CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 407

_id sigradi2008_077
id sigradi2008_077
authors Briones, Carolina
year 2008
title A collaborative project experience in an architectural framework, working with Open Source applications and physical computing [Diseño de Plataformas Digitales e Interactivas: una experiencia educativa trabajando colaborativamente con aplicaciones de Código Abierto y Computación Física]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary Nowadays, thanks to the telecommunication revolution and therefore the massive spread of Internet, we have seen the come up of international architectural offices with branches located in different continent, working in a collaborative fashion, surpassing physical and time frontiers. At the same time, the multidisciplinary work between designers, architects, engineers, programmers and even biologist, between others, have been taking place in the new network society. All transformations also supported by the arising of FOSS (Free Open Source Software) and the virtual communities behind them, which allow the creation of non-traditional or specific software, the association between disciplines, and also, the formation of meeting scenarios for a mixture of individuals coming up with multiple motivation to coexist in collaborative environment. Furthermore, it is possible to argue that Open Source applications are also the reflection of a social movement, based on the open creation and exchange of information and knowledge. Do the appeared of FOSS compel us to re-think our working and teaching methods? Do they allow new modes of organizing and collaborating inside our architectural practices?. This paper would like to address these questions, by presenting the results of the “Experience Design” course, which by implementing teaching methods based on Open Source principles and cutting-edge tools, seeks to approach students to these new “way of do”, knowledge and methodologies, and overall, focus them on the science behind the computer. This paper describes the “Experience Design” course, in which architectural graduate students of Universidad Diego Portales (Chile), put for first time their hands on the creation of interactive interfaces. By acquiring basic knowledge of programming and physical computing, students built in a collaborative way a responsive physical installation. The course use as applications “Processing” and “Arduino”. The first one is an Open Source programming language and environment for users who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It has a visual context and serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is a project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas, at the MIT Media Lab (www.processing.org). The second is an Open Source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino has a microcontroller (programmed with Processing language) which can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators (www.arduino.cc). Both environments shared a growing community of people working in related projects and extending useful assistance for beginners. In this paper it is presented the current state of the pilot course and some of the initials results collected during the process. Students and teacher’s debates and evaluations of the experience have been exposed. Together with a critical evaluation in relation to the accomplishment of the effort of place together different disciplines in one collaborative project akin, architecture, design, programming and electronic. Finally, futures modifications of the course are discussed, together with consideration to take in account at the moment of bring Open Source and programming culture into the student curriculum.
keywords Physical computing, teaching framework, Open Source, Interactive Installation
series SIGRADI
email fili_pax@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2008_53_session5b_437
id caadria2008_53_session5b_437
authors Ambrose, Michael A.; Lisa Lacharité
year 2008
title Representation and re-Presentation: Emerging Digital Conventions of Architectural Communication
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 437-444
summary This paper examines the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of digital architectural representation. Emerging digital tools, processes, and methods are sponsoring new conventions for the communication of architectural ideas and motives. New conventions yielded through digital media offer fresh and currently uncodified ways to communicate. These new conventions attempt to communicate the same ideas as the old, sometimes subverting the imperative for drawing as the representation does not refer to information in the abstract, but literally is the information. This research explores the use of architectural conventions, such as plan, section, and perspective, to examine re-presentation—not only a way to convey form and content, but to also to be used as a form of communication. The emerging digital conventions are forms of communication situated between representation and re-presentation.
keywords Education, design theory, digital design representation
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu, lisa.lacharite@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2008_080
id sigradi2008_080
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. At first, it describes and discusses different uses of art in architectural history. Through the analyzes of Le Corbusier’s artistic and architectural practices, it observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. More than bringing pictorial ‘inspiration’, art, as a experimental field, can change our architectural procedures and approaches - a much richer and powerful addition to the development of architecture. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. Very commonly present in our contemporary life, not only on the making of architecture – computer drawings and modeling of extravagant buildings – nor in ‘automated rooms’ of the millionaire’s houses. Televisions, telephones and computers leave the walls of our houses “with as many holes as a Swiss cheese”, as Flusser has pointed. The architecture has historically manipulated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Since is inevitable to think the contemporary world without them, it is extreme urgent that architects start dealing with this whole universe in a creative way. Important changes in architecture occur after professionals start to research and experiment with different artistic medias, not limiting their visions to painting and sculpture. The main hypothesis of this paper is that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. This confluence can only take form when architects rise questions about technology based interaction and automation during their creative process, embodying these concepts into the architecture repertoire. An educational experience was conducted in 2007 at UFMG Architecture School, in Brazil, with the intention of this activity was to allow students to research creatively with both information technology and architecture. The students’ goal was to create site-specific interventions on the school building, using physical and digital devices. Finally, the paper contextualizes this experience with the discussion above exposed. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some contemporary art modalities (specially the hybrid ones) in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture; Information and Communication Technologies; Digital Art; Site Specific Art; Architectural Learning.
series SIGRADI
email robertoandres@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2008_153
id ecaade2008_153
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 267-274
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. It observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. The architecture has historically mediated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Then, it analyses the hypothesis that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. An educational experience is presented, aiming to verify some points discussed on the text. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some hybrid art modalities in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture, Information and Communication Technologies, Digital Art, Site Specific Art, Architectural Learning
series eCAADe
email andres@superficie.org
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id sigradi2008_103
id sigradi2008_103
authors Baltazar, Ana Paula; Maria Lucia Malard, Silke Kapp, Pedro Schultz
year 2008
title From physical models to immersive collaborative environments: testing the best way for homeless people to visualise and negotiate spaces
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper describes an experiment to investigate the best way for lay people to use representation to visualise and negotiate space. It was motivated by our observations in workshops for digital inclusion in the context of a housing project for a homeless association. Computers were used to make it easier for the community to understand and change the spaces in real time. The first workshops proved that our approach was efficient as an exercise but not certainly effective concerning the understanding of spatial qualities. So we have designed an experiment to compare the usability of different media in participatory design processes. For that we have adapted the ‘Usability’ methodology, which is fully described in the paper. We started with three main questions. The first concerned the effectiveness of different media to represent spatial quality; the second concerned the best way for novices to approach space, whether by refurbishing a pre-existing space or by starting from the scratch; and the third concerned the effectiveness of negotiation by means of discourse and by means of or action. We also had two main hypothesis: one coming from research on digital environments and stereo visualisation, indicating that the more people feel immersed in the represented environment the more they are able to correlate it with physical space; and the other coming from our own observations in the participatory design workshops, in which the collective decision-making was manipulated by those people with more advanced communication skills who use their ability in an authoritative way regardless of the relevance of what they have to say. This paper describes the whole experiment, which was an exercise of spatial negotiation in 5 versions. In the first version we provided fixed digital views of a room in plan and axonometry; for another two versions we provided a physical model of the room in 1:10 scale, with some pieces of the existing furniture in different scales. This was done to check if people were just playing with a puzzle or actually grasping the correspondence between representation and the object or the space represented. One version proposes refurbishment and the other starts from the scratch. And the last two versions repeated the same task made with the physical model, but this time using a 3D interactive digital model. People were required not only to organise the furniture in the space but also to build a full scale cardboard structure and organise the real furniture reproducing their proposed model. Their comments on the spaces they had built confronted with what they had imaged when working with the model has enabled us to compare the different models, as also the different ways of negotiating spaces. This paper describes this experiment in detail concluding that 3D digital interactive models are far more effective than physical models and 2D drawings; when negotiation happens by means of action it provides more creative results than when the discoursive practice prevails; people are more creative when they start something from scratch, though they spend more time. The results of this experiment led us to formulate a new hypothesis leading to the development of an immersive collaborative environment using stereoscopy.
keywords Visualisation, negotiation, immersive environment, digital interfaces, homeless people
series SIGRADI
email anapaulabaltazar@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2010_031
id caadria2010_031
authors Burke, A.; B. Coorey, D. Hill and J. McDermott
year 2010
title Urban micro-informatics: a test case for high-resolution urban modelling through aggregating public information sources
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 327-336
summary Our contention is that the city is a rich collection of urban micro-ecologies in continuous formation that include information types outside the traditional boundaries of urban design, city planning, and architecture and their native data fields. This paper discusses working with non-standard urban data types of a highly granular nature, and the analytical possibilities and technical issues associated with their aggregation, through a post professional masters level research studio project run in 2008. Opportunities for novel urban analysis arising from this process are discussed in the context of typical urban planning and analysis systems and locative media practices. This research bought to light specific technical and conceptual issues arising from the combination of processes including sources of data, data collection methods, data formatting, aggregating and visualisation. The range and nature of publicly available information and its value in an urban analysis context is also explored, linking collective information sites such as Pachube, to local environmental analysis and sensor webs. These are discussed in this paper, toward determining the possibilities for novel understandings of the city from a user centric, real-time urban perspective.
keywords Urban; informatics; processing; ubicomp; visualisation
series CAADRIA
email Anthony.burke@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2008_198
id ecaade2008_198
authors Crotch, Joanna; Mantho, Robert
year 2008
title Media, Technology and Teaching
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 293-300
summary With the growing reliance on technology and other visual media to explore architectural ideas, has architectural pedagogy realigned itself with the evolving possibilities of the new technological age? With the above in mind, we designed a program to explore and test this question. The programs encouraged experimentation and speculation. Technology was seen to be central to the program. The starting point was the selection of an activity. Each stage of the process required the student to firstly, carefully observe, then to create an image utilizing different ‘medium’ to realize their observations. The chosen mediums were cubism, movie making and digital imaging. Conventional plans and sections were required to be made of each final outcome, of each stage. As part of and in response to each progressive stage, a space to house an element of the activity was designed. The concluding part required the design of a small urban building to accommodate the activity selected.
keywords Pedagogy, Architecture, Technology, Spatialization, Exploration
series eCAADe
email j.crotch@gsa.ac.uk, r.mantho@gsa.ac.uk
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2008_177
id ecaade2008_177
authors Fatah gen. Schieck, Ava
year 2008
title Exploring Architectural Education in the Digital Age
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 861-870
summary This paper reports on work carried out within the module ‘Digital Space & Society as part of the MSc Adaptive Architecture & Computation course at UCL. I describe my approach in investigating possibilities for integrating digital media and computation into a module taught to students coming predominantly from a design background. The teaching adopts the design studio culture, which integrates: teaching, discovery (research), and application (practice). Here I present an attempt to develop new ways that extend beyond conventionally applied methods within traditional architectural education by adopting project based learning that is carried out in the real world. The project is driven by my recent research activities. Donald Schon’s concept of the ‘knowledge in action’ provides a useful framework for interpreting my approach.
keywords Architectural education, digital, project based, teaching & research
series eCAADe
email ava.fatah@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2008_142
id ecaade2008_142
authors Hoog, Jochen; Wolff-Plottegg, Manfred
year 2008
title Real Virtualities - Architecture 2.0
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 817-822
summary The Institute of Architecture and Design, TU Vienna has bought a virtual island in Second Life (SL) in order to use it in a design course (5 ECTS). The goal was to introduce students to new ways in which computers in a web based network like SL can be used to generate designs by using end user scripting within a virtual 3D environment. After a short introduction into the basics of SL and to the rules and conditions of multi-user virtual environments (MUVE’s) the students worked within that kind of spatial software as a place and as hyper media. The main focus of this paper is to stress and to describe the differences of the student’s results compared to common architectural design courses.
keywords Algorithmic architecture, Second Life, virtual space design, learning platform
series eCAADe
email hoog@tuwien.ac.at, plottegg@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id jemtrud02_paper_eaea07
id jemtrud02_paper_eaea07
authors Jemtrud, Michael
year 2008
title Emerging Technologies in a Participatory Design Studio_between Carleton University and Pennsylvania State University
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary As a preliminary report on a proof-of-concept design studio conducted during the spring semester of 2007 between the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University in Ottawa and the Immersive Environment Laboratory (IEL) at Pennsylvania State University, the paper first describes the implementation of this network-centric collaborative design platform. The report articulates the “staging” of the conditions of possibility for a dynamic interplay between technological mediation and the reality of making, then compares the use of high bandwidth technology with customized symmetrical toolsets in the tele-collaborative educational environment, versus commercial toolsets deployed over moderate bandwidth connections. In each setting, the collaborative environment is assessed according to issues encountered by students and design outcomes. The effectiveness of the digitally mediated collaborative studio is also gauged in terms of student reaction to the learning process via feedback surveys and questionnaires.
keywords design, collaboration, tele-presence, visualization, broadband
series EAEA
email michael.jemtrud@mcgill.ca
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id sigradi2008_081
id sigradi2008_081
authors Kirschner, Ursula
year 2008
title Study of digital morphing tools during the design process - Application of freeware software and of tools in commercial products as well as their integration in AutoCAD
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This research work examines methods of experimental designing with CAAD in a CAD laboratory with architecture students as the testing persons. Thereby the main focus is on the early phase of finding forms, in which different techniques with digital media are tried out in the didactic architectural design lessons. In these work have been traced the influences of the media employed on the design processes and combined the approaches of current CAAD research with aspects from classic design theory. For mathematical rules of proportion, atmospheric influence factors and analogy concepts in architecture, I have developed design methods which have been applied and verified in several series of seminars. (Kirschner, U.: 2000, Thesis, a CAAD supported architectural design teaching, Hamburg, school of arts). Previous experimental exercises showed that morphological sequences of modeling are effective sources for playful designing processes. In the current work these approaches are enhanced and supplemented by different morphological architectural concepts for creating shapes. For this purpose 2D based software like Morphit, Winmorph and other freeware were used. Whereas in the further development of this design technique we used 3D freeware morphing programs like zhu3D or Blender. The resulting morphological shapes were imported in CAD and refined. Ideally the morphing tool is integrated in the modeling environment of the standard software AutoCAD. A digital city model is the starting basis of the design process to guarantee the reference to the reality. The applied design didactic is predicated on the theories of Bernhard Hoesli. The act of designing viewed as „waiting for a good idea“ is, according to him, unteachable; students should, in contrast, learn to judge the „the force of an idea“. On the subject of morphology a form-generating method in the pre-design phase has been tested. Starting from urban-planning lines on an area map, two simple geometric initial images were produced which were merged by means of morphing software. Selected images from this film sequence were extruded with CAAD to produce solid models as sectional drawings. The high motivation of the students and the quality of the design results produced with these simple morphing techniques were the reason for the integration of the artistic and scientific software into the creative shape modeling process with the computer. The students learned in addition to the „bottom up “and „ top down” new design methods. In the presentation the properties and benefits of the morphing tools are presented in tables and are analyzed with regard to the architectural shape generating in an urban context. A catalogue of criteria with the following topics was developed: user friendliness, the ability of integrating the tools or as the case may be the import of data into a CAD environment, the artistic aspects in terms of the flexibility of shape generating as well as the evaluation of the aesthetic consideration of shapes.
keywords Architectural design, freeware morphing software, AutoCAD
series SIGRADI
email kirschner@uni.leuphana.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cf2011_p035
id cf2011_p035
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Weber Markus, Petzold Frank, Liwicki Marcus, Dengel Andreas
year 2011
title Sketch-based Methods for Researching Building Layouts through the Semantic Fingerprint of Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 85-102.
summary The paper focuses on the early stages of the design process where the architect needs assistance in finding reference projects and describes different aspects of a concept for retrieving previous design solutions with similar layout characteristics. Such references are typically used to see how others have solved a similar architectural problem or simply for inspiration. Current electronic search methods use textual information rather than graphical information. The configuration of space and the relations between rooms are hard to represent using keywords, in fact transforming these spatial configurations into verbally expressed typologies tends to result in unclear and often imprecise descriptions of architecture. Nowadays, modern IT-technologies lead to fundamental changes during the process of designing buildings. Digital representations of architecture require suitable approaches to the storage, indexing and management of information as well as adequate retrieval methods. Traditionally planning information is represented in the form of floor plans, elevations, sections and textual descriptions. State of the art digital representations include renderings, computer aided design (CAD) and semantic information like Building Information Modelling (BIM) including 2D and 3D file formats such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) (IAI, 2010). In the paper, we examine the development of IT-technologies in the area of case-based reasoning (Richter et al., 2007) to provide a sketch-based submission and retrieval system for publishing and researching building layouts including their manipulation and subsequent use. The user interface focuses on specifying space and their relations by drawing them. This query style supports the spatial thinking approach that architects use, who often have a visual representation in mind without being able to provide an accurate description of the spatial configuration. The semantic fingerprint proposed by (Langenhan, 2008) is a description and query language for creating an index of floor plans to store meta-data about architecture, which can be used as signature for retrieving reference projects. The functional spaces, such as living room or kitchen and the relation among on another, are used to create a fingerprint. Furthermore, we propose a visual sketch-based interface (Weber et al., 2010) based on the Touch&Write paradigm (Liwicki et al., 2010) for the submission and the retrieval phase. During the submission process the architect is sketching the space-boundaries, space relations and functional coherence's. Using state of the art document analysis techniques, the architects are supported offering an automatic detection of room boundaries and their physical relations. During the retrieval the application will interpret the sketches of the architect and find reference projects based on a similarity based search utilizing the semantic fingerprint. By recommending reference projects, architects will be able to reuse collective experience which match the current requirements. The way of performing a search using a sketch as a query is a new way of thinking and working. The retrieval of 3D models based on a sketched shape are already realized in several domains. We already propose a step further, using the semantics of a spatial configuration. Observing the design process of buildings reveals that the initial design phase serves as the foundation for the quality of the later outcome. The sketch-based approach to access valuable information using the semantic fingerprint enables the user to digitally capture knowledge about architecture, to recover and reuse it in common-sense. Furthermore, automatically analysed fingerprints can put forward both commonly used as well as best practice projects. It will be possible to rate architecture according to the fingerprint of a building.
keywords new media, case-based reasoning, ontology, semantic building design, sketch-based, knowledge management
series CAAD Futures
email langenhan@tum.de
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2008_087
id sigradi2008_087
authors Lautenschlaeger, Graziele; Anja Pratschke
year 2008
title Electronic Art and Second Order Cybernetic: From Art in Process to Process in Art.
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The goal of the paper presented below is to discuss partial results of a research which has been financed by the state sponsored agency FAPESP since 2007. Inserted in the research line Design Process, it aims to analyse connections between design process in electronic art and architecture, concerning the creation of mixed media spatialities, as well as present how each field can get the benefits from this analyses. Based on Grounded Theory methodology, a method of qualitative research which aims to understand “reality” from the meanings attributed by people for their experiences, the research has been started collecting data from bibliographical references, interviews with media artists, theoreticians and curators of electronic art and visits to media labs. Interviews and visits of media centers were taken in Europe while the researcher was as an exchange student in the Interface Culture Department in Kunstuniversität Linz, from March to September of 2008. By crossing data collected from the interviews and visits, with the cybernetic social system theory by Niklas Luhmann, and the discussion of an example of mixed media spatiality creation in the art field, this paper analyses how creative processes in digital era depends on different interdisciplinary relationships and how collaborative approaches are needed nowadays in the arts and architectural areas, seeing that artworks are always being influenced by their respective specific “mediality”. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relevance of the use of the cybernetic theory in digital culture, when concepts like participation, interaction and communication are some of the keywords, towards a “collective and distributed authorship”, and their reflects in the contemporary spatiality. The special interest in the comparison of art experience and second order cybernetics as a reference to architecture field is one of the findings of the paper. And, concerning the practical implication, due to cybernetics’ constant questioning of viability, adaptability and recursion, it should be able to point some ways to architects and artists´ works, especially if we consider that they never work in “ideal” conditions.
keywords Electronic art. Design process. Second order Cybernetic. Niklas Luhmann.
series SIGRADI
email gra_nola@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id acadia08_400
id acadia08_400
authors Riether, Gernot
year 2008
title Digital Traces
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 400-405
summary Digital media, with the capacity to master complexity, has permitted an unprecedented ability to reinterpret natural processes. An infinite number of realities can emerge from their interpretations that can be developed into physical structures or spatial models that can further be appropriated to inform the design of architecture. In this paper the potential of these digital interpretations to inform architectural design processes will be discussed. Demonstrating how digital media can operate as an interface that couples information with cognitive processes I will show how digital media can be constructed in order to intensify our perception of our natural environment. Examples from projects that were developed with students during the spring semester of 2008 at Georgia Institute of Technology will be used to support the argument.
keywords Digital Fabrication; Emergence; Environment; Media; Perception
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ddss2008-28
id ddss2008-28
authors Rügemer, Jörg
year 2008
title Pimp my Box – Architecture of TransformationInterdisciplinary Collaboration and Various Media as DesignDecision and Support Tools
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary The paper describes an interdisciplinary architectural design studio setting at the graduate level, which explores the notion of “transformation” in architecture. By collaborating with a group of modern dance students, the studio approaches the creation of space from a different perspective, using dynamic movement coupled with digital tools as a space generator.
keywords Transformation of Space, Dynamic Space, Hybrid Design Method, Interdisciplinary Studio Approach
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id caadria2008_36_session4a_293
id caadria2008_36_session4a_293
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel; Xiangyu Wang, Hartmut Seichter, Thomas Kvan
year 2008
title Touching The Untouchables: Virtual-, Augmented- And Reality
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 293-299
summary This paper brings forth an overview of design and interaction within realms stretching from reality to virtuality. In recent years, architects have been exploring creative technologies and potentials using a variety of interfaces ranging from real and virtual to augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR) media. The process of design and method of communication are becoming increasingly imperative for inter-disciplinary work. This highlights the need for a structured review of successful effective adoptions and settings of those realms and technologies. This paper critically reflects on lessons learned from architectural design research, which employ virtual, augmented, mixed and real environments, and address rising issues in these areas.
keywords Reality; Mixed Reality; Augmented Reality; Virtual Reality; Design Conversing
series CAADRIA
email {marcaurel, x.wang}@arch.usyd.edu.au, hartmut.seichter@canterbury.ac.nz, tkvan@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cdc2008_041
id cdc2008_041
authors Schork, Tim
year 2008
title Option Explicit – Scripting as Design Media
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 41-46
summary In practice, the domains of architecture and computation have traditionally been perceived as distinct. Computation and its associated technologies, such as computers and software applications, have primarily only been applied to the domain of architecture. The aim of this paper is to reconsider the relationship between these domains. In moving away from separate entities towards a synthesis of architecture and computation, this paper explores the potential and the challenges of this rich creative space that opens up for architectural design through a series of case studies.
email tim.schork@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id stretton02_theses_eaea2007
id stretton02_theses_eaea2007
authors Stretton, Graham
year 2008
title Modelscope: An Interior Design Perspective
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary As an education tool tactile modelling processes are far from dead. The use of modern digital modelscopes and associated digital lens based media has given fresh impetus allowing both tactile and visual interaction with the 3D internal Environment that cannot be replicated using computer generated system alone.
series EAEA
email grs@dmu.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id sigradi2008_180
id sigradi2008_180
authors Vincent, Charles
year 2008
title Gulliver in the land of Generative Design
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The current trend in architectural design towards architectural computing has been treated both from a philosophical standing point and as an operational systems’ problem, in a quest for explications which could at last break ground for a more broad development and adoption of design tools. As Kostas Terzidis (2007) puts it, the intuitiveness that architects have put on so high a pedestal seems to be the central issue to be dealt with by both views. There seems to be no apparent shortcut toward the reconciliation between traditional practice and new media and most certainly it is not only a problem of interface design, but one of design method clarification and reinterpretation of those methods into computing systems. Furthermore, there’s no doubt left as to whether computing systems can generate such new patterns as to impact our own understanding of architecture. But even if computer algorithms can make possible the exploration of abstract alternatives to an abstract initial idea, as in Mathematica and Processing, the issue of relating abstract and geometric representations of human centered architecture lays in the hands of architects, programmers or, better yet, architect-programmers. What seems now to be the relevant change is that architectural design might escape from the traditional sequence embedded in the need – program – design iterations – solution timeline, substituted by a web of interactions among differing experimental paths, in which even the identification of needs is to be informed by computing. It is interesting to note that the computational approach to architectural design has been praised for the formal fluidity of bubbles and Bezier shapes it entails and for the overcoming of functionalist and serialization typical of modern architecture. That approach betrays a high degree of canonic fascination with the tools of the trade and very little connection to the day to day chores of building design. On the other hand, shall our new tools and toys open up new ways of thinking and designing our built landscape? What educational issues surface if we are to foster wider use of the existing technologies and simultaneously address the need to overtake mass construction? Is mass customization the answer for the dead end modern architecture has led us to? Can we let go the humanist approach begun in Renascence and culminated in Modernism or shall we review that approach in view of algorithmic architecture? Let us step back in time to 1726 when Swift’s ‘Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World by Lemuel Gulliver’ was first published. In Swift’s fierce critic of what seemed to him the most outrageous ideas, he conceived a strange machine devised to automatically write books and poetry, in much the same generative fashion that now, three centuries later, we begin to cherish. “Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politicks, law, mathematics and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study. He then led me to the frame, about the sides whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty foot square, placed in the middle of the room. The superficies was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a dye, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered on every square with paper pasted on them; and, on these papers were written all the words of their language in their several moods, tenses, and declensions, but without any order. The professor then desired me to observe, for he was going to set his engine at work. The pupils at his command took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down.” (Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, A Voyage to Balnibarbi) What astonishing forecast did Swift show in that narrative that, in spite of the underlying incredulity and irony, still clarifies our surprise when faced to what might seem to some of us just an abandonment of all that architects and designers have cherished: creativeness and inventiveness. Yet, we could argue that such a radical shift in paradigm occurred once when master builders left the construction ground and took seat at drafting boards. The whole body of design and construction knowledge was split into what now seem to us just specialties undertaken by more and more isolated professionals. That shift entailed new forms of representation and prediction which now each and all architects take for granted. Also, Cartesian space representation turned out to be the main instrument for professional practice, even if one can argue that it is not more than the unfolding of stone carving techniques that master builders and guilds were so fond of. Enter computing and all its unfolding, i.e. DNA coding, fractal geometry, generative computing, nonlinear dynamics, pattern generation and cellular automata, as a whole new chapter in science, and compare that to conical perspective, descriptive and analytical geometry and calculus, and an image begins to form, delineating a separation between architect and digital designer. In previous works, we have tried approaching the issues regarding architects education in a more consensual way. But it seems now that the whole curricular corpus might be changed as well. The very foundations upon which we prepare future professionals shall change, not only in College, but in High School as well. In this paper, we delve further into the disconnect between current curricula and digital design practices and suggest new disciplinary grounds for a new architectural education.
keywords Educational paradigm; Design teaching; Design methods;
series SIGRADI
email cvincent@mackenzie.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ecaade2008_154
id ecaade2008_154
authors Vrontissi, Maria
year 2008
title Digital Database of Building Structural Systems: an Educational Tool to Support Multi-disciplinarity and Enrich Design Vocabulary in Preliminary Conceptual Structural Design
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 397-404
summary In building design practice, especially in the preliminary stages, multi-disciplinarity is often ignored, due to the intrinsic characteristics of the design process, the features of design education, or lack of appropriate tools, resulting in a limited design vocabulary. This paper investigates the development of a digital multi-media database of building structures, operating as a supporting tool in preliminary structural design in order to enrich and justify design decisions. The proposed database responds to the need of bridging the gap between systematic, yet abstract, theoretical analytical approach of structural systems and descriptive, visual, yet fragmented, representations of architectural forms, through a highly visual, yet thoroughly systematic, approach based on case-studies.
keywords Database: multi-disciplinarity, structural design, digital library, conceptual design
series eCAADe
email mavron@tee.gr
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 20HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_997913 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002