CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 424

_id ecaade2010_142
id ecaade2010_142
authors Labelle, Guillaume; Nembrini, Julien; Huang, Jeffrey
year 2010
title Geometric Programming Framework: ANAR+: Geometry library for Processing
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.403-410
wos WOS:000340629400043
summary This paper introduces a JAVA based library for parametric modeling through programming. From the recent advent of scripting tools integrated into commercial CAAD software and everyday design practice, the use of programming applied to an architectural design process becomes a necessary field of study. The ANAR+ library is a parametric geometry environment meant to be used as programming interface by designers. Form exploration strategies based on parametric variations depends on the internal logic description, a key role for form generation. In most commercial CAD software, geometric data structures are often predefined objects, thus constraining the form exploration, whereas digital architectural research and teaching are in need for an encompassing tool able to step beyond new software products limitations. We introduce key concepts of the library and show a use of the library within a form finding process driven by irradiance simulation.
keywords Processing; JAVA; Scene graph; Parametric modeling; Geometry
series eCAADe
email Guillaume.LaBelle@epfl.ch
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ascaad2010_075
id ascaad2010_075
authors Schubert, Gerhard; Kaufmann Stefan and Petzold Frank
year 2010
title Project Wave 0.18
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 75-88
summary In recent years a number of projects have been emerged, in which the new possibilities of the computer as a design tool, have been used. Through the digital chain from design to manufacturing the efficiency has increased and allows the implementation of complex architectural structures. With all these new opportunities, also new challenges arise in the teaching and the educational concepts. The paper describes the detailed course concept and the didactic strategy using the example of a parametric designed roof structure, we designed, planed and build up in scale 1:1 within the main course. „Wendepunkt|e im Bauen“ (Turning point|s of building) is the name of an exhibition at the “Pinakothek der Moderne” in Spring 2010. In addition to contributions of the industrialization in the building industry from 1850 to the present day, the exhibition also serves as a platform, to demonstrate new possibilities of computer-aided parametric design and the closely related computer aided manufacturing (CAM). In this context, we took the chance to build a sculpture in Scale 1:1 to show the potential of a constant digital workflow and the digital fabrication. Through the digital chain from design to manufacturing, the efficiency has been increased by the computer and allows the implementation of new complex architectural structures. But the efficiency of the high-degree-automation through the use of computerized machines usually ends in the production of the components. Because this coincidence of the elements in the assembly often proves cost and time, the aim of the project was to optimize both, the production of components and their assembly as well. As part of the wintercourse 2009/2010 different aspects of automation have been reviewed and new solutions have been analyzed. Together with 15 students of the Faculty of Architecture the complete digital chain started with the first design ideas, about parametric programming through production and assembly had been researched, implemented and brought to reality. In the first steps, the students had to learn about the potential, but also about the problems coming with the digital-design and the attached digital-production. There for the course took part at our computerlab. In weekly workshops, all ideas have been implemented and tested directly in the 3-dimensional parametric model. And thanks to the interdisciplinary work with the Department of Structural Design also static factors had been considered, to optimize the form. Parallel to the digital form-finding process, the first prototypes have been produced by the students. By using the chairs 3D-CNC-Mills we were able to check the programmed connection detail in reality and apply the so learned lessons to the further development. After nearly 3 month of research, designing, planning and programming, we were able to produce the over 1000 different parts in only 4 days. By developing a special pre-stressed structure and connection detail it was also possible, to assemble the whole structure (13.5m x 4.5m x 4m) in only one day. The close connection between digital design (CAD) and digital manufacturing (CAM) is an important point of our doctrine. By the fact, that the students operate the machines themselves, but also implement projects on a scale of 1:1, they learn to independently evaluate these new tools and to use them in a meaningful way.
series ASCAAD
email gerhard.schubert@gmail.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ijac20108401
id ijac20108401
authors Attar, Ramtin; Robert Aish, Jos Stam, et al.
year 2010
title Embedded Rationality: A Unified Simulation Framework for Interactive Form Finding
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 4, p. 39
summary This paper describes embedded rationality as a method for implicitly combining fabrication constraints into an interactive framework for conceptual design. While the concept of ‘embedded rationality’ has been previously discussed in the context of a parametric design environment, we employ this concept to present a novel framework for dynamic simulation as a method for interactive form-finding. By identifying categories of computational characteristics, we present a unified physics-solver that generalizes existing simulations through a constraint-based approach. Through several examples we explore conceptual approaches to a fixed form where the resulting effects of interacting forces are produced in real-time. Finally, we provide an example of embedded rationality by examining a constraint-based model of fabrication rationale for a Planar Offset Quad (POQ) panelization system.
series journal
last changed 2011/06/24 06:41

_id acadia10_218
id acadia10_218
authors Chok, Kermin; Donofrio, Mark
year 2010
title Structure at the Velocity of Architecture
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 218-226
summary This paper outlines a digital design workflow, utilized by the authors, which actively links the geometry platforms being utilized by architects with tools for structural analysis, design, form-finding, and optimization. This workflow leads to an accelerated generation and transfer of information to help guide and inform the design process. The engineering team is thus empowered to augment the architect’s design by ensuring that the design team is conscious of the structural implications of design decisions throughout the design process. A crucial element of this design process has been the dynamic linkage of parametric geometry models with structural analysis and design tools. This reduces random errors in model generation and allows more time for critical analysis evaluation. However, the ability to run a multitude of options in a compressed time frame has led to ever increasing data sets. A key component of this structural engineering workflow has become the visualization and rigorous interpretation of the data generated by the analysis process. The authors have explored visualization techniques to distill the complex analysis results into graphics that are easily discernable by all members of the design team.
keywords Workflows, Structure, Collaboration, Visualizations, Analysis
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kermin.chok@gmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia10_117
id acadia10_117
authors Crotch, Joanna; Mantho, Robert; Horner, Martyn
year 2010
title Social Spatial Genesis: Activity Centered Space Making
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 117-124
summary Digital technologies and processes have been used to generate architectural form for over two decades. Recent advances in digital technologies have allowed virtual digital environments to be constructed from physical movement. But can a bridge that connects the physical and virtual realms be developed? Can this, currently arbitrary form making be grounded in human activity and subsequently be integrated in to real time, space, and place. This research asks how space generated from the process of digital morphogenesis can be related to meaning beyond just the creation of form. Existing research asks how new form can be discovered, or what material and structural possibilities can be derived from form, through these morphological processes. The aim of this research project is to complete the loop, physical–virtual–physical, and to connect these digital processes to meaning through human activity. Its aim is to discover the consequences of generated spatial envelopes that are manipulated through digital morphogenesis and related to specific human activity, in the pursuit of possibilities for a digitally generated architecture that is socially engaged. This is not random form finding, wherein architecture tries to imitate biological processes or form, but form finding that is connected to a primary architectural concern, how is the architecture being used by humans.
keywords Social digital morphogenesis, event based, motion capture
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email j.crotch@gsa.ac.uk
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2012_261
id ecaade2012_261
authors Feringa, Jelle; Sondergaard, Asbjorn
year 2012
title Design and Fabrication of Topologically Optimized Structures; An Integral Approach - A Close Coupling Form Generation and Fabrication
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 495-500
wos WOS:000330320600052
summary Integral structural optimization and fabrication seeks the synthesis of two original approaches; that of topological optimization (TO) and robotic hotwire cutting (HWC) (Mcgee 2011). TO allows for the reduction of up to 70% of the volume of concrete to support a given structure (Sondergaard & Dombernowsky 2011). A strength of the method is that it allows to come up with structural designs that lie beyond the grasp of traditional means of design. A design space is a discretized volume, delimiting where the optimization will take place. The number of cells used to discretize the design space thus sets the resolution of the TO. While the approach of the application of TO as a constitutive design tool centers on structural aspects in the design phase (Xie 2010), the outcome of this process are structures that cannot be realized within a conventional budget. As such the ensuing design is optimal in a narrow sense; whilst optimal structurally though, construction can be prove to be prohibitively expensive.
keywords Topology optimization; robotics; hotwire cutting; EPS formwork; concrete structures
series eCAADe
email jelleferinga@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ascaad2010_109
id ascaad2010_109
authors Hamadah, Qutaibah
year 2010
title A Computational Medium for the Conceptual Design of Mix-Use Projects
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 109-116
summary Mix use development is receiving wide attention for its unique sustainable benefits. Nevertheless, the planning and designing of successful mixed use projects in today's environment is a complex matrix of skill sets and necessary collaborations between various stakeholders and design professionals. From a design point of view, architects are required to manage and coordinate large information sets, which are many time at odds with one another. The expansive space of knowledge and information is at its best vague and substantially ill-structured. A situation that continues to overburden architects mental and intellectual ability to understand, address and communicate the design issue. In the face of this complex condition, designers are gravitating towards information modeling to manage and organize the expansive data. However, is becoming increasingly evident that current building information modeling applications are less suited for early design activity due to their interrupted and rigid workflows. Against this background, this paper presents a theoretical framework for a computational medium to support the designer during early phases of exploring and investigating design alternatives for mix-use projects. The focus is on the conjecture between programming and conceptual design phase; when uncertainty and ambiguity as at its maximum, and the absence of computational support continues to be the norm. It must be noted however, the aim of the medium is not to formulate or automate design answers. Rather, to support designers by augmenting and enhancing their ability to interpret, understand, and communicate the diverse and multi-faceted design issue. In literature on interpretation, Hans-Georg Gadamer explains that understanding is contingent on an act of construction. To understand something is to construct it. In light of this explanation. To help designers understand the design issue, is to help them construct it. To this end, the computational medium discussed in this paper is conceived to model (construct) the mix-use architectural program. In effect, turning it into a dynamic and interactive information model in the form of a graph (network). This is an important development because it will enable an entirely new level of interaction between the designer and the design-problem. It will allow the designer to gather, view, query and repurpose the information in novel ways. It will offer the designer a new context to foster knowledge and understanding about the ill-structured and vague design issue. Additionally, the medium would serve well to communicate and share knowledge between the various stakeholders and design professionals. Central to the discussion are two questions: First, how can architects model the design program using a graph? Second, what is the nature of the proposed computational medium; namely, its components and defining properties?
series ASCAAD
email qutaibah@mac.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_089
id ascaad2010_089
authors Hemmerling, Marco
year 2010
title Origamics
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 89-96
summary Folding strategies in architecture have been explored since the 1990s – if not before – as a method to generate spatial and structural concepts by applying complex geometries. These strategies are generally related to an analogue working method that involves paper folded models rather than digital form finding processes. Against this background the paper focuses on the impact and possibilities of folding principles from origami for the digital design process in using parametric software to generate integral and adaptive systems within an experimental and intuitive design approach.
series ASCAAD
email marco.hemmerling@hs-owl.de
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p035
id cf2011_p035
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Weber Markus, Petzold Frank, Liwicki Marcus, Dengel Andreas
year 2011
title Sketch-based Methods for Researching Building Layouts through the Semantic Fingerprint of Architecture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 85-102.
summary The paper focuses on the early stages of the design process where the architect needs assistance in finding reference projects and describes different aspects of a concept for retrieving previous design solutions with similar layout characteristics. Such references are typically used to see how others have solved a similar architectural problem or simply for inspiration. Current electronic search methods use textual information rather than graphical information. The configuration of space and the relations between rooms are hard to represent using keywords, in fact transforming these spatial configurations into verbally expressed typologies tends to result in unclear and often imprecise descriptions of architecture. Nowadays, modern IT-technologies lead to fundamental changes during the process of designing buildings. Digital representations of architecture require suitable approaches to the storage, indexing and management of information as well as adequate retrieval methods. Traditionally planning information is represented in the form of floor plans, elevations, sections and textual descriptions. State of the art digital representations include renderings, computer aided design (CAD) and semantic information like Building Information Modelling (BIM) including 2D and 3D file formats such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) (IAI, 2010). In the paper, we examine the development of IT-technologies in the area of case-based reasoning (Richter et al., 2007) to provide a sketch-based submission and retrieval system for publishing and researching building layouts including their manipulation and subsequent use. The user interface focuses on specifying space and their relations by drawing them. This query style supports the spatial thinking approach that architects use, who often have a visual representation in mind without being able to provide an accurate description of the spatial configuration. The semantic fingerprint proposed by (Langenhan, 2008) is a description and query language for creating an index of floor plans to store meta-data about architecture, which can be used as signature for retrieving reference projects. The functional spaces, such as living room or kitchen and the relation among on another, are used to create a fingerprint. Furthermore, we propose a visual sketch-based interface (Weber et al., 2010) based on the Touch&Write paradigm (Liwicki et al., 2010) for the submission and the retrieval phase. During the submission process the architect is sketching the space-boundaries, space relations and functional coherence's. Using state of the art document analysis techniques, the architects are supported offering an automatic detection of room boundaries and their physical relations. During the retrieval the application will interpret the sketches of the architect and find reference projects based on a similarity based search utilizing the semantic fingerprint. By recommending reference projects, architects will be able to reuse collective experience which match the current requirements. The way of performing a search using a sketch as a query is a new way of thinking and working. The retrieval of 3D models based on a sketched shape are already realized in several domains. We already propose a step further, using the semantics of a spatial configuration. Observing the design process of buildings reveals that the initial design phase serves as the foundation for the quality of the later outcome. The sketch-based approach to access valuable information using the semantic fingerprint enables the user to digitally capture knowledge about architecture, to recover and reuse it in common-sense. Furthermore, automatically analysed fingerprints can put forward both commonly used as well as best practice projects. It will be possible to rate architecture according to the fingerprint of a building.
keywords new media, case-based reasoning, ontology, semantic building design, sketch-based, knowledge management
series CAAD Futures
email langenhan@tum.de
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2010_161
id ascaad2010_161
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2010
title Design and Simulation of Textile Building Elements
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 161-170
summary In this paper we examine the use of textile building elements and investigate on their potential scope of application in architecture. Other than commonly used for spanned or tent-like structures we concentrate on the use of textiles for folded, crinkled and procumbent assemblies, as these seem to correspond much better with the textiles´ inherent properties. On closer examination of these properties it becomes obvious that fabric primarily exists in a loose, uneven and irregular physicality that can be adjusted and configured into different states that match specific criteria. That is why fabric is mainly used for covering, protecting or hiding objects, e.g. as apparel for people. Only at a second glance does one recognize that textiles can be used for many other purposes such as collecting, separating, filtering or even healing. Thus, in the first instance of this research we examined customary usages and classified them into different categories that aided us to further develop practical application areas for the architectural domain. Subsequently to the fact that the shape of a textile might alter under the influence of forces, the further focus of this research lied on the appraisal of digital simulation techniques and simulation engines to provide sophisticated instruments for the generation of the associated time-based geometric form of the fabric. External elements that might drive this deformation process such as wind, temperature, precipitation, as well as static and dynamic building components were considered in the simulation process in order to generate visual output of the corresponding shapes. Studies about bipartite materials that can control the deformation process and might lead the textile beyond its primary functionality conclude this work.
series ASCAAD
email tlomker@sharjah.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id acadia10_81
id acadia10_81
authors Marcos, Carlos L.
year 2010
title Complexity, Digital Consciousness and Open Form: A New Design Paradigm
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 81-87
summary Complexity as a result of improved design capabilities through the use of computer tools was introduced in the architectural debate since these became irreplaceable. On the other hand, not every designer is genuinely aware of the logical implications that the use of these tools may entail. Used as a simple emulation of enhanced traditional design tools—drawings and models, they do not alter the process of design significantly. However, the potential of such tools beyond their instrumentality introduces designers into the realm of digital consciousness. This paper analyzes complexity as an inherent quality of computer aided architectural design in relation to four different digitally conscious design strategies. First, the increase of complexity involved in digital architectural designs because of their potentiality to manage enormous amounts of differentiated information. Second, the complexity inherent to an open form such as parametric or generative designs may be defined. Third, the use of the computer as a smart partner involved in the design process —i.e., form finding strategies— rather than as a simple efficient machine able to repeat our abilities faster and more effectively in certain roles of the design process. Finally, it analyzes the possibility of generating parameterized typologies as a result of the openness of form, as well as the increased complexity that randomness may introduce in algorithmic design. The paper concludes with reflections on complexity vs. simplexity considering the fact that the simplicity characteristic of Modernism aesthetics and constructive values collide with the baroque formal complexity achieved in generative design.
keywords Digital consciousness, complexity, added information, open form, form finding, randomness
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email barrios@cua.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia10_151
id acadia10_151
authors Menges, Achim
year 2010
title Material Information: Integrating Material Characteristics and Behavior in Computational Design for Performative Wood Construction
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 151-158
summary Architecture as a material practice is still predominantly based on design approaches that are characterized by a hierarchical relationship that prioritizes the generation of geometric information for the description of architectural systems and elements over material specific information. Thus, in the early design stage, the material’s innate characteristics and inherent capacities remain largely unconsidered. This is particularly evident in the way wood constructions are designed today. In comparison to most construction materials that are industrially produced and thus relatively homogeneous and isotropic, wood is profoundly different in that it is a naturally grown biological tissue with a highly differentiated material makeup . This paper will present research investigating how the transition from currently predominant modes of representational Computer Aided Design to algorithmic Computational Design allows for a significant change in employing wood’s complex anisotropic behaviour, resulting from its differentiated anatomical structure. In computational design, the relation between procedural formation, driving information, and ensuing form, enables the systematic integration of material information. This materially informed computational design processes will be explained through two research projects and the resultant prototype structures. The first project shows how an information feedback between material properties, system behaviour, the generative computational process, and robotic manufacturing allows for unfolding material-specific gestalt and tapping into the performative potential of wood. The second project focuses on embedding the unique material information and anatomical features of individual wooden elements in a continuous scanning, computational design and digital fabrication process, and thus introduces novel ways of integrating the biological variability and natural irregularities of wood in architectural design.
keywords Computational Design, Digital Fabrication, Material Properties, Behavioural Modelling
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email achim.menges@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia10_243
id acadia10_243
authors Pasold, Anke; Foged, Isak Worre
year 2010
title Performative Responsive Architecture Powered by Climate
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 243-249
summary This paper is to link the thermonastic behavior found in flower heads in nature with the material research into bimetallic :abstract strips. This is to advance the discussion of environmental responsive systems on the basis of thermal properties for advanced environmental studies within the field of architecture in general and in form of a responsive building skin in particular.
keywords Environmental response, Material properties, Embedded Informaiton flo
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email apasold@hotmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id caadria2010_050
id caadria2010_050
authors Salim, Flora Dilys; Hugo Mulder and Jane Burry
year 2010
title A system for form fostering: Parametric modeling of responsive forms in mixed reality
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 531-540
summary This paper investigates the integration of mixed reality with parametric modeling. This supports the concept of Form Fostering, which goes beyond the traditional form finding. Form Fostering takes sensory input from the physical world to inform a parametric model. We will present a prototype of the system that we have developed, which includes the use of a Wii Remote, an Arduino processing board, servo actuators and a camera as haptic input and interaction devices for Form Fostering. The potential benefits of designing in mixed reality are significant since designers can get real-time feedback from both the physical context and from changing physical design constraints represented by virtual parametric relationships. In order to leverage seamless interaction and activity between the physical and the virtual world, it is invaluable to consider sensing as an input for design.
keywords Parametric modeling; mixed reality; responsive architecture; responsive form; physical interaction; form fostering
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email flora.salim@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia10_97
id acadia10_97
authors Tang, Ming; Anderson, Jonathon
year 2010
title Mathematically Driven Forms and Digital Tectonic: A formula for realizing the digital
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 97-102
summary Mathematics has been the interest of architects for hundreds of years and has been used in projects ranging from the Denmark Pavilion at Expo 2010 to Gaudi’s cathedral. Generative form finding frequently takes the inspiration of the geometric aesthetic found in mathematic forms. Today, the influence of digital computation technology is increasingly evident in architectural form seeking and analysis as they relate to mathematics. The sculptural possibilities of math forms have reconditioned the design process that establishes new modeling and tectonic approaches. This paper focuses on the study of current constraints and new procedures within mathematical approaches to architecture. Furthermore, this paper describes three experimental projects exploring mathematically driven designs and their potential within architectural vocabulary. In these experiments, the designers and students explored the manipulation of a planar surface through algorithmic equations and the molecular make-up of a surface through voxel representation.
keywords mathematical, digital fabrication, generative form finding, tectonic approaches, digital design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email mtangmsu@hotmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia11_186
id acadia11_186
authors Chaturvedi, Sanhita; Colmenares, Esteban; Mundim, Thiago
year 2011
title Knitectonics
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 186-195
summary The project Knitectonics aims at exploring digital fabrication systems that facilitate optimized, adaptive and specific integrated architectural solutions (Male-Alemany 2010). It is inspired by the beauty of nature systems with their inherent efficiency and performance. The research explored on-site fabrication of monocoques shells, integrating skin and structure along with services and infrastructure, using a simple household technique. It thus embodies a self organized micro system of textures and a macro system of structures. This paper elaborates how the numeric aspects of a textile technique were used, first to digitally imitate the process of assembly and further exploited to develop and visualize a novel fabrication system, based on material research and technical experimentation.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email sanhita.chaturvedi@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ascaad2010_039
id ascaad2010_039
authors Almusharaf, Ayman M.; Mahjoub Elnimeiri
year 2010
title A Performance-Based Design Approach for Early Tall Building Form Development
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 39-50
summary This paper presents a methodological interactive design approach within which structure is integrated into tall building form development. The approach establishes a synergy between generative and analytical tools to allow for parallel interaction of the formal and structural design considerations during the conceptual design phase. An integration of the associative modeling system, Grasshopper, and the structural analysis tool, ETABS was established, and a bi-directional feedback link between the two tools was initiated to guide the iterative from generation process. A design scenario is presented in this paper to demonstrate how the parametric generation and alteration of architectural form can be carried out based on instant feedback on the structural performance. Utilizing such a tool, architects can not only develop improved understanding of structural needs, but also realize their formal ideas structurally and materially.
series ASCAAD
email ayman414@yahoo.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id acadia10_125
id acadia10_125
authors Andersen, Paul; Salomon, David
year 2010
title The Pattern That Connects
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 125-132
summary While patterns have a spotty history in architecture, their definitions and uses in other fields offer new possibilities for design. This paper examines those definitions and uses—including theories put forward by architectural theorist, Christopher Alexander; art educator, Gyorgy Kepes; chemist, Ilya Prigogine; and anthropologist, Gregory Bateson. Of particular interest is the shift from eternal, essential, universal, and fundamental patterns to fleeting, superficial, specific, and incidental versions. While endemic to many contemporary architectural practices, this multifaceted view of patterns was anticipated by Bateson, who saw them as agents of evolution and learning. His desire to combine redundancy and noise offers architects new ways to understand patterns and use them to link form and information, matter and thought.
keywords pattern, Bateson, evolution, noise, redundancy, feedback
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email Paul@indiearchitecture.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id caadria2010_029
id caadria2010_029
authors Baerlecken, Daniel; Martin Manegold, Judith Reitz and Arne Kuenstler
year 2010
title Integrative parametric form-finding processes
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 303-312
summary The recent developments in digital technologies and contemporary design tools are initiating new approaches of form-finding based on parametric development of multiple geometries with simultaneous consideration of various aspects. This paper focuses on the use of advanced parametric CAD systems and reformulated construction logics to enhance the potential and possibilities of form finding processes. This approach is exemplified through the “Greenhouse Trauttmansdorff project”. The project demonstrates a form finding approach which is based on defined parameters that not only fulfil aesthetic and functional aspects, but simultaneously take structural properties and the resulting sun shading behaviour into account. We will explore within this paper how – next to the functional and contextual building requirements – required illumination levels inside the greenhouse create a feedback loop between the structural system and its cladding system.
keywords parametric representations; digital technologies; digital fabrication; variable systems; load bearing construction
series CAADRIA
email baerlecken@bfrlab.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

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