CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 486

_id 69d2
id 69d2
authors Derix, Christian
year 2008
title Genetically Modified Space: Evolutionary Design in Practice
source In David Littlefield (ed), ‘Space Craft: Advanced in Architectural Computing’, RIBA publications, March 2008
summary Genetically Modified Spaces discusses three projects implementing three different evolutionary algorithms and types of selection processes, to evolve spatial configurations for buildings and masterplans. The level of participation by the user varies from observation to collaboration in directing the search of the design space.
keywords evolutionary architecture, genetic algorithms, space planning, emergence
series book
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.ribabookshops.com/item/space-craft-developments-in-architectural-computing/63560/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:09

_id ijac20086405
id ijac20086405
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Fleischmann, Moritz
year 2008
title Elemental Methods for Integrated Architectures: Experimentation with Design Processes for Cable Net Structures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 4, 453-475
summary Tension active systems are compelling architectural structures having an intimate connection between structural performance and the arrangement of material. The direct flow of structural forces through the material makes these systems attractive and unique from an aesthetic point of view, but they are a challenge to develop from a design and an engineering perspective. Traditional methods for solving such structural systems rely on both analog modeling techniques and the use of highly advanced engineering software. The complexity and laborious nature of both processes presents a challenge for iterating through design variations. To experiment with the spacemaking capabilities of tension active systems, it is necessary to design methods that can actively couple the digital simulation with the analog methods for building the physical structure. What we propose is a designer-authored process that digitally simulates the behaviors of tension active systems using simple geometric components related to material and structural performance, activated and varied through elemental techniques of scripting. The logics for manufacturing and assembly are to be embedded in the digital generation of form. The intention is to transform what is a highly engineered system into an architectural system where investigation is as much about the determination of space and environment as it is about the arrangement of structure and material.
series journal
last changed 2009/03/03 06:48

_id acadia08_472
id acadia08_472
authors Key, Sora; Mark D Gross; Ellen Yi-Luen Do
year 2008
title Computing Spatial Qualities For Architecture
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 472-477
summary Computational representation of spatial qualities can lead us to a better understanding of how we construct spatial concepts. Analyses of spatial qualities can support architects in reasoning about the form of a configuration, helping them predict the consequences of a design. ¶ In this paper we present three definitions (enclosure, viewfield, continuity) that describe experiential qualities of architectural spaces. Our project aims to provide computable definitions to these qualities to describe common spatial experiences that are implicitly understood by architects. The description, using familiar terms, reveals the analytical structure of spatial qualities that is based on the geometry of the physical elements. ; We therefore introduce a graphic editor, Descriptor, that provides visualization of spatial qualities as the designer diagrams building elements. The system calculates perceived relationships (surrounded, visible, nearby, nearest) between a viewpoint and the architectural elements based on their geometric properties such as location and distance. The relationships are the components of the three qualities we define. We also present a use scenario to demonstrate how one might use our Descriptor system during early design. ¶ Descriptor is an attempt to formalize descriptions of the spatial qualities to help beginners understand how to make design decisions. In the future, we plan to extend the set of qualities and add detailed attributes of the physical elements to the system.
keywords Analysis; Computation; Environment; Representation; Spatial
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ecaade2008_058
id ecaade2008_058
authors Niblock, Chantelle; Hanna, Raid
year 2008
title An Investigation of the Influence of Using the Computer on Cognitive Design Actions:
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 693-700
summary This paper documents a research pilot study; it is a comparative investigation between an expert designer and a novice designer. The study used protocol analysis to examine design cognitive actions whilst using 3D digital media during the conceptual stage of design. The empirical study found novice designers capable of managing a design process of complex objects due to the increase in their contribution of design strategies to the overall process. The possible reason for this may be due to using free-form modelling with accuracy aids found in computing facilities. This provides evidence to suggest automated computing should be encouraged within the pedagogical framework of architectural design.
keywords Protocol Analysis, Design cognition, Complexity Management, Design Process
series eCAADe
email chantelleniblock@hotmail.com, gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ijac20076102
id ijac20076102
authors Schein, Markus; Tessmann, Oliver
year 2008
title Structural Analysis as Driver in Surface-Based Design Approaches
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 1, pp. 19-39
summary This research argues for novel strategies to integrate structural analysis data in architectural design. Instead of a linear procedure of analysis, synthesis, evaluation and post-rationalization a synthesis/evaluation loop is installed which embeds structural analysis data as design driver from early on. The approach regards structural performance as one design criteria within a network of different requirements. An equilibrium of multiple parameters is aspired to instead of a single-parameter-optimum. The research is conducted via a custom-made digital interface between 3d modelling software and an application for structural analysis of space frames. The information exchange provides the basis for successive strategies within a collaborative design process of spatial roof structures: negotiation of an overall form and a multi-dimensional improvement of space frame topologies by a Genetic Algorithm (GA).
series journal
last changed 2008/06/18 06:12

_id ijac20076204
id ijac20076204
authors Schlueter, Arno; Bonwetsch, Tobias
year 2008
title Design Rationalization of Irregular Cellular Structures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 2, pp. 197-211
summary Complex geometries found in nature are increasingly used as images and analogies for the creation of form and space in architectural design. To be able to construct the resulting complex building forms, strategies to handle the resulting production requirements are necessary. In the example of a design project for a Japanese noodle bar, a strategy for the realization of an irregular cellular spatial structure is presented. In order to represent its complex geometry, building principles relating to foam are applied to transform and optimize the design, which is based on hexagonal, cellular compartments defining the different interior spaces. The principles are converted into software code and implemented into a digital design toolbox to be used within a 3D-modelling environment. Utilizing the tools within the redesign process made a rationalization of the cellular structures possible without sacrificing the desired visual irregularity. The toolbox also enables the extraction of the cell geometry to support the generation of production documents. The result is the dramatic reduction of production effort to realize the complex cellular structures by keeping a maximum of design flexibility and desired visual appearance.
series journal
last changed 2008/10/01 19:49

_id sigradi2008_180
id sigradi2008_180
authors Vincent, Charles
year 2008
title Gulliver in the land of Generative Design
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The current trend in architectural design towards architectural computing has been treated both from a philosophical standing point and as an operational systems’ problem, in a quest for explications which could at last break ground for a more broad development and adoption of design tools. As Kostas Terzidis (2007) puts it, the intuitiveness that architects have put on so high a pedestal seems to be the central issue to be dealt with by both views. There seems to be no apparent shortcut toward the reconciliation between traditional practice and new media and most certainly it is not only a problem of interface design, but one of design method clarification and reinterpretation of those methods into computing systems. Furthermore, there’s no doubt left as to whether computing systems can generate such new patterns as to impact our own understanding of architecture. But even if computer algorithms can make possible the exploration of abstract alternatives to an abstract initial idea, as in Mathematica and Processing, the issue of relating abstract and geometric representations of human centered architecture lays in the hands of architects, programmers or, better yet, architect-programmers. What seems now to be the relevant change is that architectural design might escape from the traditional sequence embedded in the need – program – design iterations – solution timeline, substituted by a web of interactions among differing experimental paths, in which even the identification of needs is to be informed by computing. It is interesting to note that the computational approach to architectural design has been praised for the formal fluidity of bubbles and Bezier shapes it entails and for the overcoming of functionalist and serialization typical of modern architecture. That approach betrays a high degree of canonic fascination with the tools of the trade and very little connection to the day to day chores of building design. On the other hand, shall our new tools and toys open up new ways of thinking and designing our built landscape? What educational issues surface if we are to foster wider use of the existing technologies and simultaneously address the need to overtake mass construction? Is mass customization the answer for the dead end modern architecture has led us to? Can we let go the humanist approach begun in Renascence and culminated in Modernism or shall we review that approach in view of algorithmic architecture? Let us step back in time to 1726 when Swift’s ‘Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Lemuel Gulliver’ was first published. In Swift’s fierce critic of what seemed to him the most outrageous ideas, he conceived a strange machine devised to automatically write books and poetry, in much the same generative fashion that now, three centuries later, we begin to cherish. “Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politicks, law, mathematics and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study. He then led me to the frame, about the sides whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty foot square, placed in the middle of the room. The superficies was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a dye, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered on every square with paper pasted on them; and, on these papers were written all the words of their language in their several moods, tenses, and declensions, but without any order. The professor then desired me to observe, for he was going to set his engine at work. The pupils at his command took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down.” (Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, A Voyage to Balnibarbi) What astonishing forecast did Swift show in that narrative that, in spite of the underlying incredulity and irony, still clarifies our surprise when faced to what might seem to some of us just an abandonment of all that architects and designers have cherished: creativeness and inventiveness. Yet, we could argue that such a radical shift in paradigm occurred once when master builders left the construction ground and took seat at drafting boards. The whole body of design and construction knowledge was split into what now seem to us just specialties undertaken by more and more isolated professionals. That shift entailed new forms of representation and prediction which now each and all architects take for granted. Also, Cartesian space representation turned out to be the main instrument for professional practice, even if one can argue that it is not more than the unfolding of stone carving techniques that master builders and guilds were so fond of. Enter computing and all its unfolding, i.e. DNA coding, fractal geometry, generative computing, nonlinear dynamics, pattern generation and cellular automata, as a whole new chapter in science, and compare that to conical perspective, descriptive and analytical geometry and calculus, and an image begins to form, delineating a separation between architect and digital designer. In previous works, we have tried approaching the issues regarding architects education in a more consensual way. But it seems now that the whole curricular corpus might be changed as well. The very foundations upon which we prepare future professionals shall change, not only in College, but in High School as well. In this paper, we delve further into the disconnect between current curricula and digital design practices and suggest new disciplinary grounds for a new architectural education.
keywords Educational paradigm; Design teaching; Design methods;
series SIGRADI
email cvincent@mackenzie.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id caadria2008_62_session6a_510
id caadria2008_62_session6a_510
authors Diniz, Nancy
year 2008
title Body tailored space: Configuring Space through Embodiment
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 510-517
summary With this project I propose that embodiment can be more emphasized and better supported in space-design frameworks. This paper presents background on several theories of embodiment since the beginning of the twentieth century to recent developments of the concept in tangible and social computing and anticipate that this reveals pathways for designing new embodiment framework systems for architecture. I suggest that architecture and interactive computing can share a common theoretical foundation in embodied interaction. The main thesis is for designers to use the body as an interface to understand how the interaction between a person and his/her surroundings arises and how our embodiment reveals other rich spatial qualities during the conception phase of design. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for embodied interaction based on the creation of real-time systems in order to instigate a framework for interactive processes that can help designers understand architecture phenomena and the performance of space. I present a design experiment on embodied performance space entitled “Body Tailored Space” where the boundaries of the human body are metaphorically extended into surrounding membranes.
keywords Embodiment; embodied interaction; interactive architecture; phenomenology; second order cybernetics
series CAADRIA
email n.diniz@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2008_27_session3b_221
id caadria2008_27_session3b_221
authors Al-Haddad, Tristan
year 2008
title Parametric modulations in Masonry
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 221-228
summary The focus of the research presented in this paper asks how a designer can create a flexible system of physical making which can accommodate multiple programmatic functions within a smooth whole, rather than creating an a priori singular formal object. This adaptable system of construction works through the development of an intelligent CAD model that can be mapped to a flexible manufacturing mechanism, i.e. a reconfigurable mold. This system of manufacturing can be used to cast totally unique solid modules without creating a unique mold for each part by manipulating the topological structure of the system. This approach takes the notion of mass-customization beyond the expensive and unsustainable one-offs that the design world has seen recently, and into a new paradigm of a sustainable, economically viable world of mass-customizable form and space.
keywords Parametrics, Variability, Reconfigurability, UHPC, Topology, Molding, Casting
series CAADRIA
email tristan.al-haddad@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2008_3_session1a_029
id caadria2008_3_session1a_029
authors Ambrose, Michael A., Carl Lostritto, Luc Wilson
year 2008
title Animate education Early Design Education Pedagogy
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 29-35
summary This paper presents a novel approach to the introduction and use of animation and motion graphics in foundation design education. Design inquiry and understanding as generated from, and translated by, movement is the focus. This work explores animation as a design methodology in the first weeks of architectural education. The proposed design exercise discussed here will probe the concept/context and spatial/visual literacy of the learned sense of space-time in architectural design education and representation. Here the digital application of animation and motion graphics is intended to be process driven to encourage students to find an attitude about solutions rather than a solution to the design project. The intention is to examine the relationship between form and space through a structured exploration of movement within a kit-of-parts design project that explores a three-dimensional spatial construct. Animation as a design method poses unique potentials and pitfalls. Animation and motion graphics, as a collection of instances, is both questioned and exaggerated. This project creates a threshold experience of learning that puts in motion an exploration of integrated digital process and design product.
keywords Education, design theory, design studies, animation
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu, carllos@umd.edu, lucienbanks@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2008_4_session1a_036
id caadria2008_4_session1a_036
authors Coorey, Ben
year 2008
title Erosive fluidity Exploration in generating digital architectural form
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 36-41
summary This paper explores emerging digital technologies and their application in architectural design. It investigates the tools and techniques that are currently available and produces some interesting work that is both inspiring and interesting. A series of three scenarios were explored via a digital design studio at the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, The University of Sydney. The final work appeared in the ‘Disparallel Spaces’ exhibition, University of Sydney in May/June 2007. This paper will explain these scenarios and offer a look at some emerging trends in architectural design.
keywords Parametric, Animation, Complexity, Responsiveness
series CAADRIA
email bpcoorey@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cdc2008_099
id cdc2008_099
authors Harrison, David and Michael Donn
year 2008
title Using Project Information Clouds to Preserve Design Stories within the Digital Architecture Workplace
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 99-104
summary During the development of an architectural design a series of design stories form. These stories chronicle the collective decision making process of the diverse project team. Current digital design processes often fail to record these design stories because of the emphasis placed on the concise and accurate generation of the virtual model. This focus on an allencompassing digital model is detrimental to design stories because it limits participation, consolidates information flow and risks editorialisation of design discussion. Project Information Clouds are proposed as a digital space for design team participants to link, categorise and repurpose existing digital information into comprehensible design stories in support of the digital building model. Instead of a discrete tool, the Project Information Cloud is a set of principles derived from a proven distributed information network, the World Wide Web. The seven guiding principles of the Project Information Cloud are simplicity, modular design, decentralisation, ubiquity, information awareness, evolutionary semantics and context sensitivity. These principles when applied to the development of existing and new digital design tools are intended to improve information exchange and participation within the distributed project team.
email david.harrison@stress-free.co.nz
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ecaade2008_110
id ecaade2008_110
authors Ireland, Tim
year 2008
title Space Diagrams
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 91-98
summary Decomposing typical hierarchies of architectural space we look to the use of agents to generate architectonic form in a process of distributed representation. This paper forms a part of this on going research; a component focusing on the problem of circulation. The work presented looks to swarm intelligence and the well-trodden field of computational way finding techniques based on the route finding means of social insects. Ant foraging algorithms are used generally towards optimization and tend to rely on a priori knowledge of the environment. Outlined here is an investigation of emergent route formation and spatial connectivity based on simple agent and pheromone interaction. Optimization is not the key, but emergent connectivity through blind local communication.
keywords Agents, self-organisation, circulation, ants, pheromones
series eCAADe
email t.ireland@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ijac20076302
id ijac20076302
authors Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2008
title Implementations and Applications of DesignMap: Case Studies to Manage an Online Database of Visual Designs
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 3, pp. 243-258
summary This research introduces state-of-the-art techniques in the areas of online libraries, communities, and forums. The research endeavours to describe a computer system called DesignMap that could be categorized as a visual design forum. This system encourages networking and can also be applied as a visual design library. The DesignMap system, which manages and displays a massive number of visual designs in two and three dimensions, was presented and discussed in a previous research. This project, however, is concerned with the application of DesignMap as a tool to search, visualize, modify, and then add designs in a map; these designs are classified based on their formal properties of object relationships. DesignMap users have access to any part or category in the map. The resulting design series created by users of this system present a new and unique form of design collaboration. The research also investigates several applications of the DesignMap system.
series journal
last changed 2008/10/14 12:00

_id koehler02_paper_eaea2007
id koehler02_paper_eaea2007
authors Koehler, Dennis
year 2008
title Artificial Light in Urban Space
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary Visual impression of city form is related to its morphology of buildings and its spatial constellations. They present themselves in different lighting conditions. According to the daytime and seasonal impression, building elements run across in a different but constantly visible way. When night-time comes along the whole system is busy, indifferent and out of control. It is unsteadily illuminated rather in accordance to its purpose than to the structure of building or space.
keywords perception, space, artificial light
series EAEA
email dennis.koehler@fh-dortmund.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id kozlov02_paper_eaea2007
id kozlov02_paper_eaea2007
authors Kozlo, Dmitri
year 2008
title Topological Method of Construction of Point Surfaces as Physical Models
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary The shape of architectural objects in general can be treated as an envelope – a two dimensional surface embedded into three dimensional space. We directly perceive only the surface as a synthesis of sequential “photo snaps” – the two dimensional imprints on a retina – a concave screen inside of our eyes. In 15th century Italian architect and theorist L. B. Alberti claimed that the architecture consists in the outlines and the structure (lineamenta et structura in the original Latin text). The visible shape (outlines) exists only because a directly not perceived structure determines it. Like Alberti, the modern mathematical theories of form distinguish the shape as an exterior surface and the form itself as an internal structure. This subtle difference becomes a very important subject in the relationship between a virtual and a physical model in the studies of architectural endoscopy.
keywords topology, manifold, knots, point surface, physical model
series EAEA
email dmitrykozlov@mtu-net.ru
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id cf2011_p035
id cf2011_p035
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Weber Markus, Petzold Frank, Liwicki Marcus, Dengel Andreas
year 2011
title Sketch-based Methods for Researching Building Layouts through the Semantic Fingerprint of Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 85-102.
summary The paper focuses on the early stages of the design process where the architect needs assistance in finding reference projects and describes different aspects of a concept for retrieving previous design solutions with similar layout characteristics. Such references are typically used to see how others have solved a similar architectural problem or simply for inspiration. Current electronic search methods use textual information rather than graphical information. The configuration of space and the relations between rooms are hard to represent using keywords, in fact transforming these spatial configurations into verbally expressed typologies tends to result in unclear and often imprecise descriptions of architecture. Nowadays, modern IT-technologies lead to fundamental changes during the process of designing buildings. Digital representations of architecture require suitable approaches to the storage, indexing and management of information as well as adequate retrieval methods. Traditionally planning information is represented in the form of floor plans, elevations, sections and textual descriptions. State of the art digital representations include renderings, computer aided design (CAD) and semantic information like Building Information Modelling (BIM) including 2D and 3D file formats such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) (IAI, 2010). In the paper, we examine the development of IT-technologies in the area of case-based reasoning (Richter et al., 2007) to provide a sketch-based submission and retrieval system for publishing and researching building layouts including their manipulation and subsequent use. The user interface focuses on specifying space and their relations by drawing them. This query style supports the spatial thinking approach that architects use, who often have a visual representation in mind without being able to provide an accurate description of the spatial configuration. The semantic fingerprint proposed by (Langenhan, 2008) is a description and query language for creating an index of floor plans to store meta-data about architecture, which can be used as signature for retrieving reference projects. The functional spaces, such as living room or kitchen and the relation among on another, are used to create a fingerprint. Furthermore, we propose a visual sketch-based interface (Weber et al., 2010) based on the Touch&Write paradigm (Liwicki et al., 2010) for the submission and the retrieval phase. During the submission process the architect is sketching the space-boundaries, space relations and functional coherence's. Using state of the art document analysis techniques, the architects are supported offering an automatic detection of room boundaries and their physical relations. During the retrieval the application will interpret the sketches of the architect and find reference projects based on a similarity based search utilizing the semantic fingerprint. By recommending reference projects, architects will be able to reuse collective experience which match the current requirements. The way of performing a search using a sketch as a query is a new way of thinking and working. The retrieval of 3D models based on a sketched shape are already realized in several domains. We already propose a step further, using the semantics of a spatial configuration. Observing the design process of buildings reveals that the initial design phase serves as the foundation for the quality of the later outcome. The sketch-based approach to access valuable information using the semantic fingerprint enables the user to digitally capture knowledge about architecture, to recover and reuse it in common-sense. Furthermore, automatically analysed fingerprints can put forward both commonly used as well as best practice projects. It will be possible to rate architecture according to the fingerprint of a building.
keywords new media, case-based reasoning, ontology, semantic building design, sketch-based, knowledge management
series CAAD Futures
email langenhan@tum.de
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id madrazo02_paper_eaea2007
id madrazo02_paper_eaea2007
authors Madrazo, Leandro; Gonçal Costa
year 2008
title In-Space: Learning to Give Form to Space
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary A perspective represents space as seen from the outside, with the eye of the transcendental subject; an eye –represented by a geometric view point– which not only sees a space, but a space as it is seen by the subject. Motion is inherent to our experience of space which is not fixed and static –like a perspective assumes– but dynamic.
keywords space conception, space perception, space representation, computer-supported collaborative learning
series EAEA
email madrazo@salle.url.edu
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id caadria2008_15_session2a_125
id caadria2008_15_session2a_125
authors Mahalingam, Ganapathy
year 2008
title A Case For Architectural Computing: Computing Using Architectural Constructs
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 125-131
summary This paper is about the potential of architectural computing. Architectural computing is defined as computing that is done with computational structures that are based on architectural forms. An analysis of works of architecture reveals the embedded forms in the works of architecture. A uniform, connections-based representation of these architectural forms allows us to derive computational structures from them. These computational structures form the basis of architectural computing. In this paper a case is made for architectural computing, ideas are provided for how it could be done, and the benefits of architectural computing are briefly explored.
keywords Architectural computing: architectural programming language; intentional programming; connections-based paradigm
series CAADRIA
email Ganapathy.Mahalingam@ndsu.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

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