CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 547

_id acadia11_72
id acadia11_72
authors Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Integrative Design Computation: Integrating material behaviour and robotic manufacturing processes in computational design for performative wood constructions
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 72-81
summary In contrast to most other building materials, wood is a naturally grown biological tissue. Today, the organic nature of wood is recognized as a major advantage. Wood is one of the very few naturally renewable, fully recyclable, extremely energy efficient and CO2-positive construction materials. On the other hand, compared to industrially produced, isotropic materials, the inherent heterogeneity and differentiated material makeup of wood’s anatomic structure is still considered problematic by architects and engineers alike. This is due to the fact that, even today, most design tools employed in architecture are still incapable of integrating and thus instrumentalizing the material properties and related complex behavior of wood. The research presented in this paper focuses on the development of a computational design approach that is based on the integration of material properties and characteristics. Understanding wood as a natural composite system of cellulose fibers embedded in a lignin and hemicelluloses matrix characterized by relatively high strain at failure, that is high load-bearing capacity with relatively low stiffness, the particular focus of this paper is the investigation of how the bending behavior of wood can become a generative design driver in such computational processes. In combination with the additional integration of the possibilities and constraints of robotic manufacturing processes, this enables the design and production of truly material-specific and highly performative wood architecture. The paper will provide a detailed explanation of such an integrative approach to design computation and the related methods and techniques. This is complemented by the description of three specific research projects, which were conducted as part of the overall research and all resulted in full scale prototype structures. The research projects demonstrate different approaches to the computational design integration of material behavior and robotic manufacturing constraints. Based on a solution space defined by the material itself, this enables novel ways of computationally deriving both material-specific gestalt and performative capacity of one of the oldest construction materials we have.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email achim.menges@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaade2011_099
id ecaade2011_099
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Methodological Approach for the Integration of Material Information and Performance in the Design Computation for Tension-Active Architectural Systems
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.799-808
summary As computational design processes have moved from representation to simulation, the focus has shifted towards advanced integration of performance as a form defining measure. Performance, though, is often assessed purely on the level of geometry and stratified between hierarchically independent layers. When looking at tension-active membrane systems, performance is integrated across multiple levels and with only the membrane material itself, defining the structural, spatial and atmospheric qualities. The research described in this paper investigates the integrative nature of this type of lightweight structure and proposes methodologies for generating highly articulated and differentiated systems. As material is a critical component, the research focuses on a system-based approach which places priority on the inclusion of material research and parameterization into a behavior-based computational process.
wos WOS:000335665500092
keywords Material behavior; material computation; system; gestalt; tension-active system
series eCAADe
email sean.ahlquist@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia11_82
id acadia11_82
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Behavior-based Computational Design Methodologies: Integrative processes for force defined material structures
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 82-89
summary With the introduction of physics-based algorithms and modeling environments, design processes have been shifting from the representation of materiality to the simulation of approximate material descriptions. Such computational processes are based upon enacting physical and material behavior, such as gravity, drag, tension, bending, and inflation, within a generative modeling environment. What is often lacking from this strategy is an overall understanding of computational design; that information of increasing value and precision is generated through the development and iterative execution of specific principles and integrative mechanisms. The value of a physics-based modeling method as an information engine is often overlooked, though, as they are primarily utilized for developing representational diagrams or static geometry – inevitably translated to function outside of the physical bounds and parameters defined with the modeling process. The definition of computational design provides a link between process and a larger approach towards architecture – an integrative behavior-based process which develops dynamic specific architectural systems interrelated in their material, spatial, and environmental nature. This paper, focusing on material integration, describes the relation of a computational design approach and the technical framework for a behavior-based integrative process. The application is in the development of complex tension-active architectural systems. The material behavior of tensile meshes and surfaces is integrated and algorithmically calibrated to allow for complex geometries to be materialized as physical systems. Ultimately, this research proposes a computational structure by which material and other sorts of spatial or structural behaviors can be activated within a generative design environment.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email sean.ahlquist@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_122
id acadia11_122
authors Pigram, David; McGee, Wes
year 2011
title Formation Embedded Design: A methodology for the integration of fabrication constraints into architectural design
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 122-131
summary This paper presents a methodology for the integration of fabrication constraints within the architectural design process through custom written algorithms for fabrication. The method enables the translation from three-dimensional geometry, or algorithmically produced data, into appropriately formatted machine codes for direct CNC fabrication within a single CAD modeling environment. This process is traditionally one-way with part files translated via dedicated machine programming software (CAM). By integrating the toolpath creation into the design package, with an open framework, the translation from part to machine code can be automated, parametrically driven by the generative algorithms or explicitly modeled by the user. This integrated approach opens the possibility for direct and instantaneous feedback between fabrication constraints and design intent. The potentials of the method are shown by discussing the computational workflow and process integration of a diverse set of fabrication techniques in conjunction with a KUKA 7-Axis Industrial Robot. Two-dimensional knife-cutting, large-scale additive fabrication (foam deposition), robot-mounted hot-wire cutting, and robot-assisted rod-bending are each briefly described. The productive value of this research is that it opens the possibility of a much stronger network of feedback relations between formational design processes and material and fabrication concerns.
keywords robotic fabrication; multi-axis; file-to-factory, open-source fabrication, parametric modeling, computational design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email david.pigram@uts.edu.au
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_049
id caadria2011_049
authors Richards, Daniel
year 2011
title Towards morphogenetic assemblies: Evolving performance within component-based structures
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 515-524
summary Performative design can be understood as the combined usage of spatial analysis simulations and form generation procedures to imbue architectural form with material characteristics and behaviours which define desirable structural, environmental and economic performance. However, to date, design processes that facilitate the integration of ‘form generation’ and ‘spatial analysis’ remain under-developed, making existing performative design methodologies highly reliant upon the manual execution of analysis and evaluation procedures. This paper presents an evolutionary design process that uses integrative computational pipelines and generatively defined component-based assemblies to produce performative structures in response to solar performance. The resulting structures demonstrate how performative composite behaviour can emerge within ‘disassociated’ componential assemblies and produce complex formal interrelationships which surpass simplistic parametric logics. This offers new possibilities for conceiving highly integrated ‘morphogenetic assemblies’ and suggests trajectories for further research within the field of morphogenetic design.
keywords Morphogenetic; evolution; performative, assemblies
series CAADRIA
email D.Richards@mmu.ac.uk
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_138
id acadia11_138
authors Buell, Samantha; Shaban, Ryan; Corte, Daniel; Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2011
title Zero-waste, Flat Pack Truss Work: An Investigation of Responsive Structuralism
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 138-143
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models.This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. A truss is defined as: “A triangulated arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial external forces to a set of axial forces in its members.” (Allen and Iano 2004)Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email srbuell2@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaade2011_013
id ecaade2011_013
authors Fleischmann, Moritz; Lienhard, Julian; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Computational Design Synthesis: Embedding Material Behaviour in Generative Computational Processes
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.759-767
summary This paper presents strategies for the design of bending-active structures through the introduction of modern computational design methods, exploring their architectural potential through contemporary means of design, engineering and robotic manufacturing. As a case study the ICD/ITKE research pavilion’s information modeling process is depicted: how form-finding experiments guided the development of various models that synthesize data for design, simulation, analysis and fabrication. The paper explains the integration of relevant material information into generative computational design processes and concludes by comparing the resultant data models with a scan of the built prototype.
wos WOS:000335665500088
keywords Computational Design; Bending-Active Structures; Robotic Fabrication; Computer-Aided Manufacturing; Information Modeling
series eCAADe
email moritz.fleischmann@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia11_98
id acadia11_98
authors Kudless, Andrew
year 2011
title Bodies in Formation: The material evolution of flexible formworks
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 98-105
summary Borne from the complex negotiation between liquid mass and tensile constraint, flexible formwork castings are resonant with material energy. Hard as stone, yet visually supple and fluid, the pre-cast architectural assemblies produced using flexible formwork techniques suggest integrative design strategies that acknowledge the intricate associations between form, fabrication, and material behavior. This tripartite synthesis between geometry, making, and performance has emerged as one of the central themes of contemporary architecture and engineering. Borrowing ideas of morphology from biology and physics, 20th century architectural innovators such as Antoni Gaudi and Frei Otto built a legacy of material practice that incorporated methods of making with material and geometric logics. The emergent effects (and affects) produced through these highly integrative practices serve as the basis of much of the research and design at Matsys. Building on the flexible formwork research of Miguel Fisac in the 1970s, the P_Wall series by Matsys explores the use of digital tools in the generation and fabrication of these bodies in formation.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email akudless@cca.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_26
id acadia11_26
authors Parlac, Vera
year 2011
title Integrating Physical and Digital: Interactive technologies and design of matter
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 26-29
summary Today, thanks to current technological achievements, deepening and broadening of scientific information and knowledge, as well as expansion in our understanding of the world around us and underlying processes that govern metabolisms of natural world, we are able to see deep connections between the made and natural worlds. With such an expansive context comes an ability to effectively and productively integrate new knowledge, information, methods and techniques back into the design and production of architecture. Confluence of various technologies and their assimilation are altering the way we perform, organize and distribute our activities and materials. The conceptual model of architecture is changing.
keywords integrative design; interaction; matter
series ACADIA
type introduction
email vera.parlac@ucalgary.ca
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_20
id acadia11_20
authors Taron, Joshua M; Parlac, Vera; Kolarevic, Branko; Johnson, Jason S
year 2011
title Forewords: An Integrative Moment
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 20-21
summary The ACADIA 2011 Annual Conference explores integrative trajectories and areas of overlap that have emerged through computation between design, its allied disciplines of engineering and construction, and other fields, such as computer science, material science, mathematics and biology. The conference highlights experimental projects in which methods, processes, and techniques are discovered, appropriated, adapted, and altered from elsewhere, and digitally pursued.
keywords integrative design
series ACADIA
type introduction
email jmtaron@ucalgary.ca
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia12_47
id acadia12_47
authors Aish, Robert ; Fisher, Al ; Joyce, Sam ; Marsh, Andrew
year 2012
title Progress Towards Multi-Criteria Design Optimisation Using Designscript With Smart Form, Robot Structural Analysis and Ecotect Building Performance Analysis"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 47-56
summary Important progress towards the development of a system that enables multi-criteria design optimisation has recently been demonstrated during a research collaboration between Autodesk’s DesignScript development team, the University of Bath and the engineering consultancy Buro Happold. This involved integrating aspects of the Robot Structural Analysis application, aspects of the Ecotect building performance application and a specialist form finding solver called SMART Form (developed by Buro Happold) with DesignScript to create a single computation environment. This environment is intended for the generation and evaluation of building designs against both structural and building performance criteria, with the aim of expediently supporting computational optimisation and decision making processes that integrate across multiple design and engineering disciplines. A framework was developed to enable the integration of modeling environments with analysis and process control, based on the authors’ case studies and experience of applied performance driven design in practice. This more generalised approach (implemented in DesignScript) enables different designers and engineers to selectively configure geometry definition, form finding, analysis and simulation tools in an open-ended system without enforcing any predefined workflows or anticipating specific design strategies and allows for a full range of optimisation and decision making processes to be explored. This system has been demonstrated to practitioners during the Design Modeling Symposium, Berlin in 2011 and feedback from this has suggested further development.
keywords Design Optimisation , Scripting , Form Finding , Structural Analysis , Building Performance
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email robert.aish@autodesk.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia11_242
id acadia11_242
authors Braumann, Johannes; Brell-Cokcan, Sigrid
year 2011
title Parametric Robot Control: Integrated CAD/CAM for Architectural Design
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 242-251
summary Robots are gaining popularity in architecture. Snøhetta has recently purchased their own industrial robot, becoming one of the first architectural offices to adopt robot technology. As more and more architects are exposed to robotic fabrication, the need for easy interoperability, integration into architectural design tools and general accessibility will increase. Architects are discovering that industrial robots are much more than kinematic machines for stacking bricks, welding or milling - they are highly multifunctional and can be used for a huge variety of tasks. However, industry standard software does not provide easy solutions for allowing direct robot control right from CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) systems. In this paper we will discuss existing methods of programming industrial robots, published architectural results (Gramazio and Kohler 2008) and the design of a new user interface that allows intuitive control of parametric designs and customized robotic mass production, by integrating CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) functions into CAAD.
keywords robot programming; parametric design; mass customization; grasshopper component design; fabrication; robot milling; digital architecture
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email johannes@robotsinarchitecture.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_70
id acadia11_70
authors Gutierrez, Maria-Paz
year 2011
title Innovative Puzzles
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 70-71
summary Matter and information; information and matter. A puzzle unveiled little by little. Hardly surprising since every atom, molecule, and basic particle in the universe registers bits of information. All interactions between these components, inert and alive, owe their existence to matter’s intrinsic ability to process information. Such aptitude explains how complex systems can arise from fundamentally simple organizational laws. In fact, the world’s almost infinite material combinations, viable through such few basic elements, are one of the most visible expressions of these capabilities. Triggered by the developments in quantum physics across the twentieth century, our understanding of material processes radically shifted our impressions of the world. For decades our scales of perception and manipulation have continued to expand into almost unfathomable boundaries. Yet, the study of the interdependencies between matter and information is still fundamentally part of the sciences and engineering. Only just recently did architecture venture into this inherently intricate field. The subsequent set of papers here presented posit fundamental interrogations of potential interdependencies between matter and information. Without fear to confront the obstacles of delving into a largely unexplored field of architecture, these researchers forge new frontiers of interrelating computational parameters to multi-physics in the complex settings of architectural scale. Unlike other epistemologies, architecture cannot be reduced to a single scale of exploration. We can neither restrict scalar boundaries (i.e., nano to micro), nor reduce morphologies to simplify the processing of multiple physics without compromising the design problem. By default, it is more difficult to conceptually and numerically articulate the abstract and numerical criteria of complex geometries and material variables.
series ACADIA
type moderator overview
email mpazgut@berkeley.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_114
id acadia11_114
authors Kaczynski, Maciej P; McGee, Wes; Pigram, David
year 2011
title Robotically Fabricated Thin-shell Vaulting: A method for the integration of multi-axis fabrication processes with algorithmic form-finding techniques
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 114-121
summary This paper proposes and describes a new methodology for the design, fabrication, and construction of unreinforced thin-shell stone vaulting through the use of algorithmic form-finding techniques and multi-axis robotic water jet cutting. The techniques build upon traditional thin-shell masonry vaulting tectonics to produce a masonry system capable of self-support during construction. The proposed methodology expands the application of thin-shell vaulting to irregular forms, has the potential to reduce the labor cost of vault construction, and opens the possibility of response to external factors such as siting constraints and environmental criteria. The intent of the research is to reignite and reanimate unreinforced compressive masonry vaulting as a contemporary building practice.
keywords masonry vaulting; robotic fabrication; water-jet cutting; multi-axis fabrication; dynamic relaxation; file-to-factory; form-finding; self-supporting; parametric modeling; computational design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email maciejpk@umich.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaade2011_035
id ecaade2011_035
authors Krieg, Oliver David; Dierichs, Karola; Reichert, Steffen; Schwinn, Tobias; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Performative Architectural Morphology: Robotically manufactured biomimetic finger-joined plate structures
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.573-580
summary Performative Architectural Morphology is a notion derived from the term Functional Morphology in biology and describes the capacity of an architectural material system to adapt morphologically to specific internal constraints and external influences and forces. The paper presents a research project that investigates the possibilities and limitations of informing a robotically manufactured finger-joint system with principles derived from biological plate structures, such as sea urchins and sand dollars. Initially, the material system and robotic manufacturing advances are being introduced. Consequently, a performative catalogue is presented, that analyses both the biological system’s basic principles, the respective translation into a more informed manufacturing logic and the consequent architectural implications. The paper concludes to show how this biologically informed material system serves to more specifically respond to a given building environment.
wos WOS:000335665500066
keywords Robotic Manufacturing; Biomimetics; Parametric Design; Wood Joints; Plate Structures
series eCAADe
email oliver@davidkrieg.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia17_512
id acadia17_512
authors Rossi, Andrea; Tessmann, Oliver
year 2017
title Collaborative Assembly of Digital Materials
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 512- 521
summary Current developments in design-to-production workflows aim to allow architects to quickly prototype designs that result from advanced design processes while also embedding the constraints imposed by selected fabrication equipment. However, the enduring physical separation between design space and fabrication space, together with a continuous approach to both design, via NURBs modeling software, and fabrication, through irreversible material processing methods, limit the possibilities to extend the advantages of a “digital” approach (Ward 2010), such as full editability and reversibility, to physical realizations. In response to such issues, this paper proposes a processto allow the concurrent design and fabrication of discrete structures in a collaborative process between human designer and a 6-axis robotic arm. This requires the development of design and materialization procedures for discrete aggregations, including the modeling of assembly constraints, as well as the establishment of a communication platform between human and machine actors. This intends to offer methods to increase the accessibility of discrete design methodologies, as well as to hint at possibilities for overcoming the division between design and manufacturing (Carpo 2011; Bard et al. 2014), thus allowing intuitive design decisions to be integrated directly within assembly processes (Johns 2014).
keywords material and construction; construction/robotics; smart assembly/construction; generative system
series ACADIA
email rossi@dg.tu-darmstadt.de
last changed 2017/10/17 09:13

_id acadia11_326
id acadia11_326
authors Velikov, Kathy; Thün, Geoffrey; O’Malley, Mary; Ripley, Colin
year 2011
title Toward Responsive Atmospheres: Prototype Exploration through Material and Computational Systems
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 326-333
summary The Stratus Project is an ongoing body of design research investigating the potential for kinetic, sensing and environment-responsive interior envelope systems. The research emerges from a consideration of our attunement to the soft systems of architecture – light, thermal gradients, air quality and noise – paired with a desire to develop and prototype envelopes that not only perform to affect these atmospheres, but also to promote continual information and material exchange, and eventually dialogue, between occupant and atmosphere. Stratus v1.0 included the construction of a modest prototype using simple open source technologies, aimed to explore the formal, operational and technological possibilities, as well as potential operability and control conflicts, as part of the first phase of thinking around these questions. It deploys a distributed approach to structural, mechanical and communications systems design and delivery, where localized response is prioritized. The project works to reclaim the environmentally performative elements of architecture – in this case, specifically, interior mechanical delivery and interface systems – to within the purview of the discipline, as territories of material, formal, technological and experiential innovation and exploration. This paper will describe both the development of the current prototype as well as future research and investigation trajectories. The Stratus Project begins by situating itself at the crossroads of the disciplinary territories of architecture, technology, environmental control and cybernetics. Through the use of computational technologies and in collaboration with researchers in the fields of computer science, mechanical engineering and materials science, this project aims to advance the development of responsive environmental design and performative building skins.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kvelikov@umich.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_204
id acadia11_204
authors Wilkins, Gretchen; Zilka, Leanne; Cherrey, John
year 2011
title Scripted Materials
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 204-211
summary Looking to fabrication technologies as a way to bridge the gap between design and execution, this research tested various methods for the digital optimization of flat sheet materials, specifically those which can be reclaimed from building and manufacturing sites. By reordering conventional design processes to begin with (reclaimed) material constraints we are looking to close the gap in the cycle of sheet material manufacturing and reduce the amount of building waste in architectural projects. This paper will discuss the process of embedding digital information and scripting processes into material systems in order to rethink the relationship between input and output in design, especially in the context of sheet material manufacturing, reclamation, fabrication and distribution. Two projects situated within architectural design studios are cited as examples to this approach, with speculation on how the work might shift the role of ‘craft’ in design and fabrication processes.
series ACADIA
type work in progress
email gretchen.wilkins@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_292
id acadia11_292
authors Davis, Adam; Tsigkari, Martha; Iseki, Takehiko; Aish, Francis
year 2011
title Just Passing Through: Integration in Computational Environmental Design
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 292-299
summary This paper proposes Buckminster Fuller’s concept of pattern integrity as a context for understanding computational techniques in environmentally responsive design. We argue that successful integration in this context requires a continuous design medium that allows for heterogeneous, mutable techniques and models. This model of integration is demonstrated by reference to a current project for a large canopy structure in Singapore with specific focus on issues of environmental mediation, object-oriented programming for CAD environments, and functional programming techniques within parametric modeling systems. We discuss the applicability of these novel integrative approaches to wider problems in computational design.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email addavis@fosterandpartners.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_34
id acadia11_34
authors Johnson, Jason S
year 2011
title Integrating Difference
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 34-37
summary In developing this year’s ACADIA Conference, the organizing committee spent much time discussing the various streams of papers, projects and contributions that form its content. Often these questions have focused on what disciplines can be defined as being “allied” to architecture and more specifically to the particular obsessions that have historically been presented here. Questions of appropriateness and legibility are difficult to grasp in the context of a community whose research focus is being pulled in many directions. Technological advances (software, robots, bioengineering) and the push towards emergent systems or parametricism as theoretical frameworks, are providing us with an interesting moment in which to ask the question: who are appropriate allies in the development of architectural projects?
keywords integrative design
series ACADIA
type introduction
email jason.johnson@ucalgary.ca
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

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