CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 485

_id ecaade2008_000
id ecaade2008_000
authors Muylle, Marc (ed.)
year 2008
title ARCHITECTURE ‘in computro’ - Integrating methods and techniques
source 26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2], Antwerp (Belgium) 26-29 September 2008, 968 p.
summary The presence of both visible and hidden digital resources in daily life is overwhelming and their presence continues to grow exponentially. It is surprising how little the impact of this evolution is questioned, especially in education. Reflecting on past experiences of this subject to learn for the future seems rarely to be done, and the sheer fact that a digital method exists is often seen as sufficient justification for its use. Are these the perceptions of serious misgivings or isolated views that circulate in the educational world and beyond? We would suggest that the eCAADe (Education and Research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe) and its conferences provide the ideal forum to provide answers in this debate. For the first conference in what is to be the next quarter century of the existence of eCAADe, a theme was chosen that could easily include all aspects of this debate: ARCHITECTURE ‘in computro’ , Integrating methods and techniques It seems a bit vulgar to use a dog-Latin phrase ‘in computro’ for such a serious matter but at least it now has a place between ‘in vivo’ and ‘in vitro’. For more than 25 years CAAD has been available, and has been more and more successfully used in research and commercial architectural practice. In education, which by definition should prepare students for the future, the constantly evolving CAAD metaphor is provoking a challenge to cope with the ever expanding scope of related topics. It is not surprising that this has led to differing opinions as to how CAAD should be taught. Questions such as how advanced research results can be incorporated in teaching, or if the Internet is provoking self-education by students, are in striking contrast with the more fundamental issues such as the discussion on analogue versus digital design methods. Is CAAD a part of design teaching or is it its logical successor in a global E-topia? Although the E of education is a prominent factor in the ‘raison d’être’ of the organisation, the papers presented at this conference illustrate that eCAADe is open to all other relevant contributions in the area of computer-aided architectural design. It will be a fortunate coincidence that this exchange of knowledge and opinions on such state-of-the-art subjects, will be hosted by the The Higher Institute of Architectural Sciences, Henry van de Velde, located in the historical buildings of the Royal Academy of Fine Art established since the founding of the academy in 1662.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email marc.muylle@artesis.be
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2008/09/09 15:20

_id bbc9
id bbc9
authors Aeck, Richard
year 2008
title Turnstijl Houses & Cannoli Framing
source VDM Verlag Dr. Muller Aktiengesellschaft Co. KG, Germany

ISBN: 3639078470 ISBN-13: 9783639078473

summary This work presumes that integrating modeling tools and digital fabrication technology into architectural practice will transform how we build the detached house. Single-family houses come in all shapes and sizes, and in doing so, imply variation as well in certain materials, methods, and lighter classes of structure. Ultimately, houses are extensions, if not expressions, of those dwelling within, yet our attempts to produce appealing manufactured houses have prioritized standardization over variation and fall short of this ideal. Rather than considering new offerings born of the flexibility and precision afforded by digital production, sadly, today’s homebuilders are busy using our advancing fabrication technology to hasten the production of yesterday’s home. In response to such observations, and drawing upon meta-themes (i.e., blending and transition) present in contemporary design, this study proposes a hybrid SIP/Lam framing system and a corresponding family of houses. The development of the Cannoli Framing System (CFS) through 3D and physical models culminates in the machining and testing of full-scale prototypes. Three demonstrations, branded the Turnstijl Houses, are generated via a phased process where their schema, structure, and system geometry are personalized at their conception. This work pursues the variation of type and explores the connection between type and production methodology. Additional questions are also raised and addressed, such as how is a categorical notion like type defined, affected, and even “bred”?
keywords Digital Manufacturing, Type, Typology, CNC, SIP, SIPs, Foam, PreFab, Prefabrication, Framing, Manufactured House, Modular, Packaged House, Digital, Plywood, Methodology
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email raeck@branchoff.net
more http://branchoff.net
last changed 2010/11/16 07:29

_id ijac20086405
id ijac20086405
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Fleischmann, Moritz
year 2008
title Elemental Methods for Integrated Architectures: Experimentation with Design Processes for Cable Net Structures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 4, 453-475
summary Tension active systems are compelling architectural structures having an intimate connection between structural performance and the arrangement of material. The direct flow of structural forces through the material makes these systems attractive and unique from an aesthetic point of view, but they are a challenge to develop from a design and an engineering perspective. Traditional methods for solving such structural systems rely on both analog modeling techniques and the use of highly advanced engineering software. The complexity and laborious nature of both processes presents a challenge for iterating through design variations. To experiment with the spacemaking capabilities of tension active systems, it is necessary to design methods that can actively couple the digital simulation with the analog methods for building the physical structure. What we propose is a designer-authored process that digitally simulates the behaviors of tension active systems using simple geometric components related to material and structural performance, activated and varied through elemental techniques of scripting. The logics for manufacturing and assembly are to be embedded in the digital generation of form. The intention is to transform what is a highly engineered system into an architectural system where investigation is as much about the determination of space and environment as it is about the arrangement of structure and material.
series journal
last changed 2009/03/03 06:48

_id caadria2008_3_session1a_029
id caadria2008_3_session1a_029
authors Ambrose, Michael A., Carl Lostritto, Luc Wilson
year 2008
title Animate education Early Design Education Pedagogy
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 29-35
summary This paper presents a novel approach to the introduction and use of animation and motion graphics in foundation design education. Design inquiry and understanding as generated from, and translated by, movement is the focus. This work explores animation as a design methodology in the first weeks of architectural education. The proposed design exercise discussed here will probe the concept/context and spatial/visual literacy of the learned sense of space-time in architectural design education and representation. Here the digital application of animation and motion graphics is intended to be process driven to encourage students to find an attitude about solutions rather than a solution to the design project. The intention is to examine the relationship between form and space through a structured exploration of movement within a kit-of-parts design project that explores a three-dimensional spatial construct. Animation as a design method poses unique potentials and pitfalls. Animation and motion graphics, as a collection of instances, is both questioned and exaggerated. This project creates a threshold experience of learning that puts in motion an exploration of integrated digital process and design product.
keywords Education, design theory, design studies, animation
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu, carllos@umd.edu, lucienbanks@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2008_53_session5b_437
id caadria2008_53_session5b_437
authors Ambrose, Michael A.; Lisa Lacharité
year 2008
title Representation and re-Presentation: Emerging Digital Conventions of Architectural Communication
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 437-444
summary This paper examines the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of digital architectural representation. Emerging digital tools, processes, and methods are sponsoring new conventions for the communication of architectural ideas and motives. New conventions yielded through digital media offer fresh and currently uncodified ways to communicate. These new conventions attempt to communicate the same ideas as the old, sometimes subverting the imperative for drawing as the representation does not refer to information in the abstract, but literally is the information. This research explores the use of architectural conventions, such as plan, section, and perspective, to examine re-presentation—not only a way to convey form and content, but to also to be used as a form of communication. The emerging digital conventions are forms of communication situated between representation and re-presentation.
keywords Education, design theory, digital design representation
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu, lisa.lacharite@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2008_080
id sigradi2008_080
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. At first, it describes and discusses different uses of art in architectural history. Through the analyzes of Le Corbusier’s artistic and architectural practices, it observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. More than bringing pictorial ‘inspiration’, art, as a experimental field, can change our architectural procedures and approaches - a much richer and powerful addition to the development of architecture. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. Very commonly present in our contemporary life, not only on the making of architecture – computer drawings and modeling of extravagant buildings – nor in ‘automated rooms’ of the millionaire’s houses. Televisions, telephones and computers leave the walls of our houses “with as many holes as a Swiss cheese”, as Flusser has pointed. The architecture has historically manipulated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Since is inevitable to think the contemporary world without them, it is extreme urgent that architects start dealing with this whole universe in a creative way. Important changes in architecture occur after professionals start to research and experiment with different artistic medias, not limiting their visions to painting and sculpture. The main hypothesis of this paper is that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. This confluence can only take form when architects rise questions about technology based interaction and automation during their creative process, embodying these concepts into the architecture repertoire. An educational experience was conducted in 2007 at UFMG Architecture School, in Brazil, with the intention of this activity was to allow students to research creatively with both information technology and architecture. The students’ goal was to create site-specific interventions on the school building, using physical and digital devices. Finally, the paper contextualizes this experience with the discussion above exposed. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some contemporary art modalities (specially the hybrid ones) in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture; Information and Communication Technologies; Digital Art; Site Specific Art; Architectural Learning.
series SIGRADI
email robertoandres@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2008_153
id ecaade2008_153
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 267-274
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. It observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. The architecture has historically mediated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Then, it analyses the hypothesis that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. An educational experience is presented, aiming to verify some points discussed on the text. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some hybrid art modalities in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture, Information and Communication Technologies, Digital Art, Site Specific Art, Architectural Learning
series eCAADe
email andres@superficie.org
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id sigradi2008_103
id sigradi2008_103
authors Baltazar, Ana Paula; Maria Lucia Malard, Silke Kapp, Pedro Schultz
year 2008
title From physical models to immersive collaborative environments: testing the best way for homeless people to visualise and negotiate spaces
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper describes an experiment to investigate the best way for lay people to use representation to visualise and negotiate space. It was motivated by our observations in workshops for digital inclusion in the context of a housing project for a homeless association. Computers were used to make it easier for the community to understand and change the spaces in real time. The first workshops proved that our approach was efficient as an exercise but not certainly effective concerning the understanding of spatial qualities. So we have designed an experiment to compare the usability of different media in participatory design processes. For that we have adapted the ‘Usability’ methodology, which is fully described in the paper. We started with three main questions. The first concerned the effectiveness of different media to represent spatial quality; the second concerned the best way for novices to approach space, whether by refurbishing a pre-existing space or by starting from the scratch; and the third concerned the effectiveness of negotiation by means of discourse and by means of or action. We also had two main hypothesis: one coming from research on digital environments and stereo visualisation, indicating that the more people feel immersed in the represented environment the more they are able to correlate it with physical space; and the other coming from our own observations in the participatory design workshops, in which the collective decision-making was manipulated by those people with more advanced communication skills who use their ability in an authoritative way regardless of the relevance of what they have to say. This paper describes the whole experiment, which was an exercise of spatial negotiation in 5 versions. In the first version we provided fixed digital views of a room in plan and axonometry; for another two versions we provided a physical model of the room in 1:10 scale, with some pieces of the existing furniture in different scales. This was done to check if people were just playing with a puzzle or actually grasping the correspondence between representation and the object or the space represented. One version proposes refurbishment and the other starts from the scratch. And the last two versions repeated the same task made with the physical model, but this time using a 3D interactive digital model. People were required not only to organise the furniture in the space but also to build a full scale cardboard structure and organise the real furniture reproducing their proposed model. Their comments on the spaces they had built confronted with what they had imaged when working with the model has enabled us to compare the different models, as also the different ways of negotiating spaces. This paper describes this experiment in detail concluding that 3D digital interactive models are far more effective than physical models and 2D drawings; when negotiation happens by means of action it provides more creative results than when the discoursive practice prevails; people are more creative when they start something from scratch, though they spend more time. The results of this experiment led us to formulate a new hypothesis leading to the development of an immersive collaborative environment using stereoscopy.
keywords Visualisation, negotiation, immersive environment, digital interfaces, homeless people
series SIGRADI
email anapaulabaltazar@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id barakat_theses_eaea2007
id barakat_theses_eaea2007
authors Barakat, Husam
year 2008
title Analytical Study of the Projects of Students in the Architectural Design - Comparision Between Physical and Digital Models
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary Since its foundation in 1981, Architectural faculty has adopted traditional teaching methods for practical subjects such as architectural design and Urban planning. In these subjects, students submitted their projects and exams on (chanson) and (calk) sheets using various drawing tools. Such tools are still in use by students up to date in manually architectural concept presentation. This comes after the students pass a number of subjects related to art and engineering drawing that help the students in gaining drawing representation and rendering skills.
keywords architectural concept, traditional teaching, computer technology
series EAEA
email barakath@baath.shern.net
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id sigradi2008_049
id sigradi2008_049
authors Benamy, Turkienicz ; Beck Mateus, Mayer Rosirene
year 2008
title Computing And Manipulation In Design - A Pedagogical Experience Using Symmetry
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The concept of symmetry has been usually restricted to bilateral symmetry, though in an extended sense it refers to any isometric transformation that maintains a certain shape invariant. Groups of operations such as translation, rotation, reflection and combinations of these originate patterns classified by modern mathematics as point groups, friezes and wallpapers (March and Steadman, 1974). This extended notion represents a tool for the recognition and reproduction of patterns, a primal aspect of the perception, comprehension and description of everything that we see. Another aspect of this process is the perception of shapes, primary and emergent. Primary shapes are the ones explicitly represented and emergent shapes are the ones implicit in the others (Gero and Yan, 1994). Some groups of shapes known as Semantic Shapes are especially meaningful in architecture, expressing visual features so as symmetry, rhythm, movement and balance. The extended understanding of the concept of symmetry might improve the development of cognitive abilities concerning the creation, recognition and meaning of forms and shapes, aspects of visual reasoning involved in the design process. This paper discusses the development of a pedagogical experience concerned with the application of the concept of symmetry in the creative generation of forms using computational tools and manipulation. The experience has been carried out since 1995 with 3rd year architectural design students. For the exploration of compositions based on symmetry operations with computational support we followed a method developed by Celani (2003) comprising the automatic generation and update of symmetry patterns using AutoCAD. The exercises with computational support were combined with other different exercises in each semester. The first approach combined the creation of two-dimensional patterns to their application and to their modeling into three-dimensions. The second approach combined the work with computational support with work with physical models and mirrors and the analysis of the created patterns. And the third approach combined the computational tasks with work with two-dimensional physical shapes and mirrors. The student’s work was analyzed under aspects such as Discretion/ Continuity –the creation of isolated groups of shapes or continuous overlapped patterns; Generation of Meta-Shapes –the emergence of new shapes from the geometrical relation between the generative shape and the structure of the symmetrical arrangement; Modes of Representation –the visual aspects of the generative shape such as color and shading; Visual Reasoning –the derivation of 3D compositions from 2D patterns by their progressive analysis and recognition; Conscious Interaction –the simultaneous creation and analysis of symmetry compositions, whether with computational support or with physical shapes and mirrors. The combined work with computational support and with physical models and mirrors enhanced the students understanding on the extended concept of symmetry. The conscious creation and analysis of the patterns also stimulated the student’s understanding over the different semantic possibilities involved in the exploration of forms and shapes in two or three dimensions. The method allowed the development of both syntactic and semantic aspects of visual reasoning, enhancing the students’ visual repertoire. This constitutes an important strategy in the building of the cognitive abilities used in the architectural design process.
keywords Symmetry, Cognition, Computing, Visual reasoning, Design teaching
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia08_364
id acadia08_364
authors Bonwetsch, Tobias; Ralph Baertschi ;Silvan Oesterle
year 2008
title Adding Performance Criteria to Digital Fabrication: Room-Acoustical Information of Diffuse Respondent Panels
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 364-369
summary In this research project we explore the defined design and application of digitally fabricated wall panels for room-acoustical architectural interventions. In Particular, we investigate the room-acoustical criteria applying to everyday used spaces. We present a digital design and fabrication process developed to create non-standardised panels and two case studies which apply this process on the acoustical improvement of a specific room situation. Our aim is to find correlations between digitally fabricated surface structures and sound- aesthetical characteristics, in order to utilise these for the architectural design.
keywords Acoustics; Digital Fabrication; Evaluation; Material; Robotics
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ecaade2008_005
id ecaade2008_005
authors Breen, Jack; Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2008
title Capital A to Z
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 759-766
summary Throughout the history of architecture, the Capital – the intermediate between a column and the beam or surface it supports – has been a recurring feature in architectural composition and articulation. In this paper we describe results and findings from the Capital A to Z exercise within the Ornamatics Course from the TU-Delft MSc curriculum. We will show how this exercise combines various digital and physical processes for form finding and how further insights can come from the actual production of models and prototypes. Conclusions will be drawn regarding the integrated educational setup and regarding the influence of different methods and tools on the design process and the design results.
keywords Computer aided manufacturing and modelling, composition, prototyping, ornamatics, education-based research
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@tudelft.nl, m.c.stellingwerff@tudelft.nl
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id sigradi2008_077
id sigradi2008_077
authors Briones, Carolina
year 2008
title A collaborative project experience in an architectural framework, working with Open Source applications and physical computing [Diseño de Plataformas Digitales e Interactivas: una experiencia educativa trabajando colaborativamente con aplicaciones de Código Abierto y Computación Física]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary Nowadays, thanks to the telecommunication revolution and therefore the massive spread of Internet, we have seen the come up of international architectural offices with branches located in different continent, working in a collaborative fashion, surpassing physical and time frontiers. At the same time, the multidisciplinary work between designers, architects, engineers, programmers and even biologist, between others, have been taking place in the new network society. All transformations also supported by the arising of FOSS (Free Open Source Software) and the virtual communities behind them, which allow the creation of non-traditional or specific software, the association between disciplines, and also, the formation of meeting scenarios for a mixture of individuals coming up with multiple motivation to coexist in collaborative environment. Furthermore, it is possible to argue that Open Source applications are also the reflection of a social movement, based on the open creation and exchange of information and knowledge. Do the appeared of FOSS compel us to re-think our working and teaching methods? Do they allow new modes of organizing and collaborating inside our architectural practices?. This paper would like to address these questions, by presenting the results of the “Experience Design” course, which by implementing teaching methods based on Open Source principles and cutting-edge tools, seeks to approach students to these new “way of do”, knowledge and methodologies, and overall, focus them on the science behind the computer. This paper describes the “Experience Design” course, in which architectural graduate students of Universidad Diego Portales (Chile), put for first time their hands on the creation of interactive interfaces. By acquiring basic knowledge of programming and physical computing, students built in a collaborative way a responsive physical installation. The course use as applications “Processing” and “Arduino”. The first one is an Open Source programming language and environment for users who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It has a visual context and serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is a project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas, at the MIT Media Lab (www.processing.org). The second is an Open Source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino has a microcontroller (programmed with Processing language) which can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators (www.arduino.cc). Both environments shared a growing community of people working in related projects and extending useful assistance for beginners. In this paper it is presented the current state of the pilot course and some of the initials results collected during the process. Students and teacher’s debates and evaluations of the experience have been exposed. Together with a critical evaluation in relation to the accomplishment of the effort of place together different disciplines in one collaborative project akin, architecture, design, programming and electronic. Finally, futures modifications of the course are discussed, together with consideration to take in account at the moment of bring Open Source and programming culture into the student curriculum.
keywords Physical computing, teaching framework, Open Source, Interactive Installation
series SIGRADI
email fili_pax@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia08_118
id acadia08_118
authors Cabrinha, Mark
year 2008
title Gridshell Tectonics: Material Values Digital Parameters
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 118-125
summary This paper begins with a simple proposition: rather than mimicking the geometric structures found in nature, perhaps the most effective modes of sustainable fabrication can be found through understanding the nature of materials themselves. Material becomes a design parameter through the constraints of fabrication tools, limitations of material size, and most importantly the productive capacity of material resistance—a given material’s capacity and tendencies to take shape, rather than cutting shape out of material. ¶ Gridshell structures provide an intriguing case study to pursue this proposition. Not only is there clear precedent in the form-finding experiments of Frei Otto and the Institute for Lightweight Structures, but also the very NURBS based tools of current design practices developed from the ability of wood to bend. Taking the bent wood spline quite literally, gridshells provide a means that is at once formally expressive, structurally optimized, materially efficient, and quite simply a delight to experience. The larger motivation of this work anticipates a parametric system linking the intrinsic material values of the gridshell tectonic with extrinsic criteria such as programmatic needs and environmental response. ¶ Through an applied case study of gridshells, the play between form and material is tested out through the author’s own experimentation with gridshells and the pedagogical results of two gridshell studios. The goal of this research is to establish a give-and-take relationship between top-down formal emphasis and a bottom-up material influence.
keywords Digital Fabrication; Form-Finding; Material; Pedagogy; Structure
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id cdc2008_137
id cdc2008_137
authors Cardoso, Daniel
year 2008
title Certain assumptions in Digital Design Culture: Design and the Automated Utopia
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 137-148
summary Much of the research efforts in computational design for Architecture today aim to automate or bypass the production of construction documents as a means of freeing designers from the sticky and inconvenient contingencies of physical matter. This approach has yielded promising questions and applications, but is based on two related assumptions that often go unnoticed and that I wish to confront: 1. Designers are more creative if the simulations they rely on engage only with the superficial aspects of the objects they design (rather than with their structural and material-specific behaviors) and 2. The symbolic 3-D environments available in current design software are the ideal media for design because of their free nature as modeling spaces. These two assumptions are discussed both as cultural traits and in their relation to digital design technologies. The work presented is a step towards the far-sighted goal of answering the question: how can computation enable new kinds of dialogue between designer, design media and construction in a design process? In concrete, this paper proposes a critical framework for discussing contemporary digital design practices as a continuity –rather than as a rupture- of a long-standing tradition in architecture of separating design and construction.
email dcardoso@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id sigradi2008_199
id sigradi2008_199
authors Castañe, Dora
year 2008
title Rosario, views on the integral revitalization of a cultural heritage [Rosario, Miradas sobre la Revitalización Integral de un Patrimonio Cultural]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This work shows the study of the methods and techniques for the development of a virtual vision VRML 3D included in an "Digitally-integrated knowledge base" with interactive interphases of a significantly revitalized fragment of a central area of the city of Rosario, Province of Santa Fé, Argentina, that includes an emblematic heritage for the Argentineans: the National Monument to the Flag. Digital models that partly allow the development of a hypothesis of integration between the digitized information and information technology—new digital proximity— to the effects of being able to investigate the generation of multimedia database that includes three-dimensional and dynamic models of the mentioned type, in this case, urban, architectonic, and cultural heritage. Different views and research on heritage have been developing. Nevertheless, the use of these new 3D non-immersive technologies and inter-phases are opening a new field of vision and understanding of the subject.
keywords Heritage, Urban-architectural planning, virtual reality
series SIGRADI
email dcastane05@ciudad.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id ecaade2008_119
id ecaade2008_119
authors Celento, David; Harrow, Del
year 2008
title CeramiSKIN
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 709-716
summary ceramiSKIN is the result of an inter-disciplinary investigation between an architect and a ceramics artist. We are exploring natural orders as generators for aperiodic (non-repeating) tiling systems in architectural ceramic cladding systems. Of particular interest are the possibilities offered by digital imaging of organic materials [at various scales from 1:1 to 1:1 nanometer] as a means of form generation. After scanning, shapes are computationally deformed to create a range of biophilic effects promulgated through unique large scale ceramic cladding systems constructed using digital fabrication techniques.
keywords Ceramic cladding systems: biophilia in architecture, digital design, digital fabrication, mass-customization
series eCAADe
email dcelento@psu.edu,, dbh13@psu.edu
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia08_340
id acadia08_340
authors Chalmers, Chris
year 2008
title Chemical Signaling as a Model for Digital Process in Architecture
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 340-345
summary The role of the architect is quite literally one of assembly: synthesizing the various parts of a project into a cohesive whole. It is a difficult job, often requiring the architect to weave many seemingly contradictory concerns into a solution that benefits them all. It is not surprising then, that the many elegant and effective systems found in nature should be inspiring to the architect. Emerging fields like biomimicry and systems dynamics model the patterns of interaction between organisms and their environments in terms of dynamic part to part and part to whole relationships. ¶ Observations of real relationships between organisms and their environments, as they exist in nature, reveal complex feedback loops working across multiple scales. These feedback loops operate by the simultaneous action of two observed phenomena. The first is the classic phenotypic relationship seen when organisms of the same genetic makeup instantiate differently based upon differences in their environment. This is the relationship that was originally proposed by Charles Darwin in his theory of natural selection of 1859. Darwin’s model is unidirectional: the organism adapts to its environment, but not the other way around. It operates at the local scale as individual parts react to the conditions of the whole. (Canguilhem, 1952). ¶ The second phenomenon, which sees its effect at the global scale, is the individual’s role as consumer and producer in the flows of energy and material that surround it. It is the subtle and incremental influence of the organism upon its environment, the results of which are often invisible until they reach a catastrophic threshold, at which point all organisms in the system feel global changes. ; The research presented in this paper addresses the dialectic between organism and environment as each responds reciprocally to the others’ changing state. Such feedback loops act in a non-linear fashion, across nested scales in biological systems. They can be modeled to act that way in a digital design process as well. This research is an exploration into one such model and its application to architecture: the simple communication between organisms as they affect and are affected by their environments through the use of signal chemicals.
keywords Biology; Cellular Automata; Feedback; Material; Scripting
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id caadria2008_81_session7b_662
id caadria2008_81_session7b_662
authors Champion, Erik; Andrew Dekker, Petra Thomas
year 2008
title Lazy Panorama Monopoly Table: Take Your City for a Spin
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 662-669
summary While conventional information displays are still effective, a lack of integration between descriptive and contextual information means they cannot be used independently of additional external information. New digital systems such as Google Maps are increasing in popularity. Unfortunately these present some limitations in terms of understanding both route and survey information, and in particular navigation and orientation, such as intuitively understanding a plan view no matter which way one is facing, so visitors can quickly and intuitively learn how to get to specific buildings or to specific facilities. Digital systems may also alienate older and non computer literate users; and they display contextual information inside an interface which limits the possible range of interaction methods offered by physical interaction. Our solution was to create a 3D physical model that one could spin, which would in turn display digital panoramas that spun in rotational alignment with the physical city model. Further, the user could place category tokens in intersections of the city model, which would bring up digital panoramas on the screen and highlight facilities linked to the category chosen. Rotating the token would also rotate the digital panorama.
keywords Urban visualization, panorama, tangible user interface, phidgets
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email e.champion@massey.ac.nz
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2008_61_session6a_501
id caadria2008_61_session6a_501
authors Christensen, Peter; Marc Aurel Schnabel
year 2008
title Spatial polyphony: Virtual Architecture Generated from the Music of J.S. Bach
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 501-509
summary This paper documents the process and outcomes of a digital design project with the aim of translating music into architecture. Parametric software has been used to generate 48 virtual forms from the preludes and fugues of Book I of The Well-Tempered Clavier (bwv 846-869), by Johann Sebastian Bach. The paper discusses historical connections between architecture and music in the Western tradition and in relation to contemporary thought and practice.
keywords Architecture: music; digital; parametric
series CAADRIA
email pchr9417@mail.usyd.edu.au, marcaurel@usyd.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

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