CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 509

_id ijac20119404
id ijac20119404
authors Champion, Erik; Andrew Dekker
year 2011
title Biofeedback and Virtual Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 4, 377-395
summary This paper explains potential benefits of indirect biofeedback used within interactive virtual environments, and reflects on an earlier study that allowed for the dynamic modification of a virtual environment’s graphic shaders, music and artificial intelligence, based on the biofeedback of the player. The aim was to determine which augmented effects aided or discouraged engagement in the game. Conversely, biofeedback can help calm down rather than stress participants, and attune them to different ways of interacting within a virtual environment. Other advantages of indirect biofeedback might include increased personalization, thematic object creation, atmospheric augmentation, filtering of information, and tracking of participants’ understanding and engagement. Such features may help designers create more intuitive virtual environments with more thematically appropriate interaction while reducing cognitive loading on the participants. Another benefit would be more engaged clients with a better understanding of the richness and complexity of a digital environment.
series journal
last changed 2012/02/14 08:02

_id ecaade2011_132
id ecaade2011_132
authors Coskun, Emirhan; Cagdas; Gulen
year 2011
title An Integrated Model For Emergent City Behavior Based On User Movements
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.159-165
wos WOS:000335665500018
summary Today, with rapidly evolving information technology, computer technologies has become an interface rather than a tool for design process. With the development in computer applications it has become possible to solve design problems which were not possible to handle before. Computer environment which has become an interface rather than a tool for design has also led to the emergence of a number of concepts. New concepts such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) are being involved in design process. With the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) , AI has earned an interdisciplinary position. Agent based systems which are contained in the fields of AI have become the subjects of many researches in design basis. Approach to the problem solving process in the process of architectural/design problems is to be addressed as an important point within the scope of evaluation process. In this context user movements have a very critical role in process of problem solving according to the design problems. While designing or solving a design problem , ignoring the user movements can lead to unwanted results. Within the scope of this study user movements in city are considered in the context of emerging urban part/particles as a preliminary study.
keywords Emergence; agent-based systems; user movements in city; city dweller
series eCAADe
email emirhancoskun@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2011_158
id sigradi2011_158
authors Davis, Felecia
year 2011
title Telephoning Textiles: Networked Soft Architectures
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 231-234
summary A textile receives a telephone call from a mobile telephone. This wearable textile is an innovative example of inter-layering and weaving together materials to make a composite soft material that can receive calls from mobile telephones. If a textile can be designed as a wearable shirt, as demonstrated in this paper, then many of these same fabrication techniques can be integrated into soft architecture at a scale large enough to shelter people. This project demonstrates networked soft materials; the project develops the concept of soft architecture and presents a new framework for building integrated architectural systems.
keywords Computational Textile; Soft Architecture; E-Textiles; Mobile Communications; Networked Wearables
series SIGRADI
email fad@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id caadria2011_026
id caadria2011_026
authors Dorta, Tomás; Yehuda Kalay, Annemarie Lesage and Edgar Pérez
year 2011
title First steps of the augmented design studio: The interconnected Hybrid Ideation Space and the CI Loop
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 271-280
summary Professional or school design studios are essential environments for design supporting free exploration of materials and representations, analogue or digital. New technologies have moved into the studio with mixed results. Paradoxically, the use of portable computers, using Internet as collaboration channel, has actually individualized the design work and limited the support to co-creation, reinforcing individual work. The Augmented Design Studio argues for the implementation of hybrid technology, such as the Hybrid Ideation Space (HIS), in the design studio to compensate for the absence of collective local or remote efficient ideation space. This paper presents a case study showing the primary results of distant synchronous and asynchronous design collaboration supported by the interconnected HIS during an ad-hoc project and assessed by the improved Collaborative Ideation Loop (CI Loop) methodology. The HIS was installed in two universities located in different countries. We ran a research protocol in the format of a design charrette where two teams (team a: two architecture students, team b: two industrial design students) participated in the ideation of a bus shelter. This case study shows that teams were able to co-design while they were virtually “teleported” into each other’s representations.
keywords Design studio; hybrid approach; Collaborative Ideation Loop; telepresence; Hybrid Ideation Space
series CAADRIA
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_318
id acadia11_318
authors Doumpioti,Christina
year 2011
title Responsive and Autonomous Material Interfaces
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 318-325
summary This paper presents continuing research on responsive systems in architecture; the ability of architectural systems to change certain properties in response to their surrounding environmental pressures. While doing so, it shifts from current and past examples of mechanical approaches of adaptation, towards biological paradigms of seamless material integration. Looking at biological mechanisms of growth and focusing on the material make-up behind them, the research proposes the exploration of material systems in a two-fold interrelated manner: firstly, through passive material systems of variable elasticity, and secondly through the embedment of smart materials with shape-changing properties. The combination of the two is aiming at architectural systems of functional versatility.Through an interdisciplinary approach, the paper examines the following questions: Is it possible to envisage structures that share the principles of adaptation and response of living organisms? What are the technological challenges faced when designing self-actuated responsive interfaces? Which is the conceptual framework for understanding and investigating complex adaptive and responsive systems? By exploring and synthesizing theories and tools from material science, bioengineering and cybernetics the aim is to inform architectural interfaces able to enhance interconnectivity between the man-made and the natural. Focusing on the self-organization of material systems the intention is to suggest architectural interventions, which become sub-systems of their ecological milieu. The emphasis therefore is placed not on architectural formalism, but on how we can define synthetic environments through constant exchanges of energy, matter and information.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email doumpic@hotmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_057
id caadria2011_057
authors Fraser, Matthew and Michael Donn
year 2011
title Thinking through digital simulation tasks in architectural education
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 599-608
summary This study reports the activities of 80 second year architecture students at Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand for the duration of a single trimester. A central theme in this studio is the framing of day-lighting problems into a quantifiable investigation and then addressing these through the use of digital modelling and simulation tools. This study offers an insight to undergraduate architecture students’ negotiation of digital design spaces and asks the question of how the knowledge of skill-based specialist tasks are extensible to core design studio.The mass education within a University environment of such specialist skill based techniques allows for an insight to the negotiation of quantitative and qualitative design criteria. The issue of learning skill based tasks at university level is a pertinent topic of study as the critique of such techniques is implicit to the holistic education of Architects but the level of this critique can vary greatly. This question also highlights the challenges faced to improving the design education approaches to computational thinking and applications.
keywords Design analysis; daylight simulation; education
series CAADRIA
email matt.architecture@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_031
id caadria2011_031
authors Fukuda, Tomohiro; Kensuke Kitagawa and Nobuyoshi Yabuki
year 2011
title A study of variation of normal of polygons created by point cloud data for architectural renovation field
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 321-330
summary Acquiring current 3D space data of cities, buildings, and rooms rapidly and in detail has become indispensable. When the point cloud data of an object or space scanned by a 3D laser scanner is converted into polygons, it is an accumulation of small polygons. When object or space is a closed flat plane, it is necessary to merge small polygons to reduce the volume of data, and to convert them into one polygon. When an object or space is a closed flat plane, each normal vector of small polygons theoretically has the same angle. However, in practise, these angles are not the same. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to clarify the variation of the angle of a small polygon group that should become one polygon based on actual data. As a result of experimentation, no small polygons are converted by the point cloud data scanned with the 3D laser scanner even if the group of small polygons is a closed flat plane lying in the same plane. When the standard deviation of the extracted number of polygons is assumed to be less than 100, the variation of the angle of the normal vector is roughly 7 degrees.
keywords Point cloud; 3D laser scanner; physical space; virtual reality; polygon optimization
series CAADRIA
email fukuda@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2011_193
id sigradi2011_193
authors Garagnani, Simone; Mingucci, Roberto
year 2011
title A.I.M. Informative Archives for architectural renovation
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 94-97
summary The information technology applied to the architectural surveys makes the environment documentation pos- sible through multimedia data, which can be processed using a "Multimedia Informative Archive" (A.I.M.), designed for Institutions interested in cultural heritage preservation. An A.I.M. system can manage analytical information embedded into digital databases, referencing a visual exploration path to several technical data, documenting the context in which a monument, or an historical building, is placed. The framework can be ported to mobile devices in order to allow a wide number of data gathering stations, connected to the same central archive, making easier browsing and storing architectural information.
keywords Digital 3D modeling; architectural information technology; virtual heritage documentation; multimedial building database; immersive data modeling
series SIGRADI
email simone.garagnani@unibo.it
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2011_126
id sigradi2011_126
authors García Amen, Fernando; Barber, Gabriela
year 2011
title Sueñan las ovejas con androides humanos? Una aproximación a los orígenes cinematográfico-literarios de la Realidad Aumentada [Do Sheep Dream of Human Androids? An approach to film-literary sources of Augmented Reality]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 245-248
summary Augmented Reality is one of the fields of technological development most currently used for various purposes. However, little is known about the genesis of AR in the collective imagination. It is perfectly legitimate to argue that the AR pays special tribute to fantasy literature and the film genre of Sci-Fi. Based on the definition of Azuma, AR must meet three conditions which can be traced in various fiction works of the twentieth century, even before the AR was conceptually defined. This work is proposed to investigate the literary and cinematic sources that give rise to the concept of AR.
series SIGRADI
email efe@farq.edu.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade2011_100
id ecaade2011_100
authors Hakak, Alireza M.; Biloria, Nimish
year 2011
title New perception of virtual environments, Enhancement of creativity: Increasing dimension of design starting point
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.967-975
wos WOS:000335665500111
summary The digital era allows for a new domain of architectural experience. Within a virtual environment designs can be created that go beyond the mere accommodation of literal functions, and that affect and contribute to the human experience by dynamically interacting with and affecting the inhabitants’ life. A key point in “creativity”, considering different disciplines, is the role of previously gained experiences, which cause the emerging of intuition. Accentuating the role of new experiences in enhancing the intuition, by designing in an imaginary world, stands to be an interesting move. Detached from the real one in sense of time and matter, the imaginary world enables the designer to cross the borderline of reality. The hypothesis underlying this ongoing research, from a cognitive point of view, is that the extensiveness of experiences gained by exploring unconventional virtual environments relates positively to both creative performance (enhancing interactivity, lateral thinking, idea generation, etc) and creativity-supporting cognitive processes (retrieval of unconventional knowledge, recruitment of ideas from unconfined virtual environments for creative idea expansion). Practically, the authors propose starting the design from a point cloud in a virtual environment that can be manipulated by the designer immersing in this environment.
keywords Virtual Environment; Experience; Enhancing creativity; Point cloud
series eCAADe
email a.mahdizadehhakak@tudelft.nl
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2011_267
id sigradi2011_267
authors Hamuy Pinto, Eduardo; Galaz, Mirtha
year 2011
title Preguntas Aumentadas: medios enriquecidos y el acto de preguntar [Augmented questions: Rich media and asking]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 448-451
summary Tutorials are widely used for learning technical mattersin architecture and design courses. This is a case study of questions from a student and answers provided by a teacher. The communication medium used was Screenr©, a web application for creating short screencasts. A sequence of screencasts was analyzed from a qualitative perspective, using Media Richness Theory and an e-learning model as framework. Ambiguity and Equivocality are managed through a rich medium that allows communication of precise data and paralinguistic cues. Visual deictic gestures (from the users) and visual cues provided by the interfaceare fundamental for building understanding.
keywords Teaching; videotutorials; media richness; screencasts; qualitative analysis
series SIGRADI
email ehamuy@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_146
id ecaade2011_146
authors Hunter, Moira; Chase, Scott; Kligerman, Bradley; Zupancic, Tadeja
year 2011
title ARCHI21: Architectural and Design based Education and Practice through Content & Language Integrated Learning using Immersive Virtual Environments for 21st Century Skills
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.725-733
wos WOS:000335665500084
summary This paper offers insights into innovative practice being undertaken in higher architectural and design education, where both language and content teaching and learning are integrated as interwoven parts with joint curricular roles. Using Expansive Learning Theory as an analytical framework to examine potential tensions and contradictions arising from the educational approach of Content and Language Integrated Learning, reference is made to three very recent pilot studies of the EU funded project, ARCHI21. The experiential learning in these studies adopted a blended approach, where classical face-to-face learning-teaching scenarios were supported by immersive 3D virtual environments together with social networking media and Web 2.0 tools. This paper uses these pilot studies to speculate on aspects of fragility and offers reflection on future project activity.
keywords Architecture; education; Content and Language Integrated Learning; 3D immersive environments; Second Life
series eCAADe
email moira.hunter@paris-malaquais.archi.fr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p108
id cf2011_p108
authors Iordanova, Ivanka; Forgues Daniel, Chiocchio François
year 2011
title Creation of an Evolutive Conceptual Know-how Framework for Integrative Building Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 435-450.
summary Low productivity of the building sector today is attributed to the fragmentation of tasks, disciplines and responsibilities, as well as to the resistance to adopt integrative work processes and digital means. The increased complexity of architectural projects and the aroused social consciousness for sustainable environment calls for integrative design collaboration. Thus, there is need for a Conceptual Framework combining work processes, technological means and policy aspects. According to the literature, integrative multidisciplinary design is a strategy resulting in high performance buildings nurturing sustainable way of living (Reed et al. 2009, Krygiel & Nies 2008). Responding to the increased technological complexity of our built environment, as well as to the objective of meeting multiple criteria of quality, both necessitating multidisciplinary collaboration during design, Building Information Modeling (BIM) is seen as a powerful means for fostering quality, augmenting productivity and decreasing loss in construction. Based on recent research, we can propose that a sustainable building can be designed through an integrative design process (IDP) which is best supported by BIM. However, our ongoing research program and consultations with advanced practitioners underscore a number of limitations. For example, a large portion of the interviewed professionals and construction stakeholders do not necessarily see a link between sustainable building, integrative design process and BIM, while in our opinion, their joint use augments the power of each of these approaches taken separately. Thus, there is an urgent necessity for the definition of an IDP-BIM framework, which could guide the building industry to sustainable results and better productivity. This paper defines such a framework, whose theoretical background lays on studies in social learning (activity theory and situated action theories). These theories suggest that learning and knowledge generation occurs mainly within a social process defined as an activity. This corresponds to the context in which the IDP-BIM framework will be used, its final objective being the transformation of building design practices. The proposed IDP-BIM framework is based on previous research and developments. Thus, firstly, IDP process was well formalized in the Roadmap for the Integrated Design Process‚ (Reed et al.) which is widely used as a guideline for collaborative integrative design by innovating practices in USA and Canada. Secondly, the National Building Information Modeling Standard (NBIMS) of the USA is putting an enormous effort in creating a BIM standard, Succar (2008) recently proposed a conceptual framework for BIM, but BIM ontology is still under development (Gursel et al 2009). Thirdly, an iterative design process bound to gating reviews (inspired from software development processes) was found to be successful in the context of multidisciplinary design studios (reported in our previous papers). The feedback from this study allowed for modifications and adjustments included in the present proposal. The gating process assures the good quality of the project and its compliance to the client's requirements. The challenge of this research is to map the above mentioned approaches, processes and technologies into the design process, thus creating an integrated framework supporting and nurturing sustainable design. The IDP-BIM framework can be represented by a multidimensional matrix linked to a semantic network knowledge database: - the axes of the matrix being the project timeline, the design process actors and building stakeholders (architect, engineers, client, contractor, environmental biologist, etc.), or different aspects of building performance (environmental, functional, social, interior environment quality, cost, etc.); and - the knowledge database providing multiple layers of semantic support in terms of process, domain knowledge, technology and workflow at a given moment of the project and for a given actor or building aspect. The IDP-BIM framework is created as an evolutive digital environment for know-how and will have an established protocol for regular updates. The paper will firstly present the state of the art in IDP and BIM. Secondly, it will expose the methodology used for the definition of the Framework, followed by a description of its structure, contents and digital implementation. Then, some scenarios for the use of the Framework will be shown as validation.
keywords integrated design process, BIM, multidisciplinary design, conceptual framework
series CAAD Futures
email ivanka.iordanova@videotron.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia11_372
id acadia11_372
authors James, Anne; Nagasaka, Dai
year 2011
title Integrative Design Strategies for Multimedia in Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 372-379
summary Multidisciplinary efforts that have shaped the current integration of multimedia into architectural spaces have primarily been conducted by collaborative efforts among art, engineering, interaction design, informatics and software programming. These collaborations have focused on the complexities of designing for applications of multimedia in specific real world contexts. Outside a small but growing number of researchers and practitioners, architects have been largely absent from these efforts. This has resulted in projects that deal primarily with developing technologies augmenting existing architectural environments. (Greenfield and Shepard 2007)This paper examines the potential of multimedia and architecture integration to create new possibilities for architectural space. Established practices of constructing architecture suggest creating space by conventional architectural means. On the other hand, multimedia influences and their effect on the tectonics, topos and typos (Frampton 2001) of an architectural space (‘multimedia effects matrix’) suggest new modes of shaping space. It is proposed that correlations exist between those two that could inform unified design strategies. Case study analyses were conducted examining five works of interactive spaces and multimedia installation artworks, selected from an initial larger study of 25 works. Each case study investigated the means of shaping space employed, according to both conventional architectural practices and the principles of multimedia influence (in reference to the ‘multimedia effects matrix’) (James and Nagasaka 2010, 278-285). Findings from the case studies suggest strong correlations between the two approaches to spatial construction. To indicate these correlations, this paper presents five speculative integrative design strategies derived from the case studies, intended to inform future architectural design practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email annejames.07@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id eaea2009_kardos_plachtinska
id eaea2009_kardos_plachtinska
authors Kardos, Peter; Petra Plachtinska
year 2011
title Spatial Experience in Real & Virtual Environment as an Urban Design Tool
source Projecting Spaces [Proceedings of the 9th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 978-3-942411-31-8 ], pp. 59-64
summary The innovations of information technologies and the new possibilities of multimedia exploitation in the realm of architectural design and education are supporting the development of image communication methods on the basis of interactivity. The creative process of searching and decision-making in the urban design studio of our Faculty is supported by spatial modeling methods. The draft is sketched in modeling material on a working model. From the didactic point of view, relevant are mainly those phases, in which is possible, in the imaginative way, to support the searching and decision making process with the aim to test, compare and continuously evaluate the fulfillment of the hypothetic intentions of the solution responsibilities. The model becomes an interactive medium of cooperation between teacher and the working group of students. From the view of design crystallization, the dominant phases, in the creative process, are examining, verification, and simulation. The alternatives of material-compositional content and the spatial performance charts of modeled physical structure are verifying and the visual experience of the anticipated urban environment is simulated by the author, but also through the future client’s eyes. The alternation of the composition’s spatial configurations is generally appreciated by the static visual verification in the endoscopic horizon like the architectural spatial studies. The effective method of the progress generates a creative atmosphere for the generative thinking and design. The laboratory simulation of spatial experiences and their evaluation is performed following the perception psychology relations. The simulation of digestion of the new spatial reality intervenes the customer’s identification and guides to subjective approaches towards the quality and complexity of the formed environment. The simulation is performed in motion in order to be able to anticipate the dynamic continuity of subjective spatial imagination. The induced atmosphere will direct the evaluational attitudes of authors on comparison and selection of the successful alternatives. In our fee, we will present the demonstrations of selected static and dynamic notations of image sequences prepared in our laboratory. The presentations have been created in order to analyze, verify and offer imaginative support to creative findings in result of fulfilling the studio design tasks in the educational process. The main one is the design of urban spatial structures. The laboratory methodology is in the first place oriented on the analogue-digital procedures of "endoscope" model simulation. At the same time it also explores and looks for new unconventional forms of visual communication or archiving as imagination support to specialist and laymen participants in creative, valorization and approval processes.
series other
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2011/03/04 07:45

_id caadria2011_007
id caadria2011_007
authors Ko, Kaon and Salvator-John Liotta
year 2011
title Digital tea house: Japanese tea ceremony as a pretext for exploring parametric design and digital fabrication in architectural education
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 71-80
summary This paper reviews the Digital Tea House, a joint workshop in August of 2010 held at the University of Tokyo, Department of Architecture, together with Columbia University GSAPP. Three pavilions for hosting ceremony were designed and built in less than one month, in an attempt to bridge technology and culture not only through design but also fabrication. Issues addressed in the process included applications of computational design, interpretations of tradition and culture in spatial or activity oriented expressions, structural stability, to practical solutions for quick physical materialization. Three teams comprised of 6 to 8 students, each a blend of different nationalities, ultimately produced 3 full-scale tea houses with the same software, primary material, budget, and principal fabrication method.
keywords Digital fabrication; academic workshop; computational design; design-build; tea house
series CAADRIA
email ko@komystudio.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_013
id caadria2011_013
authors Kozlova, Karine; Roham M. Sheikholeslami, Lyn Bartram and Robert F. Woodbury
year 2011
title Graph visualization in computer-aided design: An exploration of alternative representations for GenerativeComponentsTM Symbolic View
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 133-142
summary In this paper we explore graph models used to illustrate the relationships between elements of designs in computer-aided design (CAD) systems. We discuss common limitations and ways to make such representations more usable and interactive. In order to study common problems of symbolic representations in CAD systems, we conducted a survey of a number of CAD applications that employ graph representations in their interface and provided comparative analysis of the properties of graph representations in these systems. As a case study we used Bentley GenerativeComponentsTM (GC) system - a parametric CAD application that uses graph (“symbolic”) view to visualize the structure of design. We conducted series of interviews with expert GC users that revealed many limitations of the GC symbolic view. To address these limitations, we developed alternative representations of symbolic view that aim at enhancing user experience with the system and reviewed these with expert GC users. As a result of our study, we developed a set of interactive prototypes using SHriMP1 visualization tool and Processing programming language. These provide improved ways of user interaction with symbolic representation, including better readability of the graph and, as a result, an improved support for design model analysis.
keywords Graph visualization; visual interfaces; CAD systems; visual interaction; node-link diagrams
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email karine.kozlova@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2011_424
id sigradi2011_424
authors Mántaras, Guillermo
year 2011
title Didáctica del proyecto arquitectónico contemporáneo [Didactics of contemporary architectural project]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 215-218
summary The architecture is crossing in a period of big changes; nevertheless the teaching of the architecture is not travelling these ways, on the contrary, remain in an inaltered reality teaching as the teachers were formed for decades. This article recounts to the introduction inside a regular course workshop of project, of a practical work realized in a module of a magister course in order to exploit and to develop the creative possibilities of the students when the digital means use as a creative tool to answer to the new demands.
series SIGRADI
email gmantaras@live.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

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