CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 546

_id ecaadesigradi2019_508
id ecaadesigradi2019_508
authors Yenice, Yagmur and Park, Daekwon
year 2019
title V-INCA - Designing a smart geometric configuration for dry masonry wall
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 2, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 515-520
summary Soil is still used as a building material in many parts of the world, especially in rural areas. Approximately 30% of the world's population is still living in shelters made by soil (Berge 2009). One of the techniques is using soil in mudbrick form, which is sun dried instead of being fired in kilns. However, mud bricks have low compressive and tensile strength. Instead of enhancing the mix formula, we focus on designing the geometry of the brick itself to improve walls' overall compressive and tensile strength. The goal of the research is to explore an innovative way to build masonry walls through geometrical examination together with computer aided design. Unlike traditional horizontal laying of the rectangular brick elements, 3D designed blocks take advantage of gravity and foster an accelerated assembly without mortar. They create a balance point in the middle of the wall during the construction. The geometry of V-INCA blocks allows dry construction which will reduce the amount of time spent on the site. Load distribution and the friction between two surfaces are sufficient to have a dry construction. Thus, a wall built with V-INCA is stronger intrinsically due to its geometry.
keywords Dry masonry construction; smart geometrical design; on-site material; compressed earth blocks; Inca masonry
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email yyenice@syr.edu
last changed 2019/08/26 20:27

_id cf2011_p018
id cf2011_p018
authors Sokmenoglu, Ahu; Cagdas Gulen, Sariyildiz Sevil
year 2011
title A Multi-dimensional Exploration of Urban Attributes by Data Mining
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 333-350.
summary The paper which is proposed here will introduce an ongoing research project aiming to research data mining as a methodology of knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis. To address the increasing multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires a multidisciplinary approach to urban analysis. This research is an attempt to establish a link between knowledge discovery methodologies and automated urban feature analysis. Therefore, in the scope of this research we apply data mining methodologies for urban analysis. Data mining is defined as to extract important patterns and trends from raw data (Witten and Frank, 2005). When applied to discover relationships between urban attributes, data mining can constitute a methodology for the analysis of multi-dimensional relational complexity of urban environments (Gil, Montenegro, Beirao and Duarte, 2009) The theoretical motivation of the research is derived by the lack of explanatory urban knowledge which is an issue since 1970’s in the area of urban research. This situation is mostly associated with deductive methods of analysis. The analysis of urban system from the perspective of few interrelated factors, without considering the multi-dimensionality of the system in a deductive fashion was not been explanatory enough. (Jacobs, 1961, Lefebvre, 1970 Harvey, 1973) To address the multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires the consideration of diverse spatial, social, economic, cultural, morphological, environmental, political etc. features of urban entities. The main claim is that, in urban analysis, there is a need to advance from traditional one dimensional (Marshall, 2004) description and classification of urban forms (e.g. Land-use maps, Density maps) to the consideration of the simultaneous multi-dimensionality of urban systems. For this purpose, this research proposes a methodology consisting of the application of data mining as a knowledge discovery method into a GIS based conceptual urban database built out of official real data of Beyoglu. Generally, the proposed methodology is a framework for representing and analyzing urban entities represented as objects with properties (attributes). It concerns the formulation of an urban entity’s database based on both available and non-available (constructed from available data) data, and then data mining of spatial and non-spatial attributes of the urban entities. Location or position is the primary reference basis for the data that is describing urban entities. Urban entities are; building floors, buildings, building blocks, streets, geographically defined districts and neighborhoods etc. Urban attributes are district properties of locations (such as land-use, land value, slope, view and so forth) that change from one location to another. Every basic urban entity is unique in terms of its attributes. All the available qualitative and quantitative attributes that is relavant (in the mind of the analyst) and appropriate for encoding, can be coded inside the computer representation of the basic urban entity. Our methodology is applied by using the real and official, the most complex, complete and up-to-dataset of Beyoglu (a historical neighborhood of Istanbul) that is provided by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB). Basically, in our research, data mining in the context of urban data is introduced as a computer based, data-driven, context-specific approach for supporting analysis of urban systems without relying on any existing theories. Data mining in the context of urban data; • Can help in the design process by providing site-specific insight through deeper understanding of urban data. • Can produce results that can assist architects and urban planners at design, policy and strategy levels. • Can constitute a robust scientific base for rule definition in urban simulation applications such as urban growth prediction systems, land-use simulation models etc. In the paper, firstly we will present the framework of our research with an emphasis on its theoretical background. Afterwards we will introduce our methodology in detail and finally we will present some of important results of data mining analysis processed in Rapid Miner open-source software. Specifically, our research define a general framework for knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis and enable the usage of GIS and data mining as complementary applications in urban feature analysis. Acknowledgments I would like to thank to Nuffic, the Netherlands Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education, for funding of this research. I would like to thank Ceyhun Burak Akgul for his support in Data Mining and to H. Serdar Kaya for his support in GIS.
keywords urban feature analysis, data mining, urban database, urban complexity, GIS
series CAAD Futures
email ahusokmenoglu@yahoo.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2012_046
id caadria2012_046
authors Lertsithichai, Surapong
year 2012
title Building Thailand's tallest Ganesh: CAD/CAM integration in conventional metal fabrication
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 337–346
summary Ganesh (Ganesa or Ganesha) is a Hindi god well known for his distinguishable elephant head and widely revered as the god of success or remover of obstacles. Patrons in Thailand have worshipped Ganesh and respected him by means of erecting statues of Ganesh in various poses and sizes throughout the country. In late 2008, the people of Chacheongsao, a province located East of Bangkok, decided to create Thailand’s tallest standing Ganesh statue made with bronze reaching heights up to 39 meters and situated on the Bangpakong river bank overseeing the city and its people. The author and design team was approached by representatives from Chacheongsao and commissioned to advise the process from conception to construction. The challenge started with seeking appropriate computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies and innovative processes to guide the design team throughout the production. The 0.60-meter bronze cast sculpture of the Ganesh was scanned using a 3D optical scanner to generate a solid model of the statue. A surface model was then extracted from the 3D model to firstly determine the most efficient structural support within the statue and secondly to generate surface strips for the foundry to create actual bronze casts. The construction of the project began early 2009 and the statue has since been erected from its base to currently its head. During construction, the author and design team has encountered several problems translating pixels to parts. Several errors have occurred during the mould and cast production process as well as construction errors on site causing mismatches of the structure and surface, misalignments, and protruding structural supports and joints. The lessons learned from this project is documented and analysed with hopes to create a more effective process for future projects with similar requirements.
keywords CAD/CAM; 3D scanner; CNC milling; metal fabrication
series CAADRIA
email icsurapong@mahidol.ac.th
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id caadria2009_063
id caadria2009_063
authors Tai, Nan-Ching; Mehlika Inanici
year 2009
title Depth Perception in Real and Pictorial Spaces: A Computational Framework to Represent and Simulate Built Environments
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 543-552
summary Architectural design is often mediated on two-dimensional representation systems and envisioned three-dimensionally in the pictorial space. The developments of advanced digital technologies have enabled us to create the pictorial representations of un-built design projects that can appear as real as photographs. The visually appealing pictures produced by photorealistic rendering tools are useful for visualizing the form and the spatial layout of the proposed architectural design; but they may be inadequate and misleading for simulating the perceptual qualities of space. This paper draws from the recent developments in computer graphics (physically based renderings and perceptually based tone mapping techniques) and proposes a computational framework to faithfully represent and simulate pictorial spaces. Guidelines are provided for generating images with appropriate representation and simulation techniques so that architects can make informed design decisions about the perceptual qualities of their designs and researchers can study depth perception in computer environments.
keywords Depth Perception: Pictorial Cue; Physically based Rendering; Tone Mapping; High Dynamic Range Imagery
series CAADRIA
email tai@u.washington.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2009_186
id ecaade2009_186
authors Trento, Armando; Loffreda, Gianluigi; Kinayoglu, Gökçe
year 2009
title Participative Technologies: an Internet-based Environment to Access a Plural Design Experience: Knowledge Modeling to Support User’s Requirements Formalization
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 515-522
summary “Re-shaping artificially the Earth on human needs” implies a very complex industrial system that is performed through a very complex process. It consists of a collective, finalized and plural-constrained process, scheduled by phases, made up by several actors, characterized by the co-presence of numerous and very different (non-) specialist skills. In this paper we define the enhancement path of a web-based collaborative environment – discussed in a previous work – laying upon actual design entities representation an innovative logical level for knowledge formalization. It is presented an example of end-users requirement formalization, aimed at supporting the designers in the process by means of rule-based project suggestions.
wos WOS:000334282200062
keywords Collaborative Environments, participative design, knowledge modeling
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email armando.trento@uniroma1.it, gianluigi.loffreda@uniroma1.it, gokce@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2009_985
id sigradi2009_985
authors Mackay, William Iain; Neander Furtado Silva
year 2009
title From Ancient To Digital: The Challenges Of A Major Transition Towards The Virtual Reconstruction Of The Andean Past (With Special Reference To Inca Architecture.)
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary The definition of an underlying shape grammar behind Inca architecture can assist in the virtual archaeological reconstruction of destroyed sites; that is, allowing us to step from the ancient to the digital realm. The Inca architectural style tends to be consistent throughout the Andes and was in effect, a statement of power. Geometricity, interlocking patterns, orthogonal layouts, colour and texture reversal, modular compression, derivations, rotation, mirroring, repetition, symmetry, proportion, ratios, recombination and Andean “entasis” are qualities frequently encountered in Andean art and architecture. They are “CAD-friendly” and can be integrated into predictive digital virtual reconstruction techniques representing partially damaged and substantially destroyed ancient Andean monuments (and fine arts).
keywords Inca; virtual reconstruction; shape grammars; kanchas; Ollantaytambo
series SIGRADI
email wimackay@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id caadria2009_151
id caadria2009_151
authors Fox, Michael A.
year 2009
title Redesigning The Brick
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 381-390
summary This research examines the value of “redesigning the brick,” in creating a new vocabulary of basic architectural building blocks with autonomous reconfigurable robotics. The paper highlights several built examples by the author of robotic architectural environments and the work of architecture students whereby individual modules were created within the context of a design studio and applied to scenarios of space making at various scales. Several strategies for decentralized control were explored dictating how individual parts of a system should behave and how local interactions between individual modules can lead to the emergence of global behaviour. The students schematically designed selfreplicating models which would allow for each object to be able to attach, detach, and reconfigure according to predetermined computational logic. The projects successfully demonstrate various strategies for mechanical design, locomotion and control.
keywords Interactive Architecture: Modular Robotics; Robotics; Kinetics; Biomimetics
series CAADRIA
email mafox@foxlin.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2009_669
id sigradi2009_669
authors Jacobi, Martina Maldaner; Jan Halatsch; Antje Kunze; Gerhard Schmitt; Benamy Turkienicz
year 2009
title A grammar-based system for the participatory design of urban structures [A grammar-based system for the participatory design of urban structures ]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary We propose a three-step participatory design cycle for the early urban design phase that can be integrated into the digital design chain. Step one involves a visualization method that is implemented as an interactive card-based interview technique for the collaborative requirement specification of urban designs. In step two these specifications are a) translated into simplified GIS data and then b) implemented into a grammar-based system together with the corresponding design regulations. The final outcome is a generative and iterative urban model, which includes buildings, building blocks, transportation networks and open spaces that visually communicates spatial impacts of urban design proposals.
keywords City modeling; participatory design; shape grammars; urban planning
series SIGRADI
email halatsch@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2009_1204
id sigradi2009_1204
authors Monteiro, Ari; Eduardo Toledo Santos
year 2009
title O Uso de Modelagem Generativa para Representação de Modulações de Alvenarias em Ferramentas BIM
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary One approach to perform the design for production of masonry with BIM tools is to explicitly represent the wall elements. However, this strategy decreases the application performance because of model complexity. Generative Modeling is a modeling paradigm aimed at defining rules and applying them for generating models. The masonry block placement is associated with a set of rules, making the use of generative modeling a viable solution to implicitly represent the blocks. This paper presents some preliminary results of our research on investigating if Generative Modeling can help in the representation of masonry modulation and for the proposal of a shape grammar for representing its basic elements.
keywords modelagem generativa; gramática de forma; projeto para a produção; alvenaria; ferramentas BIM
series SIGRADI
email amonteiro@usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia09_264
id acadia09_264
authors Zhang, Yu; Feng, Han; Wang, Jianguo
year 2009
title An Interactive Decision Support System for Deriving Plot Ratios Based on the Similarity Relations Between Land Attributes
source ACADIA 09: reForm( ) - Building a Better Tomorrow [Proceedings of the 29th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-9842705-0-7] Chicago (Illinois) 22-25 October, 2009), pp. 264-266
summary This paper presents a simple tool for deciding land attribute plot ratios by defining elementary entities and their relationships from the viewpoint of a complex adaptive system. Each entity in this case, a block in the city, is described according to its condition and potential for development, such as land function, accessibility, landscape control, and so on. This not only provides a rich yet subtle identification of each entity, but also creates the basis to establish dynamic interconnections between them. The similarity coefficient, calculated by the comparison between the different blocks’ factors fits well with the explanation of the spontaneous development of the city. The weight of every factor and the threshold of the similarity coefficient are both set as variables, with the optimized value recommended as a default, which ensures a multitudinal application of this software with a focus on different aspects of urban planning. The resultant self-regulatory system with flexible input is not only a credible tool for deriving plot ratios, but also an effective platform to activate urban design creations. The system, as a socio-technical tool, enhances the essential process of urban self-organization and hetero-organization.
keywords Decision Support, software, self-organization systems, parametric systems
series ACADIA
type Short paper
email zy033@163.com
last changed 2009/11/26 16:44

_id acadia09_30
id acadia09_30
authors Aish, Robert
year 2009
title Tools of Expression: Notation and Interaction for Design Computation
source ACADIA 09: reForm( ) - Building a Better Tomorrow [Proceedings of the 29th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-9842705-0-7] Chicago (Illinois) 22-25 October, 2009), pp. 30-31
summary Design considers function, fabrication, and aesthetics collectively. Computation is beginning to affect the competitive dynamics of design. Using algorithms, designers are exploring forms that are essentially “undrawable,” even with advanced modeling and direct manipulation techniques. Determining the appropriate functional characteristics may require the application of increasingly complex structural- and environmental-performance analysis techniques. To realize physically a design may require further geometric analysis and rationalization, and the use of complex computer-controlled fabrication techniques.
keywords Design, Computation, Form Finding, Design logic
series ACADIA
type Keynote paper
email Robert.Aish@autodesk.com
last changed 2009/11/26 16:44

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2009_145
id ecaade2009_145
authors Gün, Onur Yüce
year 2009
title Value through Precision, Beyond the Realms
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 377-384
summary Today we portray designs with analytical systems and systems with the emerging terminology of computational design. Generative, intelligent, digital, parametric, associative, biomimetic designs sound valuable, whereas the integrity remains questionable. The tool, enabling designer to play with forms, patterns, models is neither granting him the knowledge nor teaching him the appropriate technique. Are we really able to digest and master all the information we’re subject to, to be used in our designs? Or do we have much to learn about the investigations of the renaissance men to reach to a level of proficiency?
wos WOS:000334282200045
keywords Computation, design, precision, digital, scripting, CAD, data, scripting, visualization, optimization, rationalization
series eCAADe
email onuryucegun@alum.mit.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2009_034
id caadria2009_034
authors Huang, Yu-Chun; Kuan-Ying Wu and Yu-Tung Liu
year 2009
title A Timing Home Pub
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 577-586
summary This paper describes how humans can communicate naturally with spaces in our daily lives by using instruments of daily life, such as whiskey glasses, cups, and MP3 players. We provided a smart space, which can not only adjust the environmental atmosphere by human activities, but also solidify connections between human feelings/memories, and record what happens inside it. The challenge of this work lies in how to create an alternative communication channel which can solidify family ties by using a natural and unobtrusive interface. The space is also able to automatically adapt to human feelings by changing the atmosphere, such as by changing the background lighting, music, and appropriate feedback.
keywords Smart space: human-computer interface
series CAADRIA
email oreo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2009_150
id ecaade2009_150
authors Ilal, Mustafa Emre; Kale, Serdar; Yavas, Altug
year 2009
title Introducing Interdisciplinary Collaboration into Design Curriculum: Identifying the Appropriate Technological Infrastructure
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 129-136
summary There is an increasing adoption of BIM technology in the AEC industry. Organizations are forced to restructure their practices. The role of the architect within the new multi-disciplinary design team will depend on the architects’ skills in communicating with other team members. Architecture schools need to prepare students for this change. Collaborative aspect of design should be incorporated into the curriculum. This paper reports on the collaboration initiative between the architecture and civil engineering departments at Bal_kesir University. The initiative is investigating the extent to which courses can be coordinated across departments. Students from three different courses have been asked to provide analysis and feedback for the same project concurrently. The results confirm that BIM technology can effectively support collaboration even among undergraduate students who are relatively inexperienced with interdisciplinary data exchange.
wos WOS:000334282200015
keywords BIM, collaboration, curriculum
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email ilal@balikesir.edu.tr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2009_1180
id sigradi2009_1180
authors Neves, Isabel Clara
year 2009
title Aproximações da Arquitectura à Biologia: Levantamento interpretativo de experimentações contemporâneas [Biology approximations in Architecture: Interpretative survey of contemporary experiments]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary It is appropriate to investigate the potential analogies between architecture and biology enabled by the use of digital processes, thereby testing the effectiveness of the application of biological principles to the lifecycle of buildings. The aim of this paper is to understand the way architects integrate and develop different biological approaches to architecture, by mapping the present situation and identifying the trends for future developments. Three major approaches were identified: biomimetics, bionics and biotechnology. The use of biological knowledge and technology in architecture, could pave the way for solutions to current problems, such as energy shortage, climate change, and lifestyle diversity.
keywords Architecture; technology; biomimetics; bionics; biotechnology
series SIGRADI
email isineves@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id caadria2009_172
id caadria2009_172
authors Schimek, Heimo; Milena Stavric, Albert Wiltsche and Otto Roeschel
year 2009
title Parametrics of Movable Polyhedral Models in Performative Architecture
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 185-194
summary We present a parametrical approach to movable polyhedral models. Based on polyhedral geometry the whole structure consisting of an interconnected series of prisms (with dual spherical joints) can move 3-dimensionally. The principles of polyhedral geometry allow constraint movements of the prisms with a certain degree of freedom. We use these geometrical principles to open and close façades for ventilation or structures for shading control superimposed on building envelopes. The different groups of regular polyhedra in the Euclidean 3-space and their specific topological types will be discussed in order to choose the appropriate model and showe geometrical theory of movable polyhedral models can be successfully applied to performative architecture.
keywords Moveable polyhedral models: kinematic architecture; parametric design; geometry of joints; performative architecture
series CAADRIA
email schimek@tugraz.at
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2009_104
id ecaade2009_104
authors Schneider, Sven; Petzold, Frank
year 2009
title A Virtual Design Platform: Bridging Barriers When Designing with Computers
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 205-212
summary The paper summarizes the results of a diploma thesis. Taking the potential of computers to be an ultimate design-medium as its premise, the thesis examines how to enhance the way we use digital design tools. It identifies central characteristics of the design process that need to be considered in a digital design environment. Based on a conception of design as a cyclic process involving appropriate design tools, the paper singles out usability, in the sense of ease of use of such tools, as a key criteria for overcoming problems associated with designing on and with the computer. Drawing on these considerations a prototype has been developed which attempts to bridge barriers between the use of different design tools using an existing software framework.
wos WOS:000334282200025
keywords Design theory, design process, interface-design, freehand sketching, collaboration
series eCAADe
email sven.schneider@uni-weimar.de, frank.petzold@uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2009_000
id ecaade2009_000
authors Çagdas, Gülen; Çolakoglu, Birgül (eds.)
year 2009
title COMPUTATION: The New Realm of Architectural Design
source 27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9], Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, 854 p.
summary In the field of architecture, computational design has emerged as sub-discipline having a multidisciplinary nature and using computing methods and capabilities to understand and solve architectural design problems. Computational design is based on computational thinking that includes a range of mental tools in solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior. It has drawn on the concepts of mathematics and computer science. Computational design elements are derived from both theoretical science and experimental design in such a way that its mechanism relies heavily on mathematical logic, but once built, experimentation is done by varying one parameter at a time to study individual changes. It is a design model, not design itself. Computational design involves applying appropriate computational mechanisms, algorithms, or methods to architecture in order to solve design problems and develop design applications. This process creates systems that can be used as design tools for exploring and forming entirely new design concepts and strategies. Over the next decade, computation will have a great impact on design world. It will solve more complex design problems with greater accuracy and be applied by more designers more routinely—it will go deeper and wider. However, the greatest change that it will bring is the breaking down of barriers between scientific domains and design, enabling real “design science.” Computation is already a key driver in “joined-up” research. It forces scientists and designers to think deeper and wider. Some people have considered it to be the enemy of creativity. In their opinion, designers simply must do things rather than think about what they are doing and how they are doing it. Deeper thinking is associated with scientific rather than designer thinking. The fact is that some of the most innovative and creative work is being done by people who have developed computational thinking skills and know other disciplines along with computing. The theme of eCAADe 2009 conference, Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design, is devoted to exploring the ramifications of this view for the domain of design: research, education, and practice. We believe that the most intriguing research questions that will emerge from the advent of new and more powerful computational devices—and from the design tools that make use of them—will be in the realm of developmental design science.
series eCAADe
email ecaade09@itu.edu.tr
last changed 2009/09/03 10:46

_id ascaad2009_wael_abdelhameed
id ascaad2009_wael_abdelhameed
authors Abdelhameed, Wael
year 2009
title Assessment of a Physical Planning Project through Virtual Reality: A case study
source Digitizing Architecture: Formalization and Content [4th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2009) / ISBN 978-99901-06-77-0], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 11-12 May 2009, pp. 365-378
summary The study reports an application of VR models in the assessment of a part of physical planning project. The project outputs were different reports, GIS data and maps, and CAD drawings. The GIS data were used to create the VR models by importing Shpfiles of the GIS project outputs to VR software. The study presents VR models and the assessment of the physical planning project in terms of: 1) effect of the population increase, 2) effect of the required residential units, and 3) quality assurance for the current situation and future situation. The method used to build up the VR Models was through satellite images (by Google Earth Pro) and VR software (by UC Win/Road). Different models were built up to visualize and assess the alternative solutions and various influential factors. The study employed Virtual Reality in various urban and planning problems through models that are employed as tools of communication and design. The visualized environment and the associated models facilitated the evaluation of important areas, namely: impact of different factors and alternative solutions. The study concludes that the processes, such as decision making, visualization and representation, performed through VR manifest its importance to different design phases of urban and physical planning.
series ASCAAD
email wael.abdelhameed@gmail.com
last changed 2009/06/30 06:12

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