CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 352

_id ascaad2010_039
id ascaad2010_039
authors Almusharaf, Ayman M.; Mahjoub Elnimeiri
year 2010
title A Performance-Based Design Approach for Early Tall Building Form Development
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 39-50
summary This paper presents a methodological interactive design approach within which structure is integrated into tall building form development. The approach establishes a synergy between generative and analytical tools to allow for parallel interaction of the formal and structural design considerations during the conceptual design phase. An integration of the associative modeling system, Grasshopper, and the structural analysis tool, ETABS was established, and a bi-directional feedback link between the two tools was initiated to guide the iterative from generation process. A design scenario is presented in this paper to demonstrate how the parametric generation and alteration of architectural form can be carried out based on instant feedback on the structural performance. Utilizing such a tool, architects can not only develop improved understanding of structural needs, but also realize their formal ideas structurally and materially.
series ASCAAD
email ayman414@yahoo.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_117
id ascaad2010_117
authors El Gewely, Maha H.
year 2010
title Algorithm Aided Architectural Design (Aaad)
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 117-126
summary Algorithm Aided Architectural Design (AAAD) is considered a second paradigm shift in the Architectural design process after the first one of bridging the conventional design process to the digital realm of design. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part comprehends the Algorithmic Architecture approach of from the point of view of tools, techniques, theories and practice in order to find the Algotecture theories on the map of Digital Architecture. Then, the paper exemplifies an application on Algorithmic Architecture. FALLINGWATER TOOLBOX VERSION 1.0 is a computational design demo tool for architects to aid in the house schematic design phase according to an analytical study of Frank Lloyd Wright's basic design rules and spatial program of his masterpiece; FallingWater House, (Edgar J. Kaufmann family house 1939). These rules have been transferred to algorithms and code thereafter. At a preceding stage, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using MAXScript 9.0. Using the FALLINGWATER TOOLBOX, infinite number of house prototypes can be generated within few minutes. Although, the FWT is based on a hypothetical design problem of producing prototype alternatives for a new house with the same identity of the Edgar Kaufmann House, the concept of the tool can be applied on a wider range of problems. It may help generating prototype alternative solutions for residential compounds design according to the required constraints.
series ASCAAD
email maha_el_gewely@hotmail.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_145
id ascaad2010_145
authors Hamani, Dalil; Jean Michel Olive and Farid Ameziane
year 2010
title Cooperative Work Based on Numerical Tools in the Building Production
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 145-160
summary This article presents the contribution of our research to the description of the built elements in the site where information is shared by partners who are distant from one another and focused on fields of expertise that are distinct but concurrent. Our work aims to provide an information system that promotes cooperation between the buildings actors, by sharing a unique data model among the partners involved in the building construction processes. It takes into account the technical data needed in the different phases of the supply chain management cycle in the construction field. To answer a cooperative context, our work is based on the fundamental assumption that it is possible to structure a building description following the economist’s view point. During the implementation phase, the different activities on a building site can be described as a model that integrates all the related tasks and includes all the work practices and requirements shared among the partners of the architectural project.
series ASCAAD
email hamani_dalil@yahoo.fr
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_065
id ecaade2010_065
authors Hardy, Steve(n); Lundberg, Jonas
year 2010
title Environmental Catalysts for a Computational Urbanism
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.805-814
summary It is perhaps no longer relevant to discuss digital tools purely as means in themselves; the growth of abstract systems or computational patterns for their own sake simply strain justification in light of real-world concerns such as climate change and economic crises. While growing concerns over climate change have necessitated an increased interest in sustainable urbanism and design, sustainability has done little to yet alter the morphological and typological consequences of architectural space (Hardy, 2008). In a series of overlapping research projects and design studio briefs, students, research assistants and we worked with the iterative and variable processes of Rhinoscript, McNeel’s Grasshopper and Bentley’s Generative Components to explore the possibilities of changing environmental extremes (specifically flooding) as catalysts for providing new urban morphologies and spatial organizations. Working between the master plan and the individual housing unit, we investigated arrays of terrace homes in the London Thames Valley flood zones while simultaneously exploring the potential for computational generation and parametric optimization.
wos WOS:000340629400086
keywords Computational urbanism; Formative strategies; Parametric design; Adaptive vs. mitagative; Environmental formations
series eCAADe
email shardy4@unl.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ascaad2010_249
id ascaad2010_249
authors Hawker, Ronald; Dina Elkady and Thomas Tucker.
year 2010
title Not Just Another Pretty Face
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 249-260
summary Digital Heritage has gained popularity recently as means of dynamically representing and reconstructing historic buildings and cityscapes. Simultaneously this new medium of visualization affords another approach to examine human-virtual environment interaction and offers possibilities of exploiting virtual environments as educational tools. At Zayed University, a federal university primarily for women citizens of the United Arab Emirates, we have integrated student-faculty research and documented and reconstructed a number of historical buildings within the curriculum of the Department of Art and Design. We have further collaborated with the animation program at Winston Salem State University in North Carolina, utilizing the motion capture laboratory at the Center of Design Innovation to literally breathe life into these reconstructions. The primary idea is to contribute to the ongoing documentation of the country’s heritage through creating “responsive virtual heritage environments” where the spectator is actively engaged in exploring the digital space and gain certain degrees of control over the course and scheme of the dynamic experience. The process begins by introducing students to utilize the diverse capabilities of CAD and three dimensional computer applications and intertwine the technical skills they acquire to construct virtual computer models of indigenous built environments. The workflow between the different applications is crucial to stimulate students’ problem solving abilities and tame the application tools, specifically when constructing complex objects and structural details. In addition the spatial and temporal specificity different computer applications afford has proven useful in highlighting and analyzing the buildings’ function within the extreme climate of the country and their role in the political-economy, particularly in visualizing the ephemeral qualities of the architecture as they relate to passive cooling and the inter-relationships between built and natural environments. Light and time settings clarify shadow casting and explain the placement and orientation of buildings. Particle simulations demonstrate the harnessing of wind and rain both urban and rural settings. The quantitative data accumulated and charted through CAD and VR programs and geo-browsers can be integrated with qualitative data to create a more holistic analytical framework for understanding the complex nature of past settlement patterns. In addition, the dynamic nature of this integration creates a powerful educational tool. This paper reviews this ongoing research project with examples of reconstructions completed across the country, demonstrating analytical and educational possibilities through the integration of CAD programs with a range of other statistical, geographic, and visualization software.
series ASCAAD
email ronald.hawker@zu.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_127
id ascaad2010_127
authors Hubers, Hans
year 2010
title Collaborative Parametric BIM
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 127-134
summary The paper will be focussing on a number of digital design tools used in [our groups credentials]. A new laboratory called […] is developed with Virtual Reality for collaborative architectural design. A brief description of the systems and how they are used to support a design team is given. Synchronic and a-synchronic, local and inter-local communication is made possible. Methods for introducing sustainability in the digital design process and user participation over the Internet will be discussed. The results of the author’s PhD research “Collaborative architectural design in virtual reality” are used to develop a new approach in which team members use their own specific software. Swarm design applications developed in Virtools are used at the start of a project. The objects in the swarm can be urban and architectural functional volumes. Examples of the first are houses, offices, factories, roads and water ways. Examples of the second are working, dining, shopping and waiting spaces. Relations between the functional volumes with or without constraints make the functional volumes swarm to find equilibrium. Everything is dynamic, meaning that relations and functional volumes can change any time. Alternatives can be developed using different values for these parameters and by top-down intervention. When the final global layout has been chosen, using a criteria matrix with sustainability criteria to be judged by all participants, including the future users, a next phase is started amongst professionals using parametric design software. A study into different types of parametric design software makes clear why object parametric software can be used for IFC based BIM, while the more interesting process parametric software can not. To make this clear a pragmatic description of the IFC format is given with a simple example of such a file. Future research will be proposed in which applications of different disciplines are connected through the application programming interfaces, while integrating as much as possible the building information and knowledge in the IFC format.
series ASCAAD
type normal paper
email j.c.hubers@tudelft.nl
last changed 2011/03/01 06:48

_id ascaad2010_179
id ascaad2010_179
authors Jones, Charles; Kevin Sweet
year 2010
title Over Constrained
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 179-188
summary Parametric software has fundamentally changed the way in which architecture is conceptualized, developed and even constructed. The ability to assign parameters or numeric variables to specific portions of a project has allowed designers the potential to test variations of their design. Small changes to a single parameter can have an exponential effect on the designed object and alter its appearance beyond original preconceptions in both positive and negative ways. Parametric software also has the ability to constrain or restrict geometry to set values, parameters or conditions. This has the benefit of allowing portions of a form to remain constant or unchanged while simultaneously allowing for a great degree of flexibility in response to a design intent. Constraining portions of a design allows architects to respond to existing or unalterable conditions by ""locking down"" information within a project and then explore those portions that can change more freely. This programmed relationship between the parameter and the form, once established, can give the illusion of minimal effort for maximum output. The ease in which geometrical form can be altered and shaped by a single variable can mislead beginning designers into thinking that the software makes these relationships for them. What is hidden, is the programming or connections needed between the parameters and the geometry in order to produce such dramatic change. Finally, thinking parametrically about design reintroduces the concept of a rigorous, intent driven, fabrication oriented practice; a practice lost in a digital era where the novelty of new tools was sufficient to produce new form. Because parametric models must have established relationships to all parts of the design, each component must have a purpose, be well thought out, and have a direct relationship to a real world object. The introduction of parametric design methodologies into an architectural pedagogy reestablishes architectural praxis in an academic setting. Students are taught to design based on creating relationships to connected components; just as they would do in a professional architectural practice. This paper outlines how Digital Project – a parametric based software – was introduced into an academic setting in an attempt reconnect the ideologies of academia with the practicalities of professional practice. In order to take full advantage of Digital Project as a parameter based software, a project that creates modular, flexible geometries was devised. Produced over one semester, the project set out to find ways of controlling designed geometry through variable parameters that allowed the initial module to be instantiated or replicated into a wall condition: maintaining a unified whole of discrete components. This paper outlines this process, the results and how the outcomes demonstrates the parametric ideologies described above.
series ASCAAD
email cjones@aus.edu
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_019
id ascaad2010_019
authors Katz, Neil C.
year 2010
title Algorithmic Modeling; Parametric Thinking: Computational Solutions to Design Problems
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 19-36
summary Architects and designers have often used computational design techniques in their design process, even without "computers", from designing spaces which activate at the instant of the solstice sunrise, to creating geometrically complex and structurally innovative cathedrals. Designing with rules and variables can lead to solutions which satisfy the design criteria and may result in interesting and unanticipated models. Computational design is a process of designing and a way of thinking; contemporary tools can promote and enhance this process. Algorithmic and parametric modeling (and thinking) can be powerful processes in design, and particularly in working with complex geometry and addressing project constraints and analytical and data-driven design. This paper describes these methods and provides examples of their use on projects at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
series ASCAAD
email Neil.Katz@som.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ascaad2010_051
id ascaad2010_051
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2010
title Towards a Framework for CAD/CAM Design and Construction Process in Freeform Architecture: A Case Study
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 51-64
summary The objective of this research is to apply the teaching of CAD/CAM media to basic design studios for 1~2 year undergraduate students. The research concludes a framework of “e-basic design studio” based on literature analysis and design studio observations, which including the new tectonics thinking and the operation of traditional 2D/3D design media and CAD/CAM digital tools.
series ASCAAD
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ijac20108409
id ijac20108409
authors Novakova, Katerina; Henri Achten, Dana Matejovska
year 2010
title A Design Studio Pedagogy for Experiments with Unusual Material, Collaboration and Web Communication
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 4, p. 557
summary In this paper we describe an experimental CAD design studio, where we study the influence of CAD tools and special materials on the process of designing. The studio has the following aims: teaching how to collaborate using an Internet facility, and exploring the relationship between computation, sketching and physical models. Interaction and sustainability are major themes in the design studio. We present the pedagogical approach and results of the design studio, followed by observations and conclusions.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ascaad2010_171
id ascaad2010_171
authors Schimek, H.; A. Meisel and T. Bogenperger
year 2010
title On Connecting Panels of Freeform Building Envelopes
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 171-178
summary As smooth geometric shapes are very tricky to manufacture with an overall great expense this paper presents a parametrical approach how to control the joint geometry within a framework of flat panels which approximate a freeform surface using discretization. Since timber has an excellent reputation as a sustainable and regenerative material plus the fact that timber can be perfectly processed with a large variety of tools including CNC milling machines we are using cross laminated timber boards (CLT) with large and heavy members. Hence that means dealing with high forces which require geometrically exact and often complex joints, which we want to push to a high degree of automation in the design process. We establish rules and constraints between all neighboring CLT-panels. That way we control a new connector system specially designed for non-standard CLT-joints. This paper documents the status of one aspect of an ongoing research project and will also give a preview to upcoming tasks including the production of a prototype structure.
series ASCAAD
type normal paper
email schimek@tugraz.at
last changed 2011/03/01 06:46

_id ascaad2010_075
id ascaad2010_075
authors Schubert, Gerhard; Kaufmann Stefan and Petzold Frank
year 2010
title Project Wave 0.18
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 75-88
summary In recent years a number of projects have been emerged, in which the new possibilities of the computer as a design tool, have been used. Through the digital chain from design to manufacturing the efficiency has increased and allows the implementation of complex architectural structures. With all these new opportunities, also new challenges arise in the teaching and the educational concepts. The paper describes the detailed course concept and the didactic strategy using the example of a parametric designed roof structure, we designed, planed and build up in scale 1:1 within the main course. „Wendepunkt|e im Bauen“ (Turning point|s of building) is the name of an exhibition at the “Pinakothek der Moderne” in Spring 2010. In addition to contributions of the industrialization in the building industry from 1850 to the present day, the exhibition also serves as a platform, to demonstrate new possibilities of computer-aided parametric design and the closely related computer aided manufacturing (CAM). In this context, we took the chance to build a sculpture in Scale 1:1 to show the potential of a constant digital workflow and the digital fabrication. Through the digital chain from design to manufacturing, the efficiency has been increased by the computer and allows the implementation of new complex architectural structures. But the efficiency of the high-degree-automation through the use of computerized machines usually ends in the production of the components. Because this coincidence of the elements in the assembly often proves cost and time, the aim of the project was to optimize both, the production of components and their assembly as well. As part of the wintercourse 2009/2010 different aspects of automation have been reviewed and new solutions have been analyzed. Together with 15 students of the Faculty of Architecture the complete digital chain started with the first design ideas, about parametric programming through production and assembly had been researched, implemented and brought to reality. In the first steps, the students had to learn about the potential, but also about the problems coming with the digital-design and the attached digital-production. There for the course took part at our computerlab. In weekly workshops, all ideas have been implemented and tested directly in the 3-dimensional parametric model. And thanks to the interdisciplinary work with the Department of Structural Design also static factors had been considered, to optimize the form. Parallel to the digital form-finding process, the first prototypes have been produced by the students. By using the chairs 3D-CNC-Mills we were able to check the programmed connection detail in reality and apply the so learned lessons to the further development. After nearly 3 month of research, designing, planning and programming, we were able to produce the over 1000 different parts in only 4 days. By developing a special pre-stressed structure and connection detail it was also possible, to assemble the whole structure (13.5m x 4.5m x 4m) in only one day. The close connection between digital design (CAD) and digital manufacturing (CAM) is an important point of our doctrine. By the fact, that the students operate the machines themselves, but also implement projects on a scale of 1:1, they learn to independently evaluate these new tools and to use them in a meaningful way.
series ASCAAD
email gerhard.schubert@gmail.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_078
id ecaade2010_078
authors Chiu, Yun-Ying
year 2010
title How To Make The Soft Skin?: A preliminary framework for the parametric design of the bionic soft skin
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.237-242
summary This paper is a presentation of the preliminary framework for the design and fabrication of the soft-skin. Today, the digital technology applied in the architecture field is everywhere. However, there are still lots of fantastic free form architecture uncompleted and remained on the paper architecture or only the digital visual simulated model. Until now, most of the finished free form cases are consisted of the skin and bones, or only the bones. The complete soft-skin cases without the bones are fewer and the process remains untold. Based on the parametric environments and biology, how might you design a free form without the bones? How could you make the soft skin stand up? The research starts a series of exploration of the design and fabrication for the soft skin, and seeks to propose the preliminary framework as a helpful reference for the designers who deal with the soft skin project.
wos WOS:000340629400025
keywords Soft skin; Bionic architecture; Parametric design; Grasshopper
series eCAADe
email blacka43@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2010_308
id sigradi2010_308
authors Tibiriçá, de Saboya Renato
year 2010
title Processos participativos de tomada de decisões: visualizando formas e idéias na busca pelo consenso [Decision - making and participatory processes: visualizing forms and ideas in the search of consensus]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 308-311
summary This paper illustrates the use of computer - aided graphic tools in participatory urban planning decision processes. Based on communicative planning and soft decision - aiding theories, the main goal of such a process is knowledge building in order to reach informed consensus. Three graphic devices were used to such an end: traditional geographic maps, mental, and causal maps. All three yielded positive results, but especially the last two, unconventional, types. They fostered intense debates while, at the same time, improving focus on specific matters, and were valuable knowledge building tools. Causal maps were considered the most innovative, because of their capacity to improve the understanding of the urban system and its interrelated parts.
keywords consensus building; communicative planning; decision - aiding; mental maps; causal maps.
series SIGRADI
email rtsaboya@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2014_023
id ascaad2014_023
authors Al-Maiyah, Sura and Hisham Elkadi
year 2014
title Assessing the Use of Advanced Daylight Simulation Modelling Tools in Enhancing the Student Learning Experience
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 303-313
summary In architecture schools, where the ‘studio culture’ lies at the heart of students’ learning, taught courses, particularly technology ones, are often seen as secondary or supplementary units. Successful delivery of such courses, where students can act effectively, be motivated and engaged, is a rather demanding task requiring careful planning and the use of various teaching styles. A recent challenge that faces architecture education today, and subsequently influences the way technology courses are being designed, is the growing trend in practice towards environmentally responsive design and the need for graduates with new skills in sustainable construction and urban ecology (HEFCE’s consultation document, 2005). This article presents the role of innovative simulation modelling tools in the enhancement of the student learning experience and professional development. Reference is made to a teaching practice that has recently been applied at Portsmouth School of Architecture in the United Kingdom and piloted at Deakin University in Australia. The work focuses on the structure and delivery of one of the two main technology units in the second year architecture programme that underwent two main phases of revision during the academic years 2009/10 and 2010/11. The article examines the inclusion of advanced daylight simulation modelling tools in the unit programme, and measures the effectiveness of enhancing its delivery as a key component of the curriculum on the student learning experience. A main objective of the work was to explain whether or not the introduction of a simulation modelling component, and the later improvement of its integration with the course programme and assessment, has contributed to a better learning experience and level of engagement. Student feedback and the grade distribution pattern over the last three academic years were collected and analyzed. The analysis of student feedback on the revised modelling component showed a positive influence on the learning experience and level of satisfaction and engagement. An improvement in student performance was also recorded over the last two academic years and following the implementation of new assessment design.
series ASCAAD
email sura.almaiyah@port.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id acadia10_313
id acadia10_313
authors Banda, Pablo
year 2010
title Parametric Propagation of Acoustical Absorbers
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 313-319
summary The following paper deals with a performance-driven morphogenetic design task to improve the conditions of room acoustics, using as a case study the material laboratory of the School of Architecture at Federico Santa Maria University of Technology. Combining contemporary Parametric Modeling techniques and a Performance- Based approach, an automatic generative system was produced. This system generated a modular acoustic ceiling based on Helmholtz Resonators. To satisfy sound absorption requirements, acoustic knowledge was embedded within the system. It iterates through a series of design sub-tasks from Acoustic Simulation to Digital Fabrication, searching for a suitable design solution. The internal algorithmic complexity of the design process has been explored through this case study. Although it is focused on an acoustic component, the proposed design methodology can influence other experiences in Parametric Design.
keywords Parametric Modeling, Sound Absorption & Acoustic Knowledge, Performance-Based Design, Design Task, Scripting, Digital Fabrication, Custom Tools, Honeycomb.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email pablo.banda.p@hotmail.com
last changed 2010/12/07 13:27

_id sigradi2010_272
id sigradi2010_272
authors Banda, Pablo
year 2010
title Absorbente de panal de abejas: explorando la adición de performance en sistemas de modelado paramétrico [Absorbing honeycomb: exploring performance addition in parametric modeling systems]
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 272-275
summary This paper analyzes the characteristics of the development of generative systems, originated by embedding knowledge of sound absorption within a parametric design system and implementing Helmholtz Resonators for the decrement of low frequencies of sound. The encounter between physically - related knowledge and explicit geometric processes is observed by focusing on contemporary author skills and design postures to outline methodological traces for a performance - based approach to parametric design.
keywords parametric modeling, performance - based design, digital fabrication, scripting, custom tools
series SIGRADI
email pablo.banda.p@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2010_183
id ecaade2010_183
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2010
title Designing Interactions: A step forward from time based media and synthetic space design in architectural education
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.151-156
summary The paper follows the development of digital tools for architects and briefly discusses their utility within education and practice. The move from static CAD tools to time based media followed by programmatic processes and virtual environment design is addressing the evolution of the profession and to an extent reflects practitioners’ needs. The paper focuses on the notion of interactivity and how it is been addressed in various fields. Borrowing from computer science and game design the author presents a course dealing with designing interactivity, responsiveness and users feeding their input back in the design. The aim of the paper is to analyse and support a new set of tools in architectural curricula that will implement interactivity and integrate it into spatial design leading to a holistic approach promoting intelligence, hybridity and responsiveness of the built environment. Following, the elaboration of the rationale, a brief discussion on tools and project directions is carried out.
wos WOS:000340629400016
keywords Interaction; Virtual environments; Time based media; Curriculum; Intelligent environments
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@uth.gr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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