CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 425

_id ascaad2010_213
id ascaad2010_213
authors Babsail, Mohammad; Mahjoub Elnimeiri
year 2010
title A Computer Process for Investigating Wind Power Production in Building Integrated Wind Turbines
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 213-220
summary This paper reports on the computer process to be used in an ongoing research to investigate the effect of architectural parameters of tall buildings on the incorporation of wind turbines. The process combines a generative modeling tool (Grasshopper) and a performance based CFD tool (Virtualwind). The process is demonstrated on three typical tall building plan configurations. The wind speed was simulated at certain locations to demonstrate the ability of tall buildings to enhance the wind speed and thus maximize the energy produced by wind turbines located between twin towers. The process to predict wind power production is lastly listed.
series ASCAAD
email mbabsail@iit.edu
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_140
id ecaade2010_140
authors Chronis, Angelos; Liapi, Katherine A.
year 2010
title Parametric Approach to the Bioclimatic Design of a Student Housing Building in Patras, Greece
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.313-319
summary A new housing complex on the Campus of the University of Patras, Greece, is expected to serve as a test-bed for experimentation with a parametric design process that integrates significant climatic data. To optimize the environmental performance of the proposed housing complex a parametric design algorithm has been developed. The algorithm links the weather data in the area with the site topography and the basic geometric features of the buildings on the site. To explore the interaction of the building features with the prevailing winds in the area and the solar exposure throughout the year various software applications, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, have been utilized. The inclusion of wind data in the algorithm renders it particularly effective. The developed parametric process has been useful during the early design phase when studies on various patterns for arranging the buildings on the site were conducted. The parametric process has facilitated the configuration of the typical building block as well.
wos WOS:000340629400033
keywords Bioclimatic design; Parametric design; Design algorithms; Sun control; Wind analysis; CFD in building design
series eCAADe
email angelos.chronis.09@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_000
id ecaade2010_000
authors Schmitt, Gerhard; Hovestadt, Ludger; Van Gool, Luc; Bosché, Frédéric; Burkhard, Remo; Colemann, Suzanne; Halatsch, Jan; Hansmeyer, Michael; Konsorski-Lang, Silke; Kunze, Antje; Sehmi-Luck, Martina (eds.)
year 2010
title FUTURE CITIES
source 28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2], ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, 904 p.
summary Future Cities – the title of the 2010 eCAADe Conference describes one of the major challenges of the 21st century. The conference theme is a logical evolution from previous years in that it expands the focus of interest from the building to larger scales and higher complexity. The conference contributions describe methods and instruments that were developed in the last three decades and apply them to city and territorial planning. The eCAADe proceedings demonstrate that CAAD research and education of the past prepared the ground for the future and for the increased responsibility of the CAAD community. The population of cities has developed worldwide from a minority to the majority. Cities are the largest, most complex and most dynamic man-made systems. As vibrant centres of cultural life and of mega events, they are engines that drive local and global economies. However, their growth was in the fewest cases determined by sustainability goals. As a result, contemporary metropolitan territories are often environmentally, socially and economically unsustainable entities placing increasing pressure on the surrounding rural areas. No longer do traditional methods support the planning and managing of large cities – these methods have reached their limits. Parallel to the revolution in the design of buildings, we need a radical re-thinking of the planning, design, development and management process of cities and urban-rural systems. Compared to buildings, urban and rural systems involve a much higher number of stakeholders and decision makers. We need to study and simulate the effects and side effects of urban-rural planning or re-development much earlier in the process than normally done today. The goal seems clear: the transformation of existing and the planning of new sustainable urban-rural systems. As ordering principles we can build on experiences with building architecture. Complexity, dynamics, scale, and the urban metabolism evolve as promising research and education areas.
series eCAADe
email ecaade2010@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2010/08/24 07:32

_id ascaad2010_231
id ascaad2010_231
authors Turrin, M.; R. Stouffs and S. Sariyildiz
year 2010
title Parametric Design of the Vela Roof
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 231-240
summary Due to the increased request for representative structures and for spaces to be used independent of the weather conditions, contemporary cities increasingly integrate public covered spaces (shadowed squares and streets, courtyards, historic commercial galleries, etc.) in the urban fibre. Facing the design of large roof structures for semi outdoor spaces is increasingly common for architects and engineers. When focusing on large roofs, aesthetics, structural performance and economics often dominate the design process. However, the current increased emphasis on energy-related aspects generates new challenges. Particularly, the use of renewable energy resources needs to be confronted. In this paper we will address the subject through a case study whose design aimed at integrating performance evaluations in the very early stages of the process. The case study focuses on the so-called “Vela roof”. This roof is part of a larger project currently under construction in Bologna (Italy). The focus of the study concerns the use of on-site renewable climate (energy) resources with special attention given passive reduction of summer overheating and daylight. For these tasks a parametric model was developed to support the decision making process and the paper will present its potential with respect to performance-oriented design during the conceptual design phase of roof structure. The very first conceptual design developed by the architectural office was assumed as a starting point for the inclusion of performance criteria. In the preliminary design of the roof uncomfortable conditions were expected under the whole roof in the summer. Various strategies for improving the thermal comfort were investigated, involving a large set of combined systems. Not all of these will be detailed in this paper. Instead we will focus on the ones directly affected by the geometry of the roof. Those are mainly air flow for cooling and the reduction of solar gain, in combination with their effects on daylight. Their investigation was based on a chain of dependencies to be integrated in the design process. With respect to that, parametric modelling was used. Parametric modelling allows both geometrical entities and their relationships to be represented. These relationships are structured in a hierarchical chain of dependencies, established during the preliminary parameterization process. The independent properties of the model are usually expressed through independent parameters, and their variations generate different configurations of the model. By making use of this potential, three project scales were parametrically explored. At the large scale, parametric variations of the overall shape of the roof were investigated in relation to cooling through ventilation and here the parametric model allowed for the generation of both different configurations of the roof, including its structural morphology and variations of its structural tessellation. At the medium scale, the integration of openable modules was investigated in relation to air extraction for cooling; with respect to this, the parametric model allows exploring openings based on variations of size and distribution. At the small scale, various options were explored for the cladding system, in order to reduce the direct solar gain while still allowing the income of indirect natural light. The parametric model was used to investigate the configuration of self-shading modules and their integration in the structure. Specific emphasis will be given to the small scale. The advantages in design process and the current limits of the parametric modelling approach used here will be discussed in the paper.
series ASCAAD
email m.turrin@tudelft.nl
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_189
id ascaad2010_189
authors Allahaim, Fahad; Anas Alfaris and David Leifer
year 2010
title Towards Changeability
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 189-200
summary Many buildings around the world have undergone successive changes over their life cycles. Regardless of the type or size of a building there are usually requirements for change due to several unanticipated forces and emerging uncertainties that act upon them. These changes might be in the building’s spatial, structural or service systems. This can be due to changes in the needs of occupants, the market demand or technological advances. Although buildings undergo change, current design practice does not address this and buildings are still designed as if they will remain static. This paper proposes an Adaptable Buildings Design (ABD) Framework to address the issue of adaptability in building design. Using this methodology uncertainties and future changes are first identified. To increase the building’s longevity, flexibility options are embedded and design rules are formulated to trigger these options when necessary. The value of adaptability is then assessed by implementing several simulations using Real Options Analysis (ROA). To demonstrate the approach, the ABD is applied to a multi-use commercial building case study. Flexibility is embedded in the building’s design across several systems allowing it to change and evolve over time based on a set of design rules. The buildings adaptability is then assessed using ROA. Positive results demonstrate the strength of the proposed methodology in addressing future change and uncertaintie.
series ASCAAD
email arch_fahadsa@yahoo.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2010_183
id ecaade2010_183
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2010
title Designing Interactions: A step forward from time based media and synthetic space design in architectural education
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.151-156
summary The paper follows the development of digital tools for architects and briefly discusses their utility within education and practice. The move from static CAD tools to time based media followed by programmatic processes and virtual environment design is addressing the evolution of the profession and to an extent reflects practitioners’ needs. The paper focuses on the notion of interactivity and how it is been addressed in various fields. Borrowing from computer science and game design the author presents a course dealing with designing interactivity, responsiveness and users feeding their input back in the design. The aim of the paper is to analyse and support a new set of tools in architectural curricula that will implement interactivity and integrate it into spatial design leading to a holistic approach promoting intelligence, hybridity and responsiveness of the built environment. Following, the elaboration of the rationale, a brief discussion on tools and project directions is carried out.
wos WOS:000340629400016
keywords Interaction; Virtual environments; Time based media; Curriculum; Intelligent environments
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@uth.gr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ijac20108408
id ijac20108408
authors Brown, Andre; Nicholas Webb
year 2010
title Examination of the Designs by Auguste Perret Using Digitally-Enabled Forensic Techniques
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 4, p. 537
summary This paper discusses how digitally-enabled techniques can be used to augment our understanding of a designer's work, particularly in relation to unbuilt or lost projects. In the first half of the twentieth century Auguste Perret gained international recognition for his buildings and we employ two of his unbuilt museums as the basis for illustration of the technique. Current knowledge of his unbuilt projects is based on surviving literature and incomplete illustrations. We show that the use of digitally-enabled techniques facilitates a fuller examination of the original material. Interpretation of material requires parallel studies into the architect, their influences and the context they operated within in order to extrapolate and fill gaps in an informed way. The construction of various digital representations enables a forensic analysis of the projects; consequently we can produce a richer set of information that can, in turn, enhance our analysis and understanding of an architect and their work, in this case, Perret.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ascaad2010_279
id ascaad2010_279
authors Celani, G.; L. Medrano; J. Spinelli
year 2010
title Unicamp 2030
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 279-286
summary The state university of Campinas, Unicamp, is a public university in upstate São Paulo, Brazil, ranked the second best in the country. It was founded in 1966, and its main campus started to be built in 1967, in the suburbs of Campinas, nowadays a two-million people city. The area of the campus is almost 3 million square meters (300 hectares), with a total built area of 522.000 m2 and a population of 40 thousand people - 30 thousand students, 2 thousand faculty members and almost 8 thousand staff members. The campus’ gross population density is 133 people per hectare. Less than 6% of the total campus area is presently occupied. The design of Unicamp's campus is based on concepts that were typical of the modern movement, with reminiscences of corbusian urbanism, in which preference is given to cars and buildings are spread apart on the territory, with little concern to the circulation of pedestrians. The standard building type that has been built on campus since the 1970's is based on non-recyclable materials, and has a poor thermal performance. Unicamp is expected to double its number of students by the year 2030. The campus density is thus expected to grow from 600 people per hectare to almost 1,000 people per hectare. The need to construct new buildings is seen as an opportunity to correct certain characteristics of the campus that are now seen as mistakes, according to sustainability principles. This paper describes a set of proposals targeting the increase of the campus' density in a sustainable way. The plan also aims at increasing the quality of life on campus and diminishing its impact on the environment. The main targets are: - Reducing the average temperature by 2oC; - Reducing the average displacement time by 15 minutes; - Increasing the campus' density by 100%; - Reducing the CO2 emissions by 50%. // In order to achieve these goals, the following actions have been proposed: Developing a new standard building for the university, incorporating sustainability issues, such as the use of renewable and/or recyclable materials, the installation of rainwater storage tanks, the use of natural ventilation for cooling, sitting the buildings in such a way to decrease thermal gain, and other issues that are required for sustainable buildings' international certifications. To assess the performance of the new standard building, different simulation software were used, such as CFD for checking ventilation, light simulation software to assess energy consumption, and so on. 1. Filling up under-utilized urban areas in the campus with new buildings, to make better use of unused infrastructure and decrease the distance between buildings. 2. Proposing new bicycle paths in and outside campus, and proposing changes in the existing bicycle path to improve its safety. 3. Developing a landscape design plan that aims at creating shaded pedestrian and bicycle passageways.
series ASCAAD
email medrano@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_249
id ascaad2010_249
authors Hawker, Ronald; Dina Elkady and Thomas Tucker.
year 2010
title Not Just Another Pretty Face
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 249-260
summary Digital Heritage has gained popularity recently as means of dynamically representing and reconstructing historic buildings and cityscapes. Simultaneously this new medium of visualization affords another approach to examine human-virtual environment interaction and offers possibilities of exploiting virtual environments as educational tools. At Zayed University, a federal university primarily for women citizens of the United Arab Emirates, we have integrated student-faculty research and documented and reconstructed a number of historical buildings within the curriculum of the Department of Art and Design. We have further collaborated with the animation program at Winston Salem State University in North Carolina, utilizing the motion capture laboratory at the Center of Design Innovation to literally breathe life into these reconstructions. The primary idea is to contribute to the ongoing documentation of the country’s heritage through creating “responsive virtual heritage environments” where the spectator is actively engaged in exploring the digital space and gain certain degrees of control over the course and scheme of the dynamic experience. The process begins by introducing students to utilize the diverse capabilities of CAD and three dimensional computer applications and intertwine the technical skills they acquire to construct virtual computer models of indigenous built environments. The workflow between the different applications is crucial to stimulate students’ problem solving abilities and tame the application tools, specifically when constructing complex objects and structural details. In addition the spatial and temporal specificity different computer applications afford has proven useful in highlighting and analyzing the buildings’ function within the extreme climate of the country and their role in the political-economy, particularly in visualizing the ephemeral qualities of the architecture as they relate to passive cooling and the inter-relationships between built and natural environments. Light and time settings clarify shadow casting and explain the placement and orientation of buildings. Particle simulations demonstrate the harnessing of wind and rain both urban and rural settings. The quantitative data accumulated and charted through CAD and VR programs and geo-browsers can be integrated with qualitative data to create a more holistic analytical framework for understanding the complex nature of past settlement patterns. In addition, the dynamic nature of this integration creates a powerful educational tool. This paper reviews this ongoing research project with examples of reconstructions completed across the country, demonstrating analytical and educational possibilities through the integration of CAD programs with a range of other statistical, geographic, and visualization software.
series ASCAAD
email ronald.hawker@zu.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_179
id ascaad2010_179
authors Jones, Charles; Kevin Sweet
year 2010
title Over Constrained
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 179-188
summary Parametric software has fundamentally changed the way in which architecture is conceptualized, developed and even constructed. The ability to assign parameters or numeric variables to specific portions of a project has allowed designers the potential to test variations of their design. Small changes to a single parameter can have an exponential effect on the designed object and alter its appearance beyond original preconceptions in both positive and negative ways. Parametric software also has the ability to constrain or restrict geometry to set values, parameters or conditions. This has the benefit of allowing portions of a form to remain constant or unchanged while simultaneously allowing for a great degree of flexibility in response to a design intent. Constraining portions of a design allows architects to respond to existing or unalterable conditions by ""locking down"" information within a project and then explore those portions that can change more freely. This programmed relationship between the parameter and the form, once established, can give the illusion of minimal effort for maximum output. The ease in which geometrical form can be altered and shaped by a single variable can mislead beginning designers into thinking that the software makes these relationships for them. What is hidden, is the programming or connections needed between the parameters and the geometry in order to produce such dramatic change. Finally, thinking parametrically about design reintroduces the concept of a rigorous, intent driven, fabrication oriented practice; a practice lost in a digital era where the novelty of new tools was sufficient to produce new form. Because parametric models must have established relationships to all parts of the design, each component must have a purpose, be well thought out, and have a direct relationship to a real world object. The introduction of parametric design methodologies into an architectural pedagogy reestablishes architectural praxis in an academic setting. Students are taught to design based on creating relationships to connected components; just as they would do in a professional architectural practice. This paper outlines how Digital Project – a parametric based software – was introduced into an academic setting in an attempt reconnect the ideologies of academia with the practicalities of professional practice. In order to take full advantage of Digital Project as a parameter based software, a project that creates modular, flexible geometries was devised. Produced over one semester, the project set out to find ways of controlling designed geometry through variable parameters that allowed the initial module to be instantiated or replicated into a wall condition: maintaining a unified whole of discrete components. This paper outlines this process, the results and how the outcomes demonstrates the parametric ideologies described above.
series ASCAAD
email cjones@aus.edu
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_161
id ascaad2010_161
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2010
title Design and Simulation of Textile Building Elements
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 161-170
summary In this paper we examine the use of textile building elements and investigate on their potential scope of application in architecture. Other than commonly used for spanned or tent-like structures we concentrate on the use of textiles for folded, crinkled and procumbent assemblies, as these seem to correspond much better with the textiles´ inherent properties. On closer examination of these properties it becomes obvious that fabric primarily exists in a loose, uneven and irregular physicality that can be adjusted and configured into different states that match specific criteria. That is why fabric is mainly used for covering, protecting or hiding objects, e.g. as apparel for people. Only at a second glance does one recognize that textiles can be used for many other purposes such as collecting, separating, filtering or even healing. Thus, in the first instance of this research we examined customary usages and classified them into different categories that aided us to further develop practical application areas for the architectural domain. Subsequently to the fact that the shape of a textile might alter under the influence of forces, the further focus of this research lied on the appraisal of digital simulation techniques and simulation engines to provide sophisticated instruments for the generation of the associated time-based geometric form of the fabric. External elements that might drive this deformation process such as wind, temperature, precipitation, as well as static and dynamic building components were considered in the simulation process in order to generate visual output of the corresponding shapes. Studies about bipartite materials that can control the deformation process and might lead the textile beyond its primary functionality conclude this work.
series ASCAAD
email tlomker@sharjah.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id sigradi2010_129
id sigradi2010_129
authors Lyon, Gottlieb Arturo; García Alvarado Rodrigo
year 2010
title Variaciones intensivas: diseño paramétrico de edificios en altura basado en análisis topológico [Intensive variations: parametric design of tall buildings based on topological analysis]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 129-132
summary Several building works have demonstrated the possibilities of architectural design based on structural performance. This work discusses some examples and digital design strategies that approach this issue, as well as an exercise for a tower generated through topological optimization. That experience presents alternatives for a traditional office tower in Santiago, Chile, the Torre Santa Maria, based on generative design strategies for the incorporation of structural and environmental requirements to define parametric models. The experience and the capabilities studied reveal an intensive variation of architectural shape. This approach challenges conventional building regularity and suggests new ways of designing based on material performance.
keywords parametric design, topological analysis, tall buildings, environmental performance, structural performance
series SIGRADI
email alyon@uc.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia10_305
id acadia10_305
authors Perry, Chris
year 2010
title Anticipatory Architecture | Extrapolative Design
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 305-312
summary The instrumental and aesthetic implications of architecture’s engagement with science and technology has a long history, part of which includes the period following the Second World War when the rapid technological advances of the Industrial Revolution merged with a general cultural mindset characterized by themes of progress and futurism. For postwar thinkers like Reyner Banham, this interest in a futurist architecture suggested an approach to design rooted less in architectural precedent than technological extrapolation. While a precedent based approach might be viewed as more disciplinary in nature, technological extrapolation suggests an inclination towards interdisciplinarity. Thus, Banham’s concept of extrapolation encouraged architects to look beyond the limits of their own discipline as a means of discovering new forms of knowledge and expertise. Indeed Banham was engaged in taking stock of the technological advances particular to his time while simultaneously anticipating the implication of these advancements for the future. To this extent, the postwar period and its inherent futurism provides a useful and poignant lens through which to take stock of our own technological climate. Given the equally revolutionary advances in computer technology in the last twenty years, our contemporary moment can be seen as having many parallels with the postwar period, and not unlike the postwar generation of architects and thinkers, contemporary designers are inevitably faced with the challenge of engaging new technological advances and their implications for architecture. In our current age of digital and biological technologies, these advances are both rapid and widespread, and include LED and fiber-optic lighting systems, motion sensing, interface design, solar tracking photovoltaic skins and wind harnessing technologies, magnetic levitation, and robotics. This paper begins with an examination of design work and criticism from the postwar period and proceeds to utilize that examination as an historical framework for addressing issues of contemporary design and 21st Century technological advancement.
keywords Architecture, Anticipatory, Technology, Science
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email chris@s-e-r-v-o.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id sigradi2010_298
id sigradi2010_298
authors Barcellos, Góes Mariza; David Maria Manuela
year 2010
title Visualization: The Contribution of a Mathematical Mediating Artefact for Creative Processes and Design Activities
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 298-300
summary Considering mathematical knowledge as an artefact that mediates social activities in the world, this paper emphasizes the contribution of visual thinking to mathematics education and extends it to the learning of design activities, especially in architectural contexts. Results from a previous research paper on architectural design, which focused on the work of some contemporary architects in their day - to - day office activities, showed the relevance of drawing in architectural practice. These results aroused our interest in researching the mediating role of drawing and its structuring effects on creative processes and design activities in architecture.
keywords visualization, mathematics education, architectural design education, activity theory
series SIGRADI
email marizagoes@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia10_234
id acadia10_234
authors de Monchaux, Nicholas; Patwa, Shivang; Golder, Benjamin; Jensen, Sara; Lung, David
year 2010
title Local Code: The Critical Use of Geographic Information Systems in Parametric Urban Design
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 234-242
summary Local Code uses geospatial analysis to identify thousands of publicly owned abandoned sites in major US cities, imagining this distributed, vacant landscape as a new urban system. Deploying GIS analysis in conjunction with parametric design software, a landscape proposal for each site is tailored to local conditions, optimizing thermal and hydrological performance to enhance local performance and enhance the whole city’s ecology. Relieving burdens on existing infrastructure, such a digitally mediated, dispersed system provides important opportunities for urban resilience and transformation. In a case study of San Francisco, the projects’ quantifiable effects on energy usage and stormwater remediation would eradicate 88-96% of the need for more expensive, centralized, sewer, and electrical upgrades. As a final, essential layer, the project proposes digital citizen participation to conceive a new, more public infrastructure as well.
keywords GIS, Parametric Design, Emergence, Morphogenesis, Network, Urban Design, Parametric Urbanism
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email demonchaux@berkeley.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ijac20108404
id ijac20108404
authors Erhan, Halil; Nahal H. Salmasi, Rob Woodbury
year 2010
title ViSA: A Parametric Design Modeling Method to Enhance Visual Sensitivity Control and Analysis
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 4, p. 461
summary The ability of parametric computer-aided design systems to generate models rapidly enables designers to explore the downstream impacts of changes to key design parameters. However, the typical modeling functions provided in the parametric systems can become insufficient when such exploration is needed for increasingly complex parametric design models. Main challenges for exploration that we observed are control and analysis of changes on the design model and in particular, when they are introduced continuously. The system interfaces and the human-visual perception system alleviate these challenges. In this study, we demonstrate ViSA, a Visual Sensitivity Analysis method that aims to make the effects of change within a parametric model controllable, measurable and apparent for designers. The approach aims to improve visually analyzing the sensitivity of a design model to planned parametric changes. The method proposes customizable control and visualization features in the model that are decoupled from each other at the design level, while providing interfaces between them through parametric associations. We present findings from our case studies in addition to the results of a user study demonstrating the applicability and limitations of the proposed method.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id sigradi2010_189
id sigradi2010_189
authors Hernández, Silvia Patricia; Verón María José; Figeroa Luciana Lanzone; Alejandra Rezk
year 2010
title Arquitectura que aparece - desaparece: experiencia de diseño [Architecture tha appears and dissapear: an experience in design]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 189-192
summary We present this paper as a proposal for a preliminary design prototype for urban architecture based on the concept of versatility, that is, spaces that can be easily changed, either on the effects level (i.e. illumination, projection), or on the mechanical level (i.e. skin movement). These spaces can be transformed by changing their proportions, limits and assistance. This versatility is provided by domotics, and is verified in 3D graphics and animations. The proposal uses a domotic system as the central control for illumination, environment outfitting, skin movements, security systems, and multimedia.
keywords versatility, domotics, animation, movable skins
series SIGRADI
email arqhernandezster@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia11_372
id acadia11_372
authors James, Anne; Nagasaka, Dai
year 2011
title Integrative Design Strategies for Multimedia in Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 372-379
summary Multidisciplinary efforts that have shaped the current integration of multimedia into architectural spaces have primarily been conducted by collaborative efforts among art, engineering, interaction design, informatics and software programming. These collaborations have focused on the complexities of designing for applications of multimedia in specific real world contexts. Outside a small but growing number of researchers and practitioners, architects have been largely absent from these efforts. This has resulted in projects that deal primarily with developing technologies augmenting existing architectural environments. (Greenfield and Shepard 2007)This paper examines the potential of multimedia and architecture integration to create new possibilities for architectural space. Established practices of constructing architecture suggest creating space by conventional architectural means. On the other hand, multimedia influences and their effect on the tectonics, topos and typos (Frampton 2001) of an architectural space (‘multimedia effects matrix’) suggest new modes of shaping space. It is proposed that correlations exist between those two that could inform unified design strategies. Case study analyses were conducted examining five works of interactive spaces and multimedia installation artworks, selected from an initial larger study of 25 works. Each case study investigated the means of shaping space employed, according to both conventional architectural practices and the principles of multimedia influence (in reference to the ‘multimedia effects matrix’) (James and Nagasaka 2010, 278-285). Findings from the case studies suggest strong correlations between the two approaches to spatial construction. To indicate these correlations, this paper presents five speculative integrative design strategies derived from the case studies, intended to inform future architectural design practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email annejames.07@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaade2010_090
id ecaade2010_090
authors Ladouce, Nicolas; Hee, Limin; Janssen, Patrick T.
year 2010
title Urban Space Planning for Sustainable High Density Environment
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.777-785
summary In this paper we investigate the possibilities of new typologies of urban public space for high density environments. The premise for the project would be that with new high-density typologies, it would be necessary to consider a difference in the nature of urban public spaces rather than a difference in degree from the status quo. From observations of urban patterns that drive collective, hybrid spaces around Asia, relationships between urban attributes are drawn. For this paper we shall focus on the particular case of Linked Hybrid, Beijing, China, as an elevated urban public space. A literature review focuses on reviewing key theories to construct and adopt a rating system to develop an empirical framework to evaluate the case studies and extract the key attributes. These rated attributes are then abstracted in a real-time model that enables user manipulation. The purpose is to create a tool to better observe the effects and evolution of planning decisions for future urban spaces in high density contexts. The preliminary results are consistent with the idea that selected spatial parameters of a space may be embedded into a “barcode” and referenced as a type. The combination of different types, hence their parameters may be used for effective replication of their characteristics to improve the decision-making process for urban designers. The research is not intended to reproduce the successful urban public spaces but rather result in a catalogue of typologies which can be referred to during the initial stages of planning to provide an indication of spatial qualities.
wos WOS:000340629400083
keywords High density environments; Collective urban space; Hybrid typologies; Parametric urbanism
series eCAADe
email nicolas@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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