CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 141 to 160 of 367

_id ecaade2010_065
id ecaade2010_065
authors Hardy, Steve(n); Lundberg, Jonas
year 2010
title Environmental Catalysts for a Computational Urbanism
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.805-814
summary It is perhaps no longer relevant to discuss digital tools purely as means in themselves; the growth of abstract systems or computational patterns for their own sake simply strain justification in light of real-world concerns such as climate change and economic crises. While growing concerns over climate change have necessitated an increased interest in sustainable urbanism and design, sustainability has done little to yet alter the morphological and typological consequences of architectural space (Hardy, 2008). In a series of overlapping research projects and design studio briefs, students, research assistants and we worked with the iterative and variable processes of Rhinoscript, McNeel’s Grasshopper and Bentley’s Generative Components to explore the possibilities of changing environmental extremes (specifically flooding) as catalysts for providing new urban morphologies and spatial organizations. Working between the master plan and the individual housing unit, we investigated arrays of terrace homes in the London Thames Valley flood zones while simultaneously exploring the potential for computational generation and parametric optimization.
wos WOS:000340629400086
keywords Computational urbanism; Formative strategies; Parametric design; Adaptive vs. mitagative; Environmental formations
series eCAADe
email shardy4@unl.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2009_903
id sigradi2009_903
authors Harris, Ana Lúcia Nogueira de Camargo
year 2009
title O Uso da Técnica dos "Planos em Série" com o Desenvolvimento da Computação Gráfica - Uma Experência Didática [The Use of the 'Serial Plan' Technique with the Development of the Computer Graphic - A Teaching Experience]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This paper is about comparative didactic experiences where the “Serial plan Technique” defined by Wong (1998), was applied in 2001 and 2008 which computer resources from that time. In 2001 this technique was applied with the help of AutoCAD for generation of the planifications, but in 2008 the appliances of AutoCAd and Sketch Up were used for the virtual construction of objects. The quality of the results showed a didactic potential and an increasement in the possible creative rhythm, mainly because the facility of the three-dimensional virtual visualization and because the speed in the physical execution of the created project.
keywords didactic experiences; serial plan technique; CAD; AutoCAD; Skecht Up
series SIGRADI
email luharris@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cdc2008_099
id cdc2008_099
authors Harrison, David and Michael Donn
year 2008
title Using Project Information Clouds to Preserve Design Stories within the Digital Architecture Workplace
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 99-104
summary During the development of an architectural design a series of design stories form. These stories chronicle the collective decision making process of the diverse project team. Current digital design processes often fail to record these design stories because of the emphasis placed on the concise and accurate generation of the virtual model. This focus on an allencompassing digital model is detrimental to design stories because it limits participation, consolidates information flow and risks editorialisation of design discussion. Project Information Clouds are proposed as a digital space for design team participants to link, categorise and repurpose existing digital information into comprehensible design stories in support of the digital building model. Instead of a discrete tool, the Project Information Cloud is a set of principles derived from a proven distributed information network, the World Wide Web. The seven guiding principles of the Project Information Cloud are simplicity, modular design, decentralisation, ubiquity, information awareness, evolutionary semantics and context sensitivity. These principles when applied to the development of existing and new digital design tools are intended to improve information exchange and participation within the distributed project team.
email david.harrison@stress-free.co.nz
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id acadia08_094
id acadia08_094
authors Helms, Michael E.; Swaroop S. Vattam; Ashok K. Goel; Jeannette Yen; Marc Weissburg
year 2008
title Problem-Driven and Solution-Based Design: Twin Processes of Biologically Inspired Design
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 94-101
summary Biologically inspired design uses biological systems as analogues to develop solutions for design problems. We conducted a cognitive study of biologically inspired design in the context of an interdisciplinary introductory course on biologically inspired design in Fall of 2006. The goal of this study was to understand the processes of biologically inspired design. This paper provides a descriptive account of twin biologically inspired design processes, problem-driven and solution-based, and highlights the similarities and differences between them.
keywords Biomimetics; Design; Evaluation; Material; Process
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ddss2008-30
id ddss2008-30
authors Hemmerling, Marco
year 2008
title Digital MaterialPerception, Interaction and Immersion in Virtual Environments
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary This paper outlines two major aspects of virtual environments for architectural design. On the one hand it focusses on how to use virtual reality as an extended tool to generate spatial design by building up and interacting with a three-dimensional digital model. On the other hand it describes - based on a case study - the relation between perception, interaction and immersion in virtual environments. Both approaches can be interconnected to a continues design process, that allows the designer to create, manipulate, visualize and decide on spatial concepts in a holistic three-dimensional simulation.
keywords Virtual Environment, Digital Architecture, Immersion, Perception, Human-Computer Interaction
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ecaade2008_079
id ecaade2008_079
authors Hemmerling, Marco; Knaack, Ulrich; Schulz, Jens-Uwe
year 2008
title Complexity in Digital Architectural Design
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 85-90
summary The association of complexity and geometry was the starting point for an academic project at the chair of Computer Aided Design in Detmold. The students were asked to analyze a complex structure - taken from nature, art, technology or society - regarding the underlying geometrical rules and principles. The translation of these abstract geometric principles (logarithmic spiral, polyhedron, rotational solids, mesh-work, double helix…) into a three-dimensional structure was then realized in Rhinoceros. The 3D-modeling was followed by a transformation- and optimization-process of the initial shape by using the evolutionary principles of mutation and selection. The set-up for these variations followed predefined rules and principles for the manipulation of the original structure.
keywords Geometry, Complexity, Computer Aided Design, Architecture
series eCAADe
email marco.hemmerling@hs-owl.de, ulrich.knaack@hs-owl.de, jens-uwe.schulz@hs-owl.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2008_163
id ecaade2008_163
authors Hemmerling, Marco; Lemberski, David
year 2008
title Anaglyph Representation as Medium for Spatial Design
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 209-214
summary The paper discusses the use and possible applications of stereoscopic projection and anaglyph representation for the design-process and visualization of architectural spaces and three-dimensional objects. As the topic of stereoscopic vision is quiet broad and has a long tradition in various fields (photography, art, virtual reality) the paper focuses on the implementation of anaglyph representation in 3D-Modeling-Software as a tool to support spatial perception within the design process. Against this background and based on a test-series with 113 students the benefits and conditions of spatial perception, vision and sense using anaglyph representation are examined.
keywords stereoscopic vision, spatial perception, anaglyph representation
series eCAADe
email marco.hemmerling@hs-owl.de, david.lemberski@hs-owl.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia08_458
id acadia08_458
authors Hemsath, Timothy; Robert Williams; Ronald Bonnstetter; Leen-Kiat Soh
year 2008
title Digital CADCAM Pedagogy Model: Intelligent Inquiry Education
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 458-463
summary Prototype manufacturing as an educational tool has been very successful at the college level in architecture and engineering design. This paper discusses an innovative inquiry-based learning approach rather than the problem-based learning models commonly utilized by other similar programs. For example, several research-funded technology projects (e.g., Cappelleri et al. 2007) look at involving students in problem-based learning exercises (e.g., building robots); however, these exercises (while providing valuable experiences) have predetermined outcomes ingrained by the teachers, the project structure, and the components used to construct the devices. Therefore, inquisitive and creative problem solving is limited to the “kit-of-parts” in their approach to solving the problem. The inquiry-based CADCAM pedagogy model is more concerned with the process of solving a problem through the vehicle of prototyping than with the specificity of the design project itself. This approach has great potential. First, the need to solve the problem drives learning on multiple levels, integrating interdisciplinary ideas into the problem and solution. Second, the problem interlocks disciplines through inquiry knowledge building in team exercises. Finally, it encourages diversity and flexibility by allowing students to look at problems from multiples perspectives and points of view.
keywords CAD; Education; Evaluation; Pedagogy; Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id sigradi2010_213
id sigradi2010_213
authors Herrera, Pablo C.
year 2010
title Tecnologías disruptivas: programación y fabricación en Latinoamérica [Disruptive technologies: programming and digital fabrication in Latin America]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 213-216
summary Since 2008 the preference for using different programming methods (Rhinoscript) had been analyzed using blogs. Searching for answers to explain the negative tendency of this year (from 48,063 to 16,332), a second repository was created (Grasshopper) featuring interactive methods and techniques. It has been discovered that of the five geographic regions analyzed Latin America is the only one that preferred the interactive interface (18% over programming). This shows that we are still keeping a strong dependency on the use of stable and safe technologies over disruptive ones that proved to be more efficient in design and fabrication.
keywords digital fabrication, scripting, architectural education, rhinoscripting, grasshopper
series SIGRADI
email pablo@espaciosdigitales.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cdc2008_301
id cdc2008_301
authors Herron, Jock
year 2008
title Shaping the Global City: The Digital Culture of Markets, Norbert Wiener and the Musings of Archigram
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 301-308
summary The contemporary “built environment” as conceived by designers – be it actual or virtual; be it architecture, landscape, industrial products or, more purely, art – is increasingly generated using powerful computational tools that are shaping the culture of the design professions, so much so that the phrase “digital culture” aptly applies. Designers are rightly inclined to believe that the emerging contemporary landscape – especially in thriving global cities like New York, London and Tokyo – has recently been and will continue to be shaped in important ways by digital design. That will surely be the case. However, design does not exist in a material vacuum. Someone pays for it. This essay argues that the primary shaper of global cities today is another “digital culture”, one defined by the confluence of professions and institutions that constitute our global financial markets. The essay explores the common origins of these two cultures – design and finance; the prescient insights of Archigram into the cybernetic future of cities; the spatial implications of nomadic “digitized” capital and the hazards of desensitizing – in many ways, dematerializing – the professional practices of design and finance. The purpose of the essay is not to establish primacy of one over the other. Especially in the case of urban design, they are interdependent. The purpose is to explore the connection.
email jherron@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ddss2008-31
id ddss2008-31
authors Heurkens, Erwin W.T.M.
year 2008
title The Urban Decision RoomApplication and Evaluation of an Urban Management Instrument
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary The Urban Decision Room (UDR) should be placed in the tradition of urban design and planning discipline that is taught, and into which research is carried out, at the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. The UDR was developed at the faculty as one of the new design and planning methods with its own specific features. The UDR is specifically aimed at decision-making processes in the practice of urban planning, and particularly at complex urban area development projects. The background to the design enables the UDR to support planning decisions that are made at urban planning element level. The participants in the interactive UDR sessions are asked to provide concrete solutions for urban planning design problems (in terms of preferences for particular functions, number of plots, etc.) and to enter them in a simulation model. A computer network is then used to calculate the common solution space of all the proposals, which is then projected onto a central screen. This outcome generally provides the basis for further discussions and negotiations, after which another round as described above can be held. The paper first focuses on the background and the main features of the UDR system. Secondly, the decision-making issue and a description of a specific Urban Decision Room model, the UDR Heijsehaven will be explained. Thirdly the structure of, and the experiences from, the experimental sessions with the Urban Decision Room Heijsehaven are described. After that the results of the evaluation of the UDR system by participants is presented and finally the follow-up assignment for the UDR system is carried out.
keywords Urban Decision Room, UDR Heijsehaven, Urban Renewal Project, Urban Planning, Urban Management Instrument, Common Solution Space, Decision Support System
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id acadia08_158
id acadia08_158
authors Hight, Christopher; Natalia Beard; Michael Robinson
year 2008
title Hydrauli_City: Urban Design, Infrastructure, Ecology
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 158-165
summary The Hydrauli_city project was commissioned by the Harris County Flood Control District, Brays Bayou Partnership and the Rice School of Architecture to research the transformation of one of the 21 main Bayous in Houston. The project seems perfectly aligned with the theme of the issue because it examines the relationship between infrastructure, risk and urban design, and does so by attempting to leverage diverse time scales and scales of intervention into the maintenance of this infrastructure, rethinking the legacy of its top-down 20th century planning logics. Moreover, it raises key questions about new agencies and sites that may be available to architects that seek to engage the political ecologies of the contemporary metropolis. Through research on the hydraulic urbanism of Houston and through three speculative design proposals, Hydrauli_city presents research about transforming Brays Bayou. The project attempts to provide a figure for and foster the new forms of collectives and networks required to transform the urban condition of Houston without resorting to unrealistic top-down planning infrastructures. We located several scales and time-frames of operations, from micro-scaled interventions derived from ongoing maintenance of the bayous to larger scale transformations now possible due to the programs to reduce the risk of flooding in the bayou’s watershed. Hydrauli_city maps the confluences of interests and agencies invested in Brays Bayou at this crucial moment in its history, and offers proposals of bold new civic spaces for the Green Century. The project will be disseminated via an interactive website and a series of public presentations to raise awareness and spark conversation. Flood risk management is a hybrid phenomenon, at once the object of scientific knowledge, engineering practice, and political and economic forces, positioning the architect in a prime-position to intervene.
keywords Infrastructure; Mapping; Morphogenesis; System; Urbanism
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id ecaade2008_092
id ecaade2008_092
authors Hofmeyer, Herm; Kerstens, J.G.M.
year 2008
title A Bird’s-Eye View of Cyclic Spatial-Structural Transformations, Grammar Based Design, and Structural Optimization
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 483-492
summary Recently, in the research field of combined architecture and structural design, the idea of a so-called research engine has been developed. During its development, initially the intention was to develop a design-support tool, however, it now becomes clear that it may serve as a general framework for several applications. In this paper the new possibilities for the applications will be presented. As a result, a bird’s-eye view is developed on a set of applications that are often presented separately and without a larger framework in literature. In conclusion, several applications used for CAAD and CASD (Computer Aided Structural Design) can be seen as derivatives of a research engine. The other way round, the research engine can be modified and new applications may result.
keywords Generative design, Optimisation, Spatial Design, Structural Design, Automated design
series eCAADe
email h.hofmeyer@tue.nl, j.g.m.kerstens@tue.nl
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ddss2008-20
id ddss2008-20
authors Holanda, Frederico de; Valério Medeiros and Ana Paula Barros
year 2008
title Integration through city space-formUsing space syntax, traffic modelling and geoprocessing tools forevaluating new urban developments
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary New boroughs are continuously being built in Brasilia, Brazil’s Capital City. The paper deals with the performance of such boroughs concerning sociospatial segregation. A comparison is made between two proposals for a new borough to the West of the North Wing of the Pilot Plan, which was originally designed by Lucio Costa. The first proposal was made by a wellknown architectural studio in Brasilia and is beginning to be implemented. The second proposal is an exercise made by undergraduate students from the School of Architecture of the University of Brasilia, under the supervision of one the authors of the paper. The two proposals present very different performances. In the first case, the borough is set apart from the immediate urban surroundings; there is no direct connection between inner roads and the main arteries that surround the site. In the second case, the students have proposed a scheme that connects the interior areas of the borough to the vicinity; we hardly know where the new borough begins vis-à-vis the neighbouring areas. We argue that there are serious traffic implications in the first case, as well as sociological implications. We deal with traffic modelling, space syntax techniques and geoprocessing tools to prove so. Furthermore, we will show how the building types are as well socially inadequate, for they will imply homogeneous social layers among the inhabitants – namely exclusively high-middle class living in the new area.
keywords Space syntax, traffic modelling, urban expansion, urban design
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ecaade2008_091
id ecaade2008_091
authors Holzer, Dominik
year 2008
title Let’s get Physical
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 125-132
summary This paper presents an approach for familiarizing architecture students with concepts of environmental performance in the early design stages. A design studio was run at the University of Technology Sydney by Leena Thomas and the author where students were applying building performance analysis to inform their design process from the very beginning of the semester. Students were using parametric design and evolutionary structural optimization in conjunction with environmental performance optimization. Michael Hensel and Defne Sunguroglu (Ocean North) joined the studio at half time for a workshop to investigate how processes occurring in nature can be mapped to inform the morphological design process. In spite the multitude of challenges put to the students during the semester in regard to their design methodology and techniques, they were able to produce highly performative and aesthetically pleasing design outcomes.
keywords environmental design, structural optimization, parametric design, design education, morphologic design exploration
series eCAADe
email dominik.holzer@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id cdc2008_017
id cdc2008_017
authors Holzer, Dominik
year 2008
title Embracing the Post-digital
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 17-22
summary This paper discusses ways for designers to reconnect their design methodologies with the process of making. The paper takes a critical standpoint on the way architects have integrated digital tools and computational processes in their design over the past three to four decades. By scrutinising the support designers can derive from their virtual design-space it is debated in how far this may be complemented by sensory information-feedback from the physical design-space. A studio-based design project is used to illustrate how students have approached this issue to address aspects of building performance in a post-digital way. Moving between digital and physical models without difficulty, the students were able to study the effects geometrical changes on sustainability-performance in real time.
email dominik.holzer@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ddss2008-21
id ddss2008-21
authors Horeni, Oliver; T.A. Arentze, H.J.P. Timmermans, and B.G.C. Dellaert
year 2008
title INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURINGINDIVIDUALS’ MENTAL REPRESENTATIONSSPACE-TIME CHOICESAn outline of three IT-based survey methods
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary A better exploration of human decision making is a necessary condition to understand individual activity-travel choices. With the advent of mental model theory a conceptual framework of individuals’ causal knowledge of the environment and its links to the behavioural choice outcome was available. Accordingly, interview techniques had been developed in order to elicit mental representations from individuals’ mind. Although these techniques delivered reliable and useful results, it turned out quickly, that they could not be applied to large-scale surveys. Hence, this paper will report on the development of three IT-based interview techniques, which are promising avenues to measure mental representations in an efficient and flexible way.
keywords Activity-travel choice, Mental representations, Electronic surveying
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ecaade2015_265
id ecaade2015_265
authors Hosey, Shannon; Beorkrem, Christopher, Damiano, Ashley, Lopez, Rafael and McCall, Marlena
year 2015
title Digital Design for Disassembly
source Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R (eds.), Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, 16-18 September 2015, pp. 371-382
summary The construction and building sector is now widely known to be one of the biggest energy consumers, carbon emitters, and creators of waste. Some architectural agendas for sustainability focus on energy efficiency of buildings that minimize their energy intake during their lifetime - through the use of more efficient mechanical systems or more insulative wall systems. One issue with these sustainability models is that they often ignore the hierarchy of energy within architectural design. The focus on the efficiency is but one aspect or system of the building assembly, when compared to the effectiveness of the whole, which often leads to ad-hoc ecology and results in the all too familiar “law of unintended consequences” (Merton, 1936). As soon as adhesive is used to connect two materials, a piece of trash is created. If designers treat material as energy, and want to use energy responsibly, they can prolong the lifetime of building material by designing for disassembly. By changing the nature of the physical relationship between materials, buildings can be reconfigured and repurposed all the while keeping materials out of a landfill. The use of smart joinery to create building assemblies which can be disassembled, has a milieu of new possibilities created through the use of digital manufacturing equipment. These tools afford designers and manufacturers the ability to create individual joints of a variety of types, which perform as well or better than conventional systems. The concept of design for disassembly is a recognizable goal of industrial design and manufacturing, but for Architecture it remains a novel approach. A classic example is Kieran Timberlake's Loblolly House, which employed material assemblies “that are detailed for on-site assembly as well as future disassembly and redeployment” (Flat, Inc, 2008). The use of nearly ubiquitous digital manufacturing tools helps designers create highly functional, precise and effective methods of connection which afford a building to be taken apart and reused or reassembled into alternative configurations or for alternative uses. This paper will survey alternative energy strategies made available through joinery using digital manufacturing and design methods, and will evaluate these strategies in their ability to create diassemblable materials which therefore use less energy - or minimize the entropy of energy over the life-cycle of the material.
wos WOS:000372316000043
series eCAADe
email cbeorkrem@uncc.edu
more https://mh-engage.ltcc.tuwien.ac.at/engage/ui/watch.html?id=4075520a-6fe7-11e5-bcc8-f7d564ea25ed
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2008_012
id ecaade2008_012
authors Hudson, Roly
year 2008
title Frameworks for Practical Parametric Design in Architecture
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 847-854
summary This paper is aimed at the development of a theoretical framework that addresses practical applications of parametric design that have been observed in architectural practice. Existing theoretical frameworks are not aimed at addressing this specific use of parametric tools but do provide a set of key themes. Based on these themes a simplified structure is presented here as a means for tackling architectural design development tasks. This is then used in order to examine a case study; the parametric design tasks involved in the design development and documentation of the new Lansdowne Road Stadium in Dublin Ireland. This project was undertaken in collaboration with HOK Sport Architects. The findings from this examination are used to discuss proposals and implications for a practical framework for parametric design in architecture.
keywords Parametric, Practice, Theory, Case Study, Lansdowne Road Stadium
series eCAADe
email rh243@bath.ac.uk
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ijac20086404
id ijac20086404
authors Hudson, Roly
year 2008
title Knowledge Acquisition in Parametric Model Development
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 6 - no. 4, 435-451
summary This paper addresses the development of parametric models in contemporary architectural practice. A parametric model can be regarded as a representation of a solution space and in order to structure this, a description of the problem is required. Architectural design tasks are typically ill structured, the goals may not be defined and the means unknown. Moving from an incomplete problem description to a functional parametric model is a difficult task. This paper aims to demonstrate that through a combination of knowledge acquisition and capture a parametric model can develop from an incomplete problem description. This demonstration draws on existing strands of design theory which are then used to outline a theoretical framework. This framework is then used to examine a case study of a live project and practical examples of the described theory in action are given. The practical observations are the result of a case study involving the author as a participant and observer working with HOK Sport to develop a cladding geometry solution for Lansdowne Road Stadium in Dublin.
series journal
last changed 2009/03/03 06:48

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