CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 573

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2009_180
id ecaade2009_180
authors Halatsch, Jan; Mamoli, Myrsini; Economou, Athanassios; Schmitt, Gerhard
year 2009
title The Hellenistic City Model Inspired by Koolhaas: A Test Case for a Generic City Model
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 279-286
summary In this paper, we suggest a generic city description model suited for purposes like semi-automatic city modeling and urban layout evaluation. The generic city model refers to basic vital functions of a (computable) city. Feature patterns are used to extend the generic city model with global and local characteristics. The Hellenistic cities serve as a platform for a first implementation to test a semi-automatic city model generation. As a result four cities are reconstructed as a first example of our ongoing work, Miletus, Knidos, Priene and Olynthus. Future work will deal with the application of the generic city model to the performance simulation of contemporary urban layouts.
wos WOS:000334282200034
keywords City modeling, semi-automatic, design grammars, urban planning, archeological reconstruction, generic city
series eCAADe
email halatsch@arch.ethz.ch, schmitt@arch.ethz.ch, myrsini@coa.gatech.edu, athanassios.economou@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2009_779
id sigradi2009_779
authors Lima, Thais Borges Sanches; Cláudia Naves David Amorim; Giselle Marie Cormier Chaim
year 2009
title Simulação do Desempenho Energético de Edifícios de Escritórios em Brasília [Energy performance simulation of Brasília’s office buildings]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This paper presents a parametric analysis where WWR and color glass was varied to determine their influence in the thermal performance of an office building’s room. Design Builder tool was used to calculate the thermal load and the internal gains. The WWR variation in different orientations resulted in a significant increase of the thermal load. The reflective glass allowed a better thermal performance of the room. With the use of computer simulation was possible to analyse many constructive and design characteristics of the facade and its influence on the results, when considered together.
keywords Energy performance; office buildings; computer simulation; Design Builder
series SIGRADI
email thaisbslima@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id c25d
id c25d
authors Shady Attia, Liliana Beltrán, André De Herde and Jan Hensen
year 2009
title Architect Friendly: A Comparison of Ten Different Building Performance Simulation Tools
source IBPSA
summary Performance Simulation tools BPS is available internationally. The users of those tools are mainly researchers, physicists and experts who value empirical validation, analytical verification and calibration of uncertainty as defined by e.g. BESTEST. However, literature and comparative surveys indicate that most architects who use BPS tools in design practice are much more concerned with the (1) Usability and Information Management (UIM) of interface and (2) the Integration of Intelligent design Knowledge-Base (IIKB). Those two issues are the main factors for identifying a building simulation program as “Architect Friendly”. Now, with the advancement of BPS tools and the recent announcements of direct links between BIM or non-BIM modeling tools and BPS tools it is important to compare the existing programs. Based on an online survey, this paper presents the results of comparing ten major BPS tools. The following programs are compared: ECOTECT, HEED, Energy 10, Design Builder, eQUEST, DOE-2, Green Building Studio, IES VE, Energy Plus and Energy Plus-SketchUp Plugin (OpenStudio). With 249 valid responses, the survey ranked the tools in three classes and revealed that architects seek the IIKB above the UIM of the interface. Finally, the paper summarizes the key findings and underlines the major requirements for future improvement and development of BPS tools, mainly from an architectural perspective.
series other
type normal paper
email chadiattia@hotmail.com
more http://www.ibpsa.org/proceedings/BS2009/BS09_0204_211.pdf
last changed 2011/05/24 05:44

_id cf2009_000
id cf2009_000
authors Tidafi, Temy; Dorta, Tomás (eds.)
year 2009
title Joining languages, cultures and visions CAADFutures 2009
source Proceedings of the 13th International Conference [ISBN ] Montreal 17-19 June 2009, 902 p.
summary In a world where sustainability, ecology, collaboration and performance are common concerns, “joining” is a keyword, expressing the idea of an integration of knowledge, efforts and processes aimed at a better future. The CAADFutures 2009 conference thus intends to join professional and scientific reflections, with the notable input of new disciplines that are also concerned with digital design, such as industrial design and civil engineering. As a result, a vivid dialogue is established between different cultural approaches, computational methods and philosophical positions. The field of computer-aided design is faced with many challenges. CAADFutures 2009 addresses the search for new paradigms for sustainable design, the issues derived from the “digital thinking” embedded in current CAD systems as opposed to the needed “design thinking”, and many more pressing questions such as those of heritage, advanced geometry and parametric design, CAD education, virtual environments, interaction and new technologies, simulation, building performance, rapid prototyping, management, collaboration and ideation.
series CAAD Futures
type normal paper
email temy.tidafi@umontreal.ca
last changed 2010/01/14 06:09

_id ascaad2014_023
id ascaad2014_023
authors Al-Maiyah, Sura and Hisham Elkadi
year 2014
title Assessing the Use of Advanced Daylight Simulation Modelling Tools in Enhancing the Student Learning Experience
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 303-313
summary In architecture schools, where the ‘studio culture’ lies at the heart of students’ learning, taught courses, particularly technology ones, are often seen as secondary or supplementary units. Successful delivery of such courses, where students can act effectively, be motivated and engaged, is a rather demanding task requiring careful planning and the use of various teaching styles. A recent challenge that faces architecture education today, and subsequently influences the way technology courses are being designed, is the growing trend in practice towards environmentally responsive design and the need for graduates with new skills in sustainable construction and urban ecology (HEFCE’s consultation document, 2005). This article presents the role of innovative simulation modelling tools in the enhancement of the student learning experience and professional development. Reference is made to a teaching practice that has recently been applied at Portsmouth School of Architecture in the United Kingdom and piloted at Deakin University in Australia. The work focuses on the structure and delivery of one of the two main technology units in the second year architecture programme that underwent two main phases of revision during the academic years 2009/10 and 2010/11. The article examines the inclusion of advanced daylight simulation modelling tools in the unit programme, and measures the effectiveness of enhancing its delivery as a key component of the curriculum on the student learning experience. A main objective of the work was to explain whether or not the introduction of a simulation modelling component, and the later improvement of its integration with the course programme and assessment, has contributed to a better learning experience and level of engagement. Student feedback and the grade distribution pattern over the last three academic years were collected and analyzed. The analysis of student feedback on the revised modelling component showed a positive influence on the learning experience and level of satisfaction and engagement. An improvement in student performance was also recorded over the last two academic years and following the implementation of new assessment design.
series ASCAAD
email sura.almaiyah@port.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2018_312
id ecaade2018_312
authors Gündüz, Gamze, Oral, Hülya and Yazar, Tu?rul
year 2018
title Integration of Design Geometry with "Computational Making" in Basic Design Studio - A Case Study of Lanterns Project
source Kepczynska-Walczak, A, Bialkowski, S (eds.), Computing for a better tomorrow - Proceedings of the 36th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland, 19-21 September 2018, pp. 439-448
summary Basic design education, as an introduction of design principles to novice students, has two-way of teaching which are design thinking and professional training, since Bauhaus. Initiated in 2009, the Computation-based Basic Design Studio creates a common ground through discussions between students, academics, and professionals from various backgrounds. In this paper, the implementation of parallel courses named Computation-based Basic Design Studio and Design Geometry is discussed upon final assignment of the first semester- New Year's Lanterns. The given assignment structured as a cyclic process through constant feedback between geometric relations, material performance, and, joinery details to achieve novel outcomes that exceed the preliminarily set structural criteria. In relation to individual processes and outcomes of the final assignment, observed tendencies developed by students', at the end of their first-term in design education, will be discussed as final remarks.
keywords design education; basic design; design geometry; polyhedra
series eCAADe
email gamze.gunduz@bilgi.edu.tr
last changed 2018/08/22 13:38

_id cf2011_p108
id cf2011_p108
authors Iordanova, Ivanka; Forgues Daniel, Chiocchio François
year 2011
title Creation of an Evolutive Conceptual Know-how Framework for Integrative Building Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 435-450.
summary Low productivity of the building sector today is attributed to the fragmentation of tasks, disciplines and responsibilities, as well as to the resistance to adopt integrative work processes and digital means. The increased complexity of architectural projects and the aroused social consciousness for sustainable environment calls for integrative design collaboration. Thus, there is need for a Conceptual Framework combining work processes, technological means and policy aspects. According to the literature, integrative multidisciplinary design is a strategy resulting in high performance buildings nurturing sustainable way of living (Reed et al. 2009, Krygiel & Nies 2008). Responding to the increased technological complexity of our built environment, as well as to the objective of meeting multiple criteria of quality, both necessitating multidisciplinary collaboration during design, Building Information Modeling (BIM) is seen as a powerful means for fostering quality, augmenting productivity and decreasing loss in construction. Based on recent research, we can propose that a sustainable building can be designed through an integrative design process (IDP) which is best supported by BIM. However, our ongoing research program and consultations with advanced practitioners underscore a number of limitations. For example, a large portion of the interviewed professionals and construction stakeholders do not necessarily see a link between sustainable building, integrative design process and BIM, while in our opinion, their joint use augments the power of each of these approaches taken separately. Thus, there is an urgent necessity for the definition of an IDP-BIM framework, which could guide the building industry to sustainable results and better productivity. This paper defines such a framework, whose theoretical background lays on studies in social learning (activity theory and situated action theories). These theories suggest that learning and knowledge generation occurs mainly within a social process defined as an activity. This corresponds to the context in which the IDP-BIM framework will be used, its final objective being the transformation of building design practices. The proposed IDP-BIM framework is based on previous research and developments. Thus, firstly, IDP process was well formalized in the Roadmap for the Integrated Design Process‚ (Reed et al.) which is widely used as a guideline for collaborative integrative design by innovating practices in USA and Canada. Secondly, the National Building Information Modeling Standard (NBIMS) of the USA is putting an enormous effort in creating a BIM standard, Succar (2008) recently proposed a conceptual framework for BIM, but BIM ontology is still under development (Gursel et al 2009). Thirdly, an iterative design process bound to gating reviews (inspired from software development processes) was found to be successful in the context of multidisciplinary design studios (reported in our previous papers). The feedback from this study allowed for modifications and adjustments included in the present proposal. The gating process assures the good quality of the project and its compliance to the client's requirements. The challenge of this research is to map the above mentioned approaches, processes and technologies into the design process, thus creating an integrated framework supporting and nurturing sustainable design. The IDP-BIM framework can be represented by a multidimensional matrix linked to a semantic network knowledge database: - the axes of the matrix being the project timeline, the design process actors and building stakeholders (architect, engineers, client, contractor, environmental biologist, etc.), or different aspects of building performance (environmental, functional, social, interior environment quality, cost, etc.); and - the knowledge database providing multiple layers of semantic support in terms of process, domain knowledge, technology and workflow at a given moment of the project and for a given actor or building aspect. The IDP-BIM framework is created as an evolutive digital environment for know-how and will have an established protocol for regular updates. The paper will firstly present the state of the art in IDP and BIM. Secondly, it will expose the methodology used for the definition of the Framework, followed by a description of its structure, contents and digital implementation. Then, some scenarios for the use of the Framework will be shown as validation.
keywords integrated design process, BIM, multidisciplinary design, conceptual framework
series CAAD Futures
email ivanka.iordanova@videotron.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2009_bhzad_sidawi
id ascaad2009_bhzad_sidawi
authors Sidawi, Bhzad
year 2009
title The Consideration of Lifelong Owner’s and Property’s Characteristics in Nd Cad System: The case of affordable housing in kingdom of Saudi Arabia
source Digitizing Architecture: Formalization and Content [4th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2009) / ISBN 978-99901-06-77-0], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 11-12 May 2009, pp. 191-204
summary Residential property value is affected by several factors during its useful time. . These factors include people’s lifestyles, traditions and culture, and the way they live and interact with the built environment. The property characteristics such as its location, building quality, adaptability, and energy efficiency would also have an impact on the property value. On the other hand, the nD CAD research that emerged in the late 1990s proposed endless dimensions of CAD modelling that would incorporate the building regulations’ requirements, basic user needs and client requirements. However, there is a need to implement lifelong parameters that would have significant effect on the property value in 3D models during the early stages of design. This can be done through a knowledge base integrated into a 3D model and links the lifelong property’s and the user’s characteristics with the property’s value. A survey was carried out on banks and Real Estate Development Fund (REDF) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to find out the level of impact of lifelong users and property characteristics on the property’s value. The results of the survey showed a number of lifelong property and user driven parameters that may have major impact on the property’s value. The implementation of lifelong parameters in nD CAD models would have a number of benefits. It would provide the decision makers such as banks and investors with a tool to assess the level of impact of possible lifelong factors on the property value and consider alternative schemes. Designers would use it during the early stages of design to produce optimum design solutions that provide an adequate product that is evaluated regarding its lifelong value to the end users. Eventually it would provide a comfortable environment that is tailored to the user’s needs and aspirations, while reserving the property’s lifelong value.
series ASCAAD
email Bsidawi@kfu.edu.sa
last changed 2009/06/30 06:12

_id cf2009_687
id cf2009_687
authors Sommer, Bernhard; Palz, Norbert
year 2009
title Prototyping dynamic architecture: Material properties as design parameters
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages, Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009, PUM, 2009, pp. 687- 699
summary This paper documents an ongoing research that combines recent developments in the field of Rapid Prototyping Technology for a materialisation of composite pneumatic models. The ability to create three dimensional prints with varying surface materials has the potential to assign the RP model a different role in the design process. The implementation of material performance, configured through CAD driven geometry, allows for an emergence of dynamical models that are freed from conventional representational function.
keywords Rapid prototyping, inflatables, performance driven design
series CAAD Futures
email bernhard.sommer@uni-ak.ac.at
last changed 2009/06/08 18:53

_id acadia18_216
id acadia18_216
authors Ahrens, Chandler; Chamberlain, Roger; Mitchell, Scott; Barnstorff, Adam
year 2018
title Catoptric Surface
source ACADIA // 2018: Recalibration. On imprecisionand infidelity. [Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-17729-7] Mexico City, Mexico 18-20 October, 2018, pp. 216-225
summary The Catoptric Surface research project explores methods of reflecting daylight through a building envelope to form an image-based pattern of light on the interior environment. This research investigates the generation of atmospheric effects from daylighting projected onto architectural surfaces within a built environment in an attempt to amplify or reduce spatial perception. The mapping of variable organizations of light onto existing or new surfaces creates a condition where the perception of space does not rely on form alone. This condition creates a visual effect of a formless atmosphere and affects the way people use the space. Often the desired quantity and quality of daylight varies due to factors such as physiological differences due to age or the types of tasks people perform (Lechner 2009). Yet the dominant mode of thought toward the use of daylighting tends to promote a homogeneous environment, in that the resulting lighting level is the same throughout a space. This research project questions the desire for uniform lighting levels in favor of variegated and heterogeneous conditions. The main objective of this research is the production of a unique facade system that is capable of dynamically redirecting daylight to key locations deep within a building. Mirrors in a vertical array are individually adjusted via stepper motors in order to reflect more or less intense daylight into the interior space according to sun position and an image-based map. The image-based approach provides a way to specifically target lighting conditions, atmospheric effects, and the perception of space.
keywords full paper, non-production robotics, representation + perception, performance + simulation, building technologies
series ACADIA
type paper
email cahrens@wustl.edu
last changed 2019/01/07 11:21

_id ijac20097408
id ijac20097408
authors Biloria, Nimish; Valentina Sumini
year 2009
title Performative Building Skin Systems: A Morphogenomic Approach Towards Developing Real-Time Adaptive Building Skin Systems
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 7 - no. 4, 643-676
summary Morphogenomics, a relatively new research area, involves understanding the role played by information regulation in the emergence of diverse natural and artificially generated morphologies. Performative building skin systems as a bottom-up parametric formation of context aware interdependent, ubiquitously communicating components leading to the development of continually performative systems is one of the multi-scalar derivations of the aforementioned Morphogenomic understanding. The agenda of adaptations for these building skins specifically corresponds to three domains of adaptation: structural, behavioral and physiological adaptations resulting in kinetic adaptability, energy generation, conservation, transport and usage principles as well as material property based changes per component. The developed skins adapt in real time via operating upon ubiquitous communication and data-regulation protocols for sensing and processing contextual information. Computational processes and information technology based tools and techniques such as parametric design, real-time simulation using game design software, environmental information mapping, sensing and actuating systems coupled with inbuilt control systems as well as manufacturing physical models in collaboration with praxis form a vital part of these skin systems. These experiments and analysis based on developing intrinsic inter-dependencies between contextual data, structure and material logistics thus lay the foundation for a new era of continually performing, self powering, real-time adaptive intelligent building skin systems.
series journal
last changed 2010/09/06 06:02

_id caadria2009_111
id caadria2009_111
authors Biswas, Tajin; Ramesh Krishnamurti and Tsung-Hsien Wang
year 2009
title Framework for Sustainable Building Design
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 43-52
summary For sustainable building design, computational tools, mostly in the form of simulations, are employed to determine loads and to predict systems performance typically in terms of energy use. Currently, sustainability, in the building domain, is judged by a rating system. Design choices are validated, by measuring against one. The objective of the framework is to provide a general approach to processing the informational needs of any rating system, by identifying, categorizing and organizing relevant data requirements. Aspects of sustainability that designers deal with intuitively will have a structured guideline and gauge as one selects a rating system of choice.
keywords Sustainable design: rating system; framework; building information model
series CAADRIA
email tbiswas@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2009_458
id cf2009_458
authors Dillenburger, Benjamin; Braach, Markus and Hovestadt, Ludger
year 2009
title Building design as individual compromise between qualities and costs: A general approach for automated building generation under permanent cost and quality control
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages, Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009, PUM, 2009, pp. 458-471
summary We introduce an evolutionary design approach for the automatic arrangement of a predefined space program on a given site. The design goal is to distribute floor spaces while ensuring the essential building performance and usage. The presented evolutionary strategy is applied to acquire optimal design solutions considering both environmental conditions and inner organization under diversified fitness functions. The evaluation process consists of the direct analysis of the spatial network and the physical factors in an adequate accuracy. The method provides a fast generation of qualified volumetric studies. The resulting buildings become a manifested compromise between qualities and cost.
keywords Evolutionary strategy, multi-fitness criteria, dual graph representation, network analysis, building envelope
series CAAD Futures
email dillenburger@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2009/06/08 18:53

_id caadria2009_146
id caadria2009_146
authors Fagerström, Gustav
year 2009
title Dynamic Relaxation of Tensegrity Structures
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 553-562
summary The structural hierarchy inherent to tensegrities enables a building skin that performs on multiple levels simultaneously. While having one function in the global building mechanics, its individual components can work as self-contained systems balancing tensile and compressive forces locally within them. The behavior of elements under load is linear and thus describable analytically. When these are aggregated in a tensegrity however, the performance of the assembly as a whole is non-linear. In order to investigate further these relationships a method of dynamic relaxation will be developed. This tool allows for simulation and load analysis of a complex tensegrous network, based on the relationships between force, stiffness and dimension formulated by Young and the computational means provided by a parametric/associative modeling environment. This research investigates the possible formfinding through computational means of a double-layer tensegrity grid.
keywords Dynamic; relaxation; tensegrity; form finding
series CAADRIA
email gustav.fagerstrom@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2009_207
id caadria2009_207
authors Fasoulaki, Eleftheria E.
year 2009
title Towards Integrated Design
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 13-22
summary This paper examines a different design approach called integrated. The term “integrated” has a dual utilization in this study. The first use refers to the integration of form and building performance. The second use refers to the integration of interrelated and diverse building performances involving multiple disciplines. The integrated design approach analyzes and evaluates several interrelated design systems involving different disciplines in the early design phase. The goal of the approach is the generation of design alternatives guided simultaneously by two basic objectives: the aspiration for form exploration and the satisfaction of the performances of interrelated systems.
keywords Generative Algorithms: Building Performances; Multiple Building Disciplines; Optimization and Simulation Techniques; Coupled Building Systems
series CAADRIA
email efasarch@alum.mit.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ascaad2009_samir_foura
id ascaad2009_samir_foura
authors Foura, Samir and Samira Debache
year 2009
title Thermal Simulation In Residential Building Within Computer Aided Architectural Design: Integrated model
source Digitizing Architecture: Formalization and Content [4th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2009) / ISBN 978-99901-06-77-0], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 11-12 May 2009, pp. 235-243
summary Nowadays, the architectural profession is seeking a better energy saving in the design of buildings. The fear of energy shortage in the very near future, together with the rapid rise in energy prices, put pressure on researchers on this field to develop buildings with more efficient heating systems and energy systems. This work is concerned mainly with the development of a software program analyzing comfort in buildings integrated in CAD architectural systems. The problem of presenting the computer with information concerning the building itself has been overcome through integration of thermal analysis with the building capabilities of CAD system. Mainly, such experience concerns the rules for calculating heat loss and heat gain of buildings in Algeria, The program has been developed in order to demonstrate the importance of the innovation of the computer aided-architectural-design field (CAAD) in the technology of buildings such as the three dimensional modeling offering environmental thermal analysis. CAAD is an integrated architectural design system which can be used to carry out many tasks such as working drawings, perspectives and thermal studies, etc., all from the same data. Results are obtained in tabular form or in graphical output on the visual display. The principle of this program is that all input data should be readily available to the designer at the early stages of the design before the user starts to run the integrated model. Particular attention is given to the analysis of thermal aspects including solar radiation gains. Average monthly energy requirement predictions have been estimated depending on the building design aspect. So, this integrated model (CAAD and simulation comfort) is supposed to help architects to decide on the best options for improving the design of buildings. Some of these options may be included at the early design stages analysis. Indications may also be given on how to improve the design. The model stored on CAAD system provides a valuable data base for all sort analytical programs to be integrated into the system. The amount of time and expertise required to use complex analytical methods in architectural practice can be successfully overcome by integration with CAAD system.
series ASCAAD
email sfoura@gmail.com
last changed 2009/06/30 06:12

_id acadia09_90
id acadia09_90
authors Fox, Michael
year 2009
title Flockwall: A Full-Scale Spatial Environment with Discrete Collaborative Modules
source ACADIA 09: reForm( ) - Building a Better Tomorrow [Proceedings of the 29th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-9842705-0-7] Chicago (Illinois) 22-25 October, 2009), pp. 90-97
summary The paper highlights a built example of a human-scale spatial environment composed of discrete collaborative modules. The primary goals were to develop and understand strategies that can be applied to interactive architecture. The design and construction were carried out in an academic context that was displayed to a public audience of approximately 200,000 people over the course of three days. In addressing the performance parameters of the prototype, the concept focused on several key strategies: 1) geometry 2) movement 3) connections 4) scale and 5) computational control, and human interaction. The final objective of the approach was to create an innovative design that was a minimally functional spatial environment with the capability for evolving additional multi-functionality. Heavy emphasis was placed on creating a full-scale environment that a person could walk through, interact with, and experience spatially.
keywords Geometry, design logic, flock behavior, prototype, fabrication, responsive systems
series ACADIA
type Normal paper
email mafox@foxlin.com
last changed 2009/11/26 16:44

_id acadia09_130
id acadia09_130
authors Kimpian, Judit; Mason, Josh; Coenders, Jeroen; Jestico, Dan; Watts, Steve
year 2009
title Sustainably Tall: Investment, Energy, Life Cycle
source ACADIA 09: reForm( ) - Building a Better Tomorrow [Proceedings of the 29th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-9842705-0-7] Chicago (Illinois) 22-25 October, 2009), pp. 130-143
summary The purpose of this project is to provide an interactive platform for clients and design teams to evaluate the consequences of shape, form, and briefing decisions on the energy use, embodied energy, and capital / life-cycle cost of a tall building early in the design process. The Tall Building Simulation (TBS) model is the result of a collaborative partnership between Aedas, Arup, Hilson Moran (HM), and Davis Langdon (DL). It is estimated that most decisions determining the sustainability of a project are made in the first 1 percent of a project’s program, whereas the majority of the information required for sustainability assessment is not usually available or examined until after the concept stage. By this time, most solutions would need design or briefing changes that are too costly to implement. Using the TBS model, architects, engineers, and clients can simultaneously explore the impact of typical technical and design decisions on a tall building’s energy footprint and its dynamic relationship to cost at the briefing stage.
keywords Design evaluation, environmental impact, energy, simulation
series ACADIA
type Normal paper
email judit.kimpian@aedas.com
last changed 2009/11/26 16:44

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