CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 537

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ijac20119404
id ijac20119404
authors Champion, Erik; Andrew Dekker
year 2011
title Biofeedback and Virtual Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 4, 377-395
summary This paper explains potential benefits of indirect biofeedback used within interactive virtual environments, and reflects on an earlier study that allowed for the dynamic modification of a virtual environment’s graphic shaders, music and artificial intelligence, based on the biofeedback of the player. The aim was to determine which augmented effects aided or discouraged engagement in the game. Conversely, biofeedback can help calm down rather than stress participants, and attune them to different ways of interacting within a virtual environment. Other advantages of indirect biofeedback might include increased personalization, thematic object creation, atmospheric augmentation, filtering of information, and tracking of participants’ understanding and engagement. Such features may help designers create more intuitive virtual environments with more thematically appropriate interaction while reducing cognitive loading on the participants. Another benefit would be more engaged clients with a better understanding of the richness and complexity of a digital environment.
series journal
last changed 2012/02/14 08:02

_id cf2011_p043
id cf2011_p043
authors Boeykens, Stefan
year 2011
title Using 3D Design Software, BIM and Game Engines for Architectural Historical Reconstruction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 493-509.
summary The use of digital tools has become a tremendous aid in the creation of digital, historical reconstructions of architectural projects. Regular visualization techniques have been used for quite some time and they still pose interesting approaches, such as following cinematic techniques [1]. While common visualizations focus on pre-rendered graphics, it is possible to apply Game Engines [2] for real-time architectural visualization, as witnessed by [3] and [4]. In the course of our teaching and research efforts, we have collected experience with several visualization and modeling techniques, including the use of gaming engines. While the modeling of qualitative geometry for use in regular visualization already poses an elaborate effort, the preparation of models for different uses is often not trivial. Most modeling systems only support the creation of models for a single amount of detail, whereas an optimized model for a real-time system will have fairly different constraints when compared to non-real-time models for photorealistic rendering and animation. The use of parametric methods is one usable approach to tackle this complexity, as illustrated in [4]. One of the major advantages of using parametric approaches lies precisely in the possibility of using a single model to generate different geometry with control over the amount of detail. We explicitly tackle this in a Building Information Modeling (BIM) context, as to support much more than purely 3D geometry and visualization purposes. An integrated approach allows the same model to be used for technical drawings in 2D and an optimized 3D model in varying levels of detail for different visualization purposes. However, while most Building Information Modeling applications are targeted to current architectural practice, they seldom provide sufficient content for the recreation of historical models. This thus requires an extensive library of parametric, custom objects to be used and re-used for historically accurate models, which can serve multiple purposes. Finally, the approach towards the historical resources also poses interpretation problems, which we tackled using a reasonably straightforward set up of an information database, collecting facts and accuracies. This helps in the visualization of color-coded 3D models, depicting the accuracy of the model, which is a valuable graphical approach to discuss and communicate information about the historical study in an appealing format. This article will present the results of different reconstruction case studies, using a variety of design applications and discuss the inherent complexity and limitations in the process of translating an active, evolving model into an environment suitable for use in a real-time system. Especially workflow issues are identified, as the translation of the model into the game engine should be repeated several times, when the model is further refined and adapted. This used to involve a large amount of repetitive work, but the current crop of game engines have much better approaches to manage the updating of the geometry.
keywords Real-time architecture, game engines, cultural heritage, digital reconstruction, parametric modeling, Building Information Modeling
series CAAD Futures
email stefan.boeykens@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2011_023
id caadria2011_023
authors Champion, Erik M. and Andrew Dekker
year 2011
title Indirect biofed architecture: Strategies to best utilise biofeedback tools and interaction metaphors within digital architectural environment
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 241-250
summary This paper explains potential benefits of indirect biofeedback used within interactive virtual environments, and reflects on an earlier study that allowed for the dynamic modification of a virtual environment’s graphic shaders, music and artificial intelligence (of Non Playing Characters) based on the biofeedback of the player. It then examines both the potential and the issues in applying biofeedback (already effective for games) to digital architectural environments, and suggests potential uses such as personalization, object creation, atmospheric augmentation, filtering, and tracking.
keywords Virtual worlds; biofeedback; sensors; empathy theory
series CAADRIA
email e.champion@massey.ac.nz
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadiaregional2011_020
id acadiaregional2011_020
authors Hudson, Roly; Drew MacDonald, Mark Humphreys
year 2011
title Race track modeler. Developing an Iterative Design Workflow Combining a Game Engine and Parametric Design
source Parametricism (SPC) ACADIA Regional 2011 Conference Proceedings
summary This paper documents the continuing development and testing of a novel digital work flow established and implemented for the design and redevelopment of formula one racing tracks. The Race Track Modeler (RTM) tool uses a game engine to simulate driving around proposed track designs. Performance data from the simulation is combined with real data acquired from analysis of vehicle mounted accident data recorders (ADRs). The output of the tool is a graphical representation of simulated stopping positions of vehicles that have lost control and left the track. This information directly informs the design of motor racing facilities; the zoning of spectator facilities, position and specification of crash barriers (if required), and surface material selection for the run-off zones (the area where vehicles are expected to stop after losing control and leaving the track). The RTM can suggest further design changes to the track geometry which are then fed back into the game engine. The project involves methods of binding analysis of design directly to geometry together with input from interactive controls. The RTM has been developed and tested during the redevelopment of Silverstone race track in the United Kingdom (figure 1) this paper documents the current state of the tool and concludes with proposed future developments.
series ACADIA
last changed 2011/07/08 09:17

_id ecaade2011_154
id ecaade2011_154
authors Piga, Barbara E. A.; Morello, Eugenio; Signorelli, Valerio
year 2011
title The experience of an academic simulation laboratory: The use of visual simulations for education and research
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.734-742
summary An overview of the research activities of a university simulation laboratory is presented. The mission of the laboratory is to anticipate the design and to support the evaluation process of urban design projects from a perceptual viewpoint through the use of digital and physical models. We have research and educational purposes. Founded five years ago, the laboratory has implemented different simulation tools, often combining existing techniques and finding new applications of existing ones. In particular, we focused our interest on visual perception tools, investigating the use of physical models and digital ones, and combining them in different ways in order to enhance the experience offered by the perceptual simulation.
wos WOS:000335665500085
keywords Visual simulation; city modelling; augmented reality; game engine; simulation laboratory
series eCAADe
email labsimurb@polimi.it
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p099
id cf2011_p099
authors Huang, Andy; Erhan Halil, Woodbury Robert, Nasirova Diliara, Kozlova Karine
year 2011
title Collaboration Workflow Simplified: Reduction of Device Overhead for Integrated Design Collaboration
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 591-602.
summary Design collaboration relies on cognitive tools such as analog media and digital peripheral devices, and shows the characteristics of distributed cognition. It is a social and complex activity involving multiple agents communicating and using external cognitive tools to encode, decode, and share information in the process of collaborative task completion. The systems supporting this activity should meet the ’principle of least collaboration effort’ [4] that proposes that agents in collaboration minimize their effort in presentation and acceptance of information. Yet, current collaboration systems are dispersed mixed media that is often overloaded with representations and functionality, thus preventing seam- less information sharing. Designers are required to spend extra effort collecting information using peripheral devices and in system management when sharing information. The goal of this study is to understand these overheads in infor- mation collection and sharing using peripheral devices, and to provide designers with a supportive platform to enhance collaboration using both analog and digital media. In this paper, we first review available peripheral devices such as smart pens, digital cameras, and voice recorders, as well as existing collaboration sup- porting software systems for their benefits and deficiencies in collaboration. We then present ’DiNa’, a collaboration platform that is envisioned to improve pro- ductivity and reduce redundant work by integrating peripheral devices into the collaboration workflow. We demonstrate a possible workflow using this system through several scenarios where designers collaborate in performing a series of design tasks. We hope to bring attention to the importance least collaborative effort in designing systems to support real-world collaboration.
keywords Collaboration, Peripheral Devices, Knowledge Collection, Human Computer Interaction, Computer Aided Design
series CAAD Futures
email huang_a@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia11_162
id acadia11_162
authors Payne, Andrew
year 2011
title A Five-axis Robotic Motion Controller for Designers
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 162-169
summary This paper proposes the use of a new set of software tools, called Firefly, paired with a low-cost five-axis robotic motion controller. This serves as a new means for customized tool path creation, realtime evaluation of parametric designs using forward kinematic robotic simulations, and direct output of the programming language (RAPID code) used to control ABB industrial robots. Firefly bridges the gap between Grasshopper, a visual programming editor that runs within the Rhinoceros 3D CAD application, and physical programmable microcontrollers like the Arduino; enabling realtime data flow between the digital and physical worlds. The custom-made robotic motion controller is a portable digitizing arm designed to have the same joint and axis configuration as the ABB-IRB 140 industrial robot, enabling direct conversion of the digitized information into robotic movements. Using this tangible controller and the underlying parametric interface, this paper presents an improved workflow which directly addresses the shortfalls of multifunctional robots and enables wider adoption of the tools by architects and designers.
keywords robotics; CAD/CAM; firefly; direct fabrication; digitizing arm
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email andyopayne@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ijac20109202
id ijac20109202
authors van Embden, Maria Vera; Andres, Michela Turrin, Peter von Buelow
year 2011
title ARCHITECTURAL DNA: A genetic exploration of complex structures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 2, 133-150
summary The approach demonstrated in this paper uses Evolutionary Computation (EC) to enhance and modify structural form based on biological micro structures.The forms are modified to conform to new boundary conditions associated with architectural structures.The process is based on a Genetic Algorithm (GA) which visually exposes for the designer a range of good performing solutions within thedesign space. The application of the GA is combined with parametric software, in this case Generative Components (GC). The program described here as ParaGen (Parametric Genetic Algorithm), uses a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to determine the structural performance of the forms.This allows the designer to manipulate and optimize a parametrically defined model based on predefined criteria and parameters.The opportunities and limitations of this design process are explored and evaluated based on an experimental case study using topologies based on radiolarian skeletons.The design procedure described includes user interaction in the exploration of solutions that perform well both for the explicitly defined programmatic criteria (structural) as well as for the implicit criteria provided by the designer (visual aesthetic).
keywords structural morphology, parametric design, genetic algorithm, structural optimization.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id sigradi2011_083
id sigradi2011_083
authors Bertuzzi, Juan; Zreik, Khaldoun
year 2011
title Mixed Reality Games - Augmented Cultural Heritage
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 304-307
summary This paper aims at enhancing Cultural Heritage in several ways. Using Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality technologies, we seek to highlight the advantages of understanding and applying hyper worlds in cultural, sociological, psychological and educational fields. For this purpose, we suggest the inclusion of social serious games as the perfect link to a more productive and pleasant experience for users and a more accurate analysis of simulated cultural environments for researchers.
keywords Game; social; city; culture; heritage
series SIGRADI
email jpbertuzzi@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2011_021
id caadria2011_021
authors Lowe, Russell; Jules Cromarty and Richard Goodwin
year 2011
title Real time modelling: A solution for accurate, updatable and real-time 3D modelling of as-built architecture
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 219-228
summary This paper describes a means for 3D modelling that sources photogrammetry data from publically available databases and integrates this data with a real time computer game application to construct point clouds. As the databases receive more data or as the data is updated the 3D visualisation within the computer game environment is capable of remodelling itself to reflect the changes, providing accurate representations of as-built infrastructure within an immersive 3D environment that can be interrogated and analysed in real time.
keywords Real-time; photogrammetry; computer game; visualisation; point cloud
series CAADRIA
email russell.lowe@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_022
id caadria2011_022
authors Lowe, Russell; Mark Hedley and Richard Goodwin
year 2011
title Real-time porosity: Combining a computer game engine with environmental sensors to better understand pedestrian movement in public/private space and in real-time
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 229-238
summary This paper describes the theoretical context, design, implementation and evaluation of a novel method for understanding pedestrian movement in public/private space. It examines the pedestrian counting and tracking methodologies of Space Syntax and proposes an alternative methodology that links sensors embedded in real-world environments and carried by pedestrians with an environment and avatars in a contemporary computer game. In this way observers are able to closely trail pedestrians without affecting their decision making. Results from a field trial are presented where the sensors and computer gaming technology were tested within a challenging real-world environment.
keywords Pedestrian movement; public/private; Space Syntax; environmental sensors
series CAADRIA
email russell.lowe@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2011_166
id sigradi2011_166
authors Orciuoli, Affonso
year 2011
title Arts and CAM: design e fabricação em tempo real [Arts and CAM: design and fabrication in real time]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 257-260
summary The principal idea of this installation is to bring in a museum digital technology that allows a new kind of design and fabrication, breaking paradigms inherited from the modern time. The final result is a collaborative, unpredicted and inserted in a place following some rules that are open to be changed. It's like a game. It's like life. Every moment needs some decision, all decisions are acceptable, but we cannot come back, and also we cannot predict the future. The installation is dedicated to labyrinths.
series SIGRADI
email orciuoli@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id sigradi2011_209
id sigradi2011_209
authors Peronti Santiago, Rodrigo
year 2011
title Jogos e Processos de Projeto: Diálogos Possíveis [Games and Design Processes: Possible Dialogues]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 503-506
summary With the background of the reflections of the philosopher Vilém Flusser about games on contemporary culture, and the mathematical theory of Constructionism of the educator Seymour Papert, the subject of this work, a doctoral research in progress, relates to the use of a new programming language in the development of design processes in architecture. Intends to examine and explore the similarity of this language with the definition of "open game" by Flusser, whose use seems to favor so-called participatory methods and collaborative work, in which the role of the individual project gives rise to an activity shared by several actors.
series SIGRADI
email rodrigoperonti@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia12_47
id acadia12_47
authors Aish, Robert ; Fisher, Al ; Joyce, Sam ; Marsh, Andrew
year 2012
title Progress Towards Multi-Criteria Design Optimisation Using Designscript With Smart Form, Robot Structural Analysis and Ecotect Building Performance Analysis"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 47-56
summary Important progress towards the development of a system that enables multi-criteria design optimisation has recently been demonstrated during a research collaboration between Autodesk’s DesignScript development team, the University of Bath and the engineering consultancy Buro Happold. This involved integrating aspects of the Robot Structural Analysis application, aspects of the Ecotect building performance application and a specialist form finding solver called SMART Form (developed by Buro Happold) with DesignScript to create a single computation environment. This environment is intended for the generation and evaluation of building designs against both structural and building performance criteria, with the aim of expediently supporting computational optimisation and decision making processes that integrate across multiple design and engineering disciplines. A framework was developed to enable the integration of modeling environments with analysis and process control, based on the authors’ case studies and experience of applied performance driven design in practice. This more generalised approach (implemented in DesignScript) enables different designers and engineers to selectively configure geometry definition, form finding, analysis and simulation tools in an open-ended system without enforcing any predefined workflows or anticipating specific design strategies and allows for a full range of optimisation and decision making processes to be explored. This system has been demonstrated to practitioners during the Design Modeling Symposium, Berlin in 2011 and feedback from this has suggested further development.
keywords Design Optimisation , Scripting , Form Finding , Structural Analysis , Building Performance
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email robert.aish@autodesk.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id caadria2011_052
id caadria2011_052
authors Al-Kazzaz, Dhuha A. and Alan Bridges
year 2011
title Assessing innovation in hybrid designs using shape grammars
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 545-554
summary Al-kazzaz et al (2010) described hybrid adaption technique to generate innovative designs from heterogeneous precedents using shape grammars. An evaluation of the degree of innovation in the hybrid designs gave feedback to grammar users before and after applying a rule. Innovation was assessed using variables derived from the internal structure of the grammar such as: the number of antecedents in the corpus having the same rule; the number of rules in a subclass rule set having the same geometry; etc. However, the validity of the innovation assessment was unclear and the use of the feedback measures was not demonstrated. Accordingly, this study aims to verify the credibility of the innovation measures and to identify the independent variables that a user can control to achieve a significant impact on each innovation measure as a dependent variable.
keywords Shape grammars; hybrid design; innovation assessment
series CAADRIA
email dhuha.abdul-aziz@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_009
id caadria2011_009
authors Anderson, Jonathon and Ming Tang
year 2011
title Form follows parameters: Parametric modeling for fabrication and manufacturing processes
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 91-100
summary As the architectural field continues to explore the possibilities of parametric design it is important to understand that architectural computation has evolved from representations to simulation and evaluation. This paper explores the digital processes of parametric scripting as a way to generate architectural artefacts that can be realized in the physical landscape through various digital fabrication and industrial manufacturing techniques. This paper will highlight the important discoveries of the geometries and the implications the script has on the construction processes. One benefit of using parametric modelling as a component to the manufacturing pipeline is being able to explore several design iterations in the digital realm before ever realizing them in the physical landscape. Furthermore, parametric modelling allows users to control the production documentation and precision needed to manufacture. As a result, the design pipeline presented in this paper seeks to eliminate the construction processes that hinder the physical act of making architecture.
keywords Manufacturing process; parametric modelling; 3D printing, plastic casting; mould making
series CAADRIA
email jrander6@uncg.edu.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 26HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_623777 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002