CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 326

_id acadia10_263
id acadia10_263
authors Beaman, Michael Leighton; Bader, Stefan
year 2010
title Responsive Shading | Intelligent Façade Systems
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 263-270
summary As issues of sustainability gain traction for architects, methodologies for designing, analyzing, and calibrating design solutions have emerged as essential areas of research and development. A number of approaches have been pursued with regard to embedding data into the design process, most fall into one of two approaches to research. The first approach is to mediate environmental impact at the level of applied technology; the second alters building methods and material construction, generating efficient energy use. However, few approaches deal with the crafting of relationships between information and performance on an architectural level. We will examine an approach focused on understanding how crafting relationships between information and design can move architecture towards achieving sustainability. In developing this approach, we created a data-driven design methodology spanning from design inception to construction. Data-driven models, common in the fields of natural science, offer a method to generate and test a multiplicity of responsive solutions. By contextualizing the solutions generated, we were able design though a set of specific and controlled responses rather than as a singular solution. Information utilization requires a new kind of craft that moves beyond instances into relationships and offers performance sensitive issues in design a focused trajectory. We applied this method to the research and development of a responsive shading structure built in conjunction with a thermal testing lab for two test locations – Austin, Texas (Figure. 1 and 2) and Munich, Germany. The following paper chronicles the design and construction at the Texas site over an academic semester.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email mlbeaman@gmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2010_074
id ecaade2010_074
authors Droste, Stephan
year 2010
title Extreme Designing: Proposal for the transfer of concepts from the agile development to the architectural design process
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.661-666
summary Obviously, design collaboration, the design process, and its methods are strongly interdependent. In order do understand collaborative processes and their requirements, methods of design process are focused prelimarly. After the hype during the last decades collaborative design seems to remain in a selfcentred discourse with little concrete application outside the academic world, while in the same time collaboration is omnipresent in conventional architectural design. Interestingly, the initiation of the so called agile methods in software design were initiated by new tools and paradigms in software design and on the other hand defective conditions in the collaborative process, corresponding widely to the challenges of the architectural design process. This paper opposes principles of software development to the architect’s approach to (early) design. Subsequently some implications for the extension of (collaborative) design tools are suggested.
wos WOS:000340629400071
keywords Design process; Collaborative design; Design methods; Agile processes; Software development
series eCAADe
email stephan@casino.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_073
id ecaade2010_073
authors Tokuhara, Toshiki; Fukuda, Tomohiro; Yabuki, Nobuyoshi
year 2010
title Development of a City Presentation Method by Linking Viewpoints of a Physical Scale Model and VR
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.747-754
summary The design of a city has a great influence on its society. Therefore, current/future cities must be understandable by everyone, regardless of their ability to use technology. Various tools have been used to show urban spaces. The authors focused on SCMODs (physical scale models), and VR (Virtual Reality). These are three-dimensional and intuitive expression methods. In this study, a city presentation method offering a united operating environment linking viewpoint information between a SCMOD and VR is developed and evaluated. Photogrammetry acquires aspect information with a laser pointer, an AR marker and a web camera. To evaluate this method, 36 testees answered a questionnaire after experiencing the method. The testees evaluated the method positively.
wos WOS:000340629400080
keywords City presentation; Physical scale model; VR; TUI; Photogrammetry
series eCAADe
email tokuhara@it.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2010_031
id caadria2010_031
authors Burke, A.; B. Coorey, D. Hill and J. McDermott
year 2010
title Urban micro-informatics: a test case for high-resolution urban modelling through aggregating public information sources
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 327-336
summary Our contention is that the city is a rich collection of urban micro-ecologies in continuous formation that include information types outside the traditional boundaries of urban design, city planning, and architecture and their native data fields. This paper discusses working with non-standard urban data types of a highly granular nature, and the analytical possibilities and technical issues associated with their aggregation, through a post professional masters level research studio project run in 2008. Opportunities for novel urban analysis arising from this process are discussed in the context of typical urban planning and analysis systems and locative media practices. This research bought to light specific technical and conceptual issues arising from the combination of processes including sources of data, data collection methods, data formatting, aggregating and visualisation. The range and nature of publicly available information and its value in an urban analysis context is also explored, linking collective information sites such as Pachube, to local environmental analysis and sensor webs. These are discussed in this paper, toward determining the possibilities for novel understandings of the city from a user centric, real-time urban perspective.
keywords Urban; informatics; processing; ubicomp; visualisation
series CAADRIA
email Anthony.burke@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2010_015
id caadria2010_015
authors Coorey, Ben
year 2010
title Scalability: parametric strategies from exoskeletons to the city
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 155-163
summary This research will explore and provide an initial study into the diversity of contemporary computational design methodologies emerging in the field of architecture. It will rely on modern philosophical and mathematical ideas as a resource to integrate a seemingly disparate set of design techniques into a unified framework for architectural design. The explorations in this paper will demonstrate a preliminary study into various methods of operating across this framework through a series of parametric design experiments that span across multiple scales. The result indicates new techniques and skills that are becoming increasingly important for architectural design.
keywords Parametric; generative; systems; interface; design
series CAADRIA
email bpcoorey@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2010_008
id caadria2010_008
authors Di Mascio, Danilo
year 2010
title Preserving memories with digital media: a methodology for the reconstruction of Castelnuovo Village
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 83-92
summary The historical centre of the village of Castelnuovo (located in Abruzzo, a region in central of Italy) was seriously damaged by the earthquake of the 6th of April 2009. Following the survey by the Civil Protection, all dwellings have been classified as unsuitable for habitation. The village should be either abandoned or totally rebuilt. But which is its value? Is there something worth of being preserved? If observed from a biodiversity point of view, or more precisely from a “cultural biodiversity” point of view, the historical centre possess interesting materials and immaterial characteristics. These qualities constitute real guidelines for a possible recovery project. Since there is not any possibility to make a survey of the inner village because of its destruction by the earthquake, in this research we have decided to use information technology, in order to rebuilt it and study it in a three-dimensional environment. In this paper we describe the theoretical basis, the method of elaboration and the instruments we have used to locate and evaluate the memories that should be preserved in a new project. Starting with a traditional documentation, such as photographs and drawings, we have used a variety of software (graphics editing program, CAD, 3D modeler, videogame 3D-engine), because of the several hypothesis considered.
keywords Digital heritage; digital design; design methods; digital reconstruction; memories conservation
series CAADRIA
email ddimascio@danarchitect.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia10_372
id acadia10_372
authors Dierichs, Karola; Menges, Achim
year 2010
title Material Computation in Architectural Aggregate Systems
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 372-378
summary Aggregates are defined as large amounts of elements being in loose contact. In architecture they are mainly known as an additive in concrete construction. Relatively few examples use aggregates in their unbound form as an architectural material system in their own right. The investigation of potential architectural applications however is both a very relevant and unexplored branch of design research. Loose granular systems are inherently different from other architectural construction systems. One of the most decisive distinctions lies in the way information on those granular architectural systems is being generated, processed, and integrated into the design process. Several mathematical methods have been developed to numerically model granular behaviour. However, the need and also the potential of using so-called ,material’ computation is specifically relevant with aggregates, as much of their behaviour is still not being described in these mathematical models. This paper will present the current outcome of a doctorate research on aggregate architectures with a focus on information processing in machine and material computation. In the first part, it will introduce definitions of material and machine computation. In the second part, the way machine computation is employed in modelling granulates will be introduced. The third part will review material computation in granular systems. In the last part, a concrete example of an architectural aggregate model will be explained with regard to the given definition of material computation. Conclusively a comparative overview between material and machine computation in aggregate architectures will be given and further areas of development will be outlined.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email achim.menges@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2010_193
id ecaade2010_193
authors Dillenburger, Benjamin
year 2010
title Space Index: A retrieval-system for building-plots
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.893-899
summary Increasingly, digital architectural data will become available through information technology. Yet until now, there were no satisfying methods to query this data for architectural purposes. This paper introduces an information retrieval system for parcels that not only allows searching for specific attributes, but also includes properties of shape and context of the building plots. An automatically generated index stores the relevant spatial properties as normalized bitmap images on several layers. When a query is started, only this index has to be queried and not the complete database. The search process can be controlled through a graphical interface that incorporates the user’s sketches. The retrieved parcels are presented as a sorted list of vector drawings including their contained buildings. With the simplified access to these case-studies, quality and efficiency of the architectural design process could be increased.
wos WOS:000340629400095
keywords Architecture-retrieval; Shape matching; Indexing; Operationalization; Urban morphology; Case-based reasoning
series eCAADe
email dillenburger@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia10_258
id acadia10_258
authors Doumpioti, Christina; Greenberg, Evan L.; Karatzas, Konstantinos
year 2010
title Embedded Intelligence: Material Responsiveness in Façade Systems
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 258-262
summary This paper presents recent research for new mechanical systems and façade designs that are able to respond to environmental changes through local interactions, inspired by biological systems. These are based on a model of distributed intelligence founded on insect and animal collectives, from which intelligent behavior emerges through simple local associations. Biological collective systems integrate material form and responsiveness and have the potential to inform new architectural and engineering strategies. The proposed façade system uses integrated sensors and actuators that moderate their local environments through simple interactions with their immediate neighbors. Computational techniques coupled to manufacturing methods and material logics create an integral design framework leading to heterogeneous environmental and structural conditions, producing local responses to environmental stimuli, and ultimately, effective performance of the whole system.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email evanlgreenberg@gmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia10_379
id acadia10_379
authors Geiger, Jordan; San Fratello, Virginia
year 2010
title Hyperculture: Earth as Interface
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 379-384
summary Digital Fabrication and Hybrid Interface: Lessons in Agriculture :abstract Two vitally important fields of work in architecture and computing—in digital fabrication methods and in the development of interfaces between digital and analog systems—can find new forms in their combination with one another. Moreover, a recent such experiment in the production of landscape rather than building not only suggests a number of implications for architectural work, but of ecological, economic and urban structures that underlie the projects’s visible formal and aesthetic orders. This project, “Hyperculture: Earth as Interface,” studied the potential outcomes of modifying a commonly employed information infrastructure for the optimization of agricultural production throughout most of America’s heartland; and that same infrastructure’s latent flexibility to operate in both “read” and “write” modes, as a means for collaborative input and diversified, shared output. In the context of industrialized agriculture, this work not only negotiates seemingly contradictory demands with diametrically opposed ecological and social outcomes; but also shows the fabrication of landscape as suggestive of other, more architectural applications in the built environment. The Hyperculture project is sited within several contexts: industrial, geographically local, ecological, and within the digital protocols of landscape processing known as “precision agriculture.” Today, these typically work together toward the surprising result of unvariegated repetition, known commonly as monoculture. After decades of monoculture’s proliferation, its numerous inefficiencies have come under broad recent scrutiny, leading to diverse thinking on ways to redress seemingly conflicting demands such as industry’s reliance on mass-production and automation; the demand for variety or customization in consumer markets; and even regulatory inquiries into the ecological and zoning harms brought by undiversified land use. Monoculture, in short, is proving unsustainable from economic, environmental, and even aesthetic and zoning standpoints. But its handling in digital interfaces, remote sensing and algorithmically directed fabrication is not.
keywords GPS, precision agriculture, digital landscape fabrication, interface, analog/digital systems, open source platform, digital fabrication, multi-dimensional scales
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email jordang@buffalo.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id sigradi2010_213
id sigradi2010_213
authors Herrera, Pablo C.
year 2010
title Tecnologías disruptivas: programación y fabricación en Latinoamérica [Disruptive technologies: programming and digital fabrication in Latin America]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 213-216
summary Since 2008 the preference for using different programming methods (Rhinoscript) had been analyzed using blogs. Searching for answers to explain the negative tendency of this year (from 48,063 to 16,332), a second repository was created (Grasshopper) featuring interactive methods and techniques. It has been discovered that of the five geographic regions analyzed Latin America is the only one that preferred the interactive interface (18% over programming). This shows that we are still keeping a strong dependency on the use of stable and safe technologies over disruptive ones that proved to be more efficient in design and fabrication.
keywords digital fabrication, scripting, architectural education, rhinoscripting, grasshopper
series SIGRADI
email pablo@espaciosdigitales.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id caadria2010_013
id caadria2010_013
authors Hewett, B. and A. Burke
year 2010
title Open tower: developing design research practice
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 137-146
summary This paper critically reflects on computational methods of design in relation to social and environmental sustainability design research within contemporary and future tall building typology. It develops the author’s experience in large-scale building design practice into academic design research. The analysis of tall building typology is presented initially in the context of practice, followed by its development in an architectural master’s studio. The authors discuss their design research within a practice context that determined the question: what opportunities do computational processes offer to the conception of the tall building typology? Its transference to an educational research context allowed for the deeper exploration and development of a position on algorithmic and parametric methods, their relevance to the typology of the contemporary tall building and complex architectural scenarios.
keywords Computational; tower; practice; research; typology; teaching
series CAADRIA
email Ben.Hewett@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2017_042
id ecaade2017_042
authors Hitchings, Katie, Patel, Yusef and McPherson, Peter
year 2017
title Analogue Automation - The Gateway Pavilion for Headland Sculpture on the Gulf
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 347-354
summary The Waiheke Gateway Pavilion, designed by Stevens Lawson Architects originally for the 2010 New Zealand Venice Biennale Pavilion, was brought to fruition for the 2017 Headland Sculpture on the Gulf Sculpture trail by students from Unitec Institute of Technology. The cross disciplinary team comprised of students from architecture and construction disciplines working in conjunction with a team of industry professionals including architects, engineers, construction managers, project managers, and lecturers to bring the designed structure, an irregular spiral shape, to completion. The structure is made up of 261 unique glulam beams, to be digitally cut using computer numerical control (CNC) process. However, due to a malfunction with the institutions in-house CNC machine, an alternative hand-cut workflow approach had to be pursued requiring integration of both digital and analogue construction methods. The digitally encoded data was extracted and transferred into shop drawings and assembly diagrams for the fabrication and construction stages of design. Accessibility to the original 3D modelling software was always needed during the construction stages to provide clarity to the copious amounts of information that was transferred into print paper form. Although this design to fabrication project was challenging, the outcome was received as a triumph amongst the architecture community.
keywords Digital fabrication; workflow; rapid prototyping; representation; pedagogy
series eCAADe
email katie_hitchings@hotmail.co.nz
last changed 2017/09/13 13:31

_id caadria2010_001
id caadria2010_001
authors Hsu, Tse-Wie; Shang-Chia Chiou and Jen Yen
year 2010
title Vine grammar generative system
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 9-18
summary Graphic designers always take both time and efforts when they are creating a decorative pattern with complicated curves and a great deal of motifs. Although there are many sourcebooks of decorative patterns, the satisfaction of the results couldn’t accomplish with designer’s requirements. Thus, graphic designers need a faster and easier system to create decorative patterns in classical style. There are a few effiencient methods to analysis curves and surfaces in the development of shape grammars. The purpose of this research is to develop Vine Grammar based on shape grammars. The vine grammar analyses principles hidden in the language of deisgn works to create the order, then generates design by using Bézier curves. This research also presents the development of a decorative pattern generative system called Shlishi by using FLASH Action Script 2.0. The grammar can be applied with computers and to verify rules quickly by Shlishi. The intention of this research is to make graphic designers to use these rules to create decorative patterns of plants in classic style and to produce satisfactory results for designer more efficiently or to make the results the source materials for the follow-up design works.
keywords Vine; Shlishi; decorative patterns; shape grammar; generative design system
series CAADRIA
email g9830812@yuntech.edu.tw
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ascaad2010_127
id ascaad2010_127
authors Hubers, Hans
year 2010
title Collaborative Parametric BIM
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 127-134
summary The paper will be focussing on a number of digital design tools used in [our groups credentials]. A new laboratory called […] is developed with Virtual Reality for collaborative architectural design. A brief description of the systems and how they are used to support a design team is given. Synchronic and a-synchronic, local and inter-local communication is made possible. Methods for introducing sustainability in the digital design process and user participation over the Internet will be discussed. The results of the author’s PhD research “Collaborative architectural design in virtual reality” are used to develop a new approach in which team members use their own specific software. Swarm design applications developed in Virtools are used at the start of a project. The objects in the swarm can be urban and architectural functional volumes. Examples of the first are houses, offices, factories, roads and water ways. Examples of the second are working, dining, shopping and waiting spaces. Relations between the functional volumes with or without constraints make the functional volumes swarm to find equilibrium. Everything is dynamic, meaning that relations and functional volumes can change any time. Alternatives can be developed using different values for these parameters and by top-down intervention. When the final global layout has been chosen, using a criteria matrix with sustainability criteria to be judged by all participants, including the future users, a next phase is started amongst professionals using parametric design software. A study into different types of parametric design software makes clear why object parametric software can be used for IFC based BIM, while the more interesting process parametric software can not. To make this clear a pragmatic description of the IFC format is given with a simple example of such a file. Future research will be proposed in which applications of different disciplines are connected through the application programming interfaces, while integrating as much as possible the building information and knowledge in the IFC format.
series ASCAAD
type normal paper
email j.c.hubers@tudelft.nl
last changed 2011/03/01 06:48

_id caadria2010_004
id caadria2010_004
authors Jowers, Iestyn; Miquel Prats, Hesham Eissa and Ji-Hyun Lee
year 2010
title A study of emergence in the generation of Islamic geometric patterns
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 39-48
summary Generative design is concerned with the definition and exploration of design spaces, and it has been suggested that emergence plays a key role in this process. In this paper, the impact of emergence on a design space is explored via consideration of different methods used to generate designs in a particular style. Three distinct methods of generating Islamic geometric patterns have been investigated and the extent to which emergence is employed in these methods has been explored. This research supports a discussion on the role of emergence in generative design, and an investigation into how design spaces are affected by the type of emergence employed in a generative process.
keywords Islamic geometric patterns; emergence; design space; design generation
series CAADRIA
email i.jowers@leeds.ac.uk
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2010_026
id caadria2010_026
authors Kann, Jeff W. T. and John S. Gero
year 2010
title Studying designers’ behaviour in collaborative virtual workspaces using quantitative methods
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 273-282
summary This paper presents a case study comparing the behaviour of designers in a collaborative 3D virtual environment with those in a face-to-face environment using quantitative tools to examine their design protocols. It starts with depicting a design ontology along with two methods of analysis for this investigation. The results in this case show that the 3D environment increases the designer’s Structure activities. The rate of meaningful design communication is slower than the base-line face-to-face session. This communication reflects the rate of design cognition when the design process is “close coupled”. Reviewing the design protocol suggests that the 3D design session composed of both “loosely coupled” and “close coupled” periods. This is consistent with other studies that 3D collaborative tools may encourage “loosely coupled” design process.
keywords Design behaviour; virtual workspaces; protocol analysis; quantitative methods; design ontology
series CAADRIA
email kan.jeff@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ascaad2010_019
id ascaad2010_019
authors Katz, Neil C.
year 2010
title Algorithmic Modeling; Parametric Thinking: Computational Solutions to Design Problems
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 19-36
summary Architects and designers have often used computational design techniques in their design process, even without "computers", from designing spaces which activate at the instant of the solstice sunrise, to creating geometrically complex and structurally innovative cathedrals. Designing with rules and variables can lead to solutions which satisfy the design criteria and may result in interesting and unanticipated models. Computational design is a process of designing and a way of thinking; contemporary tools can promote and enhance this process. Algorithmic and parametric modeling (and thinking) can be powerful processes in design, and particularly in working with complex geometry and addressing project constraints and analytical and data-driven design. This paper describes these methods and provides examples of their use on projects at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
series ASCAAD
email Neil.Katz@som.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_156
id ecaade2010_156
authors Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Grasso, Christopher J.; McDearmon, Michael J.
year 2010
title World16: Innovation and collaboration in VR technology
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.593-603
summary This paper outlines the work and organizational framework of World16, a working group of 16 professors from around the world that engage in collaborative research on virtual reality (VR) technologies. Because of the abundance of VR software and the resulting fragmentation of research efforts in this field, World16 shares knowledge and resources using a common software package. A common research platform facilitates the sharing of data and the coordination of research efforts among member professors spread around the world. In addition to the organizational practices of World16’s project management team, various tools and methods of sharing research are described. Additionally, World16’s major research projects are outlined as well as the successes and failures of working within a shared software platform. Lastly, future work and goals of World16 are discussed, including the marketing and commercialization of several computational tools created by member professors.
wos WOS:000340629400064
keywords Virtual Reality; 3D graphics; City modeling; Parametric modeling; International organization
series eCAADe
email dr.yoshihiro.kobayashi@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 16HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_457999 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002