CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 485

_id ijac20076103
id ijac20076103
authors Tonn, Christian; Petzold, Frank; Bimber, Oliver; Grundhofer, Anselm; Donath, Dirk
year 2008
title Spatial Augmented Reality for Architecture Designing and planning with and within existing buildings
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 1, pp. 41-58
summary At present, more than half of all building activity in the German building sector is undertaken within existing built contexts. The development of a conceptual and technological basis for the digital support of design directly on site, within an existing building context is the focus of the research project "Spatial Augmented Reality for Architecture" (SAR). This paper describes the goals achieved in one aspect of the project: the sampling of colors and materials at a scale of 1:1 using Augmented Reality (AR) technologies. We present initial results from the project; the development of an ad-hoc visualization of interactive data on arbitrary surfaces in real-world indoor environments using a mobile hardware setup. With this, it was possible to project the color and material qualities of a design directly onto almost all surfaces within a geometrically corrected, existing building. Initially, a software prototype "Spatial Augmented Reality for Architecture-Colored Architecture" (SAR-CA) was developed and then assessed based on evaluation results from a user study.
series journal
last changed 2008/06/18 06:12

_id acadia08_308
id acadia08_308
authors Berrier, Seth; Gary Meyer; Clement Shimizu
year 2008
title Creating Metallic Color Sequences for an Architectural Wall
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 308-315
summary A metallic paint scheme for an architectural wall is created using computer aided color appearance design techniques. New computer graphic hardware that allows real-time rendering of complex reflectance functions is employed to produce photo-realistic images of the metallic paint applied to the surface of the wall. An interpolation scheme is developed that permits one and two dimensional metallic shade sequences to be determined between individual bricks in a single row of the wall and between the complete rows of bricks that compose the wall. Paint formulation software, originally developed for auto refinish applications, is used to determine the paint mixtures necessary to realize the metallic colors in the design. A prototype of the wall is constructed and exhibited in a museum gallery.
keywords Color; Design; Environment; Perception; System
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id sigradi2008_077
id sigradi2008_077
authors Briones, Carolina
year 2008
title A collaborative project experience in an architectural framework, working with Open Source applications and physical computing [Diseño de Plataformas Digitales e Interactivas: una experiencia educativa trabajando colaborativamente con aplicaciones de Código Abierto y Computación Física]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary Nowadays, thanks to the telecommunication revolution and therefore the massive spread of Internet, we have seen the come up of international architectural offices with branches located in different continent, working in a collaborative fashion, surpassing physical and time frontiers. At the same time, the multidisciplinary work between designers, architects, engineers, programmers and even biologist, between others, have been taking place in the new network society. All transformations also supported by the arising of FOSS (Free Open Source Software) and the virtual communities behind them, which allow the creation of non-traditional or specific software, the association between disciplines, and also, the formation of meeting scenarios for a mixture of individuals coming up with multiple motivation to coexist in collaborative environment. Furthermore, it is possible to argue that Open Source applications are also the reflection of a social movement, based on the open creation and exchange of information and knowledge. Do the appeared of FOSS compel us to re-think our working and teaching methods? Do they allow new modes of organizing and collaborating inside our architectural practices?. This paper would like to address these questions, by presenting the results of the “Experience Design” course, which by implementing teaching methods based on Open Source principles and cutting-edge tools, seeks to approach students to these new “way of do”, knowledge and methodologies, and overall, focus them on the science behind the computer. This paper describes the “Experience Design” course, in which architectural graduate students of Universidad Diego Portales (Chile), put for first time their hands on the creation of interactive interfaces. By acquiring basic knowledge of programming and physical computing, students built in a collaborative way a responsive physical installation. The course use as applications “Processing” and “Arduino”. The first one is an Open Source programming language and environment for users who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It has a visual context and serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is a project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas, at the MIT Media Lab (www.processing.org). The second is an Open Source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino has a microcontroller (programmed with Processing language) which can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators (www.arduino.cc). Both environments shared a growing community of people working in related projects and extending useful assistance for beginners. In this paper it is presented the current state of the pilot course and some of the initials results collected during the process. Students and teacher’s debates and evaluations of the experience have been exposed. Together with a critical evaluation in relation to the accomplishment of the effort of place together different disciplines in one collaborative project akin, architecture, design, programming and electronic. Finally, futures modifications of the course are discussed, together with consideration to take in account at the moment of bring Open Source and programming culture into the student curriculum.
keywords Physical computing, teaching framework, Open Source, Interactive Installation
series SIGRADI
email fili_pax@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia08_174
id acadia08_174
authors Jaskiewicz, Tomasz
year 2008
title ‘iPortals’ as a Case Study Pre-Prototype of an Evolving Network of Interactive Spatial Components
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 174-181
summary The art and craft of design and creation of buildings is undergoing a radical paradigm shift. This shift is being driven by diverse novel cross-disciplinary technical possibilities, as well as by ongoing cultural transformations. They all, directly or indirectly, originate from omnipresent advancements in information technologies. Instant and ubiquitous availability of information and immediate access to computing power pervasively penetrating our lives is profoundly transforming our culture. This phenomenon has enormous implications for architecture in a multitude of ways1. ¶ Firstly, the speed of changes that occur in modern-day culture and society makes it inconvenient or even entirely impossible to design buildings with fixed and permanent functionalities. As lifestyle patterns, production methods and environmental conditions, to name a few factors only, may now dramatically change from one day to another, architecture has to become flexible. It has to allow dynamic, active, or even pro-active adaptation and customization of spaces on many levels of its functionality2. ¶ Secondly, these profound cultural changes are not only of technical relevance. In its process-driven character, information technology strongly mandates the already widely recognized ontology of becoming, proclaimed by the prominent minds of contemporary philosophy and science. This process-oriented worldview, supported by latest technological possibilities3, has caused a radical change in the common sense of the manner in which architecture has to be understood and dealt with4. As an effect, it requires an in-depth reconsideration of the nature of processes of both creation and participation in spatial environments.
keywords Environment; Interactive; Open Systems; Prototype; Skin
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ecaade2008_084
id ecaade2008_084
authors Alaçam Aslan, Sema; Çagdas, Gülen
year 2008
title An Interface Proposal for Collaborative Architectural Design Process
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 319-324
summary The aim of this paper is to explore how new technological opportunities affect approaches of designers during collaborative architectural design process. Which factors affect the communication and the quality of interaction? The study is based on two phases: the data input by the designer via devices to the computer environment and the transformation of data into design product in the software by scripting addition. Input devices that are used are 3D mouse, graphic tablet as a tangible interface and implementation of second mouse besides a standard mouse and keyboard. The potential usage of these interfaces in collaborative architectural design process is discussed and proposals are developed in 3ds max scripting environment.
keywords Collaborative design, human-computer interaction, user participation in design
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email cagdas@itu.edu.tr
last changed 2008/09/09 14:18

_id ecaade2008_025
id ecaade2008_025
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2008
title How to Find an Idea? - Computer Aided Creativity
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 735-742
summary In this paper the possibilities of using computer software in creative searching of design ideas is analysed. At the basis of such psychological theories as Incubation, Synectics, Geneplore, Bisociation, Conceptual Blending, Visual Synectics the implementation of digital technologies in the idea searching – the main stage of design process – is presented. In all computer ‘metaphorisation’ methods presented in this paper pictures are treated as idea triggers. Designer generate the ideas of the form by use the pictures as triggers for free association or for metaphorisation. The two cases of implementation of these methods, which based on graphic transformations, will be presented.
keywords Creativity, design methods, form searching
series eCAADe
email asan@pb.edu.pl
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia11_242
id acadia11_242
authors Braumann, Johannes; Brell-Cokcan, Sigrid
year 2011
title Parametric Robot Control: Integrated CAD/CAM for Architectural Design
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 242-251
summary Robots are gaining popularity in architecture. Snøhetta has recently purchased their own industrial robot, becoming one of the first architectural offices to adopt robot technology. As more and more architects are exposed to robotic fabrication, the need for easy interoperability, integration into architectural design tools and general accessibility will increase. Architects are discovering that industrial robots are much more than kinematic machines for stacking bricks, welding or milling - they are highly multifunctional and can be used for a huge variety of tasks. However, industry standard software does not provide easy solutions for allowing direct robot control right from CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) systems. In this paper we will discuss existing methods of programming industrial robots, published architectural results (Gramazio and Kohler 2008) and the design of a new user interface that allows intuitive control of parametric designs and customized robotic mass production, by integrating CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) functions into CAAD.
keywords robot programming; parametric design; mass customization; grasshopper component design; fabrication; robot milling; digital architecture
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email johannes@robotsinarchitecture.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ddss2008-33
id ddss2008-33
authors Charlton, James A.; Bob Giddings and Margaret Horne
year 2008
title A survey of computer software for the urban designprocess
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary Urban design is concerned with the shape, the surface and the physical arrangement of all kinds of urban elements, the basic components that make up the built environment, at the level of buildings, spaces and human activities. It is also concerned with the non-visual aspects of the environment, such as noise, wind and temperature and humidity. The city square is a particular urban element which can take many forms and its geometrical relationships such as maximum dimensions, ratio of width to length and building height to length have been analysed for centuries (Alberti 1475), (Vitruvius 1550), (Sitte 1889), (Corbett 2004). Within the current urban design process there are increasing examples of three dimensional computer representations which allow the user to experience a visual sense of the geometry of city squares in an urban landscape. Computer-aided design and Virtual Reality technologies have recently contributed to this visual assessment, but there have been limited attempts at 3D computer representations which allow the user to experience a greater sense of the urban space. This paper will describe a survey of computer tools which could support a more holistic approach to urban design and which could be used to simulate a number of urban texture and urban quality aspects. It will provide a systematic overview of currently available software that could support the simulation of building density, height, colour and style as well as conditions relating to noise, shading, heat, natural and artificial light. It will describe a methodology for the selection and filtering of appropriate computer applications and offer an initial evaluation of these tools for the analysis and representation of the three-dimensional geometry, urban texture and urban quality of city centre spaces. The paper is structured to include an introduction to the design criteria relating to city centre spaces which underpins this research. Next the systematic review of computer software will be described, and selected tools will undergo initial evaluation. Finally conclusions will be drawn and areas for future research identified.
keywords Urban design, Software identification, 3D modelling, Pedestrian modelling, Wind modelling, Noise mapping, Thermal comfort, VR Engine
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id acadia08_072
id acadia08_072
authors Frumar, Jerome
year 2008
title An Energy Centric Approach to Architecture: Abstracting the material to co-rationalize design and performance
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 72-81
summary This paper begins by exploring matter as an aggregated system of energy transactions and modulations. With this in mind, it examines the notion of energy driven form finding as a design methodology that can simultaneously negotiate physical, environmental and fabrication considerations. The digital workspace enables this notion of form finding to re-establish itself in the world of architecture through a range of analytic tools that algorithmically encode real world physics. Simulating the spatial and energetic characteristics of reality enables virtual “form generation models that recognize the laws of physics and are able to create ‘minimum’ surfaces for compression, bending [and] tension” (Cook 2004). The language of energy, common in engineering and materials science, enables a renewed trans-disciplinary dialogue that addresses significant historic disjunctions such as the professional divide between architects and engineers. Design becomes a science of exploring abstracted energy states to discover a suitable resonance with which to tune the built environment. ¶ A case study of one particular method of energy driven form finding is presented. Bi-directional Evolutionary Structural Optimization (BESO) is a generative engineering technique developed at RMIT University. It appropriates natural growth strategies to determine optimum forms that respond to structural criteria by reorganizing their topology. This dynamic topology response enables structural optimization to become an integrated component of design exploration. A sequence of investigations illustrates the flexibility and trans-disciplinary benefits of this approach. Using BESO as a tool for design rather than purely for structural optimization fuses the creative approach of the architect with the pragmatic approach of the engineer, enabling outcomes that neither profession could develop in isolation. The BESO case study alludes to future design processes that will facilitate a coherent unfolding of design logic comparable to morphogenesis.
keywords Energy; Form-Finding; Morphogenesis; Optimization; Structure
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id acadia08_208
id acadia08_208
authors Griffiths, Jason
year 2008
title Man + Water + Fan = Freshman: Natural Process of Evaporative Cooling and the Digital Fabrication of the ASU Outdoor Dining Pavilion
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 208-213
summary To the east of Johnson City TX is the Lyndon B. Johnson’s family home. Part of the Johnson Estate2 is given over to a working farm circa 1870 that presents various aspects of domestic practice from the era. This includes a desert fridge which is a simple four-legged structure with a slightly battered profile that’s draped in calico. Its principle is simple; water from an upturned jar is drawn by osmosis down the sides of the calico where it evaporates in wind currents drawn though a “dog run” between two log cabins. Cooled air circulates within the structure and where cheese and milk are kept fresh during the summer. The desert fridge is a simple system that reaches a state of equilibrium through the natural process of evaporation. ¶ This system provides a working model for a prototype structure for an outdoor dining pavilion that was designed and constructed on the campus of Arizona State University. The desert fridge is the basis for a “biological process”3 of evaporative cooling that has been interpreted in terms a ritual of outdoor dining in arid climates. The pavilion is intended as a gathering point and a place of interaction for ASU freshmen. The long-term aim of this project is to provide a multiple of these pavilions across the campus that will be the locus of a sequence of dining events over a “dining season”4 during the fall and spring semester. ; This paper describes how the desert fridge principle has been interpreted in the program and construction of the dining pavilion. It explores a sequence of levels by which the structure, via digital production process, provides an educational narrative on sustainability. This communicative quality is portrayed by the building in direct biological terms, through tacit knowledge, perceived phenomena, lexical and mechanical systems. The paper also describes how these digital production process were used in the building’s design and fabrication. These range from an empirical prognosis of evaporative cooling effects, fluid dynamics, heat mapping and solar radiation analysis through to sheet steel laser cutting, folded plate construction and fully associative variable models of standard steel construction. The aim of the pavilion is to create an environment that presents the evaporative cooling message at a multiple of levels that will concentrate the visitor in holistic understanding of the processes imbued within the building.5
keywords Communication; Digital Fabrication; Environment; System
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id caadria2008_6_session1b_053
id caadria2008_6_session1b_053
authors Gu, Ning;Singh Vishal, London Kerry, Ljiljana Brankovic, Taylor Claudelle
year 2008
title Adopting Building Information Modeling (BIM) as Collaboration Platform in the Design Industry
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 53-60
summary This paper discusses the preliminary findings of an ongoing research project aimed at developing a technological, operational and strategic analysis of adopting BIM in AEC/FM (Architecture-Engineering-Construction/Facility Management) industry as a collaboration tool. Outcomes of the project will provide specifications and guidelines as well as establish industry standards for implementing BIM in practice. This research primarily focuses on BIM model servers as a collaboration platform, and hence the guidelines are aimed at enhancing collaboration capabilities. This paper reports on the findings from: (1) a critical review of latest BIM literature and commercial applications, and (2) workshops with focus groups on changing work-practice, role of technology, current perception and expectations of BIM. Layout for case studies being undertaken is presented. These findings provide a base to develop comprehensive software specifications and national guidelines for BIM with particular emphasis on BIM model servers as collaboration platforms.
keywords Building Information Modelling, Collaboration Platform
series CAADRIA
email Ning.Gu@newcastle.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2008_079
id ecaade2008_079
authors Hemmerling, Marco; Knaack, Ulrich; Schulz, Jens-Uwe
year 2008
title Complexity in Digital Architectural Design
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 85-90
summary The association of complexity and geometry was the starting point for an academic project at the chair of Computer Aided Design in Detmold. The students were asked to analyze a complex structure - taken from nature, art, technology or society - regarding the underlying geometrical rules and principles. The translation of these abstract geometric principles (logarithmic spiral, polyhedron, rotational solids, mesh-work, double helix…) into a three-dimensional structure was then realized in Rhinoceros. The 3D-modeling was followed by a transformation- and optimization-process of the initial shape by using the evolutionary principles of mutation and selection. The set-up for these variations followed predefined rules and principles for the manipulation of the original structure.
keywords Geometry, Complexity, Computer Aided Design, Architecture
series eCAADe
email marco.hemmerling@hs-owl.de, ulrich.knaack@hs-owl.de, jens-uwe.schulz@hs-owl.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia08_458
id acadia08_458
authors Hemsath, Timothy; Robert Williams; Ronald Bonnstetter; Leen-Kiat Soh
year 2008
title Digital CADCAM Pedagogy Model: Intelligent Inquiry Education
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 458-463
summary Prototype manufacturing as an educational tool has been very successful at the college level in architecture and engineering design. This paper discusses an innovative inquiry-based learning approach rather than the problem-based learning models commonly utilized by other similar programs. For example, several research-funded technology projects (e.g., Cappelleri et al. 2007) look at involving students in problem-based learning exercises (e.g., building robots); however, these exercises (while providing valuable experiences) have predetermined outcomes ingrained by the teachers, the project structure, and the components used to construct the devices. Therefore, inquisitive and creative problem solving is limited to the “kit-of-parts” in their approach to solving the problem. The inquiry-based CADCAM pedagogy model is more concerned with the process of solving a problem through the vehicle of prototyping than with the specificity of the design project itself. This approach has great potential. First, the need to solve the problem drives learning on multiple levels, integrating interdisciplinary ideas into the problem and solution. Second, the problem interlocks disciplines through inquiry knowledge building in team exercises. Finally, it encourages diversity and flexibility by allowing students to look at problems from multiples perspectives and points of view.
keywords CAD; Education; Evaluation; Pedagogy; Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ecaade2008_139
id ecaade2008_139
authors Kepczynska-Walczak, Anetta
year 2008
title Contemporary Renaissance Architect - Yet Architect?
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 445-450
summary This paper is a contribution into domain of Generative Design and Digital Aids to Design Creativity. The outcomes of two workshops for the fourth and fifth year students of architecture are presented. The workshops allowed to draw particularly interesting lessons leading, in consequence, to more general reflections on questions such as the limits in design creativity versus unexpected outcomes calculated by a computer, the gap between boundless possibilities offered by digital design tools and real practice in building construction. And finally, how advanced research results can be incorporated in teaching. This is particularly important, as nowadays students, to become successful architects in the future, not only will have to be good in using CAAD software but also in programming and software development.
keywords Generative Design, Digital Aids to Design Creativity, CAAD Curriculum
series eCAADe
email anetta@p.lodz.pl
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id sigradi2008_081
id sigradi2008_081
authors Kirschner, Ursula
year 2008
title Study of digital morphing tools during the design process - Application of freeware software and of tools in commercial products as well as their integration in AutoCAD
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This research work examines methods of experimental designing with CAAD in a CAD laboratory with architecture students as the testing persons. Thereby the main focus is on the early phase of finding forms, in which different techniques with digital media are tried out in the didactic architectural design lessons. In these work have been traced the influences of the media employed on the design processes and combined the approaches of current CAAD research with aspects from classic design theory. For mathematical rules of proportion, atmospheric influence factors and analogy concepts in architecture, I have developed design methods which have been applied and verified in several series of seminars. (Kirschner, U.: 2000, Thesis, a CAAD supported architectural design teaching, Hamburg, school of arts). Previous experimental exercises showed that morphological sequences of modeling are effective sources for playful designing processes. In the current work these approaches are enhanced and supplemented by different morphological architectural concepts for creating shapes. For this purpose 2D based software like Morphit, Winmorph and other freeware were used. Whereas in the further development of this design technique we used 3D freeware morphing programs like zhu3D or Blender. The resulting morphological shapes were imported in CAD and refined. Ideally the morphing tool is integrated in the modeling environment of the standard software AutoCAD. A digital city model is the starting basis of the design process to guarantee the reference to the reality. The applied design didactic is predicated on the theories of Bernhard Hoesli. The act of designing viewed as „waiting for a good idea“ is, according to him, unteachable; students should, in contrast, learn to judge the „the force of an idea“. On the subject of morphology a form-generating method in the pre-design phase has been tested. Starting from urban-planning lines on an area map, two simple geometric initial images were produced which were merged by means of morphing software. Selected images from this film sequence were extruded with CAAD to produce solid models as sectional drawings. The high motivation of the students and the quality of the design results produced with these simple morphing techniques were the reason for the integration of the artistic and scientific software into the creative shape modeling process with the computer. The students learned in addition to the „bottom up “and „ top down” new design methods. In the presentation the properties and benefits of the morphing tools are presented in tables and are analyzed with regard to the architectural shape generating in an urban context. A catalogue of criteria with the following topics was developed: user friendliness, the ability of integrating the tools or as the case may be the import of data into a CAD environment, the artistic aspects in terms of the flexibility of shape generating as well as the evaluation of the aesthetic consideration of shapes.
keywords Architectural design, freeware morphing software, AutoCAD
series SIGRADI
email kirschner@uni.leuphana.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ddss2008-08
id ddss2008-08
authors Koshak, Nabeel A.; Abdullah Fouda
year 2008
title Analyzing Pedestrian Movement in Mataf Using GPSand GIS to Support Space Redesign
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary Evaluating the use of architectural and urban spaces is an important issue for architects and urban designers who wish to enhance space usability. Space usability is crucial in crowded spaces such as Mataf areas. Millions of people come to the city of Makkah, Saudi Arabia every year to perform Hajj (Islamic Pilgrimage) and Umrah. A cornerstone of Hajj and Umrah spirituals is to perform Tawaf, which is the circumambulation of the Ka'bah in the center of the Holy Mosque in Makkah. The areas of performing Tawaf (called Mataf) become very crowded during Hajj and the last ten days of Ramadan. This paper demonstrates how we utilized Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze pedestrian movement while performing Tawaf. During the Hajj of 1424 H (2004 in the Georgian Calendar), several GPS devices were used to collect pedestrian movement coordinates at specific time intervals. Computer software for tracking analysis is used to visualize and analyze the pattern of pedestrian movement in Tawaf. The software allows users to view temporal data, which can be set up with past time windows for historical data analysis. The findings of this research show levels of service and flow rates throughout different zones and times of Mataf. They indicate the most critical zones and times for Tawaf during Hajj. They also visually demonstrate the track pattern of pedestrian movement at different locations in the Tawaf area. The paper concludes with some redesign recommendations to remove obstacles and facilitate pedestrian movement in Tawaf. The approach described in this paper can be implemented in architectural and urban design space modifications to improve pedestrian movement in open spaces.
keywords Pedestrian movement analysis, GPS, GIS, Hajj, Makkah, Tawaf
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id acadia08_406
id acadia08_406
authors Lee, Yungil; Jumphon Lertlakhanakul ;Jinwon Choi; Yehuda E. Kalay
year 2008
title Dynamic Architectural Visualization Based On User-Centered Semantic Interoperability
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 406-415
summary Technically-oriented architectural spaces today are getting complicated because the building contains a number of electronic facilities and complex structures. Furthermore, the advent of the ubiquitous environment enabled the building to provide various services to users and accelerated the importance of architectural visualization as problem-solving and communicating tools. It is recommended that architectural visualization has been more intuitive and effective to support the design decision and collaboration. In this manner, this paper intends to define the role of current architectural visualization with considerations of previous research and related works in the practical field and proposes the appropriate method of architectural visualization. Also, in order to evaluate our idea, we recommend a prototype system based on dynamic and semantic representation with the avatar. It is a kind of simulator for the design of ubiquitous smart space and can deliver to users the better comprehension in how technological oriented space will be constructed and utilized.
keywords Interoperability; Semantic; Ubiquity; User; Visualization
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

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