CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ascaad2010_109
id ascaad2010_109
authors Hamadah, Qutaibah
year 2010
title A Computational Medium for the Conceptual Design of Mix-Use Projects
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 109-116
summary Mix use development is receiving wide attention for its unique sustainable benefits. Nevertheless, the planning and designing of successful mixed use projects in today's environment is a complex matrix of skill sets and necessary collaborations between various stakeholders and design professionals. From a design point of view, architects are required to manage and coordinate large information sets, which are many time at odds with one another. The expansive space of knowledge and information is at its best vague and substantially ill-structured. A situation that continues to overburden architects mental and intellectual ability to understand, address and communicate the design issue. In the face of this complex condition, designers are gravitating towards information modeling to manage and organize the expansive data. However, is becoming increasingly evident that current building information modeling applications are less suited for early design activity due to their interrupted and rigid workflows. Against this background, this paper presents a theoretical framework for a computational medium to support the designer during early phases of exploring and investigating design alternatives for mix-use projects. The focus is on the conjecture between programming and conceptual design phase; when uncertainty and ambiguity as at its maximum, and the absence of computational support continues to be the norm. It must be noted however, the aim of the medium is not to formulate or automate design answers. Rather, to support designers by augmenting and enhancing their ability to interpret, understand, and communicate the diverse and multi-faceted design issue. In literature on interpretation, Hans-Georg Gadamer explains that understanding is contingent on an act of construction. To understand something is to construct it. In light of this explanation. To help designers understand the design issue, is to help them construct it. To this end, the computational medium discussed in this paper is conceived to model (construct) the mix-use architectural program. In effect, turning it into a dynamic and interactive information model in the form of a graph (network). This is an important development because it will enable an entirely new level of interaction between the designer and the design-problem. It will allow the designer to gather, view, query and repurpose the information in novel ways. It will offer the designer a new context to foster knowledge and understanding about the ill-structured and vague design issue. Additionally, the medium would serve well to communicate and share knowledge between the various stakeholders and design professionals. Central to the discussion are two questions: First, how can architects model the design program using a graph? Second, what is the nature of the proposed computational medium; namely, its components and defining properties?
series ASCAAD
email qutaibah@mac.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia10_218
id acadia10_218
authors Chok, Kermin; Donofrio, Mark
year 2010
title Structure at the Velocity of Architecture
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 218-226
summary This paper outlines a digital design workflow, utilized by the authors, which actively links the geometry platforms being utilized by architects with tools for structural analysis, design, form-finding, and optimization. This workflow leads to an accelerated generation and transfer of information to help guide and inform the design process. The engineering team is thus empowered to augment the architect’s design by ensuring that the design team is conscious of the structural implications of design decisions throughout the design process. A crucial element of this design process has been the dynamic linkage of parametric geometry models with structural analysis and design tools. This reduces random errors in model generation and allows more time for critical analysis evaluation. However, the ability to run a multitude of options in a compressed time frame has led to ever increasing data sets. A key component of this structural engineering workflow has become the visualization and rigorous interpretation of the data generated by the analysis process. The authors have explored visualization techniques to distill the complex analysis results into graphics that are easily discernable by all members of the design team.
keywords Workflows, Structure, Collaboration, Visualizations, Analysis
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kermin.chok@gmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ascaad2010_249
id ascaad2010_249
authors Hawker, Ronald; Dina Elkady and Thomas Tucker.
year 2010
title Not Just Another Pretty Face
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 249-260
summary Digital Heritage has gained popularity recently as means of dynamically representing and reconstructing historic buildings and cityscapes. Simultaneously this new medium of visualization affords another approach to examine human-virtual environment interaction and offers possibilities of exploiting virtual environments as educational tools. At Zayed University, a federal university primarily for women citizens of the United Arab Emirates, we have integrated student-faculty research and documented and reconstructed a number of historical buildings within the curriculum of the Department of Art and Design. We have further collaborated with the animation program at Winston Salem State University in North Carolina, utilizing the motion capture laboratory at the Center of Design Innovation to literally breathe life into these reconstructions. The primary idea is to contribute to the ongoing documentation of the country’s heritage through creating “responsive virtual heritage environments” where the spectator is actively engaged in exploring the digital space and gain certain degrees of control over the course and scheme of the dynamic experience. The process begins by introducing students to utilize the diverse capabilities of CAD and three dimensional computer applications and intertwine the technical skills they acquire to construct virtual computer models of indigenous built environments. The workflow between the different applications is crucial to stimulate students’ problem solving abilities and tame the application tools, specifically when constructing complex objects and structural details. In addition the spatial and temporal specificity different computer applications afford has proven useful in highlighting and analyzing the buildings’ function within the extreme climate of the country and their role in the political-economy, particularly in visualizing the ephemeral qualities of the architecture as they relate to passive cooling and the inter-relationships between built and natural environments. Light and time settings clarify shadow casting and explain the placement and orientation of buildings. Particle simulations demonstrate the harnessing of wind and rain both urban and rural settings. The quantitative data accumulated and charted through CAD and VR programs and geo-browsers can be integrated with qualitative data to create a more holistic analytical framework for understanding the complex nature of past settlement patterns. In addition, the dynamic nature of this integration creates a powerful educational tool. This paper reviews this ongoing research project with examples of reconstructions completed across the country, demonstrating analytical and educational possibilities through the integration of CAD programs with a range of other statistical, geographic, and visualization software.
series ASCAAD
email ronald.hawker@zu.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia10_000
id acadia10_000
authors Sprecher, Aaron; Yeshayahu, Shai and Lorenzo-Eiroa, Pablo (eds.)
year 2010
title ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), 411 p.
summary The ACADIA 2010 conference will focus on the changing nature of information and its impact on architectural education, research and practice. With the ever-increasing integration of information technologies in the design laboratory, the discipline of architecture has changed profoundly in recent years. The emerging fields of digital fabrication, generative and evolutionary modeling among others, are now at the core of investigations in a growing community of digital design practitioners and researchers. ACADIA 2010 will explore the ways designers, architects, engineers and scientists collect, analyze and assemble information through computational systems that redefine the notions of design performance and optimization, evolutionary and responsive models. These notions are today inherently related to the possibilities and limitations offered by our increasing computational capabilities, and the way information shapes relations between the human, the environment, and the machine. ACADIA 2010 will gather leading practitioners, theorists, and researchers who will examine the relation that architecture has with technology and information, and how the latter propels today’s most innovative design experimentations and research. The conference will be centered on a series of peer-reviewed paper sessions and a groundbreaking exhibition including peer-reviewed projects.
series ACADIA
email aaron@o-s-a.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2010_131
id ecaade2010_131
authors Tzaka, Anastasia; Kalogirou, Nikos; Papakostas, Giorgos; Symeonidou, Ioanna
year 2010
title SKG IN_FLUX: An Urban ‘Process-Plan’
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.107-114
summary The paper introduces, analyzes and evaluates the outcomes of a design experiment that took place at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in the form of an intensive workshop on parametric urban design. The strategies and methods adopted defined a field for design experimentation as a response to the broader disciplinary discourse related to the use of advanced digital tools, their potentialities in dealing with urban form and their role in architectural education. The workshop’s operative processes and the results obtained serve as a paradigm for an alternative urban design approach. The analysis and the evaluation of this specific approach give rise to further questions and define the goals and anticipations of related future investigations.
wos WOS:000340629400011
keywords Urban systems; Fields; Datascapes; Parametric design; Dynamic modeling
series eCAADe
email anastasia.tzaka@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_051
id ecaade2010_051
authors Girot, Christophe; Bernhard, Mathias; Ebno_ther, Yves; Fricker, Pia; Kapellos, Alexandre; Melsom, James
year 2010
title Towards a Meaningful Usage of Digital CNC Tools: Within the field of large-scale landscape architecture
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.371-378
summary The innovative and integrative use of digital CNC technologies in the field of landscape architecture is, for the most part, quite new when compared with the field of architecture. The following paper focuses on new techniques for visualizing work processes and developments for large-scale landscape designs. The integration of these processes within a teaching environment stands at the forefront. In this context, the use of programmed tools and the immediate translation of preliminary design ideas to models using the Mini Mill in the studio allow students to investigate and test new approaches. Next steps will be explored through the use of parametric design tools.
wos WOS:000340629400039
keywords Digital aids to design creativity; Generative design; Modes of production; Shape studies
series eCAADe
email bernhard@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_067
id ecaade2010_067
authors Guzik, Agata
year 2010
title Digital Fabrication Inspired Design: Influence of fabrication parameters on a design process
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.227-235
summary Considering the use of a particular digital fabrication method, this research intends to look into the design-production relation and attempts to answer the question of how the manufacturing parameters can be integrated into the design process to facilitate the design-to-production communication. It is argued that the above is achievable through the application of a simulationbased algorithmic procedures derived from the inherent logic of a fabrication machine’s functionality. It has been studied through creation of two custom tools facilitating the design process – a library for the Processing programming language and a bespoke design procedure - both based on a functionality of the CNC milling machine. Finally, the conclusion is made that broader implementation of custom design procedures with underlying digital fabrication logic has a potential of altering the design process and facilitate the design-tofactory communication.
wos WOS:000340629400024
keywords Digital fabrication; Design process; Optimization; Genetic algorithm; CNC milling
series eCAADe
email a.a.guzik@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_065
id ecaade2010_065
authors Hardy, Steve(n); Lundberg, Jonas
year 2010
title Environmental Catalysts for a Computational Urbanism
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.805-814
summary It is perhaps no longer relevant to discuss digital tools purely as means in themselves; the growth of abstract systems or computational patterns for their own sake simply strain justification in light of real-world concerns such as climate change and economic crises. While growing concerns over climate change have necessitated an increased interest in sustainable urbanism and design, sustainability has done little to yet alter the morphological and typological consequences of architectural space (Hardy, 2008). In a series of overlapping research projects and design studio briefs, students, research assistants and we worked with the iterative and variable processes of Rhinoscript, McNeel’s Grasshopper and Bentley’s Generative Components to explore the possibilities of changing environmental extremes (specifically flooding) as catalysts for providing new urban morphologies and spatial organizations. Working between the master plan and the individual housing unit, we investigated arrays of terrace homes in the London Thames Valley flood zones while simultaneously exploring the potential for computational generation and parametric optimization.
wos WOS:000340629400086
keywords Computational urbanism; Formative strategies; Parametric design; Adaptive vs. mitagative; Environmental formations
series eCAADe
email shardy4@unl.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_148
id ecaade2010_148
authors Joyce, Sam; Tabak, Vincent; Sharma, Shrikant; Williams, Chris
year 2010
title Applied Multi-Scale Design and Optimization for People Flow
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.633-639
summary This paper presents an overview of the current developments in people flow analysis in Buro Happold’s analytical group SMART Solutions. The role of people flow analysis has become an established one, within many leading consultancy firms with their own specialist groups supporting the architects and planners in the design of buildings and urban spaces. This paper proposes that the key development in the progression of this work is a due to a change in emphasis, away from a passive analysis task where its key role is to validate assumptions of flow and alleviate areas of high concern to using the process as a design instigator/driver. The new paradigm emerging, involves calculating people flow at the conceptual stage of a project in collaboration with the respective architectural firm, and using this information as a primary design input. This paper describes and analyses the two objectives set out by Buro Happold’s SMART group in order to improve the process of design; firstly to make it more prominent in the design environment and secondly to see if it has the potential to work as a design driver. These objectives create a design methodology defined by people flow and suggest value in innovating and conceiving of robust simple methods of improving designs.
wos WOS:000340629400068
keywords People flow; Pedestrian flow; Multi-objective optimization; Masterplanning; Network analysis
series eCAADe
email Sam.Joyce@BuroHappold.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia10_139
id acadia10_139
authors Miller, Nathan
year 2010
title [make]SHIFT: Information Exchange and Collaborative Design Workflows
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 139-144
summary This paper explores design processes requiring the invention and implementation of customized workflows for the optimization of design information exchange. Standard workflows in design software are typically dependent upon the use of proprietary file formats to communicate design intent across the design team. Software platforms promote “one-stop-shop” proprietary approaches to BIM where all team members and consultants ideally operate within a single model environment and store information within a single file format. While the ‘single model’ approach can be effective under some circumstances, this approach is often found to be limiting when the design process calls for the integration of other design toolsets and delivery processes. This is especially true for large complex projects where multiple participants with different software requirements need to collaborate on the same design. In these cases, various non-standard ways of working are often implemented, resulting in a new means of communicating design and building information across a team. This paper will outline the impact customized workflows have on the design process at NBBJ and evaluate their potential for leading to more innovative design and integrated teams. The first study will explore and evaluate the communication and collaborative process that took place in the design development and construction documentation stages of the Hangzhou Stadium. The second study will be an overview of ongoing investigation and experimentation into customized workflows for team and data integration.
keywords team integration, international practice, parametric methods
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email nmiller@nbbj.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2010_000
id ecaade2010_000
authors Schmitt, Gerhard; Hovestadt, Ludger; Van Gool, Luc; Bosché, Frédéric; Burkhard, Remo; Colemann, Suzanne; Halatsch, Jan; Hansmeyer, Michael; Konsorski-Lang, Silke; Kunze, Antje; Sehmi-Luck, Martina (eds.)
year 2010
title FUTURE CITIES
source 28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2], ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, 904 p.
summary Future Cities – the title of the 2010 eCAADe Conference describes one of the major challenges of the 21st century. The conference theme is a logical evolution from previous years in that it expands the focus of interest from the building to larger scales and higher complexity. The conference contributions describe methods and instruments that were developed in the last three decades and apply them to city and territorial planning. The eCAADe proceedings demonstrate that CAAD research and education of the past prepared the ground for the future and for the increased responsibility of the CAAD community. The population of cities has developed worldwide from a minority to the majority. Cities are the largest, most complex and most dynamic man-made systems. As vibrant centres of cultural life and of mega events, they are engines that drive local and global economies. However, their growth was in the fewest cases determined by sustainability goals. As a result, contemporary metropolitan territories are often environmentally, socially and economically unsustainable entities placing increasing pressure on the surrounding rural areas. No longer do traditional methods support the planning and managing of large cities – these methods have reached their limits. Parallel to the revolution in the design of buildings, we need a radical re-thinking of the planning, design, development and management process of cities and urban-rural systems. Compared to buildings, urban and rural systems involve a much higher number of stakeholders and decision makers. We need to study and simulate the effects and side effects of urban-rural planning or re-development much earlier in the process than normally done today. The goal seems clear: the transformation of existing and the planning of new sustainable urban-rural systems. As ordering principles we can build on experiences with building architecture. Complexity, dynamics, scale, and the urban metabolism evolve as promising research and education areas.
series eCAADe
email ecaade2010@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2010/08/24 07:32

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia10_313
id acadia10_313
authors Banda, Pablo
year 2010
title Parametric Propagation of Acoustical Absorbers
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 313-319
summary The following paper deals with a performance-driven morphogenetic design task to improve the conditions of room acoustics, using as a case study the material laboratory of the School of Architecture at Federico Santa Maria University of Technology. Combining contemporary Parametric Modeling techniques and a Performance- Based approach, an automatic generative system was produced. This system generated a modular acoustic ceiling based on Helmholtz Resonators. To satisfy sound absorption requirements, acoustic knowledge was embedded within the system. It iterates through a series of design sub-tasks from Acoustic Simulation to Digital Fabrication, searching for a suitable design solution. The internal algorithmic complexity of the design process has been explored through this case study. Although it is focused on an acoustic component, the proposed design methodology can influence other experiences in Parametric Design.
keywords Parametric Modeling, Sound Absorption & Acoustic Knowledge, Performance-Based Design, Design Task, Scripting, Digital Fabrication, Custom Tools, Honeycomb.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email pablo.banda.p@hotmail.com
last changed 2010/12/07 13:27

_id ecaade2010_107
id ecaade2010_107
authors Gaiani, Marco; Ferioli, Silvia; Ricci, Pier Carlo; Barone, Mirko; Agnoletti, Michele
year 2010
title A Framework for a Sustainable Design and Presentation Process of Furniture Collection
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.471-480
summary Design and presentation of new furniture is today a great challenge that requires a large amount of resources: exhibition space, photographic studios, physical prototypes, etc. In this paper we present a new RTR framework RTR-based that allows a more sustainable design and communication process. The framework is addressed to furniture designers, interior designers, furniture companies and presents techniques and methods developed to meet the requirement to ensure predictive rendering quality required by the high level furniture industries. Finally, in order to ensure full functionality a number of tools described in the paper were developed.
wos WOS:000340629400051
keywords Real-time rendering; Semantic modeling; Virtual furniture design
series eCAADe
email marco.gaiani@unibo.it
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_166
id ecaade2010_166
authors Geyer, Philipp; Buchholz, Martin
year 2010
title System-Embedded Building Design and Modeling: Parametric systems modeling of buildings and their environment for performance-based and strategic design
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.641-650
summary The paper proposes Parametric Systems Modeling (PSM) as a tool for building and city planning. The outlined method is based on the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and is intended for design, dimensioning, and optimization of buildings and cities as systems. The approach exceeds the geometric approach, considers additional information from physics, technology, as well as biology, and provides a basis for multidisciplinary analyses and simulations. Its application aims at the exploration of innovative sustainable design solutions at system level. The proposal of an innovative buildinggreenhouse-city system serves to illustrate the approach. Features of this system are closed water cycles, renewable energy use, thermo-chemical energy storage and transport of energy for heating and cooling purposes on the base of desiccants, as well as recycling of CO2 , accumulation of biomass and related soil improvement.
wos WOS:000340629400069
keywords Parametric systems modeling; Systems design and engineering; Sustainable city system; City-integrated greenhouse
series eCAADe
email Philipp.Geyer@Uni-Weimar.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2010_017
id caadria2010_017
authors Hao, Hua and Ting-Li Jia
year 2010
title Floating bubbles: an agent-based system for layout planning
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 175-183
summary This program converts bubble diagram into an agent-based system for architectural design. The program suggests a model for layout planning based on bubble diagram which explicitly describes the adjacency requirements in architecture. Generally there is a basic set of rules for every agent dealing with adjacency topology and also an alternative set for other objectives. Then this basic program is developed into several generative tools for different design tasks. They imply that the agent-based system is efficient for elementary spatial arrangement and it could generate a wide range of complex solutions.
keywords Agent-based modeling; layout planning; bubble diagram
series CAADRIA
email hhua@student.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ascaad2010_019
id ascaad2010_019
authors Katz, Neil C.
year 2010
title Algorithmic Modeling; Parametric Thinking: Computational Solutions to Design Problems
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 19-36
summary Architects and designers have often used computational design techniques in their design process, even without "computers", from designing spaces which activate at the instant of the solstice sunrise, to creating geometrically complex and structurally innovative cathedrals. Designing with rules and variables can lead to solutions which satisfy the design criteria and may result in interesting and unanticipated models. Computational design is a process of designing and a way of thinking; contemporary tools can promote and enhance this process. Algorithmic and parametric modeling (and thinking) can be powerful processes in design, and particularly in working with complex geometry and addressing project constraints and analytical and data-driven design. This paper describes these methods and provides examples of their use on projects at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
series ASCAAD
email Neil.Katz@som.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_158
id ecaade2010_158
authors Kuo, Jeannette; Zausinger, Dominik
year 2010
title Scale and Complexity: Multi-layered, multi-scalar agent networks in time-based urban design
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.651-657
summary Urban design, perhaps even more than architecture, is a timedependent discipline. With its multi-layered complexities, from individual buildings to entire regions, decisions made at one level, that may not show effect immediately, may prove to have disastrous consequences further down the line. The need to incorporate time-based simulations in urban modeling, and the demand for a means of evaluating the changes have led to explorations with multi-agent systems in computation that allow for decisions to be decentralized. From the first basic rule-based system of Conway’s Game of Life [1] to recent urban simulations developed at institutions like the ETH Zurich [2], or UCL CASA [3], these programs synthesize the various exigencies into complex simulations so that the designer may make informed decisions. It is however not enough to simply use parametrics in urban design. Rules or desires implemented at one scale may not apply to another, while isolating each scalar layer for independent study reverts to the disjunctive and shortsighted practices of past planning decisions. Central to current parametric research in urban design is the need to deal with multiple scales of urbanism with specific intelligence that can then feed back into the collective system: a networked parametric environment. This paper will present the results from a city-generator, developed in Processing by Dino Rossi, Dominik Zausinger and Jeannette Kuo, using multiagent systems that operate interactively at various scales.
wos WOS:000340629400070
keywords Agent-based modeling; Cellular automata; Parametric urbanism; Neural network; Complexity; Genetic algorithm; Urban dynamics
series eCAADe
email kuo@karamukkuo.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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