CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 537

_id cf2011_p043
id cf2011_p043
authors Boeykens, Stefan
year 2011
title Using 3D Design Software, BIM and Game Engines for Architectural Historical Reconstruction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 493-509.
summary The use of digital tools has become a tremendous aid in the creation of digital, historical reconstructions of architectural projects. Regular visualization techniques have been used for quite some time and they still pose interesting approaches, such as following cinematic techniques [1]. While common visualizations focus on pre-rendered graphics, it is possible to apply Game Engines [2] for real-time architectural visualization, as witnessed by [3] and [4]. In the course of our teaching and research efforts, we have collected experience with several visualization and modeling techniques, including the use of gaming engines. While the modeling of qualitative geometry for use in regular visualization already poses an elaborate effort, the preparation of models for different uses is often not trivial. Most modeling systems only support the creation of models for a single amount of detail, whereas an optimized model for a real-time system will have fairly different constraints when compared to non-real-time models for photorealistic rendering and animation. The use of parametric methods is one usable approach to tackle this complexity, as illustrated in [4]. One of the major advantages of using parametric approaches lies precisely in the possibility of using a single model to generate different geometry with control over the amount of detail. We explicitly tackle this in a Building Information Modeling (BIM) context, as to support much more than purely 3D geometry and visualization purposes. An integrated approach allows the same model to be used for technical drawings in 2D and an optimized 3D model in varying levels of detail for different visualization purposes. However, while most Building Information Modeling applications are targeted to current architectural practice, they seldom provide sufficient content for the recreation of historical models. This thus requires an extensive library of parametric, custom objects to be used and re-used for historically accurate models, which can serve multiple purposes. Finally, the approach towards the historical resources also poses interpretation problems, which we tackled using a reasonably straightforward set up of an information database, collecting facts and accuracies. This helps in the visualization of color-coded 3D models, depicting the accuracy of the model, which is a valuable graphical approach to discuss and communicate information about the historical study in an appealing format. This article will present the results of different reconstruction case studies, using a variety of design applications and discuss the inherent complexity and limitations in the process of translating an active, evolving model into an environment suitable for use in a real-time system. Especially workflow issues are identified, as the translation of the model into the game engine should be repeated several times, when the model is further refined and adapted. This used to involve a large amount of repetitive work, but the current crop of game engines have much better approaches to manage the updating of the geometry.
keywords Real-time architecture, game engines, cultural heritage, digital reconstruction, parametric modeling, Building Information Modeling
series CAAD Futures
email stefan.boeykens@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_127
id ecaade2011_127
authors Di Mascio, Danilo; Palka, Pierpaolo
year 2011
title From the 3D survey “ad Oggetto” to the technological representation of the architecture: The case study of Caporciano
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.829-836
summary In this paper we are to present a research, still in progress, whose main objective is the desire to develop and test an alternative method of surveying, representing and analyzing buildings that are part of a minor historical-artistic heritage. The instruments used and the proposed methodology want to give an alternative to other solutions such as 3D laser scanners and photogrammetry, which would be not only expensive, but also difficult to use in small and irregular spaces, typical of the old Italian villages. The case study that will be presented is Caporciano, a small medieval village in Abruzzo (a region at the centre of Italy), in the internal area of the region affected by a violent earth quake in 2009. This tragic event has put the spotlights on the problems and the fragility of these small villages, which represent an important local resource of cultural importance, and therefore must be preserved for the future generation. In order to properly act in these areas, it is necessary to thoroughly know the actions to be taken for its recovery or conservation, and the present methodology allows the creation of this knowledge made up of several drawings, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional.
wos WOS:000335665500095
keywords 3D survey; cultural heritage; 3d modeling; CAD; Abruzzo region
series eCAADe
email ddimascio@danarchitect.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2011_163
id ecaade2011_163
authors Mark, Earl
year 2011
title Visualizing the Unknown in Historical Vernacular Architecture: Making Speculation from Archaeological Fragments Explicit
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.868-874
summary Computer based visualization tools have the capacity to create convincing reconstructions of historical structures that appear to be authentic and complete but where inferences have been drawn from relatively limited evidence. The challenge is how to make the exciting process of discovery, argument and reasoning more self-evident in the model and also make known the alternative constructions that were plausible but less likely. This paper refers to two computer visualizations developed by the author for world heritage building sites. In both cases, a similar geometrical modeling technique was used. However, in the second case, the 3D modeling approach is developed for juxtaposition with captured dialogs, the evidence used, and the process followed so as to make level of speculation more explicit.
wos WOS:000335665500100
keywords Authentication; Three-Dimensional Digital Reconstruction; Archaeology; Parametric Modeling; Decision Tree
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia11_226
id acadia11_226
authors Salim, Flora; Jaworski, Przemyslaw; Kaftan, Martin; Friedrich, Eva; Urquiza, Rafael; Oh, Suhee; Fihn, John; Galaso, Jose Luis; Roa, Rafael; Banke, Tore; Bak, Jakob; Kalvo, Raul; Di Leo, Stefan; Madeddu, Davide; Albuquerque, Joao; Gillespie, David; Østergaard, Jacob
year 2011
title Informing Architecture and Urban Modeling with Real-world Data on 3D Tangible Interfaces and Augmented Displays
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 226-233
summary The proliferation of online and digital data in our world yields unprecedented opportunities for connecting physical and digital parametric models with live data input and feedback. Tangible interfaces and augmented displays provide theatrical settings for designers to visualize real-world data and experience realtime feedback while manipulating physical and digital models on the table. This paper proposes a new approach to design workflow, where physical model and virtual model can be interconnected and informed in realtime by multiple analytical datasets and live data streams. Using 3D scanning, blob detection, and multi-touch techniques, multidimensional tangible interfaces and augmented displays presented in this paper demonstrate a powerful new approach for designing and interacting with physical models, materials, and environmental data.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id sigradi2011_172
id sigradi2011_172
authors Castañé, Dora; Tessier, Carlos
year 2011
title Estrategias Implementales en la Investigación Patrimonial. 3 casos de modelos urbanos digitales [Implementales strategies in the heritage research. 3 Cases of digital urban models]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 86-89
summary This paper shows 3 digital models implemented in two research product of a team of researchers of CONICET, CEDODAL projects who have been developing various annual proposals. The objective of this work is to show the implementales strategies used in each case. With the digital technological tools of three-dimensional modelling and its interfaces from spatial databases with different levels of complexity representational 2d-3d-4 d-5 d, applied to the recognition and research of this cultural and urban architectural heritage. Who allowed to store and retrieve information in multiple formats with a diversity of views to the review and analysis.
series SIGRADI
email dcastane05@fibertel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id sigradi2011_194
id sigradi2011_194
authors Garagnani, Simone; Manferdini, Anna Maria
year 2011
title Virtual and augmented reality applications for Cultural Heritage
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 556-559
summary The purpose of this paper is to show the results of a research aimed at investigating the potential of digital technologies in order to provide instruments that allow to share information about the Cultural Heritage, which Museums and Institutions are called to preserve and promote. Our project's aim is finding the most suitable procedure to acquire archaeological artefacts, build their digital replica together with 3D printed prototypes and derive simplified models to be visualized through stereoscopic devices, allowing the simultaneous viewing of real and digital 3D data through an augmented reality environment, portable to mobile devices as well.
keywords 3D recontructions; stereoscopic visualization; augmented reality; virtual museum; rapid prototyping
series SIGRADI
email simone.garagnani@unibo.it
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2011_193
id sigradi2011_193
authors Garagnani, Simone; Mingucci, Roberto
year 2011
title A.I.M. Informative Archives for architectural renovation
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 94-97
summary The information technology applied to the architectural surveys makes the environment documentation pos- sible through multimedia data, which can be processed using a "Multimedia Informative Archive" (A.I.M.), designed for Institutions interested in cultural heritage preservation. An A.I.M. system can manage analytical information embedded into digital databases, referencing a visual exploration path to several technical data, documenting the context in which a monument, or an historical building, is placed. The framework can be ported to mobile devices in order to allow a wide number of data gathering stations, connected to the same central archive, making easier browsing and storing architectural information.
keywords Digital 3D modeling; architectural information technology; virtual heritage documentation; multimedial building database; immersive data modeling
series SIGRADI
email simone.garagnani@unibo.it
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade2011_059
id ecaade2011_059
authors Jacquot, Kevin; Chevrier, Christine; Halin, Gilles
year 2011
title Study of the Fortification of old scale models in order to automate their 3D modelling
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.915-924
summary The creation of virtual models of Plans-Reliefs (sometimes called relief maps) is a project to preserve and to make known masterpieces of European Cultural Heritage. In this paper, we present the first experiments carried out in the automatic reconstruction of the fortifications modelled in every plan-relief. Their scale, size and state mean that digitising data alone is not usable. The study of historical documents like the many treatises of fortification allows us to fill in the gap by retrieving all the modelling information required in the creation of a library of parametric components with canonical values. These components are then adjusted according to theoretical ranges with a first set of reference documents like the plans that have been used by the original model makers.
wos WOS:000335665500105
keywords Virtual heritage; scale model; fortifications; parametric modelling, knowledge modelling
series eCAADe
email jacquot@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2011_211
id sigradi2011_211
authors Manferdini, Anna Maria; Cipriani, Luca
year 2011
title Digital 3D Collections of Mosaics
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 560-563
summary In this paper we present a methodology developed to access to Cultural Heritage information using digital 3d reality-based models as graphic interfaces. The case studies presented belong to the wide repertoire of mosaics of Ravenna, ranging from the byzantine to the modern ones. One of the most peculiar characteristics of mosaics that often limits their digital survey is their multi-scale complexity; nevertheless their models could be used in 3d information systems, for digital exhibitions, for reconstruction aims and to document their conservation conditions in order to conduct restoration interventions in digital environments aiming at speeding and performing more reliable evaluations.
keywords Range and image-based technologies; 3d modeling; mosaics; digital collections; knowledge sharing
series SIGRADI
email am.manferdini@unibo.it
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id ijac20109305
id ijac20109305
authors Martens, Bob and Herbert Peter
year 2011
title A Long-term Scope of Actions for Reconstructed Cultural Heritage: Maintaining a Virtual Archive of Nonexisting Synagogues
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 3, 285-302
summary Reconstruction work on more than twenty synagogues in Vienna has been ongoing for more than a decade. The fact that these sacred buildings no longer exist is a pivotal aspect in this undertaking. Research revealed archived material, however, which served as reliable basis for the reconstruction work. The authors discuss details of the process of handling archival research as well as the decision-making process during reconstruction. The paper focuses on the possibilities and limits of this exploration and discusses the long-term options of handling 3D models, also in the light of continuous changes in the software environments used. The dissemination of results to a large audience and the appropriate illustration of spatial contexts is another aspect that has been explored. The publication of results in the form of a city guide is in line with the objective of conveying the reconstruction results to a large audience.
keywords Virtual reconstruction; destroyed synagogue; 3D-Modelling; visual representation; urban context
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ecaade2011_016
id ecaade2011_016
authors Stojakovi_, Vesna; Tepav_evi_, Bojan
year 2011
title Single Image Ambiguity and Adjustment of Cultural Heritage Modeling Approach
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.99-106
summary The objective of this research is to point out the deficiency of the modeling from a single image and give suggestion for the improvement. In the domain of cultural heritage visualization, single image modeling is mainly used to recover the scene shown in the historical photographs. In this paper, some common ambiguities in the area of the historical architectural environments are highlighted. In most approaches user is the one to introduce and choose constraints, and therefore he must have control over the ambiguity problems. We propose suggestions about how to adjust the single-image-based modeling in order to minimize chance for irregular 3D shapes to emerge due to ambiguity. Simple examples are used to illustrate how ambiguity of a single image can affect the models veridicality, which are the common mistakes that inexperienced user can make and how and when they can be corrected.
wos WOS:000335665500011
keywords Single-image-based modeling; Restitution; Perspective; Photography; Shape ambiguity; Cultural heritage
series eCAADe
email vesna100jakovic@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadiaregional2011_025
id acadiaregional2011_025
authors Bum Kim, Jong ; Mark J. Clayton, Wei Yan
year 2011
title Parametric Form-Based Codes: Incorporation of land-use regulations into Building Information Models
source Parametricism (SPC) ACADIA Regional 2011 Conference Proceedings
summary This project describes investigations into whether parametric modeling using a Building Information Modeling (BIM) platform can represent the provisions and constraints of Form-Based Codes (FBCs). BIM software environments couple 3D modeling with parametric form generation and rich semantics. Further capabilities of an Application Programming Interface that supports Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) results in a very powerful environment for expressing planning and design concepts. While these capabilities were developed under the intention of supporting building design, we hypothesize that they can support planning rules and regulations that are found in FBCs. If our approach is successful, future planning departments will be able to provide architects and urban designers with a FBC that is implemented as a BIM software toolkit, better integrating the planning phase of a project into the building design phase.
series ACADIA
last changed 2011/07/08 09:17

_id cf2011_p165
id cf2011_p165
authors Chasznar, Andre
year 2011
title Navigating Complex Models in Collaborative Work for (Sustainably) Integrated Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 619-636.
summary Increasingly intensive use of computational techniques such as parametric-associative modeling, algorithmic design, performance simulations and generative design in architecture, engineering and construction are leading to increasingly large and complex 3D building models which in turn require increasingly powerful techniques in order to be manipulated and interpreted effectively. Further complexities are of course due also to the multi-disciplinary nature of building projects, in which there can be significant variation and even conflict among the aims of architects, engineers and builders, as well as owners, occupants and other stakeholders in the process. Effective use of model information depends to a large extent on sense-making, which can in some ways be helped but also hindered by schemes for organizing the information contained. Common techniques such as layering, labeling (aka ‘tagging’) and assignment of various other attributes to model objects have significant limitations – especially those arising from general problems of language, ontology and standardization, as well as but distinct from issues of interoperability – both with respect to locating the desired items in a 3D building model and also with respect to displaying the objects in informative ways which effectively assist collaborative design and decision-making. Sustainable design in particular is an area generally requiring a high level of inter-disciplinary collaboration to achieve highly integrated designs which make multiple use of the elements and systems incorporated (though integrated design may also be pursued without explicit aims of sustainability). The proposed paper describes ongoing research concerning alternatives to the currently common techniques for locating and displaying information in 3D building models in support of sense-making to promote collaborative and integrated design. These alternatives comprise on the one hand interactive geometric-content-based methods for search and classification of model objects – as an alternative or complement to common assigned-attribute-based methods – and on the other hand visual analytic techniques – in contrast to existing, relatively static tabular and "physical" views – which can help to increase the informativeness of the geometric data within the model, as well as the non-geometric data that is attached to geometric objects (e.g. as in the cases of BIM and various types of CAE performance simulations). Tests undertaken with architects and engineers in practice and academia to evaluate the proposed methods are also described. Finally conclusions are drawn regarding these methods’ positive present performance and some of their shortcomings, as well as indicating directions for future research concerning the methods’ refinement and extension to help 3D building models become more effective components of the design process than they are at present, both with respect to these models’ present levels of complexity and especially with respect to their anticipated increasing complexity in future.
keywords CAD/CAE/BIM, content-based search, visual analytics
series CAAD Futures
email a.t.chaszar@tudelft.nl
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2011_125
id sigradi2011_125
authors Groetelaars, Natalie Johanna; Amorín, Arivaldo
year 2011
title Tecnologia 3D Laser Scanning: Características Processos e Ferramentas para Manipulação de Nuvens de Pontos [3D Laser Scanning Technology: characteristics, processes and point cloud tools]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 490-494
summary This paper presents techniques and tools to manipulate point cloud from terrestrial laser scanner. Firstly, architectural survey phases are presented, since planning and capturing point cloud of existing buildings, until processing and obtaining several products from point cloud data. Secondly, we cite and classify in four categories some point cloud software, used in laser scan survey and processing phases: (1) scan; (2) visualization; (3) processing; (4) quality inspection.
keywords 3D laser scanning technology; point cloud tools; geometrical modeling; architectural survey; computational tools
series SIGRADI
email natgroet@ig.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade2011_046
id ecaade2011_046
authors Kudumovi_, Lana; Taso, Amra; Hasanbegovi_, Omer
year 2011
title Digital design and fabrication: Case study: seashell
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.779-787
summary Computational aspects of architectural design have revolutionized actual process, and have made a new platform for cooperation that spans across all disciplines. The focus of this study is to understand how the seashell form can be applicable in design process of human architectures. Our approach will show the act of choosing an inspirational natural form and its application into the virtual world, then digitalization, transformation, and evaluation of the form that are suitable for human architecture. 3D model generating would be performed by doing the scan of a selected seashell form. Further action would be to import the object as a tool in the Zbrush application, and continued modeling transformations. This phase would include other parameters that need to be integrated during the architectural design process since architecture usually exists in a radically different environment in comparison with the seashell.
wos WOS:000335665500090
keywords Complexity; architectural form; generative design; digital design fabrication; rapid prototyping
series eCAADe
email lanakudumovic@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2011_021
id caadria2011_021
authors Lowe, Russell; Jules Cromarty and Richard Goodwin
year 2011
title Real time modelling: A solution for accurate, updatable and real-time 3D modelling of as-built architecture
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 219-228
summary This paper describes a means for 3D modelling that sources photogrammetry data from publically available databases and integrates this data with a real time computer game application to construct point clouds. As the databases receive more data or as the data is updated the 3D visualisation within the computer game environment is capable of remodelling itself to reflect the changes, providing accurate representations of as-built infrastructure within an immersive 3D environment that can be interrogated and analysed in real time.
keywords Real-time; photogrammetry; computer game; visualisation; point cloud
series CAADRIA
email russell.lowe@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p073
id cf2011_p073
authors Nasirova, Diliara; Erhan Halil, Huang Andy T, Woodbury Robert, Riecke Bernhard E.
year 2011
title Change Detection in 3D Parametric Systems: Human-Centered Interfaces for Change Visualization
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 751-764.
summary The research on current parametric modeling systems concerns mainly about the underlying computational technology and designs produced; and emphasizes less human factors and design tasks. We observe users being challenged in interacting with these systems regardless of their expertise level. In these systems, user’s attention is divided on system-imposed actions such as tool selection and set-up, managing obscured views, frequent view manipulation, and switching between different types of representations. In essence, control of the system can become more demanding than the design task itself. We argue that this unbalanced emphasis inhibits one of the most important functions of parametric design: agility in exploration of design alternatives by applying frequent user-introduced or system-generated changes on the parametric design models. This compounded by the effect of cognitive limitations such as change blindness and shifts in locus of attention hinders change control and imposes an extra cognitive load in design. In this paper, we made a first step in developing a set of heuristics that is going to present how designers’ change control and detection can be improved. We experimented with three interfaces that control and visualize changes on three different compositions in relation to the designer’s locus of attention: on-model, peripheral and combined views. We measured designers’ performance as the number of changes detected, number of trials, and time required to complete each change detection task. The results support our hypothesis that change blindness significantly slows down and overloads design thinking, and thus should not be ignored. Furthermore, an interesting finding shows that visualizations on the visual periphery can equally support change detection as on-model visualizations, but it is significantly easier and faster to detect changes when they are visualized in both views. These findings can guide us to develop better interfaces in 3D parametric systems.
keywords parametric design, change detection, change blindness, user-centered design, interface ergonomics, HCI, CAD, visualization
series CAAD Futures
email dnasirov@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia11_152
id acadia11_152
authors Rael, Ronald; San Fratello, Virginia
year 2011
title Developing Concrete Polymer Building Components for 3D Printing
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 152-157
summary The creation of building components that can be seen as sustainable, inexpensive, stronger, recyclable, customizable and perhaps even reparable to the environment is an urgent, and critical focus of architectural research. In the U.S. alone, the construction industry produced 143.5 million tons of building-related construction and demolition debris in 2008, and buildings, in their consumption of energy produce more greenhouse gasses than automobiles or industry.Because the inherent nature of 3D printing opens new possibilities for shaping materials, the process will reshape the way we think about architectural building components. Digital materiality, a term coined by Italian and Swiss architects Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler, describes materiality increasingly enriched with digital characteristics where data, material, programming and construction are interwoven (Gramazio and Kohler, 2008). The research aspires towards this classification through the use of parametric modeling tools, analytic software and quantitative and qualitative analysis. Rapid prototyping, which is the automatic construction of physical objects using additive manufacturing technology, typically employs materials intended for the immediate analysis of form, scale, and tactility. Rarely do the materials used in this process have any long-term value, nor does the process - except in rare cases with expensive metal prototyping - have the ability to create actual and sustainable working products. This research intends to alter this state of affairs by developing methods for 3D printing using concrete for the production of long-lasting performance-based components.
series ACADIA
type work in progress
email r@el.net
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_009
id caadria2011_009
authors Anderson, Jonathon and Ming Tang
year 2011
title Form follows parameters: Parametric modeling for fabrication and manufacturing processes
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 91-100
summary As the architectural field continues to explore the possibilities of parametric design it is important to understand that architectural computation has evolved from representations to simulation and evaluation. This paper explores the digital processes of parametric scripting as a way to generate architectural artefacts that can be realized in the physical landscape through various digital fabrication and industrial manufacturing techniques. This paper will highlight the important discoveries of the geometries and the implications the script has on the construction processes. One benefit of using parametric modelling as a component to the manufacturing pipeline is being able to explore several design iterations in the digital realm before ever realizing them in the physical landscape. Furthermore, parametric modelling allows users to control the production documentation and precision needed to manufacture. As a result, the design pipeline presented in this paper seeks to eliminate the construction processes that hinder the physical act of making architecture.
keywords Manufacturing process; parametric modelling; 3D printing, plastic casting; mould making
series CAADRIA
email jrander6@uncg.edu.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2011_136
id ecaade2011_136
authors Bohnenberger, Sascha; de Rycke, Klaas; Weilandt, Agnes
year 2011
title Lattice Spaces: Form optimisation throgh customization of non developable 3d wood surfaces
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.751-758
summary This paper discusses a collaborative project by RDAI architects, Bollinger+Grohmann and the timber construction company Holzbau Amann. The project is located in a former swimming pool in Paris and it is part of the new interior of a flagship store of the French fashion label Hermes. In late 2009, Rena Duma Architects, asked Bollinger+Grohmann to collaborate as structural engineers on a challenging design proposal within a very short timeframe. Three wooden lattice structures, the so-called “bulle” and one monumental staircase with a similar design approach characterize the interior of the new flagship store. The lattice structures are dividing the basement into different retail spaces. They vary in height (8-9 m) and diameter (8-12 m) and have a free-form shaped wicker basket appearance. Wood was the chosen material for these structures to strengthen the idea of the wickerbaskets and to create an interior space with a sustainable and innovative material.
wos WOS:000335665500087
keywords Digital production; parametric design; mass customization; wood; digital crafting
series eCAADe
email sbohnenberger@bollinger-grohmann.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 26HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_989252 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002