CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 127

_id acadia08_464
id acadia08_464
authors Belcher, Daniel; Brian Johnson
year 2008
title MxR: A Physical Model-Based Mixed Reality Interface for Design Collaboration, Simulation, Visualization and Form Generation
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 464-471
summary MxR—pronounced “mixer”—is a Mixed/Augmented Reality system intended to support collaboration during early phases of architectural design. MxR allows an interdisciplinary group of practitioners and stakeholders to gather around a table, discuss and test different hypotheses, visualize results, simulate different physical systems, and generate simple forms. MxR is also a test-bed for collaborative interactions and demonstrates different configuration potentials, from exploration of individual alternatives to group discussion around a physical model. As a MR-VR transitional interface, MxR allows for movement along the reality-virtuality continuum, while employing a simple tangible user-interface and a MagicLens interaction technique.
keywords Augmented Reality; Collaboration; Interactive; Interface; Physical Modeling
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id cdc2008_049
id cdc2008_049
authors Jaskiewicz, Tomasz
year 2008
title Dynamic Design Matter[s]: Practical considerations for interactive architecture
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 49-56
summary This paper explores the concept of interactive architecture. The first section begins by formulating a daring vision of a radically new kind of architecture. In the second chapter this vision is further elaborated upon, by proposing a generic approach towards practically accomplishing the originally formulated theoretical concept. Opportunities and threats that emerge from this vision and approach are discussed in the third section and eventually, in section four and five, the proposed approach is brought to practical applications and illustrated with a number of experimental building component examples that all together include all necessary features to create a complete large scale architectural object. All projects and explorations have been conducted as part of the Hyperbody group’s research at the Delft University of Technology and have been inspired by group’s director, prof. Kas Oosterhuis.
email t.j.jaskiewicz@tudelft.nl
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ecaade2017_202
id ecaade2017_202
authors Sollazzo, Aldo, Trento, Armando and Baseta, Efilena
year 2017
title Machinic Agency - Implementing aerial robotics and machine learning to map public space
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 611-618
summary The research presented in this paper is focused on proposing a new digital workflow, involving unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and machines learning systems, in order to detect and map citizen's behaviors in the context of public spaces.Novel machinic abilities can be implemented in the understanding of the human context, decoding, through computer visions and machine learning, complex systems into intelligible outputs (Olson, 2008), mapping the relationships of our reality. In this framework, robotic and computational strategies can be implemented in order to offer a new description of public spaces, bringing to light the hidden forces and multiple layers constituting the urban habitat. The presented study focuses on the development of a methodology turning video frames collected from cameras installed on drones into large datasets used to train convolutional networks and enable machines learning systems to detect and map pedestrians in public spaces.
keywords mapping; drones; machine learning; computer vision; city
series eCAADe
email aldo@noumena.io
last changed 2017/09/13 13:30

_id ecaade2008_065
id ecaade2008_065
authors Uddin, M. Saleh
year 2008
title Simulation of Daylight in the Architecture of Louis I. Kahn: A Study of the Un-built Hurva Synagogue
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 727-734
summary One of the most powerful aspects of Louis I. Kahn’s architectural space is his handling of natural light. Kahn believed that architecture began with the ‘making of a room’ and that ‘a room is not a room without natural light.’ Throughout his career, he explored bringing light into interiors in the most imaginative ways. Kahn used endless possibilities, from small devices to complex dome structures, to create a poetic and spiritual light inside buildings. The purpose of this paper is to present the theories and practices of natural light in architecture by Louis Kahn, who has deftly used it as a creative medium in his design of buildings. Starting from development of theories, this research focuses on how he implemented his theories into practice. As a case study, the Hurva Synagogue project is selected to analyze its unique lighting solutions. Many of Kahn’s previous concepts can be traced to the Hurva, making it an ideal project for lighting study. Since Hurva Synagogue is an un-built project, recent techniques of computer graphics is used to understand how daylight illuminates the interior in different times of the day and year in both still images and in 3D animations.
keywords Louis I Kahn, Daylight Simulation, 3D Model, Animation
series eCAADe
email suddin@spsu.edu
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2008_055
id ecaade2008_055
authors Beirão, José; Duarte, José; Stouffs, Rudi
year 2008
title Structuring a Generative Model for Urban Design: Linking GIS to Shape Grammars
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 929-938
summary Urban Design processes need to adopt flexible and adaptive procedures to respond to the evolving demands of the contemporary city. To support such dynamic processes, a specific design methodology and a supporting tool are needed. This design methodology considers the development of a design system rather than a single design solution. It is based on patterns and shape grammars. The idea is to link the descriptions of each pattern to specific shape rules inducing the generation of formal solutions that satisfy the pattern. The methodology explores, from the urban designer point of view, the capacity of a shape grammar to codify and generate urban form (Duarte et al, 2007). This paper defines the ontology of urban entities to build on a GIS platform the topology describing the various components of the city structure. By choosing different sets of patterns the designer defines his vision for a specific context. The patterns are explicated into shape rules that encode the designer’s interpretation of the pattern, and operate on this ontology of urban entities generating solutions that satisfy the pattern’s concept. Some examples of the topological relations are shown.
keywords Patterns, shape grammars, ontology, generative urban design
series eCAADe
email J.N.Beirao@tudelft.nl
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2008_049
id ecaade2008_049
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang
year 2008
title Creating and Using 3D City Models
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 223-230
summary City modelling is a topic which has been on the agenda for a long time. Today crucial questions concerning the creation of a city model are resolved. The vision of the automatic generation of the 3D geometry of a city out of high resolution digital aerial images is a reality now. These new developments decreased the cost for creating and maintaining a 3D city model of a complete city significantly. This paper wants to outline the ‘history’ of 3D city models and show recent developments in this field. An overview about current applications and uses in this field in Austria and the implementation into daily work is shown with examples (Graz and Vienna city models). Additionally the new developments like Street View in Google Earth or Bird’s Eye in Virtual earth are discussed in relation to their 3D ‘relatives’.
keywords 3Dcity Models, GIS, Google Earth, Virtual Earth
series eCAADe
email Dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ijac20076304
id ijac20076304
authors Baltazar, Ana Paula; Kapp, Silke; Nascimento, Denise Morado; Goncalves, Rodrigo Marcandier; Lino, Sulamita Fonseca; Coelho, Mara Lidia Rodrigues; Olalquiaga, Amanda Alves; Gontijo, Felipe Jose; Silva, Joana Vieira Da; Magalhaes, Pedro Arthur Novaes
year 2008
title Noncopyright And The Digital Interface To Support The Autonomous Production Of Dwellings
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 3, pp. 279-297
summary This paper presents the discussions on intellectual property crucial for the research group MOM to develop the system IDA (digital interface for supporting autonomous production of dwellings). It first introduces IDA, its conceptual framework, its database and its interactive interface. Then, it examines the arguments for copyright, identifying them as myths or disguises of other intentions, usually based on perpetuating privileges. From that it discusses the way IDA approaches interaction as a means to break the usual logic of perpetuating privileges in digital systems. This leads to examining some anti-copyright movements concluding that they follow the same logic of register of the copyright. Thus, noncopyright seems to be the best means to protest against the current logic and for conveying information towards autonomy of users in their processes of production of space. It also points to an alternative use of computers in architecture as proposed in IDA, which is not based on representation but on interaction.
series journal
last changed 2008/10/14 12:00

_id 4d32
id 4d32
authors Christian Derix, Åsmund Gamlesæter, Pablo Miranda Carranza.
year 2008
title 3d Isovists and Spatial Sensations: two methods and a case study
source EDRA 39th Annual Conference
summary The development of the first Isovist in 3D, is the result of a collaboration between the Aedas CDR group and the New York based architecture office Davis Brody Bond, for the design of the Ground Zero Memorial Museum. The article introduces the design context that prompted the development of 3D Isovists, and discusses 2 basic methods and their variations developed as part of the research.
keywords Isovist, spatial perception, user cognition, visibility graph analysis
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.sfbtr8.uni-bremen.de/papers/SFB_TR%208%20Rep%20015-05_2008.pdf
last changed 2012/09/20 15:58

_id ddss2008-47
id ddss2008-47
authors Den Otter, Ad F. and H.J. Pels
year 2008
title Rivalry between the collective use of IT tools and working methods of design teams Comparison of research outcomes
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary Nowadays a high variety of IT tools is available for communication purposes in design processes on individual and group level. Despite this, the exchange and sharing of design documents collectively in design and engineering teams might be limited mainly, due to habits, preferences, working methods and rivalry between the collective use of IT tools in such product development. Changes in habits and preferences for collective use of IT tools might be realized by training and management power. However, adoption of collectively to be used tools, like project websites, is depending heavenly on the attractiveness for users in daily work. Based on empirical research outcomes it is indicated that rivalry between collective used tools and differences in working methods of users might be main barriers for attractiveness of these tools in daily work. Applying a framework for analyzing and categorizing of the frequency of use of IT tools for team communication, the authors explain the appearance of rivalry between tools, limiting the effectiveness in daily work and not affecting team communication and performance. By comparison of working methods in different sectors authors explain the necessity of changes in working methods in design and engineering in the building & construction industry on organizational and inter-organizational level for successful adoption of collectively to be used IT tools in team communication.
keywords Rivalry between IT tools, collective use, team communication, team performance, working habits, preferences, working methods, 2nd order of change
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ecaade2008_122
id ecaade2008_122
authors Kawasumi, Norihiro; Morozumi, Mitsuo; Homma, Riken
year 2008
title The APEX/VPB & MAP: Graphical Design Interface and Archive for Distributed Collaboration
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 341-348
summary The digital tools are most convenient technologies to realize distributed collaborative design environment on the web. A lot of practical design systems have been already developed with researches in the world. On these systems, the digital bulletin board and web-map technologies are generally used to support for group-discussing and exchanging design proposals via the web. But some of them are only possible to store design materials apart on the web and the peculiar interface is not well-optimized for architectural design activities. In this paper, we discuss to develop the collaborative design system simulated of our practical group-work methods. The APEX/VPB & MAP will realize the easy information management with interactive digital bulletin board and map-based interface. Finally, we will report the results of our experimental design studio using with APEX/VPB & MAP.
keywords Dynamic Interface, Distributed Collaboration, Geographical Map Navigation, Design Management, Web Archive
series eCAADe
email kawasumi@sys.wakayama-u.ac.jp, moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp, homma@ge.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id sigradi2008_097
id sigradi2008_097
authors Nogueira de Carvalho, Ana Paula; Marcelo Tramontano, Marlon Rubio Longo
year 2008
title D.O.S. Designers on Spot: Communication processes and Learning actions [Processos de Comunicação e Ações de Aprendizagem]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary D.O.S. Designers on Spot: Communication processes and Learning actions This paper introduces some concepts that have been studied at D.O.S. project as part of the learning and communication actions. These concepts are relevant to the project as they brought to the team some improvements about design experiences based on network communication, as well as some reflections done by designers and researchers in different parts of the world. The project proposed by our research group is part of growing demands for experiments able to explore the Advanced Internet for fast transferring large packages of content. The activities are divided in two different instances: one is called exploratory research and aims to identify enrichments that a collaborative practice would add to the design process and to the production of interactive prototypes as well. The other one is related to remote learning strategies. It aims at investigating new methods of collective design and prototyping of objects with integrated media, and the diffusion of these techniques and methods in classroom environments, as a teaching strategy. Following are three different aspects about design experiences. The first one, called communication processes, presents a panoramic view about different ways the participants of a remote design session can share information. It targets to point and to systematize design actions by exploring transversal characteristics among designers, teams and the resulting objects. In order to achieve it, we have to understand some relations between remote communication and design processes, which explore issues in the project phases of conception, production and interaction. This exploration is part of the search for a conceptual scope for the D.O.S. project development, with an emphasis on the communication specificities between remote designers and the design process. The second one, learning action processes, introduces some issues about academic teaching and learning of design through remote and collaborative media. The third one, Virtual Design Studio (VDS), is related to the previous and aims to present a specific kind of remote design sessions targeting to create strategies to use new communication and information technologies (ICT) on remote project instances. The teaching of Architecture and Design is, above all, multidisciplinary – this means that it is not limited to the knowledge of one field of activity but, by a wide range of subjects from different areas - including Computing. The introduction of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) in the project process is commonly associated to the final stages, and not to the creation. The contribution of the digital environment is provided for the use of various software, which are not restricted to those responsible for graphical representation: programs responsible for the organization of data in tables, for example, enable monitoring developments with clarity. The multidisciplinary consideration supports new variables in the process of design, working quickly and accurately on the possibilities, which modifies the agency of decisions and management tasks.
keywords Advanced internet, collaborative design, virtual design studio
series SIGRADI
email anaetudomais@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id acadia08_134
id acadia08_134
authors Peters, Brady
year 2008
title Copenhagen Elephant House: A Case Study of Digital Design Processes
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 134-141
summary This paper outlines the digital design processes involved in the design and construction of the new Elephant House at Copenhagen Zoo. Early design concepts for the canopy were tested using physical sketch models. The geometric complexity of these early physical models led to the involvement of the Specialist Modelling Group and the use of the computer to digitally sketch 3D CAD models. After many studies, the complex form of the canopies was rationalised using torus geometry. A computer program was written to generate the canopy glazing and structure. This parametric system was developed to be a design tool, and was developed by an architectural designer working with the team. Through its use the team were able to explore more design options, and alter the design farther along in the design process; however, this generative tool was created largely as a CAD efficiency tool. Another series of computer programs were written to generate and populate a shading system based on environmental analysis. Unlike the computer program that generated the structure and glazing, this program was not developed to make the generation of complex geometric structures more efficient, but developed to explore computational approaches that would have been impossible without the computer. Most of the canopy’s design was communicated to fabricator through a geometry method statement, a method that has been proven to be effective in the past. The project completed in June 2008.
keywords Complex Geometry; Computation; Design; Generative; Sustainability
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ddss2008-28
id ddss2008-28
authors Rügemer, Jörg
year 2008
title Pimp my Box – Architecture of TransformationInterdisciplinary Collaboration and Various Media as DesignDecision and Support Tools
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary The paper describes an interdisciplinary architectural design studio setting at the graduate level, which explores the notion of “transformation” in architecture. By collaborating with a group of modern dance students, the studio approaches the creation of space from a different perspective, using dynamic movement coupled with digital tools as a space generator.
keywords Transformation of Space, Dynamic Space, Hybrid Design Method, Interdisciplinary Studio Approach
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id acadia11_60
id acadia11_60
authors Speaks, Michael
year 2011
title New Values of New Design
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 60-63
summary Driven by advances in building and information technology and accelerated by the tumultuous period of global economic restructuring that commenced in 2008, architecture and interior design practice is today confronted with the necessity of fundamental change. According to the “Building Futures” group at the Royal Institute of British Architects and US-based “Design Futures Council,” both of which this past year published studies on this very topic, a great deal depends on what happens in China and other emerging markets, where many European and US firms now have offices. And that is not only because these are the most vibrant markets for architecture and design services, but also because the demands placed on practitioners in these markets are fundamentally changing the way buildings are designed and delivered, at home and abroad. Both studies suggest that all sectors of the A/E/C industry will face increasingly fierce competition that will, of necessity, force practices large and small to compete less on cost and more on value. In the very near future buildings and their interiors will be valued almost entirely based on performance—economic, cultural, environmental—and only those firms able to create these and other forms of added value will survive. Disruptive technologies like building information modeling and integrated product delivery will enable all firms, even those competing solely on the basis of cost, to design better buildings and deliver them more efficiently. But in such a fiercely competitive global marketplace, efficiency alone will not be enough to guarantee market viability. The real differentiator will instead be design.
series ACADIA
type keynote paper
email michael.speaks@uky.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaade2008_111
id ecaade2008_111
authors Theodoros, Dounas
year 2008
title Dynamic Algebras and Grammars
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 429-436
summary The research presented in the paper explores the creation of custom shape grammars with animation tools, either as learning or educational tool or for the purposes of architectural design. Standard shape grammars contain an initial shape or design and one or more transformation rules. The designer just applies the rules in the initial design or has to chose which rule to apply. Dynamic shape grammars on the other hand use animation tools to produce dynamic rules of transformation, or even dynamic – parametric initial shapes on which to apply the rules on. The dynamic state of the rules in our system allows the designer to change the rules during designing without having to abandon a core structural idea or concept. Furthermore the implementation with an animation tool allows the design system to be form-independent and express the underlying structure of an architectural idea with non-graphical connections like parent and child relationships, or other deformation rules.It can be shown that in a computation context dynamic shape grammars are actually groups of standard shape grammars where the grammars in the group share the classification of the transformation rules they contain. The system that we present allows the designer to change between the grammars in one group in a transparent way without expressing the grammar formally but by only manipulating simple objects inside the animation software package.
series eCAADe
email dounas@gmail.com
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id caadria2008_2_session1a_022
id caadria2008_2_session1a_022
authors Theodoros, Dounas; Kotsiopoulos M. Anastasios
year 2008
title Dynamic (Shape) Grammars
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 22-28
summary The research presented in the paper explores the creation of custom shape grammars with animation tools, either as learning or educational tool or for the purposes of architectural design. Standard shape grammars contain an initial shape or design and one or more transformation rules. In a simple scenario the designer just applies the rules in the initial design or in a complicated scenario has to choose which rule to apply. Dynamic shape grammars on the other hand use animation tools to produce dynamic rules of transformation, or even dynamic – parametric initial shapes on which to apply the rules on. The dynamic state of the rules in our system allows the designer to change the rules during designing without having to abandon a core idea or concept. Furthermore the implementation with an animation tool allows the design system to be form-independent and express the underlying structure of an architectural idea with non-graphical connections like parent and child relationships, or other deformation rules. It can be shown that in a computation context dynamic shape grammars are actually groups of standard shape grammars where the grammars in the group share the classification of the transformation rules they contain. The system that we present allows the designer to change between the grammars in one group in a transparent way without expressing the grammar formally but by only manipulating simple objects inside the animation software package. This transparency focuses the effort of the user in simply design and keeping track of the formal declarations of shape grammars while the multiple dynamic grammars remove the obstacle of conforming to a single set of rules. The benefits of this effort can be especially seen in actual architectural design where the focus is in developing a concept idea and not strictly adhering to the rules.
series CAADRIA
email dounas@gmail.com, kotsiop@arch.auh.gr
last changed 2008/05/17 07:16

_id sigradi2008_179
id sigradi2008_179
authors Toloudi, Zenovia
year 2008
title Architectural Brand valuations through a tag-based learning machine.
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary Brand is a set of associations related to an object from a particular source (Libai 2008). Such an object can be a product, person or service. Architecture is both service and product. However architectural Branding has never been clearly defined. This probably happens due to the lack of tools to measure the architectural Brand. This paper explores a direction to evaluate the architectural Brand by using computational methods in order to offer a better understanding regarding the awareness, reputation and prominence of the architectural firm. The methodology is based on case studies in which the brands of different types of architectural firms are analyzed, measured and compared to each other through a two-part process: a. the development of one tool to statistically measure the architectural Brand and b. the interpretation of the results of the measurements. a. Learning machine In order to make these brand measurements within a specific group of people or images, this paper develops an interactive tool that uses an image database. The tool constitutes a learning machine; it makes a hypothetic hierarchical categorization of the image database into + and – using an initial sample and it proposes to the user the first image of the list; finally, the user validates the image by confirming or not the machine’s guess. In this image database, each image is described as an array of attributes (tags). Tags can be generated either by the architectural firm itself or can emerge by users. b. Evaluation of results This interactive, user-friendly tool is drawing a user’s preference by proposing similar images from the database based on a learning process from the user input (initial sample and feedback); alternatively, it can be used as a questionnaire for quantitative research. Moreover, this tool categorizes photos of similar content. This research focuses on the following issues as parameters of the effectiveness of the process: o Simplicity of the database organization through computation. o Top-down Vs. Bottom-up tagging of works/ images mechanism. o Future use of the image database. o Transformation of the image database while becoming larger. o “Market” segmentation or not. o Combination of the tool with other Brand measurement tools. o Combination of the tool with other image databases. The outcome of this approach can provide an analysis and metric of the brand strength of different architectural firms. Furthermore, it can help architectural firms to understand better how they are perceived by others in order to improve their brand image and associations.
keywords Branding, learning machine, image database, attribute, tag
series SIGRADI
email ztoloudi@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id ecaade2010_224
id ecaade2010_224
authors Trento, Armando; Fioravanti, Antonio; Loffreda, Gianluigi
year 2010
title Ontologies for Cities of the Future: The quest of formalizing interaction rules of urban phenomena
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.797-804
summary “A city can not be designed” Watanabe [1]: our ambition can be at the maximum to guide someway and in some part its growth. So as planners need tools to aid an open design with uncertain goals. This research group beginto develop such a tool at high level of abstraction (Fioravanti 2008), with theaim of investigating the potentiality of a collaboration among complementary research domains. The present work reports about early implementation results of an innovative approach developed by the authors, for representation of design knowledge. It has been identified in the Urban Design Ontology (Montenegro and Duarte 2009) some design entities and their internal relationships that have been formalized and visualized by means of an intuitive interface. As a matter of fact, this approach, by means of inference engines allows coherence’s check and constraint verification, pointing out incompatibility between initial design program and each partial specialist design solution and/or the overall shared one.
wos WOS:000340629400085
keywords Knowledge formalization; Urban design ontology; Knowledge structure; Collaborative design; Open design
series eCAADe
email armando.trento@uniroma1.it
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2019_009
id cf2019_009
authors Veloso, Pedro; Jinmo Rhee and Ramesh Krishnamurti
year 2019
title Multi-agent space planning: a literature review (2008-2017)
source Ji-Hyun Lee (Eds.) "Hello, Culture!"  [18th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2019, Proceedings / ISBN 978-89-89453-05-5] Daejeon, Korea, pp. 52-74
summary In this paper we review the research on multi-agent space planning (MASP) during the period of 2008-2017. By MASP, we refer to space planning (SP) methods based on online mobile agents that map local perceptions to actions in the environment, generating spatial representation. We group two precedents and sixteen recent MASP prototypes into three categories: (1) agents as moving spatial units, (2) agents that occupy a space, and (3) agents that partition a space. In order to compare the prototypes, we identify the occurrence of features in terms of representation, objectives, and control procedures. Upon analysis of occurrences and correlations of features in the types, we present gaps and challenges for future MASP research. We point to the limits of current systems to solve spatial conflicts and to incorporate architectural knowledge. Finally, we suggest that behavioral learning offers a promising path for robust and autonomous MASP systems in the architectural domain.
keywords Space planning; Agent-based modeling; Multi-agent systems; Generative systems
series CAAD Futures
email pveloso@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2019/07/29 12:08

_id acadia08_222
id acadia08_222
authors Westre, Aaron
year 2008
title Complexity Machine 1: A 3D Modeling Application Implementing Behavioral Simulation
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 222-229
summary Complexity Machine 1 is a software application developed by the author as a Master of Architecture thesis project at the University of Minnesota. The software acts as a platform for exploring three dimensional form produced via behavioral simulation. Specifically, the behaviors are modeled on emergent group dynamics found commonly in nature such as flocking, chasing, and evading. Though various commercial softwares and numerous small-scale architectural projects exist in this area, Complexity Machine 1 is intended as a freely available and generic platform for exploring the formal implications of these emergent behaviors. The simulated behaviors are governed by a variety of parameters and a set of eight simple rules. Formal results are influenced by these parameters and rules; along with scale, color, and geometric settings. The flexibility of the software allows users to investigate a vast array of potential forms, adjust settings in real time, and export the results for further manipulation. Complexity Machine 1 continues to be refined and improved towards the goal of providing an easy to use platform to designers for exploring forms that emerge from complex group behavior.
keywords Behavior; Complexity; Emergence; Flocking; Simulation
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

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