as a parametric model for exploring the spatial organization of an architectural program. This paper also illustrates the application of the proposed computational model, i.e., the particle flow system, by using a case study - the design of a high-rise building in downtown Tel Aviv, Israel.
series journal
last changed 2008/10/01 19:49

_id caadria2008_28_session3b_229
id caadria2008_28_session3b_229
authors Park, Young-Kyu and Hyoung-June Park
year 2008
title The study of environmental sustainability in the 19th century traditional korean residence, Yeongyeongdang
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 229-235
summary In this paper, one of traditional Korean residential buildings in the 19th century, Yeongyeongdang, is selected as a model to demonstrate the achievement of the environmental sustainability in the formal composition of traditional Korean architecture. With a computational analysis on the geometric model of Yeongyeongdang using Ecotect, this paper investigates the ecological characteristics employed in the design of the traditional Korean residence and the applications of the sustainable principles for its spatial system.
keywords Environmental factors; Simulation; Yeongyeongdang
series CAADRIA
email youngpar@hawaii.edu, hjpark@hawaii.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2008_098
id ecaade2008_098
authors Tonn, Christian; Petzold, Frank; Donath, Dirk
year 2008
title Put on Your Glasses and Press Right Mouse Button
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 201-208
summary Activities in the building industry in Germany concentrate increasingly on a combination of renovation and new building. A prerequisite for computer-aided planning in the context of existing buildings is both the use of on-site computer aided techniques and the integration of all professional disciplines in an integrated information and communication system. How will computers be used on site in the future? Which equipment will be needed? An ongoing interdisciplinary research project undertaken jointly by the faculty of media and the faculty of architecture is investigating methods and techniques for the computer-aided support of the design process with and within existing buildings. The aim of this project is the development of a practice-oriented toolbox for the architectural design process based on SAR (spatial augmented reality). This paper focuses on Augmented-Reality based user interaction on site using laser pointer tracking. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation.
keywords Augmented Reality, Design Support, User Interaction
series eCAADe
email christian.tonn@archit.uni-weimar.de, frank.petzold@archit.uni-weimar.de, donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia08_390
id acadia08_390
authors Vrana, Andrew; Joe Meppelink; Ben Nicholson
year 2008
title New Harmony Grotto
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 390-399
summary With the expanding wave of contemporary architecture inspired and informed by biomorphic design and biomimetic processes, the re-evaluation of work of Frederick Kiesler has become immanent. Throughout the mid 20th century he became increasingly interested in the relationship of natural form and structure to architectural space and organization. The Grotto for Meditation proposed in 1963 for New Harmony, Indiana commissioned by Mrs. Jane Blaffer-Owen was the culmination of his life’s work. Though the project was not realized, it embodies all of the influences of his time from surrealism to biology and cybernetic theory. Through our university and the Blaffer Foundation, we engaged in formal research and tectonic resolution of the project employing digital modeling and fabrication technologies at our College and in Houston where Mrs. Owen lives when she is not in New Harmony. We based this project on the full catalog of archival material made available to us with support from the Blaffer and Kielser Foundations. Our exploration also was influenced by discussions with Mrs. Blaffer-Owen who is still very interested in realizing this profoundly interesting and enigmatic project. Our university has opened the door to the opportunity that our reinterpreted Grotto become a permanent fixture on the campus next to a wetland landscape that it is currently under construction. Our research into Kiesler has engaged his esoteric concepts of “co-realism” and “continuous tension” as well as his early use of recursive geometry and biomorphic form in design. From reverse engineering and digital fabrication via 3D scanning to generative structural articulation, we are experimenting with a structural/spatial system that closely aligns with Kiesler’s originally proposed tile patterning dilated into a minimal structure. Our prototypes and the final version will be fabricated by one of the largest commercially for-hire water jet cutter in country and assembled on the site.
keywords Biomorphic; Digital Fabrication; Prototype; Structure
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id cdc2008_105
id cdc2008_105
authors Friedrich, Christian
year 2008
title Information-matter hybrids: Prototypes engaging immediacy as architectural quality
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 105-110
summary ‘Immediate Architecture’ is an exploratory investigation into possibilities of immediate interactive and constructive interaction with the built environment supported by digital technologies. Aim is to realize interactive reconfigurable architectural objects that support their informational and material reconfiguration in real-time. The outcome is intended to become a synergetic amalgam of interactive architecture, parametric design environment, automated component fabrication and assembly. To this end, computational and material strategies are developed to approach the condition of immediate architecture and applied in real-world prototypes. A series of developed techniques are presented, ranging from realtime volumetric modeling, behavioral programming and meta-application protocol to streaming fabrication and dynamic components for interactive architecture.
email h.c.friedrich@gmail.com
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id cdc2008_279
id cdc2008_279
authors Jensen, Ole B.
year 2008
title Networked mobilities and new sites of mediated interaction
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 279-286
summary This paper takes point of departure in an understanding of mobility as an important cultural dimension to contemporary life. The movement of objects, signs, and people constitutes material sites of networked relationships. However, as an increasing number of mobility practices are making up our everyday life experiences the movement is much more than a travel from point A to point B. The mobile experiences of the contemporary society are practices that are meaningful and normatively embedded. That is to say, mobility is seen as a cultural phenomenon shaping notions of self and other as well as the relationship to sites and places. Furthermore, an increasing number of such mobile practices are mediated by technologies of tangible and less tangible sorts. The claim in this paper is, that by reflecting upon the meaning of mobility in new mediated interaction spaces we come to test and challenge these established dichotomies as less fruitful ways of thinking. The paper concludes with a research agenda for unfolding a ‘politics of visibility’, engaging with the ambivalences of networked mobilities and mediated projects, and critically challenge of taken for granted interpretations of networked mobilities.
email obje@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ecaade2008_032
id ecaade2008_032
authors Kaijima, Sawako; Michalatos, Panagiotis
year 2008
title Computational Design Consultancy
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 311-318
summary The pervasiveness of the digital media has set the ground for tighter collaboration between the discipline involved in the architecture practice and potential for reconfiguring the well-established communication patterns in the industry to occur. Considering the context thereof, Computation Design Consultancy aims to connect different considerations and priorities raised by different parties involved in the architecture production system by means of digital computation. Here, we discusses the inefficiency of the existing system in engaging with the contemporary context influenced by the digital media as well as our approaches and findings thus far though the consultancy work.
keywords Consultancy, Communication, Interactive Software
series eCAADe
email Sawako@akt-uk.com, Panmic@akt-uk.com
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id cdc2008_091
id cdc2008_091
authors Neumann, Oliver
year 2008
title Digitally Mediated Regional Building Cultures
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 91-98
summary Designs are complex energy and material systems and products of diverse cultural, economic, and environmental conditions that engage with their extended context. This approach relates architecture to the discourse on complexity. The design research described in this paper introduces an extended definition of ecology that expands the scope of design discourse beyond the environmental performance of materials and types of construction to broader cultural considerations. Parallel to enabling rich formal explorations, digital modeling and fabrication tools provide a basis for engaging with complex ecologies within which design and building exist. Innovative design applications of digital media emphasize interdependencies between new design methods and their particular context in material science, economy, and culture. In British Columbia, influences of fabrication and building technology are evident in the development of a regional cultural identity that is characterized by wood construction. While embracing digital technology as a key to future development and geographic identity, three collaborative digital wood fabrication projects illustrate distinctions between concepts of complexity and responsiveness and their application in design and construction.
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

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